Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 1

Antiques experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion hit the road in a camper van. Charlie gets into the kilt-wearing spirit as they kick off in Inverness, Scotland.


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It's the nations favourite antiques experts.

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-With £200 each, a classic car...

-We're goin' roond!

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..and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I want to spend lots of money.

-The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-Oh, no!

-There'll be worthy winners...

-We've done it!

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-..and valiant losers.

-You are kidding me on...

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-What am I doing?

-You've got a deal.

-This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Today sees the start of a brand-new Road Trip with Charlie Ross,

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a campervan and...

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Hang on, we're missing someone.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Ah, welcome aboard!

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Ah, yes, his antique adversary for this adventure

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is Christina Trevanion.

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Come on the trip of a lifetime with your old uncle Ross-co.

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-Ah. That van's going down a treat.

-We are in ultimate luxury.

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-We can sleep in it.

-Yeah.

-When we pull up to a shop...

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-We can eat in it.

-..we can blow the horn

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and ask the chap to bring the items out on a tray.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Do you like that idea?

-I don't think...

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-'Your antiques, sir!'

-Sounds like an adventure.

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Hold on to your bonnets, folks. We're in Bonnie Scotland.

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We're right up in the Highlands now.

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-Are you a real Scotsman, Charles Ross?

-Well...

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Let's say, when the wind blows...

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-I'll find out?

-You'll find out.

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Oh, crikey...

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Road Trip veteran Charlie Ross is a flamboyant auctioneer

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who knows no fear.

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Will they kill me?

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-No. No.

-They've got big horns on them.

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But of course they have. And he aims to please.

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-Do you like the tea bag to dangle?

-Yes, please.

-Oh, yes.

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His competition is Christina Trevanion.

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She's an auctioneer embarking on her second Road Trip

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and she loves a spot of dressing up.

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Ooh, it fits. What do you think?

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-And she hobnobs with celebs, don't you know?

-You must be Madonna.

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Hello. Hi, lovely to meet you.

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Our handsome duo begin their awfully big adventure

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with £200 each.

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And their trusty 1977 VW campervan

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called Geoffrey II.

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Hawd on tae yer pants. We're goin' roond!

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-Good Lord, this old gearbox is a bit sporting.

-What's going on? Ooh!

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-You enjoying that? Now I think we're in 2nd.

-You think?

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-Well, we're going uphill.

-Oh, my. Come on, Geoffrey...

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Come on, Geoffrey II!

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Geoffrey II...

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HORN TOOTS Oh, my goodness.

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This is going to be a trip and a half.

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It certainly seems that way so far.

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Charlie and Christina will travel over 500 miles

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from Inverness in the Scottish Highlands

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all the way to the port town of Boston in Lincolnshire.

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Today, they start in Inverness

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and will head towards their first auction in Bo'ness, near Falkirk.

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Boasting a 19th-century castle and sitting on the River Ness,

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Inverness is regarded as the capital of the Scottish Highlands.

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-I say. What a guy.

-It's a little windy in the Trossachs.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Have a good buying day.

-Happy shopping.

-And I'll see you later.

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-I'll see you later.

-Bye.

-Bye.

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Whoops! Nearly got an eyeful there.

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Charlie's charged up as he gets stuck in to his first shop.

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-Watch out, girls.

-Good morning!

-Morning.

-It's Moira, is it not?

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-It is.

-Charlie.

-How do you do?

-Nice to meet you.

-You too.

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-May I be that forward?

-Of course.

-Steady on...

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-How long have you been here?

-Just since the end of last year.

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Oh, really?

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Did you come from another shop or is this a new project?

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This is a new project. My husband's a collector as well.

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-Do all the good things that you buy end up at home?

-Yes.

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-Where do you live?

-I'm not telling you.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Nice try, Charlie.

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Bother! That one didn't work.

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-So all the things your husband doesn't like end up in the shop?

-Yes.

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-Oh, well, thank you very much.

-That's why I'm here!

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-I'm sure that's not true, Moira.

-How dare you!

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-May I have a look round?

-Of course.

-And he's not hanging about.

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A pair of Cantonese vases.

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Famille rose.

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Famille rose is the style of 18th-century Chinese wares

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typified by shades of pink and green.

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-Someone's been having a bashing time, haven't they?

-Yes.

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Having said that, you've got one perfect one.

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£90 the pair.

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While he has a think, he's got a fancy for something else.

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I like your quill basket.

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Anglo-Indian?

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-Do you think?

-Spot on, Charlie.

-I think so.

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This 19th-century porcupine quill basket

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was very popular during the British Empire

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when it was the fashion to show off wares from far-flung travels.

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You do have an easel clock there.

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-I know nothing about that.

-Charlie certainly does.

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Well, I think it's French. It's on a French porcelain plaque.

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In terms of date, I would imagine 1890-1900. I imagine it's...

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Well, it's got an enamel chapter ring here.

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Is it buyable for 50 quid?

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-Yeah.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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Well, I think that's fabulous and I'm going to have it. And thank you.

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-Perfect.

-I say. Christina's going to be jealous of that.

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And I'm going to win, ha-ha!

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Gosh, he's got his tail up today.

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What about Christina, poor girl?

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She's just down the road and, as a relative newcomer,

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she's got her work cut out today against the old hand, Charlie.

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She's off to meet Madonna - no, not the Grammy Award winner,

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but the lovely lady who owns this antiques emporium.

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Stand by.

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-Hello. Hi, you must be Madonna.

-I'm Madonna, yes.

-You're Madonna.

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Brilliant, hi. I'm Christina. Lovely to meet you, how are you?

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-I'm fine, thank you.

-With £200 in her purse, what will take her fancy?

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Those are quite impressive. There isn't a huge amount of age to them.

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Nice. Nice little bit of Moorcroft.

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And we've got a lovely sticker on the back here.

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-Is it what they call, erm...a luckenbooth brooch?

-It is, yes.

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Just be grand if it would have a little mark on there, but...

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You can't have everything, can you? I'm asking for everything.

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Greedy!

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This traditional brooch became popular in 18th-century Edinburgh

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and were sold in luckenbooths,

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tiny, lockable shops along the Royal Mile.

