Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

On the second leg of their trip, Charlie Ross comes face to face with the penguins of Edinburgh Zoo and Christina Trevanion steps on to the top of the iconic Forth Rail Bridge.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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With £200 each, a classic car...

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We're going round.

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..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I want to spend lots of money.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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Oh, no!

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They'll be worthy winners...

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We've done it!

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..and valiant losers.

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You are kidding me on!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-What am I doing?

-You've got a deal!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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It's the second leg of the road trip through Scotland for

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kilt-wearing Charlie Ross and fellow treasure hunter Christina Trevanion.

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Have you washed this?

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-What, the kilt?

-Yeah.

-No!

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Don't need to wash the kilt, I mean, I do but not every day.

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-Have you changed your pants?

-I have changed my pants!

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Charlie ran his own auction house for over 25 years.

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This gamekeeper turned poacher likes to sniff out

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bargains that will make a stinking profit!

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I love it!

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THEY GASP See!

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His competitive companion, Christina, has youth,

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brains and charm on her side.

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-Are you a den of iniquity, Cedric?

-I am not.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Oh, bad luck!

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They're behind the wheel of a 1977 Volkswagen campervan named

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Geoffrey II.

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I wonder what happened to Geoffrey I.

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-Died.

-Oh...

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-The trippers are clocking up the miles.

-Is this a private drive?

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Yeah....private drive!

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# Private drive... #

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HORN BEEPS

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# Private drive! #

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I'm not sure we're allowed up here.

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Christina made a loss at the first auction.

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-Did I make any money?

-No, you lost a little bit. THEY LAUGH

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And Road Trip veteran Charlie showed her how it was done.

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You are doubling your money on everything!

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Christina started the trip with £200 but she's now only left

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with £176.30, poor lamb.

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Charlie started with the same amount but he's made a tidy profit

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and has £296.36 in his pocket.

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That's why he's looking so chuffed!

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You buy stuff you don't particularly like

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and you still make shed loads of money.

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I buy stuff that I really like and it absolutely bombs!

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Charlie and Christina started their 500 mile drive in Inverness.

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Their journey will see them travel all the way south to Boston,

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in Lincolnshire.

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Today, the duo will head towards their next auction,

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in the beautiful border town of Galashiels.

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First stop, the seaside town of Aberdour, home to charming pubs,

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shops and reputedly one of the finest beaches in Scotland.

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You will come up with a lot of real goodies!

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-See you soon.

-THEY KISS

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-Happy shopping.

-Two kisses, two kisses!

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-Oh, sorry.

-THEY KISS

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-Happy shopping!

-Spend that money...and make a profit...

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-..for a change!

-You said it.

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Hopefully, shop owner Jennifer will have something to catch

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Christina's eye.

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-Hello, nice to meet you.

-I'm Jennifer.

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This is lovely, isn't it?!

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Is that a little Staffordshire rabbit? What's he over there?

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He looks rather sweet, doesn't he?

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To make a big profit from a little rabbit like that,

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Christina will need to knock a few pounds off the ticket price of £38.

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What can you do me on that?

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30.

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£30, come on, Jennifer, I need to make some money...20,

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for a Staffordshire rabbit?

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Can we say 25?

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-25.

-25, brilliant!

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There's one down, I like him a lot. I think he's great fun.

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One deal done.

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-Any more?

-Have you got some Scottish pottery over here?

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The blue jug and that are Bell's, I am 100% certain that's Bell's.

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Bell's pottery was founded by two Glaswegian brothers

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in the early 19th century

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but their business went from boom to bust in less than 100 years.

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Bell's made their money trading to Southeast Asia but struggled

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to compete against the dominant potteries in England and Holland.

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And when the Scottish market became flooded with cheap imports,

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Bell's sadly went into liquidation.

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This would have been part of a much larger tea service originally,

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-wouldn't it? So, you would have had...

-With a jug, cups and saucers.

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-Your teapot.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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With some nice Scottish scenes on, we've got a few loch scenes there.

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What do we have on that?

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We have 12.50.

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It says, "Sale, £5"!

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Ooops!

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-That's come off something else, I think.

-Oh, has it?

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Yes, it doesn't matter.

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What's my price on this?

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-10.

-I'd push for five!

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Something to think about.

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Meanwhile, Charlie's at it again.

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# I like Scotland

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# Bonnie, bonnie Scotland

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# Scotland is where I'll spend my life! #

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Oh, lordy, Charlie's on his way to Inverkeithing in Fife.

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In the 1880s, it became a temporary home for some of the thousands

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of workers building the Forth Bridge just down the road.

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I'm rather hopeful that in Inverkeithing will be a shop

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bursting with quality goods.

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All waiting for my £296!

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Charlie's first stop is the Bargain Centre.

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"No dumping"...promising!

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HE BELLOWS

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A simple hello would have sufficed!

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Anyone in?

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-Hello! I'm Charlie.

-Hi, Charlie, I'm Gail.

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Gail, what have you got to sell me?

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-I've come here to spend all my money, I've got loads of cash.

-Good, good.

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I hate a braggart!

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Have you got something you could recommend, you'd go straight to

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and go, "Charlie, this is for you!" Ooh, hang on!

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-You don't need to answer that question.

-Right.

-I've seen something.

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Is that a shell case?

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He's spotted a sturdy brass mounted case that once would have

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held ammunition.

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Look at the quality of leather! I think that is a...yes...

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or a cartridge case, I think.

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That is absolutely wonderful quality.

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You put your cartridges in there

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and then they're held in place by the leather thong.

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-The strap.

-Yeah, the strap.

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If they're the original straps that's a real bonus as they're

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often missing or rotted.

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Cogswell & Harrison.

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Good name, even a name I've heard of.

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Cogswell & Harrison are London's oldest surviving gun makers,

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known for their extraordinary range of sporting guns.

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The company actually dates back to 1770.

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What's interesting is it's got MacLean Cameron Highlanders,

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so the fact that it's got the regiment on there leads me to believe

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it's not one for shooting game or whatever, it's actually an army one.

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-Wouldn't you like that to tell you a story!

-I know.

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-It does.

-Goodness me, where has that been?

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The cartridge case has a ticket price of £50.

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I love it, I absolutely love it!

