Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 24

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures. Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon begin in Aberdeen before travelling through Cullen and on to auction at Elgin in Moray.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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Sold! Going, going, gone.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-50p!

-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Come on, then.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh! Come on, I got to get to another shop.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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As they begin the fourth leg of their road trip,

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our experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon are back

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on the road to Scotland,

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where sunlight is a dim and distant memory.

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I don't know where we're going.

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-I think this is the wrong...

-Do you think I've gone wrong?

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-Many, many years ago.

-THEY LAUGH

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Mark is an antiques expert with considerable experience

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as both an auctioneer and a dealer.

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But he's found himself falling behind on this road trip.

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Oh! Ooh!

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Oooh! Oh, I say!

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Catherine has worked in the world of antiques for over 16 years

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and seems to have found the key to success on this trip.

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But she isn't going to let the cat out of the bag.

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MECHANICAL SINGING How do you shut it up?

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These two friends have been fighting like cat and dog on the trip,

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which inspired a challenge to buy a canine-related item on each leg.

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Our pair began their journey with £200 each,

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and three auctions later...

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I do believe I'm slightly ahead.

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You are way ahead, not slightly, Catherine.

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A chasm is opening up between them.

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Catherine took the lead in the road trip

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with victory in the third auction,

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giving her a delicious £290.42 to spend today.

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While Mark had another bruising encounter at the last auction

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and is kicking off this leg with a rather limp £218.02.

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Doesn't it show?

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Not even the weather is on Mark's side

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as he and Catherine have the roof up and wipers on

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in their 1968 MG Midget. But he's ready for a fight.

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-When my back is up against the wall, Catherine, I come out fighting.

-Yes.

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Where are we, anyway?

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I'm just coming to that.

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Our travelling antiquarians are cruising the length of Scotland.

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They started in New Abbey, in Dumfries, in Galloway,

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then up to Elgin on the Moray Firth, before looping back down

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to finish at an auction finale

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in the beautiful capital city of Edinburgh.

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On this leg we are kicking off in Aberdeen and meandering

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across the north-east of Scotland to an auction in Elgin, in Moray.

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Aberdeen's seaport is Europe's principal hub, supporting

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the oil industry in the North Sea.

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Oh, and there's a fine antiques centre here, too.

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Oh, here it is, Catherine.

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Right, you don't need to be so bossy!

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I'm not being bossy, I'm just pointing it out.

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You don't need to because I can see it - it says Antiques Centre.

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-but I know you need...

-Guidance.

-..driving.

-Yes, yes, yes.

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-I'm just trying to be helpful.

-Right.

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Well, don't try too hard.

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Ah, the familiar squabbling of the lesser spotted antique experts.

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Let's hope they can behave themselves inside.

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But, listen, I do love spending time with you,

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as you know, but I think I'm going to leave you and go down that way.

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Go on, then. I'll stay up here.

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He's quite nice, isn't he?

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"The famous Chemould Art Gallery, Calcutta."

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Have you heard of the...? No, I haven't either.

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So they are not that famous, are they?

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There's a load of tram

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and railway books from the estate of a railway enthusiast.

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Railway, railway...

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Railway... So that one is trams, so we don't want that one.

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Actually, my little boy would probably really like this book.

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He loves trains.

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Actually quite interesting.

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I'm going to go and get someone.

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I'll be back.

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With the weight of winning the last two auctions on her shoulders,

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Catherine seems to have adopted a new strategy

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and wants to share it with dealer Alex.

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Don't get excited, Alex. Don't think I've found the bargain of the day,

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because I'm sure I haven't and it's something so boring.

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OK.

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Books!

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-Yeah.

-The only reason I picked them up is because they are all

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on railway and someone somewhere in Elgin

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-will come and buy these books.

-OK.

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Railway art is highly collectable amongst train enthusiasts,

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surprise, surprise.

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Whilst these aren't necessarily collectable, they would

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be of interest to the thousands who have a passion for the subject.

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This is from another dealer.

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-He's got them all priced individually.

-Oh, has he?

-Yeah.

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What I would like to do...

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..is take the lot for 30 quid.

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-I'll go and get in contact, then.

-Thank you.

-No problem.

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Oh, he's lovely! Thank you, Alex.

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And it's not long before the lovely Alex comes back with some news.

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This one's about America, trains in America. Oh, hello!

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-Yeah, that will be fine for the books.

-Is it?

-Yes.

-Oh, fab.

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Well, that's one purchase down for Catherine. How is Mark getting on?

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I really want to have a look at this little cherub painting in the gilt frame.

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This late 19th-century plaque with the Florentine rococo easel frame

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has caught Mark's eye,

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so he's brought Holly in to get a closer look.

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I quite like this, actually, it's quite fun.

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It's got a little easel, which is rather nice.

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It's marked on the back with the factory name and...

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I think it' probably what we'd call decorated.

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It's had a print put on and then just painted over.

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With a ticket price of £40 it's one to consider.

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Now, Catherine wants to buy more here and she's dabbling in pens.

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The pen that I bought yesterday, sold yesterday, rather, was a Jones one.

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And I bought it purely on the aesthetics rather than

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looking at the actual name. It wasn't a Waterman.

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But this is a Waterman so I would be going up in the world.

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And that's where I belong.

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But Alex is tempting Catherine with a Sheaffer fountain pen instead.

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-This is a...

-That's nice. Ah, that's lovely.

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The Sheaffer brand of luxury fountain pens has become

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synonymous with quality and value.

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With a ticket price of £90,

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what is Alex looking for on this particular item?

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£50.

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-There is no movement on that.

-OK. Would you do 45 on it?

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-Yeah. £45.

-OK.

-That'll give you a chance.

-I'll shake your hand.