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We've got £40 on that.

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-What's your thoughts, Madonna?

-Aye...

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You should make a profit on it at 30, if I come down to 30.

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Lovely. OK, all right, that's definitely a possibility.

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Back to Charlie. How's he getting on?

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What about the ebony and quill basket from earlier?

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I think that would make, at auction, between £20 and £30.

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Which would have to be bought... I think you've got it priced up at 35.

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I think I would have to pay, sort of, 18 quid for it.

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Something like that, I don't know.

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-Is that any good?

-Yeah... That should be fine.

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-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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You're not just saying yes, because I'm wearing a kilt, are you?

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-And if you are...

-No. Even though, very nice.

-..it's worked! THEY LAUGH

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Well, I'll have that as well.

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Well, for his first shop, he's definitely splashing the cash.

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I'm going to have one last look aroond...

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This is like a shopping spree, this is. Once I'm on a roll...

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Quote me a price on those. Try me.

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I could probably do 50 for the pair.

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If 40 quid shows you a profit, I'll have those as well.

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-I think that's quite fair.

-That's fab.

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Jeepers creepers, Charlie's going for it.

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All in all, he's spent £40 on the pair of vases, 50 on the easel clock

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and 18 on the quill basket, a whopping total of £108.

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-Now, look out...

-I'll dip into my sporran.

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Oh, so that's what you keep in there...

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And with a swirl of his kilt, he's off.

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Meanwhile, Christina's a busy little bee.

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What have you got over there?

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This is a little piece of Swarovski crystal.

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-Thought you might be interested in.

-Pretty...

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Gosh, where did that come from?

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That's actually a friend's of mine. That's who I'm selling it for.

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-Are you?

-On her behalf, yes.

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That's beautiful. Nice mark on the back as well.

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-Because Swarovski is a really big, really luxury name, isn't it?

-Yes.

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So probably, to buy, that would have cost an absolute fortune.

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It would have, yes.

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-I like the little lovebirds.

-Is that me and Charlie Ross?

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-SHE LAUGHS

-It could be.

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Although, we'd probably be pecking each other and falling out.

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"I'm driving! No, you're driving, no, I'm driving..."

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Aw... And what have we got on that? That's £25 on that. OK.

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What would your friend feel about an offer on that, do you think?

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Was that her absolute limit on that?

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-No, I think she would be happy with 20.

-Be happy with 20?

-Yes. Yes.

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What about 40 on the two?

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-How would you feel about that?

-Since it's you...

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-Really?!

-Yes.

-Really?!

-Yes.

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Thank you very much. Brilliant. Thank you.

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Cor, Christina's not messing about. Two bits of jewellery for £40, eh?

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you. Take care now. Bye-bye.

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Both our Road Trip chums are making a confident start.

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Her partner in crime, Charlie Ross, is back in the van,

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making his way 15 miles to the village of Drumnadrochit -

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try and say that quickly - on the shores of Loch Ness.

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So, it's a good, solid start, Ross.

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I like building an innings through the week, you know.

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And as the week goes on, expand the stroke play.

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Buy things for £100. £200.

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Towards that £1,000 target.

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That's it, Ross-co. Dream big, boy.

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Look at this sun shining off Loch Ness.

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It's glorious!

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Hear, hear.

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The magnificent Loch Ness

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is the largest body of freshwater in Britain.

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It's claimed there's more water here

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than in all the lakes in England and Wales put together. How's that?

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So much so, that anything could be lurking under the surface.

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SNARLING

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The myths of a Loch Ness monster are legendary.

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Nessie, as she's more fondly known, is world-famous

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and has become an icon of Scotland.

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But does such a creature really exist?

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Charlie's looking for answers

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from a man who's spent his life hunting for the truth.

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-Adrian, it must be.

-Hello.

-Hello. Lovely to see you.

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Adrian Shine is a naturalist

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and project leader of the Loch Ness Centre and Exhibition.

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When did it all start?

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Well, there was always the tradition of the waterhorse.

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Which is not a nice, fluffy, benign thing,

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it was something that would spoil your whole day.

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Something deep in Highland folklore.

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Yes. These ancient legends took a turn in 1933

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when a local woman claimed to have seen a more reptilian creature

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and word spread quickly.

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Later that year, a national newspaper

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sent a renowned big game hunter, Marmaduke Wetherell,

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up to the loch to gather evidence.

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-He came to the lochside and he found, on the bank...

-Yeah.

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-..footprints.

-Oh, no!

-And...

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Plaster casts were taken, very similar to this one.

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-And with due ceremony, they are sent to the natural history museum.

-Yep.

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-In London.

-Yep.

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And they have a look at it and it gives them

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some perplexity to start with but, as you see...

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..they think, in the end, that it's from a stuffed hippopotamus.

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Now, what is a hippopotamus doing by Loch Ness?

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-A stuffed one?

-Particularly a stuffed one.

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-Well, a stuffed one couldn't move, for a start.

-And there we have it.

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But if it's an ashtray, it fits the purpose extremely well.

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And that is where Marmaduke Wetherell

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committed his first hoax at Loch Ness.

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Amazingly, it took 60 years

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to finally solve the hippo print mystery.

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During this time, sightings continued and the legend grew.

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In 1934, Nessie was finally caught on camera,

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in a now famous image.

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Now, Marmaduke Wetherell had a step-son.

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And his name was Christian Spurling.

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-And he was a model maker of some repute.

-Aha...

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And he made the model

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-that sat on a toy submarine...

-No!

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..in April of 1934.

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-Oh!

-Our reconstruction of the picture.

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-It's like a swan!

-Exactly.

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-You've spent your whole life round here with this project.

-Yes.

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Though my interests are more diverse than monsters.

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In his now 40-year quest for the truth,

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Adrian has gone to great lengths to explore what lies beneath the loch.

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One of his early, ingenious inventions

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was this self-built submarine.

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My strategy was to look upward, against the surface brightness.

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-Because anything relevant would be coming to the surface.

-Exactly.

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To this end, Adrian squeezed himself into his home-made submarine

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and boldly went into the loch.

