Episode 25 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 25

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures. Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon start their last leg in Rait in Perth before heading to auction in Edinburgh.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I am on fire! Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Come on, then.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh, come on, I've got to get to another shop!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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On this trip, we've been hitching a ride around Scotland,

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with formidable friends and antiques experts Mark Stacey

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-and Catherine Southon.

-You've loved it, haven't you?

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Of course, I have loved it!

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THEY MAKE KISSING NOISES

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Like a married couple, aren't we?

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-We're like an old married couple.

-Speak for yourself with the old!

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When I get back, I'm filing for divorce.

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Do you need the number of a good lawyer?

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Catherine Southon is Surrey's First Lady of Antiques

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and even after 16 years in the trade,

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she still has a fear of large numbers.

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Oh! 285!

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Whilst Mark Stacey, Brighton's brightest treasure hunter

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for over 20 years, has lost none of his charm.

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They're a bit like me and Catherine, aren't they, couple of old deers?

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I hate it when you're all smiley-smiley to me.

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Our pair began their journey with £200 each.

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Over the week, Catherine looked to be streaking ahead of Mark,

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but he came racing back in the last auction,

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to leave it all to play for today.

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HORN BLARES

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Careful!

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-I'm nipping at your heels again.

-You really are.

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-I am poised to strike.

-Oh, you are!

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Catherine has a slender lead in Road Trip with the cash pot

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of £306.52 to spend today.

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While Mark starts just over £15 behind,

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with a tidy sum of £291.02.

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The MG Midget was produced by the British Motor Corporation

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from 1961 to 1979, and for the trip

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our experts opted for this racing green, 1968 one.

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On this trip, Mark and Catherine

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have traversed the length of Scotland,

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starting out in New Abbey in Dumfries & Galloway

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up to Elgin on the Moray Firth, before looping back down

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to finish at an auction finale in the stunning city of Edinburgh.

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On this leg, we're kicking off in Rait in Perth and Kinross

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and meandering into Dundee and Arbroath, before going to auction

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in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh.

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Both our experts are heading to the Rait Antiques Centre

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neck and neck in this trip.

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With a host of shops and dealers to choose from,

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one canny buy could make all the difference.

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Oh gosh, this looks interesting, Catherine.

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This looks posh and expensive.

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-Do you think?

-It does, but it looks like there's quite a big place.

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While Catherine's heading for Julia Drinkhall's Antiques & Interiors,

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Mark is trying his luck across the courtyard in The Old Sawmill.

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-Morning!

-I'm Mark.

-Welcome to The Old Sawmill.

-Thank you.

-I am Lisa.

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Gosh, you specialise in all sorts,

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but mainly Oriental, by the looks of it.

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I love these Satsuma colours and covers.

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These are what we'd call Meiji period,

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so, from around 1868 to about 1912.

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Looking at the type of decoration on them,

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they're towards the end of that period.

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But they're £1,595.

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I have not been that successful, really, have I?

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Ha! Well, maybe just a little outside your budget, Mark.

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I wanted to have a little look at this.

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It's a little shoehorn.

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It's beautifully engraved with some little flower heads

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here, and then the handle has got those rather nice sort of flowers

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and that rather nice crown and crane,

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are they called Ibis?

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Those exotic cranes? I think so.

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The highly endangered Crested Ibis, once thrived in Japan

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and this bronze shoehorn dates back to the Meiji period,

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from 1868 to 1912.

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Priced at a very reasonable £25, that's one to think about, Mark.

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Now, while you're on the subject of animals,

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dare I ask what's happening with your dog challenge?

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Where you both find an item with a dog theme,

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until it took a funny turn last leg

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when you bought a pig!

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And when Catherine found out...

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Yes! Hold on, that's not on!

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-Look at that, I couldn't find a dog.

-That's against the rules!

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There are no rules, Catherine!

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I suppose, Catherine and I

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are keeping on with the poochy purchase,

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as well. She wasn't terribly pleased with me earlier on, so,

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I'm not going to mention it, unless she mentions it.

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Is that fair? I think so.

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I had hoped it had gone away, to be honest.

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But what's this Catherine has in her hand?

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What do you think of this?

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-It's quite nice, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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It's a lovely little wall plaque.

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Ivory is not to everyone's taste but the fact is that it predates 1947, meaning it's perfectly legal.

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I notice there's a dog in this scene,

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and I'm beginning to fear the worst.

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Cos if I bought that, would that count as my doggie purchase?

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Cos it's got a dog in it, hasn't it?

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So, that would be all right, wouldn't it?

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I would be playing ball properly, as I have been all along,

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and buying a dog-related item. Not like Mark.

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Still not forgiven him, eh?

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With a ticket price of £95,

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it's time to ask Heather the all-important question.

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Go on, take a gamble. 55.

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Shall we both do it? Shall we?

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-You're costing me a fortune.

-Oh, I'm not. Shall we? 55?

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-Go on, seeing it's you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-You're welcome.

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-I'm really happy.

-Cor, Catherine's quick off the mark.

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Her first deal done and already she's sorted out her challenge item.

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Meanwhile, Mark's turning Japanese again at Old Timers Antiques.

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This is bamboo actually, I think.

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Carved bamboo, so it's going to be Oriental.

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But look at this wonderful carving here.

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If you follow it up from the snake's tail, which moves all the way round...

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But what makes it really interesting is it's got a little signature here.

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-And would you like to know what it is?

-Yes.

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-So would I, cos I haven't got the faintest idea!

-Ha-ha!

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Maybe you could get David in to find out more about it, like the price.

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How much is it? Do you know?

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It's not my piece, but I've had to ring Tony about it

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and he has said that his very best price is £40, I'm afraid.

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So, while Mark is left to ponder on another item,

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nearby Catherine's ready to spend, spend, spend.