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Thank you so much. Super.

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At half price, that seems a good deal, Catherine.

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That's two items down. Now, what's Mark up to?

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These are political cartoons from the 18th and 19th century.

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There was a flourishing industry, particularly in London,

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of political cartoons, mocking the government or even the royal family.

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Some of them were incredibly satirical and were really...

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They tried to ban them. They were not popular with the powers that be.

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This one is all to do with the Duke of Wellington.

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He's looking rather cross, with his hat and his big nose.

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They are making fun.

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You've got the Battle of Waterloo on the wall there.

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It's published in London in 1827.

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Items depicting historical figures such as Wellington, Nelson

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and Napoleon, are very collectable and should gain a lot of interest.

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I tell you what also was quite interesting is the price. £25!

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I think that's a bit of a find, actually.

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It won't stop me trying to get it cheaper.

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I've got my own Battle of Waterloo raging behind me here

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and I want to come out victorious.

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And with that, Mark gallantly marches to the counter

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to do battle over the price with poor Holly.

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Now, I really like these.

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-I would like to buy them and take to the auction.

-OK.

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But I'm so far behind.

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I know everybody says this to you

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but I'm not used to being behind, particularly with Catherine.

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But I would really love to pay £15 for this and 20 for this.

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OK, we could do this for 20 and this for 20, so that's 40 for the pair.

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-Holly, you've been very fair. Thank you so much.

-No problem.

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So that's half price on the frame and a fiver off the cartoon.

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Catherine, meanwhile, is still on the prowl

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and Mark is laying down the gauntlet.

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-I want a lot of money spent, Catherine.

-What?

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I want a lot of that money spent.

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Because I'm going to spend everything. I really am.

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I need to, Catherine. I need to find things.

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-You're going to spend every single penny?

-I am, because I need to.

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What have I got to lose?

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Mark is doing his best to unsettle our Catherine, sly old fox,

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and this is Trixie, the cute terrier that Catherine saw earlier,

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with a ticket price of £25.

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Alex, can I borrow you for a second?

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-It is nicely drawn if you like that sort of thing.

-Yes.

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-I'm trying to convince you as well as me.

-If I had a Westie I'd buy it.

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-Would you?

-Yeah.

-Hm.

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Can I have it for £10?

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I think 12.50 is the best we can do on it.

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That would be a 50% discount.

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12.50. That's fine by me.

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Our experts have already bought five items between them

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in their first shop, but not even that can keep these two happy.

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-Are you finally ready?

-What do you mean?

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-I'm always waiting for you.

-You weren't!

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Come on, I've got to get to another shop.

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Oh, dear, it looks like the pressure is getting to them.

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Just as well they are splitting up for now.

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Catherine is dropping Mark off

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around the corner for a spot more shopping at Elizabeth Watt Antiques.

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The shop may be small but it's filled to the brim

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and Jeff is on hand to help Mark spend his money.

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Hi, nice to meet you.

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A rather interesting little brooch.

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Abstract. '70s.

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It's Ola Gorie, from Orkney.

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-Oh!

-An Edinburgh hallmark.

-It's quite fun, isn't it?

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That is quite fun, actually.

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Ola Gorie is one of Britain's most important jewellery designers

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of recent times.

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She was a pioneer in Celtic and Norse-designed jewellery.

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The only trouble is, not many people wear brooches these days.

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That's the real difficulty. I love the quality, I like the finish.

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-What could it be?

-Give me 12.

-£12? We are so close.

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I was going to say ten.

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12 is the price.

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Ohhh!

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-Oh, I can't say no. £12. Come on. Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Are you sure?

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-Yes, absolutely.

-Promise? I think that's a bargain.

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£12? Not exactly the big buy we were expecting, Mark.

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Meanwhile, Catherine has made the short journey to visit

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the University of Aberdeen's King's College Chapel.

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The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495

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by the Bishop of Aberdeen, William Elphinstone and King James IV.

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It is the UK's fifth oldest university,

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and standing at the centre of King's College campus is the chapel

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that serves as a constant reminder of the university's foundations.

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-Hello, Catherine. Welcome to King's Chapel.

-Thank you very much.

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-I'm Jane Geddes.

-Hi, Jane.

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I want to show you what I hope is really going to surprise you

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-about a medieval church interior.

-Oh, that sounds exciting.

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Oh, wow.

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Automatic doors! That is surprising.

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-This is quite incredible, isn't it? Are all of these hand-carved?

-Yes.

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It's some of the finest surviving medieval woodwork in Scotland.

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Gosh, it's everywhere. Gosh, look at all these vines and thistles.

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The decorative panels are not just ornamental,

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they also tell the story of the university.

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To start off, we have the Thistle of Scotland, which is the king.

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-I saw that.

-Yes, at the doorway as you come in, you see the king.

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But as you move towards the chancel in the east end you have the vine,

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which is the priesthood and the clergy and the Eucharist and Christ.

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All the way through the chapel you'll see this connection

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between the king and the church together.

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Hence the name of the chapel, the crown on the roof and so on.

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The stained-glass windows are an outstanding feature

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of the chapel, and particularly

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the work of Aberdonian Douglas Strachan, considered to be

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one of the most significant designers of stained glass

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of the 20th century.

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Up here you can see two themes from the history of the university.

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First of all the Pope granting a papal bull,

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which founds the university in 1495.

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And next to it you see Elphinstone very solemnly overlooking

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the construction of the chapel,

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with ladders up against the church wall and so on.

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So there he is in his finery,

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watching his university grow around him.

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That's a wonderful scene, isn't it?

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He was incredibly fond of this building.

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And although he was bishop of Aberdeen Cathedral

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and he could have been buried there,

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he chose to be buried in the chapel that he founded.