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To go down, he let water in.

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To go up, he had to hand-pump the water back out.

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And you had to do huge calculations before you built this.

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-Well, I did a few sums, but I wasn't very good at sums.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

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Adrian spent hours in his submarine,

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then conducted the largest ever search of the loch using sonar,

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but both were inconclusive.

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Yet Adrian remains philosophical

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about the chance of one day meeting Nessie.

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So I'm going to have to pop the question now.

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After all these years...

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Is there a monster?

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Certainly, generically speaking,

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in the human psyche, there is a monster and there always have been.

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I don't believe Loch Ness is Jurassic Park,

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so is Loch Ness a veil which we can penetrate?

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Or is it a mirror to our imagination?

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And we may, in the end,

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learn more about human perception than we do about natural history.

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What a wonderfully broad way of looking at it. And thank you.

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Thank you for letting me in on your wonderful, wonderful experience.

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That is quite a profound view.

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One thing's for certain, Adrian has taken a true shine to these waters

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and will always be vigilant in his search for the truth.

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Now, while Charlie has been searching for Nessie,

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the delectable Christina has travelled half an hour away

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to the village of Auldearn, just outside the town of Nairn.

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Christina's going for a mooch about Auldearn Antiques,

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a family-run business owned by Roger.

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This is just brilliant, isn't it?

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-Yes, it is.

-I mean, it's just what you want from an antiques shop.

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It's full of character, it's stuffed to the brim and you just know

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that in here somewhere, there's something just a little bit magical.

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It's brilliant.

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Here's hoping, Christina.

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And before you can say abracadabra, she's found a couple of birds.

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So we've got a glazed case here,

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containing what looks to be a rather magnificent cock pheasant and a...

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Is that a grouse? Is that a grouse? Or a capercaillie?

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Look, I'm no David Attenborough, but I think it's a hen pheasant...

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hen.

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Now, taxidermy isn't really everyone's cup of tea.

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It is a bit of a controversial area.

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But I'm certainly finding at the moment that it does seem

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to be quite fashionable.

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The Victorians loved taxidermy.

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It was a fashionable feature within many a parlour.

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-Ah, here's owner Roger for a chat.

-Tell me about...

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-Because obviously, this is a cock pheasant.

-Yes.

-This is a grouse?

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This is male and female.

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-Oh, this is a pheasant?

-Told you so.

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-The man is decked out in full finery.

-Yeah, he looks...

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But I wouldn't have put that as a female. Ooh, blimey. Very nice.

0:17:180:17:22

-Watch out. Here comes the Christina charm.

-Roger...

-Yes?

0:17:220:17:26

-I hate haggling...

-Fibber!

-You've got 125 on it.

0:17:260:17:29

-You're in the wrong business.

-I know. I am. I'm hopeless.

0:17:290:17:33

It's 125 on it, what could be your best price on it?

0:17:330:17:37

I could come close to £100

0:17:370:17:39

but it has to be probably the wrong side of £100 for you.

0:17:390:17:43

-Probably 105, I could sell it for.

-105?

-Yeah.

-OK. All right.

0:17:430:17:48

What I'll do is, I'll see if I can find anything else,

0:17:480:17:51

but if we can stick a red dot on that for me for the moment,

0:17:510:17:55

that would be great. Grand. I'll see you in five.

0:17:550:17:57

There are more antiques in the outbuildings.

0:17:590:18:02

Christina's off to explore.

0:18:020:18:03

-Ooh. This is quite pretty, isn't it?

-Lovely.

-What have we got?

0:18:050:18:08

-We've got the Fifty Pence Shop. Which sounds good.

-Sounds cheap.

0:18:080:18:13

50p...

0:18:130:18:14

Ooh.

0:18:160:18:17

-That's rather lovely, isn't it, for 50p?

-If you say so.

0:18:180:18:22

Somebody might want that.

0:18:220:18:24

Though I'm not sure you'd be able to fit many letters through it.

0:18:240:18:26

I mean, given a bit of a paint strip,

0:18:260:18:29

it would be rather lovely.

0:18:290:18:31

And for 50p? That can't be bad, surely.

0:18:310:18:33

Surely. So, it's back to Roger to talk business.

0:18:350:18:39

I like my 50p letter rack. Very sweet.

0:18:410:18:44

And I also like the taxidermy very much.

0:18:440:18:48

-And you're going to try and beat me down even further.

-Oh, but no.

0:18:480:18:52

That's not very civilised, is it? No, give me something, Roger.

0:18:520:18:55

All I can do is...

0:18:550:18:57

-bring it to a round figure for the two items of £100.

-£100.

0:18:570:19:01

Hopefully you'll do well with that.

0:19:010:19:03

OK. £100.

0:19:030:19:05

-For the pheasants and for my letter box?

-Yep.

0:19:060:19:09

-£100 is it.

-Good.

-Thank you very much.

-Good luck.

-Brilliant.

0:19:090:19:12

-Thank you.

-Cor, she's bold. That's half of her budget gone.

0:19:120:19:16

£100 on a pair of stuffed birds and a letter flap. Huh.

0:19:160:19:21

Back together again,

0:19:210:19:22

it's time for Charlie and Christina to have a rest.

0:19:220:19:26

The thrilling adventure continues tomorrow.

0:19:260:19:28

Nightie night, you two birds.

0:19:280:19:30

# There's a chookin a-clookin it here... #

0:19:320:19:34

It's the start of a brand-new day,

0:19:340:19:36

and Charlie and Christina are in a musical mood.

0:19:360:19:39

Well. Charlie is, mainly.

0:19:390:19:40

# And there's a cow a-mooing it here

0:19:400:19:42

# and a cow a-mooing it there

0:19:420:19:43

# They were mooing it here mooing it there every... #

0:19:430:19:46

Is that like the grown-up version of Old MacDonald?

0:19:460:19:48

# There's a pig a-SNORT there and a pig a-SNORT there

0:19:480:19:51

# Here a SNORT, there a SNORT, everywhere a SNORT SNORT... #

0:19:510:19:54

Oh, dear. What did he have for breakfast?

0:19:540:19:56

So far, Charlie has spent £108 on three items.