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-This time at Carse Antiques.

-I like that. Bit of pokerwork.

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It's a candle box, essentially.

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So, you put all your candles in there, funnily enough.

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And this is all...

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This design on here is all done by hot pokers.

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I love the design on this. This is really nice.

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This 1890s candle box is decorated with mythical creatures

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but the ticket price is a very real £60.

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Let's get dealer Alasdair involved.

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-Is this yours, Alasdair?

-Yes, yes.

-It's quite nice, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-So, now you want to know...

-Yeah.

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Well, really, yes.

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-What...?

-30.

-OK.

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And it is 30.

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-I think I should have that at 30.

-Yeah, so do I.

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-I think you've got a chance with that.

-Yeah.

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That's the way to do it, Catherine. Two items down.

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Now, has Mark worked himself up to buy the cane yet?

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-So, 40 is the final?

-I think it has to be.

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-I'll shake your hand on that.

-Thank you very much.

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-Thanks very much. That's £40 for you.

-Thanks.

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With no movement on the price for the cane,

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can Mark find some wiggle room on the shoehorn he looked at earlier?

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-What's the best price I can have on that?

-I've got it on at 25.

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I could do 18.

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We're very close. Could we possibly do it for 15?

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-OK, seeing as it's you.

-Give me a hug.

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Well done, Mark. The master haggler is back in business.

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But he's facing an uphill battle because I do believe

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Catherine's going to buy something else from Alasdair.

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Press that, yeah.

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-Just like a little snuff.

-Yeah, that's right. Yeah.

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-Nice to have the heart.

-That's nice. That's what I thought.

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-How much is that?

-45.

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-Can you do a bit better on that, Alasdair?

-35.

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-Do you want me to give it to you?

-Go on, then!

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-If you insist!

-35.

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-Oh, 30.

-It's wonderful! Keep doing it!

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30. £30. That's it.

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-We're doing well, aren't we?

-Well, you're doing well.

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-Not sure about me.

-Please may we say 25? And then I won't do any more.

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-£25.

-Thanks, Alasdair. You're lovely.

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-What did I start at?

-I don't know. But we won't worry about that.

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-Must be stupid.

-No, you're not, you're nice.

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Now, now, Alasdair.

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You're not the first to fall for a bit of Southon charm.

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Both our experts are clearly on a mission.

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First stop of the morning and they've already amassed five items between them.

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But now it's time to leave Rait, heading 30 miles east to Dundee,

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where Mark's dropping Catherine off for some more shopping.

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-Hop out.

-Enjoy your afternoon.

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-Enjoy your afternoon shopping.

-I will. Bye!

-Bye!

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Now, I don't know about you but I'm getting a sense of deja vu here.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-I remember seeing you before.

-You certainly did.

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-Mark's been here, hasn't he?

-He has.

-Only a few days ago, I do believe.

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Ah, yes. Clepington Antiques,

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where Mark did quite well out of the Bakelite telephone

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and the doggy decanters he bought from Derek.

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And it looks like Catherine has found something equally quirky.

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Who's this little fellow?

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That is Jonah of Whales.

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He's wonderful. I don't think he's very old, is he?

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-I don't think it is, no.

-But isn't that great?

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You haven't seen one before, have you?

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No, I haven't seen one before.

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I feel I've got to buy that. How much is it?

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£25 on it.

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-To you...big blue eyes...

-Oh!

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-£15.

-£15. Oh, OK.

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My gosh! It looks as if she's a hit with the men today.

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-I'm going to have the whale.

-Well done.

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-And I'm going to give you £15 for it.

-OK.

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-We'll...

-Unless you want to knock off another pound or two,

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in which you're very welcome to! HE LAUGHS

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No, I'm going to find...

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OK, I'll give it for 14 and that will definitely swing the...

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Oh, gosh! Right. That's very kind!

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I was actually pulling your leg but that's fine.

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I'll shake on that before you change your mind! 14! That's fabulous!

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-I'd better give you some money.

-That's a good idea.

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Crikey! She's done it again. There's no messing about with her.

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It's safe to say she's keen to beat Mark who,

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meanwhile, is motoring further east,

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making his way along the coast to Arbroath.

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The seaside town is notable not only for its smokies

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but also for it football team, Arbroath Football Club,

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which holds the world record for the biggest win in a professional game -

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36-0 against poor old Aberdeen Bon Accord.

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But it's not fish or football that Mark is here for.

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Instead he's visiting what is believed to be Scotland's

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first school of fine art, as well as one of the most outstanding

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country houses in the nation.

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-Hello, Graham.

-Mark, nice to see you. Welcome to Hospitalfield.

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Thank you. It is a lovely house, isn't it?

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-Tremendous monument to 19th century skills.

-Wonderful.

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-What are we going to see first?

-Well, come with me.

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Hospitalfield House was originally founded in the 1200s by monks

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from the nearby Arbroath Abbey as a leprosy and plague hospice.

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In the 17th century it was bought by the well-to-do Fraser family

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as a rather grandiose family home and in 1843,

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Elizabeth, the sole heiress to the estate, fell in love

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and married a local artist, Patrick Allan.

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This triple portrait really dominates the room, doesn't it?

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It does. It's a portrait of Patrick on the left,

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-his mother-in-law in the middle...

-In the middle? How cosy!

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-..and Elizabeth, his wife, on the right.

-How did they meet?

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There's various stories.

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One is that Patrick came out here to make some sketches or drawings

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-of Hospitalfield to illustrate a book by Sir Walter Scott.

-Really?

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And Elizabeth might have been there at that time and so things develop.

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In favour of this version of events,

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there are several illustrations which hang in the house,

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painted by Patrick for Scott's book The Antiquary.

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Sir Walter Scott stayed in the house in the early 1800s

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and used it as his model for Monkbarns in the novel.