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And he wished to be buried at the altar, in front of the altar,

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which is what happened.

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And I'll show you what happens down here.

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This is the tomb that was eventually made for Bishop Elphinstone.

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When he died he wished to be simply buried at the foot of the steps

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leading up to his own altar.

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But when his successor, Bishop Dunbar,

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came into the university

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and asked where were the remains of the founder of this great

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institution, they said, "He's under your feet,

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"under the flagstones." And in 1514 this was absolutely absurd

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for such an important person to be buried in such a humble way.

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And Bishop Dunbar immediately

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commissioned this amazing construction here.

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We have an inventory from 1542, which says that on top of this

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was an enormous full-sized bronze effigy of the Bishop

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in his full robes.

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So what happened to the statue?

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Well, there's no story about it,

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but by the end of the Civil War period,

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the end of the 1600s, we are told there were only a few bits of metal

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hanging off it, so clearly something awful happened during the Civil War.

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Scotland was invaded by Cromwell's troops,

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who were notorious for plundering towns and cities.

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300 years later, excavations uncovered that the tomb

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had been disturbed and the bones of the Bishop had been removed.

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So all that remains now is this monument to his life

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and this incredible chapel.

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-Thank you so much, Jane.

-Thank you for coming.

-I've really enjoyed it. Thank you.

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The chapel is still used throughout the year by the university

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and its alumni, but, for Catherine, it's time to meet up with Mark

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and to get some shut-eye.

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It's been a busy day after all.

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Time to rest and to reflect on a good day's shopping. Nighty-night.

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After a night's kip,

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Catherine has finally woken up to Mark's mind games.

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-Have you got much money left?

-I know exactly what you're doing now.

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You want me to say, "Right, that's it, I'll spend it all."

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So it all goes horribly wrong for me.

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-Catherine, you've got to make your decisions.

-It's true, isn't it?

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No, it's not.

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Uh-oh, looks like you've been rumbled, Stacey.

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I think you need to concentrate on what YOU'RE buying from now on.

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Despite encouraging Catherine to spend big,

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Mark has only spent a measly £52 on three items -

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an Italian porcelain plaque, an 1820s political cartoon

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depicting Wellington and a vintage Scottish silver brooch.

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That means he has £166.02 left in his coffers.

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Catherine, on the other hand,

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has parted with £87.50

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on a collection of railway-related books,

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a fountain pen in its original case and a pastel drawing of a terrier,

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which still leaves her with a magnificent £202.92 to play with.

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Our experts have motored 45 miles north-east

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to the rural idyll of Glass.

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Mark is dropping Catherine off,

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but it looks likes he's leading her up the garden path.

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-Do you think this is it?

-Do you think so?

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-Well, the sign pointed this way.

-HE TOOTS HORN

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CATHERINE CHUCKLES

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Announce our arrival, Mark.

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Housed in a large steading, Antiques At Glass offers a great selection

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of affordable antiques and collectables.

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We'll catch up with Mark shortly.

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-Hello?

-Hello.

-I didn't know if I was going to get in! Hi. I'm Catherine.

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-I'm Tim.

-Hello, Tim. Nice to meet you.

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Inside, Tim and Lynn are only too keen to help.

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This place is awash with doggy items,

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but Catherine already has her dog purchase sorted.

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So she's turned her attention to something shiny priced at £60.

0:19:040:19:08

-A fire screen.

-Yeah.

-Does it open out?

-Yeah.

-Is it repro?

0:19:080:19:14

-Good weight to it. A lot of the modern ones seem...

-Yeah, they do.

0:19:140:19:17

No weight to them at all.

0:19:170:19:20

SHE CHUCKLES

0:19:240:19:26

Peacock feathers opening out. What do you want for it?

0:19:310:19:36

Normally it would be about 50.

0:19:360:19:38

Would you take 20?

0:19:380:19:41

-Who's the boss?

-I'd love the chance!

0:19:410:19:44

-The woman's the boss!

-Of course. The woman is always the boss!

0:19:440:19:49

Can you do that, yeah? Does that still give you a bit of a margin?

0:19:490:19:54

-A wee bit.

-A wee bit?, Well, that's good. OK, £20.

0:19:540:19:59

Cor! You're on fire today, Catherine.

0:19:590:20:01

Another nice purchase at a snip.

0:20:010:20:04

Meanwhile, Mark is heading ten miles north to Keith,

0:20:040:20:08

to the oldest distillery in the Highlands of Scotland.

0:20:080:20:11

Strathisla Distillery has been in operation

0:20:110:20:14

since 1786 and produces the single malt at the heart of Chivas Regal,

0:20:140:20:20

a world-famous blended whisky.

0:20:200:20:23

Little has changed in that time,

0:20:230:20:26

with its distinctive pagodas,

0:20:260:20:28

cobbled courtyard and the gleaming copper pot stills

0:20:280:20:31

making the distillery arguably one of the most beautiful in Scotland.

0:20:310:20:36

-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Hi, Mark. Ian. Welcome to Strathisla.

-Nice to meet you.

0:20:360:20:40

-I'm dying for my tour.

-Please come in.

0:20:400:20:42

Whisky is as synonymous with Scotland as tartan and bagpipes.

0:20:420:20:46

The name whisky derives from the Gaelic word "uisce beatha",

0:20:460:20:51

similar to aqua vitae, the water of life.

0:20:510:20:54

Over time, the shorter "uisce" was anglicised to whisky.

0:20:540:20:59

The first evidence of whisky production in Scotland

0:20:590:21:03

dates back to 1494.

0:21:030:21:05

King James IV enjoyed "ardent spirits,"

0:21:050:21:09

and paid to have whisky provided at his pleasure.