0:19:570:20:02

The pair of Cantonese famille rose lidded vases,

0:20:020:20:05

the ebony and porcupine quill basket

0:20:050:20:07

and the 19th-century French easel clock.

0:20:070:20:10

Leaving him £92 for the day ahead.

0:20:100:20:13

Christina has also been rather industrious.

0:20:150:20:18

She's spent £140 pounds on four items.

0:20:180:20:20

The luckenbooth brooch,

0:20:220:20:24

the crystal necklace,

0:20:240:20:25

the taxidermy study of a cock and hen pheasant

0:20:250:20:28

and the little letters flap.

0:20:280:20:31

She only had £60 to spend today.

0:20:320:20:35

With Christina at the helm of the campervan,

0:20:370:20:40

our duo are snaking their way to Glass, near Huntly in Aberdeenshire.

0:20:400:20:45

So what have you bought? How many things have you bought? Come on.

0:20:460:20:49

-Tell me.

-Oh, don't do that. Your knees are distracting me!

0:20:490:20:51

Oh, stop it. Get your hand...

0:20:510:20:53

# Keep your hands on your wheel

0:20:530:20:55

# Get your hands off my knee...

0:20:550:20:57

-# Put... #

-It's quite racy, isn't it? Wearing a kilt?

0:20:570:20:59

It is quite racy when you're sitting down. THEY LAUGH

0:20:590:21:03

Lordy. They're quite fruity, this pair, aren't they?

0:21:030:21:05

Look, there's a lay-by here.

0:21:050:21:07

I'll tell you what.

0:21:080:21:10

You pull over there. And I'll give you a treat.

0:21:100:21:13

Ooh.

0:21:130:21:15

Brace yourself, Christina.

0:21:150:21:17

-I know how to treat a girl.

-Don't you just?

0:21:170:21:20

-Make yourself at home, darling.

-I feel very special.

0:21:200:21:23

What are you up to, Charlie?

0:21:230:21:25

-Kettle on.

-Yep. Charlie, are you an English Breakfast man?

0:21:250:21:29

Oh, they're jolly good to themselves.

0:21:290:21:31

I might get some biscuits. Ho-ho!

0:21:310:21:34

You're going to have the best cup of tea you've ever had in your life.

0:21:340:21:37

No expenses spared on this Road Trip.

0:21:370:21:40

-Do your own dangling.

-Blimey!

0:21:400:21:42

Cheers.

0:21:420:21:43

-Can I tempt you?

-Ooh, thank you.

0:21:440:21:46

-It's not a hard life. It's not a bad life, is it?

-No.

0:21:480:21:51

Beats shopping, doesn't it?

0:21:510:21:52

Fab.

0:21:530:21:54

I hate to spoil your moment, but this is the Antiques Road Trip,

0:21:540:21:59

so perhaps you should get back on the road and look for some antiques.

0:21:590:22:04

So, come on, you two. Charlie's got some shopping to do.

0:22:040:22:06

This is sensational!

0:22:090:22:10

Well, I think this has to be the antique shop

0:22:100:22:12

that wins the best view.

0:22:120:22:14

Can you believe that there are antiques here?

0:22:140:22:16

-SHE LAUGHS

-Yes.

-We're getting antiques here.

-I'm looking at one.

0:22:160:22:19

-Cheeky!

-Goodbye, dear.

-Bye-bye, love. See you later.

0:22:190:22:23

-Have a lovely day.

-Will do, you too. Have fun.

0:22:230:22:25

Antiques At Glass is a rural hideaway

0:22:250:22:28

where Charlie's hoping to add some more jewels to his antiques booty.

0:22:280:22:32

-Hello?

-Hello.

-Hi! The sun's coming out.

-Lovely.

-You do get sun up here.

0:22:340:22:39

-We do, yeah.

-Hi, I'm Charlie.

0:22:390:22:41

-Tim.

-Hello, Tim.

-This is Lyn.

-Hello, Lyn. Nice to see you.

-Hello.

0:22:410:22:45

Thank you for allowing me in.

0:22:450:22:48

Hope they know what they're letting themselves in for.

0:22:480:22:50

-It's a nice bit of brass, isn't it?

-I thought it was a tapestry.

0:22:530:22:56

Christina's mode of transport!

0:22:560:22:58

Naughty. What's he found here, though?

0:23:000:23:02

There we go.

0:23:050:23:06

That's a really pleasing object. I think that's nice.

0:23:080:23:10

It's an inkwell, old boy, in the shape of a miniature curling stone.

0:23:100:23:14

The full-sized ones make quite a lot of money.

0:23:140:23:15

-You see them in shops, don't you?

-Oh, yes.

-Make a few hundred pounds.

0:23:150:23:18

£200, £300, quite easily.

0:23:180:23:20

I suppose they must cost that to make, or probably more.

0:23:200:23:23

Look at that. I think that's delightful. Has it...

0:23:240:23:28

got any age? Don't suppose it's Victorian, is it?

0:23:280:23:30

-No, I think it's 20th-century.

-Is it?

0:23:300:23:32

The ticket price on this little curio is £45.

0:23:340:23:38

It's not that much money.

0:23:380:23:39

I'd do that for 20.

0:23:410:23:43

If you're really happy with that, I think it's a sweet, sweet object.

0:23:440:23:47

Um... Fab.

0:23:470:23:50

-OK.

-I think it's really, really lovely. I'll dip into my sporran.

0:23:500:23:54

Uh-oh.

0:23:540:23:56

But £20, that's less than half price. Well done.

0:23:560:23:58

Now THAT'S what you call a whopper.

0:24:010:24:03

A wooden pitchfork. Isn't that fabulous?

0:24:060:24:09

It's certainly big enough.

0:24:090:24:10

And that is, actually... That's something you'd put on a wall

0:24:120:24:15

and you're never going to use that as a pitchfork, are you?

0:24:150:24:18

But isn't it fantastic? It's got some age too.

0:24:180:24:21

Yeah. With the old farm houses, it's the sort of thing...

0:24:210:24:23

Yeah, you can stick that on a farmhouse wall.