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Well, we'd never have guessed that, old bean.

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Huh, I wonder if Christina's made a decision on that cup

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and saucer she loved?

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-Is there anything else I've missed?

-Seems not.

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-That's nice.

-That is nice.

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Oh, a nice lead crystal one as well.

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There's some nice bubbly-bubblies in there.

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Oh, a nice ground out Pontil mark - that is nice!

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Lead used to be mixed with glass to add some sparkle.

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These days, safer zinc is used instead.

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-How much is on that one?

-45, I think.

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-Could you do any more on that?

-You could twist my arm to 37.

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Twist...I'll twist away.

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Jennifer's proving no pushover.

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-Come on, Jennifer!

-No, no, 35 is bottom on that Rummer.

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OK, right and what do we think about the cup and saucer?

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-10.

-Could we do 40 for the two?

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-No.

-Oh, Jennifer!

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-Oh, Christina!

-You're a hard woman!

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OK, let's go glass and rabbit.

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-Glass and rabbit, glass and rabbit.

-You like those as well!

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Yes, let's go glass and rabbit,

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sorted...but I do like that cup and saucer.

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Are you sure you can't budge on that? Are you absolutely sure?

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Very special price for you, eight.

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-Eight pounds...

-And we're not haggling any more on it!

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Eight pounds, £35, £25.

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That's a total of £68.

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Can we do 65 for the lot?

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-Go on, Jennifer!

-Yes.

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-Yes, there we go, 65!

-Jennifer, you said, "No more haggling"!

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Well done, that's three lots bought in the first shop

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and a total of £30 off the ticket prices.

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Back in Inverkeithing, Charlie still has an eye on the leather

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cartridge case but is still yet to strike a deal.

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-Is he drawn to anything else?

-An old dead box...quality!

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New Bond Street!

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I think that's a solicitors dead box.

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I wish the deeds were still in there, we might end up owning a nice house,

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you and I.

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Now, that would be a profit.

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And that was Mr LBB Gubbins.

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My mother used to call all rubbish "gubbins".

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"Put it in the gubbins", do you have that name up here?

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-Yeah, has been heard.

-Unfortunate name, I think,

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if I was called Gubbins, I'd change my name by Deed Poll I think.

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You wouldn't want to be called Mr Rubbish would you.

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I like that but I'd like that...that would have to be very cheap.

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There's no ticket price.

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Gail's open to offers. Look out.

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-Is that an old adding machine?

-Yes, a comptometer, yeah.

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A comptometer.

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The comptometer was the first commercially successful,

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key-driven mechanical calculator.

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-Where did you find that?

-That we've had for a while.

-Have you?

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-Yes.

-Oh, you're fed up with it!

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THEY LAUGH

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Oh, I like that. What date's that, 1920? It's pretty old, isn't it?

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-Yeah. It does have...

-Oh, it's got a date on it?

-..detail on it.

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1909 there.

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Oh, yes, the patent, 1904, 1912, 1913.

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So, it's a good thing for a collector.

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Very difficult thing to value.

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Well, you won't need a calculator to get that for a better price,

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Gail's asking £50.

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I have to say that's really interesting.

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I'm passionate about that!

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If that was dirt cheap I'd buy it,

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simply cos it would make a few quid at auction and it's a nice tail.

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And what would you consider "dirt cheap", Charlie?

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I'm thinking more in terms of wanting to spend sort of £50 on the three.

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£50 for the lot, cheeky!

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What if we said 60?

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It's incredibly tight...erm, I'll tell you what,

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split the difference, £55.

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-Deal?

-Yes, deal.

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-Put there.

-No problem.

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-I'll dip into my sporran and see what I've got.

-Just you do that.

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Oh, yeah, Charlie's charm has bagged him some brilliant buys,

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three items for just £55.

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That's even better than half price, gosh!

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Back on the road and the short journey to a local landmark.

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When it was completed in 1890,

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the Forth Bridge was regarded as the eighth wonder of the world.

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And Christina's in for a treat,

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she's going to take in the stunning view from the very top!

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There you go, darling!

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-Thank you.

-I'm going to drop you off there.

-OK.

-Have a cracking time.

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-Don't fall off!

-I will certainly try not to.

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See you soon, have a lovely afternoon.

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The bridge is a milestone in civil engineering.

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After 124 years,

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the Forth rail bridge is still the longest cantilever

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railway bridge ever to be constructed in the world,

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a real testament to the men who built it.

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Crossing the one and a half mile wide estuary was a huge challenge.

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Engineer Sir John Fowler and Sir Benjamin Baker took on the ambitious

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task of designing Britain's first major steel construction.

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When built, it transformed the Scottish economy by providing

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a continuous rail route from London to Aberdeen.

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Here to give Christina the inside track - ha! -

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on its history is Ian Hay.

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Oh, it's quite speedy, isn't it?

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As principle construction manager, he's in charge of the bridge.

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So, I think this is the pinnacle of Victorian engineering.

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It's pretty solid, well, hopefully it's pretty solid.

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It's extremely solid.

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This is the only bridge of any span that does not shut

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because of the weather.

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And up to 200 trains use the bridge every day. Wow!

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-Is that another train?

-Yes, it is.

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-And it's right there, isn't it?

-Absolutely!

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Six feet above your head.

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Fowler and Baker's design is only half the story.

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It took a multi-national team seven years to build.

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These men became known as Briggers, a colloquialism for bridge-workers.

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With few safety measures in place and paid in part in beer,

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these men and boys risked life and limb,

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working at dangerous heights over the icy water.

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We're going quite high.

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Oh, yes.

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-So, the top is how high?

-367 feet.

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Christina's about to make history.

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Fewer than 1,000 people have stood on the top

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since it was built over 100 years ago, you lucky girl!

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My legs are going to go a bit wobbly!

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-That's OK.

-Don't let me go!

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Look at this, it's amazing!

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Isn't it? It's a wonderful view!

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Construction of this Scottish icon came at a cost.

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Tragically, around 70 men died building the bridge.

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One of the most dangerous jobs was underwater.

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Divers had to build and then inspect the foundations,

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using primitive kit.

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Back in the 1880s, men dived with heavy, lead boots,

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huge brass helmets and a pipe.