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Its purpose as a family home changed in the mid 19th century

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when Patrick embarked on a substantial remodelling

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of Hospitalfield House.

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He worked with local craftsmen to convert an 18th century barn

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into a gallery. Having studied art in Edinburgh, Paris and London,

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he went on to become president of the British Academy Of Art in Rome.

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This is the original studio.

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This is the studio that Patrick had built for his own use

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and where he was very active, as you have seen by the paintings in Hospitalfield House.

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And in some ways, this was the start of the college that now exists to

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further art in various forms, which is what Patrick wanted when he died.

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With no heirs to the estate, the building was bequeathed

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for the promotion of education in the arts in 1890.

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On his death our trust was set up under his will,

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which was to encourage artists and have them educated,

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-trained here at Hospitalfield and fully looked after.

-Wonderful.

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So it really spawned a legacy.

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It has spawned a legacy which is still here

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and growing stronger, I think.

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Since the early 20th century,

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Hospitalfield has hosted resident artists, students and teachers

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working within the broad themes of contemporary art and design.

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They include pop artist Sir Peter Blake,

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Joan Eardley and Peter Howson.

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Graham, thank you so much for your time.

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I feel we've only scratched the surface of Hospitalfield

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and I hope one day to come back again and have a closer look.

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It has been a pleasure to have you, Mark. Thank you for coming.

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Over 100 years later and Hospitalfield

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retains its central and innovative role

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in the cultural landscape of Scotland.

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Back together, Mark and Catherine are off

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to enjoy some of those famous Arbroath smokies

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before they get some shut eye.

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And as they say in these parts, "Nichty nicht!"

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It's a brand-new day and our experts are taking time

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to appreciate a marvel of engineering.

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Look at the bridge, Mark! Look at the Forth Bridge!

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That is a fantastic piece of engineering, isn't it?

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It's a wonderful piece of engineering.

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I've already said that, thank you.

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It also used to be said that painting the Forth Bridge

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was a never-ending job, but its most recent paintwork

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is expected to last at least 25 years.

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When it was built in 1890,

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the bridge had the longest cantilever span in the world.

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But how far have these two stretched their purse strings on this leg?

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Mark's only spent a very conservative £55 on two items -

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his Japanese themed shoehorn and walking cane.

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That means he has £236.02 left in his coffers.

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Catherine, on the other hand,

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has splashed out more than double Mark's outgoings,

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paying £124 on four lots - a wood and ivory wall plaque,

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a candle box, a snuff box and a whale automaton,

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which still leaves her with £182.52 to part with.

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Our experts have motored 77 miles south

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to the stunning city of Edinburgh.

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I love Edinburgh. It's such a wonderful city.

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-It's quite a colourful city.

-It's a very colourful city.

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Beautiful architecture.

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And it's the beautiful architecture, magnificent castle

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and vibrant festival that helps Edinburgh regularly attract

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millions of visitors

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as the second most popular tourist destination in the UK.

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But for our pair, it's the final push to buy their remaining items

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to take to the auction finale.

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Mark's starting in the compact and bijou Antiques

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just off the famous Royal Mile.

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He looks a bit of a boar! Ha!

0:17:390:17:41

These are quite fun. These are little...

0:17:410:17:43

I suppose bonbon dishes. They're modelled as... Not sure, really.

0:17:440:17:49

They're some kind of fruit with a stalk handle.

0:17:490:17:51

The word bonbon comes from the French word for good

0:17:510:17:56

and these Edwardian silver dishes would have been

0:17:560:17:59

used for serving or displaying confectionery.

0:17:590:18:01

They're priced at a very reasonable £25

0:18:010:18:04

but aren't the only things that have impressed Mark.

0:18:040:18:07

I'm probably going to find, in the smallest shop

0:18:070:18:09

that I have ever been to in the universe,

0:18:090:18:12

more things in this shop than I have in a huge antiques centre yesterday.

0:18:120:18:16

-How bizarre and ironic is that?

-Well, if that's the case,

0:18:160:18:19

you're bound to find a dog purchase in here then.

0:18:190:18:23

The poochy purchase is back on,

0:18:260:18:28

I was informed by Her Serene Highness last night.

0:18:280:18:32

I think she's bought something. So I've got to find a dog.

0:18:320:18:36

How ridiculous is that?

0:18:360:18:38

What's that they say about dogs resembling their owners again?

0:18:380:18:42

I think he's quite fun. They are collectable, aren't they, soft toys?

0:18:430:18:47

I think so.

0:18:470:18:49

I think that might be my poochy purchase.

0:18:490:18:51

Again, with the original dust.

0:18:510:18:53

Could have hoovered him off!

0:18:550:18:57

Maybe Tony can knock off a few notes from its £12 ticket price.

0:18:580:19:03

And don't forget those bonbon dishes, Mark.

0:19:030:19:06

-They can be 20, those two.

-For the pair?

-Yeah.

0:19:060:19:09

I think that's reasonable enough.

0:19:100:19:12

-Can I make you a really sneaky offer on that?

-Go on, yeah.

0:19:120:19:15

-Just as a bit of fun. Can he be a fiver?

-He can, yeah. That's good.

0:19:150:19:19

-Oops.

-Oh, hello! Even the dog's surprised at that price!

0:19:200:19:26

Thank you so much, Tony. That's wonderful.

0:19:260:19:28

I'm really pleased with that. Thanks very much, Tony.

0:19:280:19:31

So, a great bit of business, Mark. Now, where's Catherine got to?

0:19:310:19:35

The University of Edinburgh is one of the highest rated in the world.

0:19:350:19:38

My daughter went there.

0:19:380:19:40

And Catherine's made her way to the Writers' Museum to meet

0:19:400:19:43

-curator Denise.

-Hi, there. Hi. I'm Catherine.