0:21:090:21:12

In the cabinet here are some of the older artefacts

0:21:120:21:15

involved in the production of whisky.

0:21:150:21:18

There are things here like Sikes Hydrometers.

0:21:180:21:21

These measured the gravity of the liquid

0:21:210:21:24

-and that would tell you how much alcohol was in it.

-Oh, right!

0:21:240:21:28

It's been a long evolution to where we are today.

0:21:280:21:31

-Years ago it was gunpowder.

-Gunpowder?

0:21:310:21:33

A measured amount of gunpowder and a measured amount of spirit.

0:21:330:21:37

If you lit it and it burnt blue, you were under proof.

0:21:370:21:39

If it burnt orange, you were pretty good.

0:21:390:21:42

-If you lost your eyebrows, it was a wee bit high.

-It was over. What's this?

0:21:420:21:47

-It's called a gauging rod.

-Yeah.

0:21:470:21:50

In the warehouse you would take the bung out and drop it into the cask.

0:21:500:21:53

Right.

0:21:530:21:55

-Every year we lose 2% evaporation as the whisky matures.

-That's a lot.

0:21:550:21:59

This gauges how much has been lost through evaporation in the cask.

0:21:590:22:03

This was made in London. "Customs & Excise". They get everywhere!

0:22:030:22:08

Up until 1978,

0:22:080:22:09

by law there had to be a customs officer living in every distillery.

0:22:090:22:14

-No?

-Yeah.

0:22:140:22:16

Yeah, the taxman and whisky go way back.

0:22:160:22:19

In 1707, the Act of Union brought increased taxation

0:22:190:22:24

and full-time excise men to collect on Scotch whisky.

0:22:240:22:28

Some distillers shut down,

0:22:280:22:30

but many continued underground or amongst heather-clad hills

0:22:300:22:34

and often in cahoots with local communities and judges.

0:22:340:22:37

Smaller Highlands-based distillers, like Strathisla,

0:22:370:22:40

produced high-quality whisky legally from the late 1700s.

0:22:400:22:44

The basic whiskey-making process is the same, but technology has moved on.

0:22:440:22:48

Ian, the first thing I notice in here, it's very, very noisy.

0:22:480:22:52

You've got extremely big copper pot stills here that are being

0:22:520:22:56

heated underneath, so you have the gas flames burning there,

0:22:560:22:59

water running through the condensers at the back.

0:22:590:23:01

-So that's a lot of background noise.

-It is, isn't it? I love this.

0:23:010:23:05

It's so visual. This is the modern hydrometer.

0:23:050:23:09

This is the way it is, yeah.

0:23:090:23:10

This is exactly what every distillery in Scotland is doing.

0:23:100:23:13

The basis of all whisky is barley, which is fermented

0:23:130:23:16

into alcohol. It's then heated in the copper pot stills,

0:23:160:23:20

where the evaporation creates a purer alcohol.

0:23:200:23:24

It is distilled a second time to double its strength

0:23:240:23:27

and remove impurities.

0:23:270:23:29

The right-hand side is your first distillation.

0:23:290:23:31

The second part is the second distillation,

0:23:310:23:34

and then you have the liquid in the hydrometers.

0:23:340:23:36

And that's doing exactly the same as those old instruments,

0:23:360:23:39

measuring the alcohol strength.

0:23:390:23:41

Scotch whisky is generally distilled twice,

0:23:410:23:44

although some are distilled up to 20 times.

0:23:440:23:47

Scotch whisky regulations require anything bearing the label "Scotch"

0:23:470:23:51

to be distilled in Scotland

0:23:510:23:53

and matured for a minimum of three years in oak casks.

0:23:530:23:57

I mean, this is really fascinating. I love it.

0:23:570:23:59

I'm delighted you enjoyed your visit.

0:23:590:24:01

You've seen everything apart from one thing - the whisky.

0:24:010:24:04

-Let's go and taste some whisky.

-Oh, but I'm driving, Ian!

0:24:040:24:08

-Let me find you something to take away, then.

-Wonderful!

0:24:080:24:11

Looks like you'll have to wait until later to taste yours, Mark.

0:24:110:24:14

-A little goodie.

-Go home and try it.

-Thank you so much.

0:24:140:24:17

I look forward to that. Nice to meet you.

0:24:170:24:19

Oh, you lucky devil! Now, remember to keep some for me, Mark.

0:24:190:24:23

And after enjoying the lure of the amber nectar,

0:24:230:24:27

Mark and Catherine have joined up to journey the 13 miles north

0:24:270:24:31

to the coastal town of Cullen.

0:24:310:24:33

This fishing village on the Moray Firth is famous as the home

0:24:330:24:37

of Cullen skink, a traditional soup made from smoked haddock,

0:24:370:24:41

and for the highly impressive viaduct that soars above the town.

0:24:410:24:47

So far, Catherine has spent over £100.

0:24:470:24:49

And despite Mark's insistence that they blow the lot,

0:24:490:24:52

he has only spent half that.

0:24:520:24:54

I smell a rat.

0:24:540:24:56

-This could be interesting.

-You're here?

-No, I'm here.

0:24:560:24:59

-I'm going in there. I'll see you later.

-Good luck.

0:24:590:25:02

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:25:020:25:03

Ready to shop, Mark has bagsied Cullen Antique Centre,

0:25:030:25:07

while Catherine is trying Abra Antiques for size.

0:25:070:25:11

-Hello, there. Hi, I'm Catherine.

-I'm Tom.

-Hi, Tom. Good to meet you.

0:25:110:25:16

There are a lot of quirky and eclectic pieces in here.

0:25:160:25:20

Has owner Tom got any suggestions?

0:25:200:25:22

Now, I have the most perfect thing.