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At the peak, there were over 5,000 people working on the bridge.

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All trades, all sorts of trades, everything from joiners,

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carpenters, steelmen, riveters, rivet catchers...

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Rivet catchers?

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-Rivet catchers.

-What did they have to do?

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They caught rivets.

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There are around 6.5 million rivets holding the bridge together.

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Now, that is a riveting fact!

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-The thing that holds the bridge together are the rivets.

-Yeah.

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So a rivet is heated in a furnace, flung up to a rivet-catcher,

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quite commonly a young lad of maybe 12, 13, 14 years of age.

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He'd catch it in a bucket

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and then the riveters would collect it from the bucket with tongs,

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place it through a hole

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and drive the rivet home to make it a full connection.

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-God!

-That's all...

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So they had to stand on these flimsy bits of metal

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300-and-something feet in the air, catching things with buckets?

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Fundamentally, yes, that's exactly what they did.

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The remarkable red bridge has become part of our vernacular.

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People still say never-ending tasks will take as long as painting

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the Forth rail bridge.

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Does it really take an age to get from one end to the other

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and then you have to start again?

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There was a time that was the case,

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when we painted on top of paint on top of paint.

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But most recently the work done on the bridge has pretty well

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-dispelled that totally.

-No!

-I'm afraid so.

-Really, it's done?

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-It's done. It's painted from end to end, top to bottom.

-Ohh!

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And it won't need another lick of paint for 25 years.

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While Christina is taking in the view,

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Charlie is leaving North Queensferry, in Fife,

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and heading to South Queensferry,

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just nine miles north of Edinburgh, via the Forth Road Bridge.

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Glorious! Great view from here to there.

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Hello, Christina!

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South Queensferry is at the foot of the bridge.

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There used to be a ferry service here,

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but that shut in 1964, the year the road bridge opened.

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Charlie is meeting Jenny, who has packed her shop to the rafters

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with all sorts of maritime antique flotsam and jetsam.

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There's a nautical flavour here, isn't there?

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-Are you from a seafaring family?

-No, I just like the sea.

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But I like to be this side of it.

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THEY LAUGH

0:17:000:17:02

-You don't like to be on it?

-No. Not particularly.

0:17:020:17:05

-This is a good...

-This is as close as you like to get.

-Yes.

0:17:050:17:08

Time to have a look round.

0:17:080:17:10

I'm going to ruin that. Oh, no, it's got a catch on it!

0:17:110:17:14

-Oh, my goodness gracious! Is that a...?

-A puffer fish.

0:17:150:17:19

-Is it a real puffer fish?

-It's a real puffer fish.

0:17:190:17:22

-It's absolutely terrifying!

-Hm.

0:17:240:17:26

-Is it as sharp as it looks?

-Yeah.

0:17:260:17:29

Its eyesight isn't so sharp, that's for sure.

0:17:290:17:31

-What do you want for that?

-£45.

0:17:310:17:34

I don't think that's a lot of money.

0:17:340:17:37

It's not a lot of money for a genuine puffer fish.

0:17:370:17:40

A genuine puffer fish! Is the market swamped with fake ones?

0:17:400:17:45

-May we take it down?

-You certainly can, yes.

0:17:450:17:48

-I wouldn't want you to puncture yourself.

-No, no.

0:17:480:17:50

-He seems to be not altogether complete.

-He is missing an eye.

0:17:500:17:54

He's winking at you, Charlie.

0:17:540:17:56

He's wonderful!

0:17:560:17:58

-Has he got a name?

-Peter.

0:17:580:18:01

Nice to meet you, Pete!

0:18:010:18:03

-And they puff up when they...?

-They puff up in anger.

0:18:030:18:07

And then I think they spike you.

0:18:070:18:09

I'm going to really struggle to find something

0:18:090:18:11

I like more than Peter in the shop.

0:18:110:18:14

He's fantastic.

0:18:140:18:16

-What could he be done for?

-45, so I could come down to 30 for Peter.

0:18:160:18:22

I want him! SHE LAUGHS

0:18:220:18:24

-Thank you! Mmmwah!

-Pleasure.

0:18:240:18:27

Hello, Peter, you're mine!

0:18:270:18:29

Even if you have got one eye.

0:18:290:18:31

-I'm going to get into my sporran and pull out some cash.

-Oh, my word!

0:18:310:18:35

You never know what you might find in my sporran!

0:18:350:18:38

COINS DROP Oh!

0:18:380:18:39

All my money has flown out everywhere!

0:18:390:18:42

Oh, yeah? And that's the last purchase of the day

0:18:420:18:45

and Charlie is rather puffed up with himself.

0:18:450:18:47

Ah! Christina! Is that you?

0:18:470:18:52

Hello!

0:18:520:18:54

I don't think she can hear me.

0:18:560:18:59

I bought a puffer fish!

0:19:000:19:03

I do hope she gets off that bridge before nightfall.

0:19:030:19:06

Night-night, you two.

0:19:060:19:07

I don't think she can hear me.

0:19:070:19:09

You're right.

0:19:100:19:11

It's Day Two of the Road Trip.

0:19:130:19:14

Yesterday, young Christina spent £65 on three items.

0:19:140:19:19

Where is the profit? Where is the profit?

0:19:190:19:22

A cup and saucer, a lead crystal glass and a Staffordshire rabbit.

0:19:220:19:28

Leaving her £111.30 today.

0:19:280:19:31

Old smiler, Charlie boy, spent £85 on the cartridge case,

0:19:310:19:35

comptometer, deed box and Peter the one-eyed puffer fish.

0:19:350:19:40

Despite the spending spree, he still has £211.36 in his sporran.

0:19:400:19:45

The pair are heading to the capital of Scotland, Edinburgh.

0:19:460:19:50

-How many things have you bought? Give me a clue.

-I have bought...

0:19:520:19:55

What did I buy? I bought three things.

0:19:550:19:58

Did you manage to buy them well below the ticket price?

0:19:580:20:00

-That's the key, isn't it?

-I hate haggling.

0:20:000:20:03

I'm awful at it, which is why I never make any money.

0:20:030:20:05

-Were you dealing with a man or a woman?

-Two ladies.

0:20:050:20:09

-Ah.

-Yeah. They were wonderful.