0:19:430:19:47

-Nice to meet you.

-Good morning.

-This is wonderful. Where are we?

0:19:470:19:50

The Writers' Museum celebrates the giants of Scottish literature

0:19:500:19:54

and we're here to learn about one of the country's greatest writers,

0:19:540:19:57

Robert Louis Stevenson,

0:19:570:19:59

one of the most translated authors in the world.

0:19:590:20:02

I'm very excited about this. Lead the way.

0:20:030:20:07

Robert Louis Stevenson was a truly international literary celebrity

0:20:070:20:11

in his lifetime, thanks to titles such as Treasure Island,

0:20:110:20:15

Kidnapped and The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde.

0:20:150:20:20

Born right here in Edinburgh

0:20:200:20:22

he was actually baptised Lewis,

0:20:220:20:25

but in his teenage years decided Louis was far more stylish.

0:20:250:20:30

He was a late reader, first learning at age seven or eight,

0:20:300:20:33

but compulsively wrote stories throughout his childhood

0:20:330:20:37

and had his first book published at just 16 years of age.

0:20:370:20:41

Here at the Writers' Museum they hold many artefacts of his,

0:20:410:20:44

including this cupboard with a macabre tale behind it.

0:20:440:20:48

One of the star exhibits in this room is this cabinet.

0:20:480:20:53

This cabinet was in Stevenson's own home as a child

0:20:530:20:59

and it was made by the notorious Deacon Brodie.

0:20:590:21:03

Deacon Brodie was a respectable cabinet-maker

0:21:050:21:07

and city councillor by day, socialising with the gentry of Edinburgh.

0:21:070:21:12

But of course, that gave him access to the homes of the wealthy

0:21:120:21:15

for building cabinets and repairing...mending locks.

0:21:150:21:20

-Ah!

-And he would make wax impressions of the keys and...

0:21:200:21:23

I can see a story coming out of that.

0:21:230:21:26

And return at night to burgle them to enable him to continue

0:21:260:21:34

his life of gambling and to pay for his family and his mistresses.

0:21:340:21:40

Do you think that was the influence for Jekyll And Hyde?

0:21:400:21:44

Yes, it was certainly a strong influence

0:21:440:21:47

and Stevenson was always interested in the idea of the coexistence

0:21:470:21:52

of good and evil and dual personalities.

0:21:520:21:56

Stevenson wrote the bulk of his best-known works,

0:21:560:21:59

including Jekyll And Hyde, in the 1880s.

0:21:590:22:03

His most important, however, was undoubtedly Treasure Island,

0:22:030:22:06

which has been adapted over 50 times for movies and television shows.

0:22:060:22:10

Stevenson had endured ill-health from birth and regularly

0:22:110:22:14

travelled to Mediterranean climes to alleviate his symptoms.

0:22:140:22:18

It is ironic that he wrote of tropical Treasure Island

0:22:180:22:22

while in chilly Braemar near Aberdeen,

0:22:220:22:25

long before he and his family crossed the world

0:22:250:22:28

to spend his last years in the Pacific islands of Samoa.

0:22:280:22:32

They built a house, Vailima, on the Samoan island of Upolu.

0:22:320:22:38

The time that he was going to Samoa, this is late Victorian England,

0:22:380:22:44

it was quite unusual for somebody to just travel to the South Pacific.

0:22:440:22:49

-But I'd love to see some of the items.

-Yes.

0:22:490:22:53

Many items in this particular room

0:22:530:22:55

are associated with his time in the South Seas.

0:22:550:23:00

Here we have Stevenson's own riding boots.

0:23:000:23:04

-Wonderful, aren't they?

-Absolutely.

-Gosh, they are.

0:23:040:23:08

They're in pretty good condition. Did he do a lot of riding?

0:23:080:23:11

He rode on Samoa, yes.

0:23:110:23:13

Stevenson was a well loved figure on the island and his influence

0:23:130:23:16

spread to the locals, who regularly consulted him for advice.

0:23:160:23:20

This ring here is very special.

0:23:220:23:24

Stevenson was known by local people as Tusitala,

0:23:240:23:29

which means teller of tales, storyteller.

0:23:290:23:32

-That's what they called him? That was his nickname?

-Yes.

-That's lovely.

0:23:320:23:35

-Tusitala.

-Tusitala.

-Tusitala.

0:23:350:23:37

And a Samoan chief had this ring made for him.

0:23:370:23:42

It's made of tortoiseshell inlaid with silver,

0:23:420:23:46

with the word Tusitala.

0:23:460:23:49

-That's lovely.

-And presented that to him.

0:23:490:23:52

It was interesting that he was actually wearing this ring

0:23:520:23:56

when he had his fatal collapse.

0:23:560:23:58

In fact, we have a picture of his tomb over here.

0:24:000:24:05

On his tomb are inscribed the last three lines of his poem, Requiem.

0:24:060:24:11

And they are -

0:24:130:24:15

Here he lies where he longed to be

0:24:150:24:18

Home is the sailor, home from the sea

0:24:180:24:21

And the hunter home from the hill.

0:24:210:24:24

That's quite poignant, isn't it?

0:24:240:24:26

Denise, it's been fascinating learning

0:24:290:24:32

so much more about Robert Louis Stevenson.

0:24:320:24:34

Thank you very much indeed for having me.

0:24:340:24:37

Thank you for visiting the Writers' Museum.

0:24:370:24:39

It's time for our little bookworm to carry on with her shopping.

0:24:390:24:43

Talking of which, what's old Stacey up to? No good, I fancy.

0:24:440:24:48

This little find is a traditional teahouse and antiques store in one.

0:24:500:24:53

How very quaint.

0:24:530:24:55

I rather like this Victorian cruet set.