0:24:230:24:26

Isn't that a super thing?

0:24:260:24:27

Could that come through the door for very little?

0:24:280:24:31

It's got £28 on it.

0:24:320:24:33

-Can that be ever so...?

-I'd do that for 20.

-Could you?

0:24:340:24:38

But that would be the best offer.

0:24:380:24:39

My, would I be bonkers buying something like that? I don't know.

0:24:410:24:45

Quite possibly, Ross-co.

0:24:450:24:46

So, as Charlie has a ponder about whether to have a pitch or not,

0:24:460:24:51

Christina has travelled east to Newmachar in Aberdeenshire.

0:24:510:24:55

-Christina's keen to get shopping, but she only has £60 left.

-Hello.

0:24:570:25:02

Hi, Brian? Nice to meet you, I'm Christina, hi. Oh, my goodness.

0:25:020:25:07

This is a little treasure trove, isn't it?

0:25:070:25:10

Collecting The World has recently opened,

0:25:100:25:12

so there may be some fresh goodies on the go.

0:25:120:25:15

This is an odd thing. I don't know if you know about...

0:25:170:25:20

fossils or gem relics.

0:25:200:25:22

-Someone thought it might be a lead ore.

-Well, I don't...

0:25:230:25:26

-This is basically a...stone specimen, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:25:260:25:31

Yeah, I think so.

0:25:310:25:33

But it's interesting, how it's got

0:25:330:25:35

the almost geographical lines through it.

0:25:350:25:37

Do you think that might be a, erm...

0:25:370:25:39

-See, it might be a meteorite or something.

-You think?

0:25:390:25:41

Then it's probably worth a fortune, eh?

0:25:410:25:43

That would be quite fun, wouldn't it? It's jolly heavy, isn't it?

0:25:430:25:46

-Feel.

-Yeah, I know. Someone thought it was lead ore

0:25:460:25:48

but I don't know. Bit of a...quirky one.

0:25:480:25:51

What have you got on that?

0:25:510:25:52

-You can have that for £10.

-I mean, it's just a paperweight, isn't it?

0:25:540:25:57

-Effectively.

-Quirky, cute thing.

-Bit of fun, bit of a paperweight.

0:25:570:26:01

It would certainly keep your paper on your desk, wouldn't it?

0:26:010:26:04

It's actually a piece of crystallised rock.

0:26:040:26:07

So that's one for the back burner. What's she going for next?

0:26:070:26:12

-Brian, that's nice.

-Oh, I know. It's a super box.

0:26:120:26:15

It's an egg box. "Dated 1930s-1940s egg box for 48 eggs.

0:26:170:26:22

"Has nice decals and also railway stickers from the 1940s.

0:26:220:26:25

-"Would look good in a kitchen and useful."

-Yeah.

0:26:250:26:28

More than can be said for your sparkly rock thingy.

0:26:280:26:31

Now, cue the Christina charm.

0:26:310:26:33

Brian, my negotiating skills are horrendous. That's £100.

0:26:340:26:37

Brian, I've got £60 left in my budget and I love this egg box.

0:26:390:26:44

And I also love that meteorite thing. Would you do both for £60?

0:26:440:26:48

Erm...

0:26:500:26:51

-Yes, I think I will.

-Would you?!

-Yes.

-Ooh, Brian!

0:26:510:26:55

Thank you!

0:26:550:26:56

Ooooh! I think she's happy.

0:26:560:26:59

That's £50 for the egg box and £10 for the lump of rock.

0:26:590:27:03

She's blown every single penny of her £200. Good girl.

0:27:030:27:07

Back to Charlie and that pitchfork.

0:27:080:27:11

It seems owner Tim has come up with a rather original discount offer.

0:27:110:27:15

I'm always up for a challenge, you see.

0:27:150:27:17

I mean, frankly, a fiver off this...

0:27:170:27:20

It involves putting that pitchfork to good use.

0:27:200:27:24

SHE CALLS THE GOATS Oh, look!

0:27:240:27:27

Oh, fantastic!

0:27:270:27:28

-Come on!

-Look at their beards!

0:27:280:27:31

How fantastic. So, where's the work to be done?

0:27:330:27:35

-Up there.

-In there?

0:27:370:27:39

What happens if I walk? Will they kill me?

0:27:390:27:41

What, you, you old goat? Are you a lion or a mouse?

0:27:410:27:45

-They've got big horns on them.

-Huh.

0:27:450:27:47

-I do hope you can run faster than them.

-Am I safe?

0:27:470:27:50

Hello.

0:27:520:27:53

Because the winter's been so bad, we haven't been able to clear it out.

0:27:530:27:57

-Right.

-For quite some time.

0:27:570:27:58

How deep is that?

0:28:010:28:03

It's probably about that deep.

0:28:030:28:05

Well, that's a stinky task

0:28:050:28:07

in a kilt.

0:28:070:28:08

I think, on balance, I'll give you 20 quid for this. THEY LAUGH

0:28:080:28:13

Farm work obviously gets your goat!

0:28:130:28:16

Nice try at getting the price lowered though.

0:28:160:28:19

So, £20 for the little curling stone and £20 for the pitchfork.

0:28:190:28:23

With her shopping all done,

0:28:260:28:27

Christina's heading ten miles south to the city of Aberdeen.

0:28:270:28:31

Sitting on the coast,

0:28:310:28:33

Aberdeen is Scotland's third-most populated city,

0:28:330:28:36

famed for its harbour

0:28:360:28:38

and locally-quarried granite architecture.

0:28:380:28:41

Christina's here to visit the Aberdeen Maritime Museum

0:28:410:28:44

and find out how a major discovery 40 years ago

0:28:440:28:47

changed the city's fortunes and put it on the global energy map.

0:28:470:28:52

-Hello.

-Hi.

0:28:520:28:53

You must be Meredith, hi. Nice to meet you. Goodness me.

0:28:530:28:57

This is pretty exciting, isn't it?

0:28:570:28:59

-It looks like I've come to some sort of space museum.

-Well, nearly.

0:28:590:29:02

Welcome. It's Aberdeen Maritime Museum.