-You really need to have a man, don't you?

0:20:090:20:13

-You can wrap round your finger.

-Well...

-"Hello...!

0:20:130:20:18

"The name is Christina." Flutter, flutter.

0:20:180:20:22

The master is revealing his secrets to his protege, eh?

0:20:220:20:26

First stop of the day, Leith, regarded as Edinburgh's port

0:20:260:20:29

and home to a shop that should be a winner for Charlie.

0:20:290:20:32

-Right, here we are.

-Here we are.

0:20:320:20:34

-This is where I'm going to buy the best antiques in the world.

-Oh, OK.

0:20:340:20:39

God, there are some nice things here.

0:20:390:20:41

Last year, it won an award for Antiques Shop Of The Year.

0:20:410:20:44

Everywhere you look there are just wonderful things.

0:20:440:20:49

Trouble is, wonderful things tend to cost.

0:20:490:20:53

How can I go into a shop like this with £200? It's almost an insult.

0:20:550:20:59

Just zoom in on that.

0:20:590:21:00

You think, is that 100? Is that 1,000?

0:21:010:21:05

No, it's 10,000!

0:21:050:21:07

A few more profits needed, I think.

0:21:090:21:12

I'd love all these at home. 2,000, 3,000...

0:21:120:21:16

1,690.

0:21:160:21:18

That's not the date of it, that's the price of it.

0:21:180:21:21

Charlie is sure going to have to delve deep to find

0:21:210:21:23

the bargains here.

0:21:230:21:26

Good Lord! Is that real antler?

0:21:260:21:29

I wonder whether that is real antler or faux antler.

0:21:290:21:33

Sounds like he's found something. It's a rather unique artefact.

0:21:330:21:36

I've never seen anything quite like it before.

0:21:360:21:39

And...

0:21:390:21:41

You quite often see antlers made into chandeliers or hat stands,

0:21:410:21:45

coat stands...

0:21:450:21:46

And this?

0:21:460:21:48

Glasses in there? It's not for candles, certainly.

0:21:480:21:50

But it's really rather splendid.

0:21:500:21:52

But what is it?! Hopefully, owner John has an idea.

0:21:520:21:56

-Tell me something - real antler?

-Oh, definitely.

-Yeah.

0:21:560:22:01

We've had a look at it and...

0:22:010:22:03

-If you put candles in it, they are going to fall out.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:22:030:22:06

The aperture has a wee opening at the side.

0:22:060:22:08

I assume it's to put the glass in. And lift the handle,

0:22:080:22:11

so it's probably for bringing out for a function.

0:22:110:22:13

It's certainly a bit different.

0:22:130:22:15

It's a fair price as well.

0:22:150:22:16

-Is it?

-Yeah.

-Well, you would say that, wouldn't you?

0:22:160:22:19

I mean, let's face it.

0:22:190:22:21

£75.

0:22:220:22:23

Is there a bit of flexibility for an old Englishman who's pretending

0:22:230:22:27

to be a Scotsman for the day?

0:22:270:22:28

I'll knock a fiver off.

0:22:280:22:30

-Will you?

-70 quid.

0:22:300:22:32

Very generous man. £60?

0:22:320:22:35

-Oh, go on! Give us a chance!

-OK, £65.

-Sold!

-OK.

0:22:360:22:40

I think that's fantastic. And I think there's a profit in there.

0:22:400:22:44

-He said.

-Best of luck.

0:22:440:22:46

You've changed your tune now you've sold it to me.

0:22:460:22:49

Maybe £65 was a bit DEAR!

0:22:490:22:51

Charlie did rather well at the auction, though.

0:22:510:22:53

The pressure is on for his younger rival to make some DOUGH.

0:22:530:22:57

My plan today... What is my plan? My plan...

0:22:570:23:01

Do I have a plan?

0:23:030:23:04

I haven't really spent much of my budget, so the plan is, spend it.

0:23:040:23:08

Go out in a blaze of glory.

0:23:110:23:12

She's getting the hang of this game.

0:23:120:23:15

Atchoo!

0:23:150:23:16

-Bless you.

-Thank you.

0:23:160:23:18

Christina has motored her way through Edinburgh,

0:23:180:23:21

and not far from the famous castle is her next shop.

0:23:210:23:25

Owner, Cedric, has two passions in life, antiques and tea,

0:23:250:23:29

and he sells both.

0:23:290:23:31

Hence, he called his shop AnTEAques.

0:23:310:23:35

We have about 85 different types of teas,

0:23:350:23:39

but I believe you like antiques.

0:23:390:23:41

-I do!

-And I have plenty for you in the back.

0:23:410:23:43

Weren't teahouses a bit of a den of iniquity in the 19th century?

0:23:430:23:47

-Well, it was... The thing is...

-Are you a den of iniquity, Cedric?

0:23:470:23:51

I am not. THEY LAUGH

0:23:510:23:53

Pardonnez-moi, is our English rose flirting with the Frenchman?

0:23:530:23:56

It looks like she's taken Charlie's advice.

0:23:560:23:58

Have we got anything in these cabinets over here?

0:23:580:24:01

-Nice little bits of silver.

-I like your golfer...stopper.

-Oh, yes.

0:24:010:24:06

He's quite cool, isn't he?

0:24:060:24:08

-He looks a bit modern.

-Yes, it is.

-Birmingham.

0:24:080:24:12

Oh, 2000, there's a Millennium hallmark on there, the year 2000.

0:24:120:24:17

Silver bottle-stopper.

0:24:170:24:19

It comes with a decanter.

0:24:190:24:21

-Oh, does it? It comes with a decanter?

-That's right.

0:24:210:24:24

Decanter included or not, the silver isn't what I'd call antique.

0:24:240:24:28

Could be a risky buy unless she can get it for the right price.

0:24:280:24:32

£90.

0:24:320:24:33

Hm...

0:24:350:24:36

I would want to be buying that, really, for £40 or £50,

0:24:360:24:40

in order to make any money at all.

0:24:400:24:42

-Hm.

-What are your thoughts?

0:24:420:24:44

-Why don't we go half and make it 45?

-45? Would that be all right?

0:24:440:24:51

-Well, for you.

-Aw, Cedric! That's a deal. Thank you very much.