0:24:550:25:00

It's very nicely done and they all match, the little

0:25:000:25:03

containers for the mustard, the salt and the vinegar et cetera.

0:25:030:25:07

This set is English Hallmarked,

0:25:070:25:09

but priced at £175, maybe you should have a think about those.

0:25:090:25:15

Where's he off to?

0:25:150:25:16

Oi! There's precious little time for a cake and a cuppa.

0:25:160:25:21

Ah, wait a minute.

0:25:210:25:22

It looks like Mark is simply buttering up the dapper

0:25:220:25:24

Cedric in his pursuit of the pretty cruet set.

0:25:240:25:28

Cedric I've been trying to cogitate here,

0:25:290:25:32

-because I think this is my favourite piece.

-OK.

0:25:320:25:34

It's my last shop of the entire series, it's my last auction.

0:25:340:25:39

I'm trailing by this much to Catherine, which she

0:25:390:25:42

is still gloating about.

0:25:420:25:44

And I've got four other really interesting objects

0:25:440:25:47

and I think this would round it off.

0:25:470:25:49

-Could I be very mean with you?

-You can try.

0:25:520:25:56

-I would love to buy it for £80.

-What about 90?

0:25:590:26:03

-Could we say 85?

-I knew you would say that.

-You did.

0:26:050:26:10

Shall we shake hands on 85?

0:26:100:26:13

OK, deal.

0:26:130:26:15

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

-Cedric, you're a gentleman.

0:26:150:26:19

And I'm going to try your tea.

0:26:190:26:20

-It's absolutely delicious.

-I'm glad you're enjoying it.

0:26:230:26:26

Now I'm going to put on weight and have that lovely scone.

0:26:260:26:29

It's all yours.

0:26:290:26:30

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:26:300:26:32

Mark's all shopped out so we'll leave him to enjoy his scone

0:26:320:26:36

while we catch up with Catherine who is meeting a well-known face.

0:26:360:26:40

It's George Pirie who we met earlier in the trip, up in Tarland.

0:26:400:26:45

I had in mind buying a small...

0:26:450:26:50

-Something small and beautiful and unusual.

-Uh-huh.

-And quirky.

-Yes.

0:26:500:26:57

-And what else? No pressure.

-No.

0:26:570:26:59

And what the lady wants the lady shall get.

0:26:590:27:04

Or maybe not.

0:27:080:27:10

I'm a bit concerned you think I've got more money than I have.

0:27:100:27:14

All right.

0:27:140:27:15

George seems to have a lot of large pieces of furniture

0:27:150:27:18

so he's taking our Catherine behind the scenes.

0:27:180:27:21

You are 200 feet below Edinburgh here.

0:27:210:27:23

I am not sure I want to go down here.

0:27:230:27:25

The lengths she'll go to to beat Mark.

0:27:250:27:27

Catherine's having a look at some of George's smaller items,

0:27:270:27:32

-like this 19th-century Chinese plate priced at £120.

-This...

-That's nice.

0:27:320:27:37

-Very nice.

-That is very nice.

0:27:370:27:39

You are quite good with Oriental stuff, I happen to know.

0:27:390:27:43

I'm not good at Oriental.

0:27:430:27:44

I bought a piece of Oriental earlier on in the week...

0:27:440:27:48

-AUCTIONEER:

-150.

0:27:480:27:49

-CATHERINE: That's amazing.

-£110 profit.

-That's amazing.

0:27:490:27:52

..and I was very lucky with it, but it was chancy. I didn't like it at all.

0:27:520:27:56

Here's another chancy piece.

0:27:560:27:58

I don't know if my nerves can take chance any more.

0:27:580:28:01

-That is...

-I'm this close to Mark. I cannot let him win.

0:28:010:28:06

Well, this is the piece that is going to get you there.

0:28:060:28:09

There's huge profit in this piece.

0:28:090:28:12

That all depends on the price, doesn't it, George?

0:28:120:28:14

I'll tell you what I'll do.

0:28:140:28:16

Because I like you and because I want you to beat Mark,

0:28:160:28:20

-but don't tell him I said that...

-Bit late now(!)

0:28:200:28:23

-..I'll give you it for a straight oner.

-Oh.

0:28:230:28:27

-You can't go wrong.

-Catherine, £100.

0:28:270:28:30

This piece could decide the entire road trip.

0:28:300:28:34

I would almost guarantee after the sale you'll

0:28:340:28:37

be on the telephone to me asking me out for a glass of champagne.

0:28:370:28:41

-That's how sure I am you're going to do well with that.

-90 quid and I'll shake your hand.

0:28:410:28:45

-You've got a deal. There you go.

-I'm mad.

0:28:450:28:47

Wow, that's a bold promise, George.

0:28:470:28:50

But what a finish to our road trip.

0:28:500:28:53

Catherine is all done with her shopping,

0:28:530:28:55

so it's time to meet up with Mark as they reveal all to each other.

0:28:550:28:59

-Catherine...

-I know.

-..it's the last one.

0:28:590:29:02

I do feel quite emotional actually.

0:29:020:29:05

-Oh!

-Oh!

-Shall I?

-Go on. Show me what you've got.

0:29:050:29:09

-Oh! Right. So we've gone back to the dog.

-We've got the dog.

-OK.

0:29:110:29:16

-Right.

-1950s, it squeaks.

-Does it?

-Yes, when you fondle it.

-OK.

0:29:160:29:22

This is gorgeous.

0:29:220:29:24

This is a snake climbing up here to a tree with

0:29:240:29:26

-a monkey picking fruit.

-That is beautiful.

0:29:260:29:30

These are a little pair of silver, Hallmarked in Chester,

0:29:300:29:33

little silver bonbon dishes.

0:29:330:29:35

-They were only £20.

-Oh!

0:29:350:29:37

And I love this. Solid silver, Victorian.