0:29:020:29:04

The main part of the building that we're looking at here,

0:29:040:29:07

-we talk about the history of oil and gas.

-Oh, how exciting.

0:29:070:29:09

So, I can tell you a bit more about that, if you like.

0:29:090:29:11

Please, that would be wonderful.

0:29:110:29:13

I'm just going to take my coat off. It's jolly warm.

0:29:130:29:15

But let's go on up. Fantastic.

0:29:150:29:17

In the 1960s, Aberdeen relied on more traditional industries,

0:29:170:29:20

like fishing and agriculture, but a top secret discovery

0:29:200:29:24

was about to transform the city into the energy capital of Europe.

0:29:240:29:28

The discovery of oil off the coast of southern Norway

0:29:330:29:35

kick-started a modern-day gold rush in the North Sea

0:29:350:29:39

and the industry drafted in experts to help harvest this liquid gold.

0:29:390:29:44

This came in the form of Stetson-wearing Texans,

0:29:440:29:47

who flooded into Aberdeen with their families.

0:29:470:29:49

So, I love the idea of these Texans coming over from the States

0:29:520:29:55

and coming to Aberdeen. It must have been...

0:29:550:29:58

really very different for them.

0:29:580:30:00

Quite rugged and wild, I would imagine. Am I right?

0:30:000:30:02

I think it was probably quite a culture shock for them

0:30:020:30:05

and their families. And still today, there is

0:30:050:30:07

a lot of traffic of personnel between Aberdeen and Houston, Texas

0:30:070:30:11

and actually all around the oil-producing world.

0:30:110:30:15

With the huge global demand for oil, came the need for rigs

0:30:150:30:19

that could withstand the rugged conditions of the North Sea.

0:30:190:30:21

These huge structures, built here in Aberdeen, were engineering marvels.

0:30:210:30:26

How do you get that into the sea?

0:30:270:30:30

Well, this was one structure, and it's built on its side

0:30:300:30:35

-and it's launched like a ship.

-OK.

-And towed out to sea.

0:30:350:30:39

And then it's sunk, very carefully.

0:30:390:30:42

So they then, if you like, semi-capsize it

0:30:420:30:45

so that this bit sinks and it turns. I mean, that's clever.

0:30:450:30:49

We're used to seeing photographs of oil platforms at sea

0:30:490:30:52

and the bit that you can see above the water is huge,

0:30:520:30:55

but actually, what's going on below the water is massive.

0:30:550:30:58

-It's just literally the tip of the iceberg.

-Absolutely.

-Yeah.

0:30:580:31:01

Throughout the 1970s, exploration continued.

0:31:010:31:03

To date, over 40 billion barrels of oil

0:31:030:31:07

have been extracted from the North Sea

0:31:070:31:09

and the industry has been largely responsible

0:31:090:31:11

for Aberdeen's economic boom over the last three decades.

0:31:110:31:15

What did the oil industry do to Aberdeen?

0:31:170:31:21

Well, it's had a massive impact on Aberdeen.

0:31:210:31:23

It's a very cosmopolitan city, it's a very wealthy city.

0:31:230:31:26

-Because of the wealth the oil industry has brought in?

-Exactly.

0:31:260:31:29

Well, Meredith, it's been absolutely fascinating.

0:31:290:31:31

Something that I knew nothing about, so thank you so much.

0:31:310:31:33

-It's been lovely to meet you.

-You're welcome. Nice to meet you too.

0:31:330:31:36

With our experts nearing the end of the first leg,

0:31:390:31:42

here's a reminder of their antique gems.

0:31:420:31:46

Charlie has indulged in five lots.

0:31:460:31:49

A pair of 19th-century Cantonese vases,

0:31:490:31:51

a porcupine quill basket,

0:31:510:31:54

a French easel clock,

0:31:540:31:56

a miniature curling stone

0:31:560:31:57

and the giant sized wooden pitchfork.

0:31:570:32:00

This bumper haul cost a total of £148.

0:32:000:32:04

Christina also has five lots. The crystal necklace,

0:32:040:32:07

the luckenbooth style brooch,

0:32:070:32:09

the taxidermy study of pheasants,

0:32:090:32:12

the 1940s egg crate

0:32:120:32:14

and she's coupled the letters flap and the crystal paperweight

0:32:140:32:17

as one lot.

0:32:170:32:19

All in all, she's blown every single penny of her £200 budget.

0:32:190:32:23

So, let's hear what they think of one another's treasures.

0:32:230:32:26

Why do you buy an egg box? Because it looks fun, doesn't it?

0:32:280:32:31

And it's quite original, but it's not really what I would call an antique.

0:32:310:32:35

What's he doing with a pitchfork? Why has he got a pitchfork?

0:32:350:32:39

It's because I LIKE it. No other reason.

0:32:390:32:42

I can tell you absolutely now, that he will hate my Swarovski necklace.

0:32:420:32:46

He will hate it with a passion.

0:32:460:32:48

The Swarovski...lovebirds?

0:32:480:32:51

Something or other? That's...ghastly!

0:32:510:32:54

It's going to be interesting. I feel a bit like

0:32:540:32:57

going into the unknown.

0:32:570:32:58

Or, with Charlie, it's a bit like the blind leading the blind.

0:32:580:33:01

SHE LAUGHS

0:33:010:33:03

That doesn't bode well.

0:33:030:33:04

Our intrepid adventurers are heading for an auction showdown

0:33:040:33:07

at their final destination of Bo'ness, near Falkirk.

0:33:070:33:12

Originally, the town was called Borrowstouness

0:33:140:33:18

but in the late 17th century, it was shortened to Bo'ness.

0:33:180:33:21

Thankfully.

0:33:210:33:23

-Oh.

-Where are we?

-Yeah, we're near Bo'ness.

-Bo'ness?

-Look at this!

0:33:230:33:27

-Yeah. Is this the sea?

-Is that near Loch Ness?

-Erm...

0:33:270:33:31

-It's in Scotland.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:33:310:33:34

Let's hope you're better at making profits than you are at geography.

0:33:340:33:38

-This is it!

-Can I park across everybody?

-Loving it.

-Here we go.