0:24:510:24:55

The charm has worked - half price.

0:24:550:24:57

I hope he gets me a hole-in-one.

0:24:570:24:59

And not a hole in your profits, eh?

0:24:590:25:01

-What's that called? Is that a birdie?

-I couldn't tell you.

0:25:010:25:04

An eagle? A swan?

0:25:040:25:06

Hang on, what is Cedric up to?

0:25:060:25:08

Has he had an idea?

0:25:080:25:09

Oh, that's brilliant! Can I have that with it?

0:25:090:25:12

Yeah. THEY LAUGH

0:25:120:25:16

You're a genius! I love it.

0:25:160:25:18

There we go, golfing interest, I can't lose.

0:25:180:25:21

It's a winner! THEY LAUGH

0:25:210:25:24

Brilliant. Cedric, you're a gentleman. Thank you.

0:25:240:25:27

-Come on, let's have a cup of tea.

-Yeah.

0:25:270:25:29

Shopping done! Time for refreshments.

0:25:290:25:31

-Your scones, madam.

-Oh, wow! They look amazing.

0:25:310:25:36

-Thank you.

-Pleasure.

-Wow-ee!

0:25:390:25:40

With his shopping done, Charlie is keen to check out

0:25:460:25:49

one of Scotland's top attractions

0:25:490:25:51

and learn about its remarkable history.

0:25:510:25:54

In the early 20th century, most people hadn't been abroad.

0:25:540:25:56

There were no TVs,

0:25:560:25:58

so to see wild and exotic beasts from faraway lands was jaw-dropping.

0:25:580:26:03

Victorian zoos displayed animals locked in cages,

0:26:030:26:06

but Edinburgh Zoo's founder, Thomas Gillespie, had a radical idea.

0:26:060:26:10

To find out more,

0:26:100:26:12

Charlie is meeting the zoo's head of living collections, Darren McGarry.

0:26:120:26:17

When it was opened, how did this zoo differ from other zoos?

0:26:170:26:21

Well, Thomas Gillespie had a vision that he wanted to have a zoo

0:26:210:26:25

that was much more open, so no animals behind bars.

0:26:250:26:28

When it opens in 1913, Gillespie's zoo was revolutionary.

0:26:280:26:33

Visitors could get up close and personal to the animals.

0:26:330:26:35

What sort of things were people able to do at the zoo that perhaps

0:26:350:26:39

-they can't do now?

-People used to go and maybe get to feed animals.

0:26:390:26:43

There were chimps' tea parties, where they would watch chimps

0:26:430:26:46

drinking cups of tea and eating food off plates.

0:26:460:26:49

-Or they might ride on an elephant.

-Really?

0:26:490:26:52

Elephant rides, camel rides -

0:26:520:26:53

these are all things we don't find acceptable nowadays.

0:26:530:26:56

Edinburgh Zoo has remained a top attraction for 101 years.

0:26:560:27:00

Now firmly focused on conservation and home to more than 1,200 animals.

0:27:000:27:06

It was one of the first zoos in the world to house and breed penguins.

0:27:060:27:10

So Charlie has put on his own penguin suit to join them.

0:27:100:27:14

-Quack!

-I don't think they quack.

0:27:140:27:16

More like a dog. That's obviously not a penguin noise, is it, really?

0:27:160:27:19

Do you want to shake flippers?

0:27:190:27:21

Oooh! May I say, that was extremely badly behaved of you?

0:27:210:27:26

A little manners, please.

0:27:260:27:29

The zoo's history with penguins and Norway goes back to 1913,

0:27:290:27:33

when the family of Norwegian shipping merchant,

0:27:330:27:36

Christian Salvesen,

0:27:360:27:37

presented the zoo with its first-ever king penguin.

0:27:370:27:41

One very special king penguin even has his own bronze statue,

0:27:410:27:45

donated by the people of Norway.

0:27:450:27:47

Nils Olav - that's his name -

0:27:470:27:50

is the mascot and Colonel in Chief of the Norwegian King's Guard.

0:27:500:27:54

He was selected because king penguins are very graceful,

0:27:540:27:57

very tall, very attractive, and so when the Norwegian King's Guard

0:27:570:28:01

come here to the zoo to visit him,

0:28:010:28:03

he'll come out and inspect the troops to make sure that they

0:28:030:28:06

are wearing the correct uniform and they are all behaving themselves.

0:28:060:28:09

And he obviously has his medals, as well,

0:28:090:28:11

so the soldiers can see that he is a very important penguin.

0:28:110:28:15

And in 2008, after 36 years of continuous service,

0:28:150:28:20

Nils was given a knighthood

0:28:200:28:22

by the King of Norway and became Sir Nils Olav.

0:28:220:28:25

-So, here he is!

-Yeah, this is Sir Nils Olav over here.

0:28:270:28:31

Sir Nils isn't looking his best, but he is mid-moult.

0:28:310:28:35

May I say, sir, it is a huge privilege to meet you?

0:28:350:28:39

I can see you're not quite as excited about meeting me

0:28:400:28:44

as I am about meeting you.

0:28:440:28:46

But the crowds don't just come here to see Sir Nils.

0:28:460:28:49

There is a very special penguin tradition at Edinburgh Zoo,

0:28:490:28:52

one that started some 60 years ago.

0:28:520:28:54

We are quite lucky, because the keepers are here now because

0:28:540:28:57

we're just about to see if they want to come out on their penguin parade.

0:28:570:29:01

-Parade?

-We do a penguin parade every day at 2.15.

-How did that start?

0:29:010:29:06

Well, in the 1950s, there was a zookeeper who left the gate open

0:29:060:29:11

and several penguins followed him out

0:29:110:29:13

and started walking around the zoo.

0:29:130:29:15

Today, Charlie is joining the parade.

0:29:150:29:18

They are wonderful, are they? They go at a fair lick, you know.

0:29:180:29:21

They are fantastic.

0:29:210:29:22

I mean, if I walk like a penguin, it's a heck of a job to keep up.

0:29:220:29:26

Gosh, look at all the crowds! I feel very privileged.

0:29:280:29:32

I get the impression they could do a marathon, I think.

0:29:320:29:35

While Charlie makes himself at home with the penguins, Christina

0:29:350:29:38

is hoping to p-p-pick up a final bargain.