0:29:370:29:42

-That was my most expensive purchase.

-How much was that?

-Quite a lot.

0:29:420:29:47

-Was it something like £60?

-No, 85.

0:29:470:29:49

Oh, Mark.

0:29:490:29:51

-But don't you think it's a nice selection?

-It is a nice selection.

0:29:510:29:55

-I wouldn't expect anything else from you.

-Thank you. Thank you.

0:29:550:29:57

-Can I see yours?

-You can, and you will be as nasty as you always are.

0:29:570:30:01

-Are you ready?

-Bite your tongue, Mark.

0:30:010:30:03

-OK, at least say something!

-Well, say something, then!

0:30:090:30:13

I'm looking, because I like the late Chinese dish with the dragons on it.

0:30:130:30:18

That's rather nice. I love that border.

0:30:180:30:20

-Mmm, it's a nice border, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Is it late?

-Well, I think...

0:30:200:30:24

-Well, is it not?

-Yes.

0:30:240:30:26

I'm shaking, because I spent a lot of money on that. A huge amount.

0:30:260:30:30

-What's a lot of money?

-I got told to buy it.

0:30:300:30:33

-Not £200?

-No. £90.

0:30:330:30:35

-I love him. I think he's lovely.

-I mean, it's new.

0:30:350:30:39

-It's brand-new, but I love it.

-It's not brand, brand-new.

0:30:390:30:42

-It's probably got about 20 years age to it or something.

-No, it's not brand-new.

0:30:420:30:46

Is that a tongue in your cheek, Mark?

0:30:460:30:49

-And you've bought a little doggie. I love him.

-Mmm.

0:30:490:30:51

Yes, that's very nice.

0:30:510:30:53

And a little horn snuff box?

0:30:530:30:54

Yes, and I bought that purely because of the heart.

0:30:540:30:57

-Oh, was that because of me?

-Because of you.

-Yeah, of course.

0:30:570:31:00

-Exactly.

-Thought it might be.

0:31:000:31:01

Well, I don't want to break your heart, Catherine,

0:31:010:31:03

-but I actually rather like your selection.

-We'll see.

-We will see.

0:31:030:31:07

Well, I wish you lots of luck at the last auction.

0:31:070:31:09

-And I equally wish you lots of luck. Well done, dear.

-And you.

0:31:090:31:12

-It's our last, really.

-You're patronising. Goodbye!

0:31:120:31:16

Oh, my God, Catherine, you are silly!

0:31:160:31:18

Well, let's find out what these silly sausages really think.

0:31:180:31:22

He may be a little bit worried about my lovely Oriental dish.

0:31:220:31:29

Plate.

0:31:290:31:30

It's a plate. Plate.

0:31:300:31:32

It all hinges, for Catherine, I feel, on the Kangxi-style dish.

0:31:320:31:37

It is well painted. I like the pattern.

0:31:370:31:40

Chinese items are still hot at the moment.

0:31:400:31:42

I'm hoping that the Chinese market in Edinburgh is going to be realistic.

0:31:420:31:47

It's time to get back on the road and head to today's auction.

0:31:470:31:51

Mark and Catherine have had a dicey final leg of their road trip,

0:31:530:31:57

shopping their way through Perthshire, Dundee, Angus

0:31:570:31:59

and Lothian.

0:31:590:32:01

Now they're en route to their final auction

0:32:010:32:03

in the Edinburgh district of Leith.

0:32:030:32:06

-I'm so sad, Catherine.

-Oh! Are you?

-Yeah.

0:32:060:32:11

It's raining on our parade, and it's our last auction.

0:32:110:32:14

-The weather's really closed in on us, hasn't it?

-I know. Is this an omen?

0:32:140:32:18

-Do you think so?

-Is it all going to end in tears?

-No!

0:32:180:32:22

Of course it's not.

0:32:220:32:23

The venue for today's contest is Ramsay Cornish,

0:32:230:32:26

a thriving auction house that's been in business since 2003.

0:32:260:32:30

-This is not quite what I was expecting.

-No.

0:32:320:32:35

Is it actually on today? It doesn't seem like there's anyone around!

0:32:350:32:38

It's just us! Are we early, or late?

0:32:380:32:40

Don't worry, everyone's waiting for you inside.

0:32:400:32:42

And presiding over the proceedings today is senior auctioneer

0:32:420:32:46

Martin Cornish.

0:32:460:32:47

Let's see what he thinks of our experts' choices.

0:32:470:32:50

I like the little snuff box.

0:32:500:32:51

I don't think it's necessarily going to make a lot of money,

0:32:510:32:54

but it's a lovely little snuff box.

0:32:540:32:56

It's in a really good condition as well and they don't often

0:32:560:32:59

come up in that sort of format.

0:32:590:33:00

They're usually much more cut off on the base.

0:33:000:33:03

I think the one thing that might struggle a little bit

0:33:030:33:05

is the little carved ivory panel.

0:33:050:33:07

Maybe ten, 15 years ago, it would have sold much better.

0:33:070:33:10

The market for that type of thing is slightly flat at the moment.

0:33:100:33:13

Mark Stacey set out on this leg with £291.02

0:33:150:33:19

and splashed out £165 of that on his five lots.

0:33:190:33:23

But will it be enough?

0:33:230:33:24

Catherine Southon began with the more impressive £306.52

0:33:270:33:31

and parted with £214 on her five lots.

0:33:310:33:34

It's time for the showdown, where any one item could mean

0:33:360:33:39

the difference between winning or losing the road trip.

0:33:390:33:43

You blend in very nicely with the surroundings.

0:33:430:33:45

There's a couple of carpets around.

0:33:450:33:47

Yes, I knew there was something coming!

0:33:470:33:49

Huh! Looks like the red carpet treatment for you, Mark! Ha!

0:33:490:33:53

This is it.