0:25:220:25:24

-THUD

-Oh, sorry!

0:25:240:25:27

Oh, I felt that!

0:25:270:25:29

Aha! A late 19th-century Indian silver purse, priced at £86.

0:25:290:25:35

You're bound to like this. Sorry.

0:25:350:25:37

Oh, I love that. You're not sorry at all!

0:25:370:25:39

-Well, that's true.

-I'll take that out, give you the box.

0:25:390:25:44

Right, let's have a look at this. What have we got?

0:25:440:25:47

-We've got this lady in the centre.

-A dancing girl, I think.

0:25:470:25:50

She looks like she's dancing. And little elephants around the side.

0:25:500:25:55

-And monkeys...

-It is silver, but it's not sterling.

0:25:550:26:03

-What's the best you can do on that?

-Well...

0:26:030:26:06

-I suppose...70.

-70.

0:26:060:26:09

What about a little pinch at 65?

0:26:090:26:11

HE MAKES HIGH-PITCHED WHINE

0:26:120:26:14

Is he all right?

0:26:140:26:16

Go on. Would you like to shake at 65?

0:26:160:26:19

Oh...

0:26:190:26:21

-All right.

-Dear, oh, dear.

0:26:210:26:23

And just like that, Catherine's spent up,

0:26:230:26:25

but Mark is having some dog problems.

0:26:250:26:27

Catherine is going to hate me - I can't find a dog.

0:26:290:26:31

I can't find a dog that really bites me.

0:26:310:26:34

But I love this pig. I LOVE this pig.

0:26:340:26:37

So I'm going to have a piggy poochy purchase, I think.

0:26:370:26:40

A piggy, poochy what?

0:26:400:26:42

I don't see this going down at all well, you swine!

0:26:420:26:45

He's adorable.

0:26:450:26:47

I mean, look at that face. Don't you die for that face?

0:26:470:26:50

And I love the fact that

0:26:500:26:51

the farmer's had his name and the date put on.

0:26:510:26:54

I think it's got everything -

0:26:540:26:56

a little bit of folk art from the 20th century. He is kitsch.

0:26:560:27:00

I think it's silver. I just think it's unmarked. I think it's great.

0:27:000:27:04

What it isn't is a dog.

0:27:050:27:07

It's got a ticket price of £60, but if you're happy, Mark,

0:27:070:27:10

best bring in dealer Alan.

0:27:100:27:12

I've failed in my poochy purchase.

0:27:120:27:15

I was supposed to find a dog. But I have fallen in love with your pig.

0:27:150:27:19

-OK, yes.

-I'd love to get him for £30.

-That's probably too little.

0:27:190:27:24

I will try and accommodate you

0:27:240:27:26

and say £40.

0:27:260:27:28

You can't go to 35?

0:27:280:27:30

-Just to give me a chance?

-To give you a chance?

0:27:300:27:32

-I'd love to buy him, honestly, for 35.

-OK, then - we have a deal.

0:27:320:27:35

Oh, thanks, Alan. Catherine is going to hate me, but I love him.

0:27:350:27:38

You've made my day, Alan.

0:27:380:27:40

But with time running out, Mark's making a dash across the road

0:27:400:27:43

to see if Tom has one last bargain for him to take to auction.

0:27:430:27:47

Watch out, old boy!

0:27:470:27:49

French.

0:27:510:27:52

Mirror's obviously seen better days,

0:27:520:27:55

but that's Jade, Art Deco.

0:27:550:27:58

Beautiful.

0:27:580:27:59

INDISTINCT

0:27:590:28:03

But it's £85.

0:28:030:28:05

-No, no - I will do a good buy on that.

-Well, how good a buy?

0:28:050:28:08

Because I like you, I'd let you have that,

0:28:090:28:14

to give you a chance of winning, 50 quid.

0:28:140:28:16

-Oh, Tom, are you sure you can't do it for 40?

-45.

0:28:160:28:21

-Tom, you are a meanie!

-No, I'm not a meanie. I'm giving it away.

0:28:210:28:25

What's a fiver between friends?

0:28:250:28:27

It makes a big difference - between death and life!

0:28:270:28:29

-So if I don't pay 45, you can't eat tonight?

-That's probably true!

0:28:290:28:34

-Go on, 45.

-45.

0:28:340:28:36

Yeah, let the man eat, for heaven's sake.

0:28:370:28:39

Now that Mark is all shopped out,

0:28:390:28:41

it's time to meet up with Catherine, because it's the moment of truth,

0:28:410:28:44

when our experts reveal all to each other.

0:28:440:28:47

-You seem to have got a lot of stuff - let's have a look.

-Well...

0:28:470:28:51

-Say something, then!

-I don't know what to say.

0:28:570:29:00

-So you bought a load of modern railway books...

-Yes.

0:29:000:29:03

-You bought a pen.

-Yes.

-Sheaffer.

0:29:030:29:07

Yes. And this one is gorgeous.

0:29:070:29:09

-Right.

-Yes.

0:29:090:29:11

OK. And you've got a pencil drawing

0:29:110:29:13

-of a terrier.

-Pastel, actually.

0:29:130:29:16

-Pastel, I saw that.

-You rejected it.

-I didn't like it, no.

0:29:160:29:20

-And a reproduction fan...

-It's not reproduction!

-It's not old!

0:29:200:29:24

-It is old!

-It's not, Catherine.

-It IS old!

-How old is it?

0:29:240:29:30

It's old!

0:29:300:29:31

Define old.

0:29:310:29:33

-OK, it's not Victorian, but it's got a little bit of age to it.

-The '50s.

0:29:330:29:37

-Yeah.

-It's very decorative.

0:29:370:29:39

I like the little Marie Antoinette.