0:29:380:29:41

She's paying the lovely Lewis of Courtyard Antiques a visit.

0:29:410:29:45

He's been trading from the same street for over 26 years.

0:29:450:29:48

His warehouse is packed with antiques and collectables.

0:29:480:29:52

From what I can see,

0:29:520:29:53

-we've got quite a lot of boys' toys going on here.

-I'm afraid so.

0:29:530:29:57

Oh, I'm feeling HOARSE!

0:29:570:29:59

When did Neddy arrive?

0:29:590:30:01

A couple of years ago.

0:30:010:30:02

I had all this First World War militaria,

0:30:020:30:05

so we needed a horse to put it all on.

0:30:050:30:07

-You need a warrior up there, don't you?

-Are you volunteering?

0:30:070:30:11

SHE LAUGHS

0:30:110:30:12

-I could do, why not?

-I'll give you a bunk-up.

0:30:120:30:15

I could be like Helen of Troy.

0:30:150:30:18

Arriving on a horse. Or maybe Lady Godiva.

0:30:180:30:20

Lady Godiva - steady on, no clothes!

0:30:200:30:22

Right, Lewis, we've got a job to do.

0:30:220:30:25

That's rather smart, isn't it?

0:30:250:30:27

Christina has spotted a rather interesting box.

0:30:270:30:30

It has a typical Chinese temple landscape on the lid.

0:30:300:30:33

It is inlaid with colourful mother of pearl, which has been engraved.

0:30:330:30:37

I'd say it's 1930s. Maybe slightly earlier, 1920s.

0:30:390:30:42

Got a little bit missing on there.

0:30:420:30:46

So it would have had another band around there.

0:30:470:30:50

Ah, clever pointing out the damage to the dealer.

0:30:510:30:53

Trying to get a few more pounds knocked off, are you?

0:30:530:30:56

The ticket price is £110 -

0:30:560:30:59

a lot more than the £66.30 she has left.

0:30:590:31:03

What can we do the box for? Because that's quite nice, isn't it?

0:31:030:31:07

I have 110 on it. SHE GASPS

0:31:070:31:10

OK.

0:31:100:31:11

What do you think? You're looking anxious. Don't be anxious.

0:31:110:31:15

-At the very best, £40.

-The very best? Yeah?

-Yeah...

0:31:160:31:21

OK, well, I will have that off you for £40,

0:31:210:31:24

as long as you're happy with that.

0:31:240:31:26

-Yeah?

-Do I not look...?

-You don't look very ecstatic.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:31:260:31:29

What a man, eh? £70 off.

0:31:290:31:33

Could this be the lot to give Christina her first big profit?

0:31:330:31:37

We're nearing the end of the second leg of the journey.

0:31:370:31:41

Here's a rundown on what Charlie

0:31:410:31:42

and Christine picked up on their travels.

0:31:420:31:45

Charlie started the trip by securing a cracking deal,

0:31:450:31:48

bagging an Edwardian leather cartridge case,

0:31:480:31:51

Mr Gubbins's old deed box and an early 20th century

0:31:510:31:55

comptometer calculator, all for just £55.

0:31:550:31:58

He also purchased an antler glass holder

0:32:000:32:03

and Peter, the one-eyed puffer fish, fully inflated and preserved.

0:32:030:32:07

The five lots costs Charlie £150. Look out!

0:32:070:32:11

Christina's purchases include a 19th-century Staffordshire rabbit,

0:32:130:32:17

a porcelain cup and saucer featuring hand-painted

0:32:170:32:20

views of the Highlands, a fine lead glass crystal rummer,

0:32:200:32:23

a mother of pearl insert circular box

0:32:230:32:26

and a silver bottle-stopper and cut glass decanter.

0:32:260:32:30

Not forgetting the vintage golf club. Gosh.

0:32:300:32:32

And all that cost her £150, too.

0:32:320:32:34

Ooh, there are some cracking lots there. They must be pleased.

0:32:370:32:40

I think I'm feeling quietly confident

0:32:400:32:42

because I bought traditional antiques.

0:32:420:32:45

I bought the best lot.

0:32:450:32:46

My cartridge case is without doubt far better than anything.

0:32:460:32:49

There's no doubt about that at all.

0:32:490:32:51

I like his cartridge case. I think he's bought well there.

0:32:510:32:54

It's an interesting thing.

0:32:540:32:55

What's this antler thing? It's wacky, isn't it?

0:32:550:32:58

I think a trip to the zoo is going to his head!

0:32:580:33:01

I think the thing that's really going to win it for me is Pierre -

0:33:010:33:06

Peter the puffer fish.

0:33:060:33:08

You ain't got one of those and I have.

0:33:080:33:11

The puffer fish, I think

0:33:110:33:13

is possibly the most grotesque thing I've ever seen in my life.

0:33:130:33:16

I mean, that is the stuff of nightmares, isn't it?

0:33:160:33:18

Well, auction glory is what dreams are made of.

0:33:190:33:22

It's time to turn those lots into profit and head south to Galashiels.

0:33:220:33:28

-This is our last day in Scotland.

-Awww!

0:33:280:33:31

-We are going to be crossing the border.

-Thank the Lord!

0:33:310:33:34

-Does that mean the kilt comes off?

-Don't you like my kilt?

0:33:340:33:37

It's about time it had a wash.

0:33:370:33:38

The second biggest town in the Borders, Gala,

0:33:380:33:41

as it's known to the locals,

0:33:410:33:43

has a rich history in the textile industry dating back to the 1500s.

0:33:430:33:48

The scene for today's auction is Hall's Auctioneers,

0:33:480:33:51

who've been trading in the town for almost 20 years.

0:33:510:33:54

Here we are.

0:33:540:33:55

Here we are. Oh, look who's in the window!

0:33:550:33:59

-Pierre!

-Pierre!

0:33:590:34:02

-The one-eyed sloth.

-He's not a sloth, he's a puffer fish.

0:34:020:34:06

Michael Hall is on the rostrum today.

0:34:080:34:10

He started in the antiques and collectables business in 1970.

0:34:100:34:14

He knows his onions, but what does he think about our items?

0:34:140:34:17

I think the leather and brass cartridge case

0:34:170:34:20

is probably the most interesting.