0:33:530:33:54

The last auction has started, Catherine.

0:33:540:33:57

And up first is Catherine's big gamble,

0:33:590:34:02

the 19th-century Chinese plate, painted with a dragon and phoenix.

0:34:020:34:06

-Oh, my stomach's going over now. I'm getting nervous.

-40 to start it. 30.

0:34:070:34:12

-30 I'm bid. £30 I am bid for the Chinese plate. At 35.

-Oh, no!

-40.

0:34:120:34:18

Five. 50. Five. 60. Five. At 65 on my right now.

0:34:180:34:23

Oh, no, no, keep going! At 65. Keep going.

0:34:230:34:25

-And there's a phone bid coming in.

-Oh, there's a phone bid!

0:34:250:34:28

70. 75. 80.

0:34:280:34:32

-85. 90. 95.

-You're in profit.

0:34:320:34:38

-100.

-Oh!

-And ten.

-Oh, I thought it was going to sell for 40 there.

-120.

0:34:380:34:43

130. 140. 150.

0:34:430:34:48

160. 170.

0:34:480:34:50

180.

0:34:510:34:53

190.

0:34:530:34:54

At 190. Standing in the room now, on my right, at 190.

0:34:590:35:03

-And I'm selling at last call.

-You've made £100 on that.

-That's amazing.

0:35:030:35:07

It took a while to get going, but a fantastic profit to start with.

0:35:070:35:11

-So I'll just go along for the ride.

-Oh, Mark, don't make me feel bad!

0:35:110:35:17

Now, can Catherine extend her lead over Mark with her pokerwork

0:35:190:35:22

-candle box, decorated with mythical beasts?

-30 for this lot?

0:35:220:35:27

-20 to start it. 20 I'm bid for the candle box.

-You've got 20.

-22.

0:35:270:35:32

24. 26. 28. 30.

0:35:320:35:35

-Lady's bid at £30.

-Come on, a bit more.

0:35:350:35:37

-I thought it would make a bit more than that.

-40. At £40.

0:35:370:35:41

Still the lady's bid in the back. At £40 for the candle box.

0:35:410:35:44

-You got a profit out of it, Catherine.

-40.

0:35:440:35:46

GAVEL BANGS

0:35:460:35:47

-I think you should be pleased with that, actually.

-Do you?

-Yes, I do.

0:35:470:35:50

Still, it's a healthy lead before Mark's even had

0:35:500:35:53

any of his lots shown.

0:35:530:35:55

Here's your chance, Mark. Your first item. The Japanese shoehorn.

0:35:570:36:02

30. 20 for this. 20 I'm bid.

0:36:020:36:05

20 I'm bid for this lot. 25. 30. Five. 35 here.

0:36:050:36:09

-At 35. Last call. 40.

-Here we are.

-Five.

-Here we are.

0:36:090:36:14

-45, that's all right.

-Very good. That's very good.

-Last call.

0:36:140:36:17

-And I'm selling it.

-Well done. That's a good profit.

0:36:170:36:20

-I'm happy with that, that's £30 profit.

-Yes, that's very good.

0:36:200:36:23

-That's OK, actually.

-Another good performer.

0:36:230:36:26

This is a promising start.

0:36:260:36:28

-I mean, you know...

-That's luck, Mark.

-No, it's not luck.

0:36:290:36:32

It's knowing what to pay, Catherine.

0:36:320:36:34

Meow!

0:36:340:36:36

Now, staying in Japan, it's Mark's walking cane up next.

0:36:380:36:42

-20 for that. Ten to start it.

-Oh, no.

0:36:420:36:45

-The cane. Ten I'm bid.

-Don't worry, it will carry on.

-This is ridiculous.

0:36:450:36:48

18. 20. 18 here. 18 here. 20. 22.

0:36:480:36:53

-24.

-It's got a long way to go.

-At 28.

0:36:530:36:57

On the right at 28. Last call. At 28. 71.

0:36:570:37:02

Well, that's it, Catherine.

0:37:020:37:05

-Can you believe it?

-No, I really don't believe that.

0:37:050:37:07

-Someone got a real bargain there.

-That's it.

0:37:070:37:10

Sometimes the right bidder is just not in the room, Mark. Bad luck.

0:37:100:37:14

Let's see if Catherine's next lot will snuff out Mark's chances. Ha!

0:37:160:37:21

20 for it. Ten to start it.

0:37:210:37:24

Ten I'm bid. 12. 14. 16. 18. 20. Two. 24.

0:37:240:37:28

26. Lady's bid now at 28. 28 at the back. At £28, in the back.

0:37:280:37:34

-£3.

-You got your money back. Wiped your face.

0:37:340:37:37

Well, after the auction house takes its well-earned commission,

0:37:390:37:43

that will be a loss, I'm afraid, Catherine.

0:37:430:37:45

Well, you can just sit back on your huge profit, now.

0:37:450:37:48

-I can, actually, can't I?

-You don't have to worry about a thing, do you?

0:37:480:37:51

No. You can do all the worrying for me!

0:37:510:37:54

Well, Catherine,

0:37:540:37:55

should you be worried about your dog challenge item?

0:37:550:37:58

A German oak wall plaque featuring a hunting dog.

0:37:580:38:02

30 for this to start it quickly.

0:38:020:38:04

30 I'm bid. £30 I'm bid. 35. 40.

0:38:040:38:08

-At £40. At £40. Nobody else now? Last call at £40.

-Disappointing.

0:38:080:38:14

-Oh, dear.

-Well, you win some, you lose some.

0:38:140:38:18

-You're still winning.

-She may well be, Mark.

0:38:180:38:22

But you can win the last dog challenge with your 1950s poodle!

0:38:240:38:27

-It is cute, isn't it? And it squeaks.

-I know!