0:29:390:29:42

-Few screws missing.

-I only paid 20 quid for it.

0:29:440:29:47

Well, there we are, then.

0:29:470:29:48

Hm, Mark's a right moaning Minnie today, isn't he?

0:29:480:29:51

How much have you spent?

0:29:510:29:53

I spent £172.50.

0:29:530:29:56

And for £172,

0:29:560:29:58

-this is your offering?

-Yeah.

0:29:580:30:00

-You should be ashamed of yourself.

-Really?

0:30:020:30:04

For that amount of money, Catherine,

0:30:040:30:07

you could have done so well!

0:30:070:30:09

-Do you want to see mine?

-Go on, then!

0:30:100:30:13

OK. Oh, yeah, that I saw that in the shop.

0:30:160:30:21

-I rejected that.

-That's fine.

0:30:210:30:23

-I'm happy you rejected it.

-How much did you pay for that, then?

-45.

0:30:230:30:27

-Yes, they saw you coming.

-I don't think they did, actually, Catherine.

0:30:270:30:32

This is lovely.

0:30:320:30:33

I didn't get a poochy purchase, so I changed it to a piggy poochy...

0:30:330:30:37

Yes, hold on! That's not on!

0:30:370:30:39

Look at that. Briggsie, 1920, unmarked silver.

0:30:390:30:43

-Look at the face!

-It's very nice, Mark, but that is against the rules.

0:30:430:30:47

I couldn't find a dog. There are no rules, Catherine. There's no rules.

0:30:470:30:50

-It's as light as a feather.

-Yes, but it's quirky. Pigs are popular.

0:30:500:30:55

Yes, so are dogs! And you were supposed to...

0:30:550:30:58

Let's hope this is the end of all this dog challenge nonsense.

0:30:580:31:02

35 quid. This...

0:31:020:31:03

Oh, you'll love this - I've got to show it to you.

0:31:050:31:08

-This is political.

-Hm.

-1827,

0:31:080:31:12

-hand-coloured...

-Yeah.

0:31:120:31:14

Have a guess how much.

0:31:140:31:16

Well, you probably got that for a steal,

0:31:160:31:18

-I don't know - 30 quid or something.

-£20.

-Yeah, that's good.

0:31:180:31:21

But has it or has it not again been fun?

0:31:210:31:24

I think we'll agree to disagree on this one. Get your hands off!

0:31:240:31:29

-I'll see you later.

-Bye!

0:31:300:31:33

Oh, CRIKEY!

0:31:330:31:34

After all that barney, what have they got to say for themselves?

0:31:340:31:38

Wasn't he horrid? I didn't think that was very nice at all.

0:31:380:31:42

He wasn't complimentary about any of my items

0:31:420:31:47

and he said he thinks I should be ashamed of myself,

0:31:470:31:50

which I thought was a bit of a cutting remark.

0:31:500:31:54

I think she's a bit mad at me because I wasn't so overly enthusiastic this time

0:31:540:31:58

about some of the pieces she's bought, but I'm not, I'm sorry.

0:31:580:32:03

So, with relations fraught, it's best we get back on the road

0:32:030:32:06

and head to the auction - smartish.

0:32:060:32:08

On the fourth leg of their road trip,

0:32:100:32:12

our dandy dealers have shot their way through Aberdeenshire

0:32:120:32:15

and Moray, starting in Aberdeen and ending in Elgin for the auction.

0:32:150:32:20

In a battle just outside Elgin, Duncan, the king of Scotland,

0:32:210:32:25

become Macbeth's first victim

0:32:250:32:27

en route to obtaining the crown for himself.

0:32:270:32:29

The venue today is Elgin Auction Centre. Built in 1995,

0:32:310:32:35

it accommodates a quarterly sale of antiques, which has built up

0:32:350:32:39

a UK-wide reputation thanks to its internet bidding.

0:32:390:32:43

-Here we are, Catherine.

-Are we going through the back entrance?

0:32:430:32:46

-I think we go into the cattle shed.

-That's nice.

0:32:460:32:49

And inside the cattle shed - I mean, auction centre - branch manager

0:32:490:32:53

Gordon Pirie is waiting to tell us

0:32:530:32:56

what he thinks of our experts' items.

0:32:560:32:59

Well, I think the Briggsie pig will sell well.

0:32:590:33:02

It's an area where there's a lot of livestock, the north-east

0:33:020:33:05

of Scotland, so just for a quirky item, I think it should do well.

0:33:050:33:10

The fire screen is quite nice - we see quite a lot of them

0:33:100:33:13

going through, but probably usually later models.

0:33:130:33:17

That is an earlier sort of model.

0:33:170:33:19

Mark Stacey set out on this leg with £218.02

0:33:210:33:25

and splashed out £132 of that on his five lots.

0:33:250:33:29

Not exactly the entire budget.

0:33:290:33:31

Catherine Southon began this leg with a more impressive £290.42

0:33:320:33:37

and parted with £172.50 on her five lots.

0:33:370:33:42

MAN HOSTS FAST-PACED AUCTION

0:33:420:33:46

The man on the Tannoy is Graham Gibb. A word of warning -

0:33:460:33:49

he's quick, this one.

0:33:490:33:50

I can't tell what he's saying!

0:33:500:33:52

SHE IMITATES THE AUCTIONEER

0:33:520:33:55

I think he's praying for rain.

0:33:550:33:57

Let's hope the bidders don't rain on your parade, Mark.

0:33:590:34:02

First up is your porcelain plaque in an easel frame.

0:34:020:34:05

20, then. 5. 10. 15?

0:34:050:34:09

15 bid, 20? 5, 30.

0:34:090:34:12

£30 I'm bid.

0:34:120:34:14

-5. 40. 5.