0:34:200:34:22

We have had them in before and they do well.

0:34:220:34:24

And we also have a nice cup and saucer.

0:34:240:34:27

They have painted reserves of Highland scenes,

0:34:270:34:31

but I don't think that's going to make too much.

0:34:310:34:33

I think it'll be £10, maybe £15.

0:34:330:34:35

Christina desperately needs a profit or she'll struggle on the next

0:34:350:34:39

leg of the road trip.

0:34:390:34:40

Charlie is stretching ahead, but will his gamble of buying

0:34:400:34:44

peculiar items end his run of good luck?

0:34:440:34:47

Let's find out.

0:34:470:34:48

First up and getting us into the swing of things,

0:34:480:34:51

Christina's golfing lot.

0:34:510:34:52

-Here we go. Good luck, darling. What did it cost, 45?

-Hm.

0:34:540:34:57

Ten to start it. £10. Ten is bid. Any more than ten?

0:34:570:35:02

-Everything starts low here and he works it into a frenzy.

-13.

0:35:020:35:06

And a pound. It's going up.

0:35:060:35:07

17. 18.

0:35:070:35:09

-19.

-He's just milking it along.

-Go on!

0:35:090:35:11

-£20. Any more at £20?

-Oh, no.

0:35:110:35:13

21. 22.

0:35:130:35:15

23. 24.

0:35:150:35:17

25. 26.

0:35:170:35:19

-26? Are you bidding here?

-Don't forget the one-iron. Here we go!

0:35:190:35:23

It's really rocketing along.

0:35:230:35:26

£30. Any more at 30?

0:35:260:35:28

-Any more at 30?

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:35:280:35:30

Ouch! Not a great start.

0:35:300:35:32

-That's not a hole-in-one.

-It isn't.

0:35:320:35:35

First up for Charlie, his antlers.

0:35:350:35:37

He's rebranded it as a zoomorphic glass holder

0:35:370:35:40

in the auction catalogue.

0:35:400:35:42

Here's hoping the posh name will entice big bidders.

0:35:420:35:45

At 10. 11. 12.

0:35:450:35:47

-13. 14.

-Can we go in more than ones, please?

-17. 18.

0:35:470:35:52

19. 20. 21. 22.

0:35:520:35:54

-It's a long way to go.

-Patience, Charlie. Every pound counts.

0:35:540:35:58

29. 30. 31.

0:35:580:36:01

-£31. 32.

-Keep going, keep going!

-33. 34.

0:36:010:36:06

-35. 36.

-Come on.

0:36:060:36:08

-37.

-Keep going.

0:36:080:36:10

£37. Any more at 37?

0:36:100:36:13

All finished, then, 37.

0:36:130:36:15

Ah, not so horny. And sadly, so Charlie's profits plummet.

0:36:150:36:20

That's a loss of £28.

0:36:200:36:22

If he'd had that priced at 100,

0:36:220:36:23

I have to confess I'd still have bought it.

0:36:230:36:25

Oh, really? Oh, Charlie, where's your taste gone?

0:36:250:36:28

The same way as his profits.

0:36:280:36:30

Now for Christina's lovely lead glass crystal rummer.

0:36:300:36:33

We'll start the bidding off at £21 for the rummer.

0:36:330:36:36

-That's a very useful start.

-24. 25.

0:36:360:36:38

26. 26 on the rummer.

0:36:380:36:40

-At 26. Any more?

-Come on!

0:36:400:36:42

-Keep going, keep going, keep going!

-At £26.

0:36:420:36:45

It's a nice rummer. At £26.

0:36:450:36:47

-Go on, keep going.

-Are we all finished at 26?

0:36:470:36:50

Oh, a disappointing loss of £4.

0:36:500:36:53

Next to go under the gavel is Mr Gubbins's old deed box.

0:36:530:36:57

Charlie got this for a steal.

0:36:570:36:58

If he can't get me a profit on this, I'll give up. It only cost a fiver.

0:36:580:37:02

£10?

0:37:020:37:03

£10 for the deed box. 10 is bid.

0:37:030:37:05

-11.

-See, it got started.

-12.

0:37:050:37:08

13. 14.

0:37:080:37:10

15. 16. 17.

0:37:100:37:12

It's like using a sort of calculator. Come on.

0:37:120:37:15

£20 for the deed box. Last time. It's going at 20.

0:37:150:37:18

-All finished?

-No, keep going!

-£20, then.

0:37:180:37:21

A very healthy gain of £15. He's tripled his outlay - excellent!

0:37:210:37:26

In a strange way, I'm disappointed.

0:37:260:37:28

I mean, it wasn't dear, was it, for 20 quid?

0:37:290:37:32

It wasn't dear for five!

0:37:320:37:33

Blimey!

0:37:330:37:36

The pressure is on.

0:37:360:37:37

Can Christina make her first profit

0:37:370:37:39

with a nice 19th-century cup and saucer?

0:37:390:37:42

-£10.

-Come on, come on.

-At 11.

0:37:420:37:45

At £11. Any more? £11.

0:37:450:37:47

It's ripping away, isn't it?

0:37:470:37:49

12.

0:37:490:37:50

-At 13. The gentleman next to me is bidding now.

-£13.

0:37:500:37:53

-Any more at 13?

-Just about wiped its face.

-All finished at 13?

0:37:530:37:58

I have to say, in the overall scheme of things,

0:37:580:38:01

-that's a whacking great profit for you.

-Well, it's a profit.

0:38:010:38:06

-I'll take it.

-I think you made a pound there.

-Yay!

0:38:060:38:09

After auction costs, she's made £1.37, actually, Charlie.

0:38:090:38:12

You need a calculator, mate!

0:38:120:38:15

Talking of which, the comptometer is up next. Bought for just £20.

0:38:150:38:20

If I can start it off at £31.

0:38:200:38:22

-See? Finally. Here we go.

-31.

0:38:220:38:26

At 31. Any more at 31?

0:38:260:38:28

No more at £31?

0:38:280:38:30

All done.

0:38:300:38:31

Ah, that added up to a nice profit of £11.

0:38:320:38:35

Next under the hammer, Charlie's leather cartridge case,

0:38:350:38:38

bought for £30.