0:38:280:38:32

-But will I squeak a profit out of it?

-Yeah, you will!

0:38:320:38:35

-30. 20 for it. 20 I'm bid.

-Oh, 20.

-On commission at £20 for the poodle.

0:38:350:38:41

25. 30. Five. 40. At £40. Last call at 40.

0:38:410:38:47

-Well done.

-That's all right!

0:38:470:38:49

Either I've gone barking mad, or finally,

0:38:500:38:53

that's the end of the poochy purchase bit.

0:38:530:38:56

When it comes to the dog challenge, Mark's been crowned Best In Show!

0:38:560:38:59

-I wish I'd bought four poodles, now!

-You should have!

0:39:010:39:04

In different colours!

0:39:040:39:06

But it's winning the road trip that Mark really wants.

0:39:070:39:10

-Can his silver bonbon dishes get him back into contention?

-40 for these.

0:39:100:39:15

-30 for them. 30 I'm bid.

-Oh, well that's a profit.

0:39:150:39:19

It's a profit, anyway.

0:39:190:39:21

£30 I'm bid. 35. 40. Five.

0:39:210:39:25

50. At £50. At £50.

0:39:250:39:28

The little bonbons at £50. Nobody else now going on.

0:39:280:39:31

Last call at 50.

0:39:310:39:33

-Well done.

-Well, that's £30 profit.

-That's very good.

0:39:330:39:37

Another good profit for Mark. This is getting close!

0:39:370:39:40

Can Mark turn the trip on its head with a big

0:39:420:39:44

profit on his Victorian cruet set?

0:39:440:39:47

This is my last lot of the sale.

0:39:470:39:49

80. 60 for this. 60 I'm bid.

0:39:490:39:52

£60 I'm bid for the cruet set. 65. 70. Five.

0:39:520:39:56

-80. Five. At 85. At £85.

-90. That's what I paid.

-100. At £100.

0:39:560:40:03

-Well, there you go.

-At 100. Last call.

-That's good.

-Well...

0:40:030:40:07

Very interesting. That's brought our experts almost neck and neck.

0:40:070:40:12

But Catherine's still got her last item to go.

0:40:130:40:16

If she can get at least £20 for her whale automaton,

0:40:160:40:19

that will see her win the road trip.

0:40:190:40:22

Have they got a sense of humour here, though?

0:40:220:40:24

Well, I think so, Catherine. They bought the poodle.

0:40:240:40:27

They bought your poodle!

0:40:270:40:29

Swings backwards and forwards and his mouth opens.

0:40:290:40:33

-30. 20 for this to start it. 20 I'm bid.

-Oh, yes! There we are.

-30.

0:40:330:40:39

Five. 40. At £40. 45. 50. New bid.

0:40:390:40:44

You see, I told you that would fly.

0:40:440:40:47

-50. Excellent. Yay!

-You see, I said that would fly, because it's fun.

0:40:470:40:50

It is fun.

0:40:500:40:51

And well-deserved.

0:40:510:40:53

After a wonderful trip, Catherine goes out on a whale of a profit. Ha!

0:40:530:40:58

-Congratulations, Catherine.

-Oh, thank you. You can buy me a drink.

0:40:580:41:01

-No, you can buy the drinks!

-I've got so much money(!)

-Come on.

0:41:010:41:07

So, after that exciting decider,

0:41:070:41:09

Mark has been pipped at the post.

0:41:090:41:11

He started this leg with £291.02

0:41:110:41:14

and battled valiantly to a profit of £50.66 after auction costs.

0:41:140:41:20

And so ends the trip with £341.68. Don't look so glum!

0:41:200:41:26

Catherine, though, started this final leg with £306.52,

0:41:260:41:31

earning a fantastic £71.36 profit after auction costs.

0:41:310:41:36

Making her not only today's winner,

0:41:360:41:38

but also the winner of this week's road trip.

0:41:380:41:40

She's finished with a grand total of £377.88, so well done, Catherine!

0:41:400:41:46

-All profits, of course, go to Children In Need.

-What can I say?

0:41:460:41:50

-Haaaa!

-It's all over. And well done.

-Ah! Well, thank you!

0:41:500:41:54

And what a trip it's been for our two.

0:41:540:41:56

They've discovered the wondrous sights of Scotland...

0:42:020:42:05

This is actually one of the most spectacular places I've ever been to.

0:42:050:42:11

-There's been laughter and fun...

-Last shot.

0:42:110:42:14

-Onward and downward, as they say!

-Onward and upward!

0:42:160:42:19

-Squabbles and tantrums...

-Hold on! That's not on!

-I was waiting for you.

0:42:190:42:23

-No, you weren't!

-Now, come on, I've got to get to another shop!

0:42:230:42:26

But through all its ups and downs...

0:42:260:42:29

Oh! Oh!

0:42:290:42:30

On fire! Yes! Woohoo!

0:42:300:42:33

-Right, you don't have to be so bossy!

-I'm not being bossy!

0:42:330:42:36

-I'm just pointing it out.

-You don't need to, because I can see.

0:42:360:42:39

-It says antique centre!

-These two will remain the best of friends...

0:42:390:42:43

Get your hands off.

0:42:430:42:45

-Makes me nervous.

-Does it?

0:42:450:42:47

As they say in Scotland, "Cheerio the noo"!

0:42:470:42:50

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:42:560:42:58

our new recruit Helen Hall ferrets out some bargains...

0:42:580:43:01

Oh, sewn together by the mouth. I daren't put that on.

0:43:010:43:05

Whilst James Braxton loses his nerve...

0:43:050:43:08

I'm going through this sort of buying crisis.

0:43:080:43:10

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures.

On the final day of their Scottish road trip Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon start in Rait in Perth and Kinross then travel through Dundee and Arbroath before heading to auction in Edinburgh.