-Oh, well done.

0:34:150:34:19

AUCTIONEER SPEAKS QUICKLY

0:34:190:34:22

45 bid - all finished.

0:34:220:34:25

45, it goes at 45...

0:34:250:34:27

Oh, that's all right.

0:34:270:34:29

He may be fast, but he can't half get the bidders interested.

0:34:290:34:33

It's Catherine's railway books next.

0:34:330:34:36

Let's hope someone here finds them less boring than she does.

0:34:360:34:40

5 and 10, 15, 20, 5, 30.

0:34:400:34:44

-Oh, come on - a bit more.

-5...

0:34:440:34:47

INDISTINCT

0:34:490:34:51

-The lady's bid at 35.

-Come on.

-40?

0:34:510:34:54

Come on, a bit more.

0:34:550:34:57

£40, £40 it goes, then. Done.

0:34:580:35:01

That's a £10 profit.

0:35:010:35:04

You're on the right track there, Catherine. Not a bad start, girl.

0:35:040:35:08

Mark's Ola Gorie brooch is next.

0:35:100:35:13

Will his luck continue?

0:35:130:35:15

£100, then. 20.

0:35:150:35:18

-10 for a bad start.

-Ooh, I'd love £100 for it.

0:35:180:35:22

-50!

-50 bid.

0:35:220:35:24

£50 bid.

0:35:240:35:26

-Come on, a bit more.

-50 bid.

0:35:260:35:28

-Come on, a bit more.

-Five.

-Yes!

0:35:280:35:30

-Lady's bid in the room at £55.

-£55.

0:35:300:35:33

-75 now...

-Well done!

-55 now, ladies and gentlemen.

0:35:330:35:38

55 to be sold in the room, then.

0:35:380:35:40

55, the internet is flashing at me here.

0:35:400:35:43

-It'll be sold in the room, 55...

-Come on, bid, Internet!

0:35:430:35:45

GAVEL BANGS 55, that's very good.

0:35:450:35:48

Yes, very good, Mark.

0:35:480:35:49

It looks like the people of Elgin share your taste.

0:35:490:35:53

Well done.

0:35:530:35:55

-Thank you. That was said with such sincerity!

-No, I mean it!

0:35:550:36:00

Now, will Catherine make up ground with her fire screen that

0:36:010:36:04

opens like a peacock's tail feathers?

0:36:040:36:07

Somebody buy it - 20, 10 bid.

0:36:070:36:11

-10 more bid.

-I was surprised with this.

0:36:110:36:13

15, 20, 30, 40...

0:36:130:36:15

INDISTINCT

0:36:160:36:18

-Come on.

-Well, you've doubled your money.

0:36:180:36:21

40 I'm bid. 50.

0:36:210:36:24

50 I'm bid. 50.

0:36:240:36:26

To be sold again, ladies and gentlemen.

0:36:260:36:28

-That's quite good.

-£50 I'm bid.

0:36:280:36:31

Put the gavel down!

0:36:310:36:33

Put it down!

0:36:330:36:35

Gosh, it went on!

0:36:350:36:36

Anyone would think you didn't want Catherine to make a bigger

0:36:380:36:41

profit, Mark! Well done. This is going well.

0:36:410:36:44

Can Mark keep up the good form with his jade Art Deco mirror?

0:36:460:36:50

The one that Catherine rejected.

0:36:500:36:52

-So if this flies, I'm going to be kicking myself.

-Well, don't kick me.

0:36:520:36:56

-Ladies and gentleman, 25 I'm bid. 10.

-Oh, no!

0:36:560:37:00

15. 20.

0:37:000:37:02

Five.

0:37:020:37:03

30.

0:37:030:37:05

Oh, this is where it's all going to go wrong.

0:37:060:37:09

-It's all going wrong now, Catherine.

-No, it's not!

0:37:090:37:11

-35 for the second time.

-Oh, no.

-35 bid.

0:37:110:37:14

-Where's the internet?

-35 bid.

0:37:140:37:17

Oh!

0:37:170:37:18

So I did the right thing to reject it.

0:37:180:37:21

No!

0:37:210:37:22

It's the first loss of the day,

0:37:220:37:24

but Mark is still in the lead.

0:37:240:37:27

Yes, I knew it was the right thing to do, to reject that.

0:37:270:37:30

Now, Catherine made a loss on the fountain pen in the last leg -

0:37:330:37:36

can she catch up with this leg's offering?

0:37:360:37:39

The Sheaffer pen, complete with box.

0:37:390:37:41

£20. Start at 20, 10, 5.

0:37:410:37:44

-Sure an opening bid. Five pounds bid.

-Five?

0:37:440:37:48

8, 10, 12, 15...

0:37:480:37:51

Come on, we've got a long way to go here.

0:37:510:37:53

20, thank you. 25.

0:37:530:37:56

30. Five. 40.

0:37:560:37:59

Come on. Come on.

0:37:590:38:01

Original case I'm told at 40.

0:38:010:38:04

-Come on!

-Will be sold again at £40, away, £40.

0:38:040:38:09

Oh, small loss there, Catherine.

0:38:090:38:13

Yes, maybe the writing is on the wall for your penchant for pens,

0:38:130:38:16

Catherine.

0:38:160:38:18

Now, can Mark's pig pique local interest

0:38:180:38:21

and win the, um...dog challenge?

0:38:210:38:24

-This is it. Briggsie.

-Briggsie the piggsie.

0:38:240:38:28

£20.

0:38:280:38:30

10 bid, £10 bid for Briggsie. 15.

0:38:300:38:35

£13 bid for Briggsie.

0:38:350:38:37

20.

0:38:370:38:38

5. 30.

0:38:380:38:41

-£30 bid for Briggsie.