0:33:400:33:44

-Grosvenor's. Right.

-Here we go.

0:33:440:33:47

-OK, Christina. The moment of truth.

-Oh, goodness me!

0:33:480:33:53

If the auction is half as good as the weather, it'll be a stormer.

0:33:530:33:57

Let's hope so.

0:33:570:33:59

The auction will take place at Grosvenor's,

0:33:590:34:01

a family-run business for the last 35 years.

0:34:010:34:04

Charles Grosvenor is today's auctioneer

0:34:040:34:06

and he has a few thoughts on Charlie and Christina's lots.

0:34:060:34:09

The taxidermy should do OK. I mean, it's always been popular.

0:34:110:34:15

In the past, it was popular.

0:34:150:34:16

I don't know how it is in today's market but, erm...

0:34:160:34:19

Yeah, usually the taxidermy should do quite well.

0:34:190:34:21

The pitchfork. I like the pitchfork. It's a desirable item.

0:34:210:34:25

Ideal decorator's piece, but...

0:34:250:34:27

No' a great value in it, unfortunately.

0:34:270:34:29

-Ah.

-Now, just keep your skirt down, OK?

0:34:310:34:33

All quiet, please. The auction is about to begin.

0:34:350:34:38

First up, it's Christina's 1940s egg crate.

0:34:380:34:42

-And with commission bids...

-BOTH: Ooh!

0:34:420:34:44

Believe it or not, there's two bids exactly the same.

0:34:440:34:48

So I can start the bidding at £32.

0:34:480:34:51

-Result!

-Any advance on £32? £35 puts all my bids out.

0:34:510:34:56

-Any advance on 35...

-I'm still losing money, but it's fine.

0:34:560:35:00

-Come on, look.

-42...

0:35:000:35:01

-Nope?

-Oh, come on, go on.

-Any advance? 44, a new bidder.

0:35:030:35:05

I take my hat off to you.

0:35:050:35:07

46. 48. 50. Any advance on 50.

0:35:070:35:12

-Unbelievable.

-To the left at 50.

0:35:120:35:14

Are you all finished at 50?

0:35:140:35:17

Well done! Do you know, you haven't lost a lot.

0:35:170:35:19

That's the most expensive thing in the sale.

0:35:190:35:22

This little cracker didn't whip up a big profit,

0:35:220:35:24

but at least you get a kiss from Charlie.

0:35:240:35:26

Next, it's the taxidermy pheasants.

0:35:280:35:32

-The taxidermy study of the cock and hen pheasant.

-Ooh, ooh, ooh!

0:35:320:35:36

Again, with commission bids on this. We've a bit of interest.

0:35:360:35:39

-Only a bit of interest.

-I can start the bidding at £80.

0:35:390:35:43

-Any advance on 80?

-You are a... You're a genius!

0:35:430:35:47

85. 90.

0:35:470:35:49

-Still with the commission bids at £90.

-Come on!

0:35:490:35:51

Yes? 95, puts my bids out. Any advance on £95? To the left at 95?

0:35:510:35:56

-You're absolutely superb.

-I'm still losing money.

-Are you all finished?

0:35:560:35:59

At £95.

0:35:590:36:02

-Oh!

-You are a genius at this game.

0:36:020:36:05

Never have I seen someone lose money so beautifully... SHE LAUGHS

0:36:050:36:09

Huh. True, but it's only a small loss for Christina

0:36:090:36:12

and it's early days.

0:36:120:36:14

-It proves that there's money in the room, doesn't it?

-Yep.

0:36:140:36:18

Yeah, but the question is, will you get any of it, Charlie?

0:36:180:36:22

Now it's Charlie's first lot. The porcupine quill basket.

0:36:220:36:26

I'm going to remember this moment.

0:36:270:36:29

-This is the beginning of Ross-co's Road Trip.

-£20, start it?

0:36:290:36:33

£20? 20 bid, thank you.

0:36:330:36:37

-See!

-Any advance on £20?

-Brilliant.

-The porcupine quill basket.

0:36:370:36:42

-Ba-ba bup ba-da bup...

-22? 24.

-It's going up!

-26.

-I'm amazed.

-28.

0:36:420:36:47

-Any advance on £28? To my left.

-Thank you very much...

0:36:470:36:51

-30, a new bidder.

-Brilliant.

-32, 34, 36, 38.

0:36:510:36:56

-40. Any advance on £40? Back with the original bidder.

-I am amazed.

0:36:560:37:00

Are you all finished at 40?

0:37:000:37:04

-Well done!

-That's what they call a solid start.

-It is.

0:37:040:37:07

-You doubled your money.

-Doubling your money from the off, eh?

0:37:070:37:11

Certainly a strong start.

0:37:110:37:13

-What was it? £40?

-Oh...

-Less commission though.

0:37:130:37:16

-I haven't made a lot.

-Not much(!)

-THEY LAUGH

0:37:160:37:20

Can he keep the old profits going, though?

0:37:210:37:23

It's Charlie's pair of Cantonese vases.

0:37:230:37:26

For the pair, we've commission bids.

0:37:260:37:29

With two bids exactly the same, I can start the bidding at £80.

0:37:290:37:33

Brilliant, well done.

0:37:330:37:35

Any advance on £80 for the famille rose Canton vases? With me at 80.

0:37:350:37:39

Make your minds up quickly because I'm going to sell them at 80.

0:37:390:37:42

-Oh, more. More, more.

-Somebody go 85?

-Go on.

0:37:420:37:46

-Not bad, though. Not bad.

-Well done, that's fantastic.

0:37:460:37:49

Another juicy profit. Things are looking good, Charlie boy.

0:37:490:37:53

It's Christina's turn next with the combo lot

0:37:540:37:58

of the crystal paperweight and the letters flap. Good luck.

0:37:580:38:01

-£10 to get it started, surely?

-It's gold.

-£5 then?

0:38:030:38:06

-What do you mean, it's gold?

-Someone's bid a fiver.

-Six? Seven?

0:38:060:38:10

-Eight? Nine?

-Here we go, see? See, see?

-12? Any advance on £12?

0:38:100:38:15

-In the centre of the hall at 12.