0:38:380:38:39

A lot of interest in it.

0:38:390:38:41

-And I can start it off at £160.

-THEY GASP

0:38:410:38:44

A commission bid of £160 to start us off.

0:38:440:38:47

Crikey!

0:38:470:38:49

160. 170. 180.

0:38:490:38:50

-190.

-This is better.

0:38:500:38:53

The fellow's going up in tens now, not ones.

0:38:530:38:56

-230. 240.

-Hold my hand.

0:38:560:38:58

240 against you. 250. 260.

0:38:580:39:01

-260. Any more at 260 for the cartridge case?

-It cost 30 quid.

0:39:010:39:05

It goes down at 260...

0:39:050:39:07

Charlie has pulled it out of the old bag! A £230 profit. Well done!

0:39:080:39:14

£230 profit! It's unbelievable.

0:39:140:39:17

That's more than I could possibly have hoped for.

0:39:170:39:20

Christina is on catch-up now.

0:39:200:39:22

Hopefully, the box with mother of pearl inlay bought for £40

0:39:220:39:25

will stir some interest.

0:39:250:39:27

-Start me off at £50 for it.

-It's a good start.

0:39:270:39:29

-50.

-At 50.

0:39:290:39:32

Time to start it. £10.

0:39:320:39:34

-10 is bid.

-Uh-oh.

0:39:340:39:37

Back to one pounds.

0:39:370:39:38

He is bidding like the absolute clappers.

0:39:380:39:41

21. £21 here.

0:39:410:39:43

-He needs some opposition. He needs somebody to...

-23.

0:39:430:39:47

24. 25. 26.

0:39:470:39:49

-27.

-Keep going, keep going.

-28. 29.

-Do you think it's going to make 300?

0:39:490:39:52

-No.

-32. 33.

0:39:520:39:54

34. 35.

0:39:540:39:56

36. 36. Any more on 36? At 36 for the box.

0:39:560:40:00

-Come on!

-At 36...

0:40:000:40:03

At 36, all finished.

0:40:030:40:05

Another loss! What a blow for Christina.

0:40:050:40:08

-Oh, Charlie, this is all getting very disastrous.

-Don't cry, darling.

0:40:080:40:13

Don't cry.

0:40:130:40:15

Now for Peter, the one-eyed puffer fish.

0:40:150:40:17

Is Charlie looking at another profit?

0:40:170:40:21

£5 for him? 5?

0:40:210:40:23

Oh, Charlie...

0:40:230:40:25

-At £5. Any more at 5?

-5 is bid! It's bid!

-At 6.

0:40:250:40:30

Seven. Eight.

0:40:300:40:31

-Nine. 10.

-Come on!

0:40:310:40:33

11. At 11 here.

0:40:330:40:36

At £11. Any more? 12.

0:40:360:40:39

-13. 14.

-Come on, Pierre!

-Really?

0:40:390:40:42

FRENCH ACCENT: 'E is a very nice puffer fish!

0:40:420:40:44

Pierre.

0:40:440:40:45

-The pounds are coming in.

-21.

0:40:450:40:49

-Oh, I don't believe it.

-Now we are going. I can see it making 1,000.

0:40:490:40:54

£26. Any more at 26?

0:40:540:40:56

-Oh, no, not quite there.

-Look out.

0:40:560:40:59

-Oh, a new bidder.

-He's certainly puffing it up!

0:40:590:41:01

Show me a profit.

0:41:010:41:02

£31 standing. At 31. Any more at £31? All finished, then.

0:41:020:41:08

I don't believe it! Peter has made a pound profit.

0:41:080:41:10

Technically a loss after auction costs, though.

0:41:100:41:14

It's the pair's last lot of the day.

0:41:140:41:17

Christina needs to make a big profit with her little Staffordshire bunny.

0:41:170:41:20

Could this be the lot that will turn her fortunes?

0:41:200:41:24

-Start me off at £10 for it.

-It's very small.

-£10 for the rabbit.

0:41:240:41:28

£10 would be about five quid an inch.

0:41:280:41:32

£5 for the rabbit?

0:41:320:41:33

At £5. At six.

0:41:330:41:35

Seven. Eight.

0:41:350:41:36

Nine. Ten.

0:41:370:41:39

-Is there a glisten in your eye.

-Yeah. They are tears, not just a glisten.

0:41:390:41:42

There it goes. It's really romping along.

0:41:420:41:45

At £17. Any more at 17?

0:41:450:41:48

-At 18, new bidder.

-A new bidder!

-19. 20.

0:41:480:41:52

£20. Any more at 20 for the rabbit here?

0:41:520:41:56

£20 for the china rabbit?

0:41:560:41:57

At £20, all finished.

0:41:570:42:00

At 20, then.

0:42:000:42:01

Oh, Christina, a disappointing end. Bad luck.

0:42:010:42:04

Put it there, partner.

0:42:040:42:06

Here's to England. Your fortunes will change in England. Come on.

0:42:060:42:11

After paying auction costs, Ms Trevanion has made a loss of £47.50.

0:42:110:42:18

As a result, Christina has £128.80 to carry forward.

0:42:180:42:21

Charlie, meanwhile, is storming ahead,

0:42:220:42:24

making another profit of £160.78 after costs.

0:42:240:42:29

Mr Ross has claimed today's victory

0:42:290:42:31

and has £457.14 to start the next leg.

0:42:310:42:36

Well! That was marvellous.

0:42:380:42:41

I have made so much money I can afford a chauffeur. Drive me away.

0:42:410:42:44

Oh, it's just too depressing for words.

0:42:440:42:47

Ugh! Never mind.

0:42:470:42:50

Goodbye to you, too.

0:42:500:42:52

Now, do get some well earned rest.

0:42:520:42:55

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Charlie is rolling in it.

0:42:550:42:59

I'm on a roll here and the problem is having so much money,

0:42:590:43:02

because you just want to spend it.

0:43:020:43:04

While Christina has to negotiate hard.

0:43:040:43:07

£40? Don't be...! Is that including the bird poo or without?

0:43:070:43:11

On the second leg of their road trip through Scotland, Charlie comes face to face with the penguins of Edinburgh Zoo and Christina dares to step on to the top of the iconic Forth Rail Bridge.