-Oh, it must be more than that, surely?

0:38:430:38:46

35 for Briggsie.

0:38:460:38:49

Any others, 35 bid.

0:38:490:38:52

-I'm surprised.

-Where's the internet?

0:38:520:38:55

35, number 43.

0:38:550:38:57

Well, I'm surprised at that, Catherine.

0:38:580:39:01

Ouch, that comes back to bite you, Mark.

0:39:010:39:04

That's what you get when you don't play the game, eh?

0:39:040:39:06

That was a bit of a pig in a poke, wasn't it?

0:39:060:39:09

So, despite Mark's derision, can Catherine's terrier portrait

0:39:110:39:15

win this leg's dog challenge?

0:39:150:39:18

-A Scottish terrier, two bid.

-Oh, come on.

0:39:180:39:21

Two pounds bid. Five.

0:39:210:39:23

10. 11.

0:39:230:39:25

-I think that's what it's worth, actually.

-See, SHE likes it.

-15.

0:39:250:39:30

-Oh, no.

-18 bid.

-Oh, I can't believe it.

0:39:300:39:33

-I can't believe it.

-Cheap for a dog.

0:39:350:39:37

-18 bid.

-Very cheap!

-18 bid.

0:39:370:39:40

-Not cheap enough, as far as I'm concerned.

-18 bid. 20 bid.

0:39:400:39:43

-Put the gavel down!

-£20 bid.

-Oh, come along!

0:39:430:39:46

£20 bid.

0:39:460:39:48

-I think the sellers are disappointed!

-No, we're not!

0:39:480:39:51

-It's wonderful!

-£20 bid.

0:39:510:39:53

-£20 bid...

-You've got the luck of the Irish!

0:39:530:39:57

And with that rather modest profit, Catherine has won the challenge

0:40:010:40:05

and more importantly, has closed the gap on Mark.

0:40:050:40:08

So, how will Mark's final item fare?

0:40:090:40:11

The hand-coloured political cartoon depicting Wellington.

0:40:110:40:15

20. 10 bid.

0:40:160:40:19

-10, 20, 30, 40 - take a look at this...

-Come on!

0:40:190:40:24

50?

0:40:240:40:25

60.

0:40:270:40:28

-That's good.

-60's in the seat.

0:40:280:40:30

This should make more than that.

0:40:300:40:32

£80 bid on it.

0:40:340:40:36

That's more like it.

0:40:360:40:38

I think you're all done here. £80 bid.

0:40:380:40:40

He said 80.

0:40:400:40:41

£80, £80, £80.

0:40:410:40:43

Well done.

0:40:440:40:45

Well, that was on the low end of my expectation,

0:40:450:40:48

but I'm pretty happy with it.

0:40:480:40:50

And so you should be - it's a fantastic profit for Mark.

0:40:500:40:53

He'll never sa-tire of hearing that.

0:40:530:40:56

Huh!

0:40:560:40:58

Now, Catherine's found the knack of finding one gem in the past

0:40:580:41:01

few auctions - will her last lot,

0:41:010:41:03

the Indian silver purse, do the trick this time?

0:41:030:41:06

£20 bid. 20 bid, 40.

0:41:060:41:09

£40 bid.

0:41:090:41:12

-Well, somebody likes it.

-Late 19th century, Indian. £40 bid. 45.

0:41:120:41:18

-Come on, I need you to get a bit more.

-50.

0:41:180:41:21

-55, 60 still with me.

-Somebody's bidding.

0:41:210:41:25

Gentlemen, 60?

0:41:250:41:27

65 bid, fresh blood at 65.

0:41:270:41:30

65 and I look for more here, 70.

0:41:300:41:33

-£70 bid.

-Come on!

0:41:330:41:35

Are you all done, ladies and gentlemen? 75.

0:41:350:41:39

80. £80 bid, are you done?

0:41:390:41:42

£80 to be sold, then.

0:41:420:41:44

£80, £80.

0:41:440:41:46

-He had a commission bid on that.

-Yes.

-£80.

0:41:460:41:51

Not quite the profit Catherine was hoping for,

0:41:510:41:54

but it's been a good auction for both our experts.

0:41:540:41:58

-Done.

-Listen, another auction done.

0:41:580:42:01

Let's get out of here.

0:42:010:42:03

Mark started this leg with £218.02 and made a magnificent

0:42:050:42:08

comeback resulting in a £73 profit

0:42:080:42:13

after auction costs.

0:42:130:42:14

He's this leg's winner, leaving him with £291.02 to take forward.

0:42:140:42:19

Did Catherine let Mark's mind games get to her?

0:42:210:42:25

She kicked off this leg with £290.42

0:42:250:42:28

and only improved her margin by a mere £16.10 after auction costs.

0:42:280:42:34

She takes a slender lead into the next leg with £306.52.

0:42:340:42:39

Catherine... Oh, it's getting close!

0:42:390:42:43

-I'm back in the game!

-You are!

0:42:430:42:45

You were trailing so far behind.

0:42:450:42:47

-This is going to be very, very nail-biting.

-Mmm.

0:42:470:42:50

So, it's all to play for as we head into the final leg. How exciting.

0:42:520:42:58

On the final fling of their Scottish sojourn,

0:42:590:43:02

Mark thinks he's judging the Great Road Trip Bake-Off.

0:43:020:43:05

-I'm going to put on weight and have that lovely scone.

-It's all yours.

0:43:050:43:09

Whilst Catherine is having a whale of a time.

0:43:090:43:11

Looks like he's had a few! His eyes are going all funny!

0:43:110:43:15

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures.

On this leg Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon begin in Aberdeen before travelling through the coastal town of Cullen and on to auction at Elgin in Moray.