-Come on, one more.

0:38:150:38:18

Are you all finished at £12?

0:38:180:38:21

-Did I make any money?

-No, you lost a little bit. THEY LAUGH

0:38:210:38:26

Oh, dear. Well, nothing to get in a flap about.

0:38:260:38:30

-You're a good sport, aren't you?

-Well, I'm used to losing.

0:38:300:38:33

Over to Charlie. It's the French easel clock next.

0:38:350:38:38

-Lovely.

-Hold my hand.

0:38:390:38:41

-And with commission bids, I can start the bidding at... £80.

-Good.

0:38:410:38:46

Any advance on £80? It's with me at 80. Make your minds up. 85, 90?

0:38:460:38:54

-95, puts my bids out.

-Charlie, well done.

0:38:540:38:56

Any advance on £95 for the French easel clock?

0:38:560:39:00

At 95, are you all finished? At £95.

0:39:000:39:04

-Well done.

-Solid. Solid.

-You are doubling your money on everything.

0:39:050:39:09

SHE LAUGHS

0:39:090:39:13

Cor, he's pleased as punch with that result.

0:39:130:39:15

Good, steady profits, Ross-co.

0:39:150:39:17

It's Charlie's giant pitchfork next.

0:39:190:39:22

With commission bids, I can start the bidding at...

0:39:250:39:27

-..£14.

-Not quite.

-15, 16.

0:39:290:39:33

18, puts my bids out. 20. 2. 24.

0:39:330:39:40

-26.

-Profit!

-28. 30. 2.

0:39:400:39:45

35, 38.

0:39:450:39:47

40. 2.

0:39:480:39:51

-45.

-Oh!

-48.

-Oh!

0:39:510:39:53

I could make you one for this...

0:39:530:39:55

50. 5. Any advance on £55?

0:39:550:39:59

-This is sheer heaven.

-At 55. Last call.

0:39:590:40:02

At 55.

0:40:020:40:05

How do you do it?

0:40:050:40:07

I'm not really sure. SHE LAUGHS

0:40:070:40:09

I don't think anyone is, but another sizable profit for Charlie.

0:40:090:40:13

Can Christina fight back with the luckenbooth brooch?

0:40:160:40:20

Again, with interest and commission bids, I can start the bidding at 30.

0:40:200:40:25

-You're at 30, right now.

-And advance on £30?

-32. Go on.

-32, 34. 36, 38.

0:40:250:40:31

-Any advance on £38?

-I've made some money!

0:40:310:40:33

-Making your minds up?

-You're making a profit.

-At 38. Last call at £38.

0:40:330:40:39

-£38! I've made some money!

-A profit.

0:40:390:40:43

It's been a long time coming, and you're lagging behind, Christina.

0:40:430:40:48

Now for her last lot. The little Lovebird necklace.

0:40:480:40:51

Can it help up the ante?

0:40:510:40:53

-100, 80, 50, 40...£20 to start them?

-Go on.

0:40:530:40:57

20 bid, thank you.

0:40:570:40:59

Any advance on £20? For the lot at 20.

0:40:590:41:02

Be quick in making your minds up.

0:41:020:41:04

I'm going to sell it at one, only bid, at 20.

0:41:040:41:08

-That's all right. You've doubled your money.

-That's not bad, is it?

0:41:080:41:11

Finally, you've doubled your money, Christina,

0:41:110:41:13

It's their last lot of the day.

0:41:160:41:17

Can Charlie score another lovely profit

0:41:170:41:19

with his little curling stone?

0:41:190:41:21

-With commission bids...

-Ooh!

-I can start the bidding at £20.

0:41:220:41:28

-Be quick.

-Jolly good.

-Making your minds up. Yes? 22, puts my bids out.

0:41:280:41:35

-Any advance on 24...

-Ooh, now, we're going.

-26, 28. Any advance on £28?

0:41:350:41:42

Are you all finished at 28?

0:41:420:41:45

Well done.

0:41:450:41:47

Well, it's not a biggie, but a good run of profits, Charlie.

0:41:470:41:50

Right, come on. Cup of tea. It's all got too exciting.

0:41:500:41:53

-I'll buy you something stronger than a cup of tea.

-Really?

-You deserve it.

0:41:530:41:56

-Come on.

-Hey. Almost a bit of an eyeful.

0:41:560:41:59

Sharon Stone, eat your heart out.

0:41:590:42:02

Our team started with £200 each

0:42:020:42:03

and it's been a mixed bag of results, but who's today's winner?

0:42:030:42:07

After paying auction costs,

0:42:070:42:08

Christina made a small loss of £23.70.

0:42:080:42:13

Ms Trevanion has £176.30 to carry forward.

0:42:130:42:18

Charlie, meanwhile, is storming ahead with a profit of £96.36.

0:42:200:42:25

Mr Ross claims victory, with £296.36 to start the next leg.

0:42:250:42:31

-Well, well, well, well, well!

-I am...

-Give me the keys!

0:42:320:42:36

..super-duper-duperly impressed.

0:42:360:42:38

-I think, next time, I am donning a kilt.

-Give me the keys.

-Why?

0:42:380:42:42

I'm going to drive you away because I'm feeling...

0:42:420:42:46

-rather smug.

-I bet you are!

-THEY LAUGH

0:42:460:42:48

-It's dark.

-Well done.

0:42:480:42:49

-It is.

-It's dark.

-And it's got cold.

-Come on.

0:42:490:42:51

Let's go, go, go.

0:42:510:42:53

-Oh!

-Here we go.

-Off into the glooming we go.

-Onwards and upwards.

0:42:530:43:00

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:040:43:05

Christina suspects something fishy is going on...

0:43:050:43:09

-Are you a den of iniquities?

-I am not.

-THEY LAUGH

0:43:090:43:12

-But Charlie is one step ahead.

-Hello!

0:43:120:43:15

I've bought a pufferfish!

0:43:150:43:17

It's the start of a new road trip as antiques experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion hit the road in a VW camper van. Charlie gets into the kilt-wearing spirit as they kick off in Inverness, Scotland, and head south towards an auction in Bo'ness.