Newmarket Antiques Roadshow


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Newmarket

Michael Aspel and the experts gather in the parade ring at Newmarket. Featuring a bronze of a Classic winner and a pearlware horse with a Yorkshire pedigree.


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Welcome to Newmarket, in Suffolk.

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Queen Boadicea's charioteers used to train their steeds on this heath,

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but today its 3,000 acres are trodden by more graceful animals.

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This is the HQ of British horse racing, home to the national stud, Tattersalls, and the Jockey Club.

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There are more than 2,000 horses in training at Newmarket's 70 stables.

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These are the oldest surviving stables, dating back to 1605.

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From six o'clock in the morning, strings of horses are brought out to exercise on the gallops.

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The sport of kings is a huge industry and most of Newmarket is involved in one way or another.

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James I found that the heath was perfect for hawking and hunting.

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But Charles II, on his twice-yearly visits, set the pattern for today's spring and autumn race meetings.

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He founded the Newmarket Town Plate Race, which is still run.

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Charles was a keen rider himself and won the race in 1671 and 1675.

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Racing and betting go together like bread and butter.

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Off-course betting now is worth over £5 billion a year.

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The sport of kings got off to a chaotic start.

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Only a few horses were involved.

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The races started at any time, anywhere, with no particular finish.

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For the last few furlongs, spectators used to ride alongside.

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Eventually, the races were shortened and handicaps were introduced.

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The organisation and discipline in racing that we know today was the work of the Jockey Club.

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Horses were saddled in a specific place, they carried numbers, jockeys wore different colours

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and spectators could watch the finish from a ready-made stand.

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Today's Antiques Roadshow is being held in the paddock

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behind the grandstand of the Rowley Mile racecourse, and our experts are getting ready for the off.

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-What's that?

-It's the Derby scarf that was produced every year on Derby Day.

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They used to hit the streets by 6pm with the Derby winner on it.

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Lester Piggott. It's not signed.

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Well, what wonderful, wonderful legs!

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I don't think I've seen four legs like that on a card table before outside of a museum.

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There's everything there should be on an English card table.

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The double scroll has got this little paper scroll at the top here.

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Then that wonderful shell.

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Then the little drops from this pendulum here.

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Then a claw-and-ball foot to die for. THAT'S a claw-and-ball foot!

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There is the sacred pearl of wisdom being held by the dragon's claw

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as you've never seen it before. All the shape in the world!

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I'm sorry, I haven't even said hello.

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Is there a family history with this?

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It was bought by my grandfather, probably in the 1920s or 1930s.

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And then passed to my father and thence to me.

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In the 1920s, this was the sort of furniture that everybody loved.

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This was the original carving that they tried to recreate on so many other plain pieces.

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A plain table later carved will have that shape,

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but the carving is within the outline.

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Here the shell is stuck onto to this wonderful knee.

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To draw that and then create it is something else.

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Normally the two legs at the back are more modest, a bit cheaper.

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It's expensive to carve four legs on one table.

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But it's an occasional piece of furniture - for an occasion.

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This stood at the side looking very grand. You used it for games or for taking tea.

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And it extends, not with things that flap out... This is a concertina action.

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It concertinas out.

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Then, when you open it, like so...

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you've got a centre table.

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If you look at it from here, it's just as beautiful. What a table!

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-The top is original?

-Totally.

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This has never been touched. But it's spent most of its life closed, and against the wall, looking grand.

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One of the best bits of furniture I've seen for a long time of this type, this period.

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1755-1760, George II,

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maybe early George III.

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In today's market,

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a modest insurance valuation would be £15,000.

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-Really? Yes.

-Yes. That's a modest valuation.

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If it turned up in a very good or important sale,

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-I don't know when

-I

-would want to stop bidding!

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More than that I cannot say.

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After my mother died, I cleared out the safe that she had in her house.

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-I found them, tucked at the back, and she had never, ever mentioned them to me.

-Really?

-No.

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They are largely enamel. All except one or two are enamel.

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This was the traditional material for making these snuff boxes.

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-Yes.

-The enamelled box of the 18th century was the equivalent of today's mobile phone -

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you had to have one.

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It was quite like the Japanese tea ceremony - you had to open the box in a particular way,

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you had to take the snuff out, you had to close it, you put it on here.

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And you were judged very much on how well you did it.

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The majority of these are either South Staffordshire, which was a big centre for making these.

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-Right.

-Or Battersea. But there were quite a number of Continental ones.

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The nicest ones...

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This is a very attractive South Staffordshire one

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with this nice emerald green ground, painted with a typical lady, just white on the inside.

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That dates from about 1760.

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-That's worth about £1,000.

-Is it? It's nice.

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There's another nice little one here with a beautiful landscape scene in this typical gilt rococo border.

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Again, same sort of date.

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And we're looking at around um...

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-£1,500 - £1,800 for that one.

-Gosh.

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But the real star is not enamel at all...

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-which is this one.

-Right.

-Which is German porcelain.

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Now, I can't tell you what factory,

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-and I suspect that anybody that did was probably guessing.

-Uh-huh.

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They are difficult to attribute, but it's mid-18th-century German,

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nice landscape scenes all the way round here.

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-But the real joy is the inside.

-Yes.

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We've got the most marvellous figure of a girl holding a letter here,

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which says in translation "To my dear Phyllis".

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-So I think this was actually made for somebody called Phyllis.

-Right.

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This was the girlfriend, the wife-to-be, and this is a portrait.

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-How lovely!

-Nice, isn't it?

-That is really nice.

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-Very nice thing.

-Thank you.

-And that's going to be worth around £2,500 to £3,500.

-Gosh. Yeah.

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So it adds up to a very tidy sum.

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It's my father's. It was given to him for a 21st present

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but it originally was my great-grandfather's, and it was used as a doorstop in his house.

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And since then, it's been on our television.

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-I knocked it off when I was a child and bent its ear.

-So I see.

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Very expensive and decorative doorstop.

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This was made by PJ Mene,

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who was an animalier, a bronze sculptor, who was in Paris between 1810 and 1871.

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This actually was the horse Ibrahim

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which won the 2,000 Guineas here at Newmarket in 1835.

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This horse became very famous and many of these would've been made.

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He's got a wonky ear, but it's still there. He's had quite a lot of cleaning or rubbing here

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which is not top, top quality.

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-No.

-Having said that,

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-PJ Mene is probably the second most sought-after bronze animalier next to Barye.

-Yes.

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-And I would imagine if you had to insure it, which you may not have it insured.

-No, it's not insured, no.

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-I should insure it for £5,000.

-OK.

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-Thank you.

-A very nice thing.

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It won't hold the door open any more!

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I'm sure you know that this is based on the famous Landseer paintings...

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-Yes.

-Sir Edwin Landseer. ...of a Newfoundland. Are all Newfoundlands this colour?

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-No, they're black and this colour, which is called Landseer.

-They're called a Landseer?

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-Yes.

-How very appropriate! And this particular dog saved a life and became a sort of national hero.

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As an image, this was reproduced numerous times.

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-Of course, this is not a painting by Landseer but a print of a painting by Landseer.

-Oh, yes.

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Although it looks exactly like a painting,

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-it is a print on glass, actually printed in colours.

-Yes.

-Lithograph print in colours.

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And the only hand colouring that I can see on it, is the tongue and the eyes.

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-Ah, yes.

-And they've been coloured from behind slightly...

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-So that's why they stand out more than the rest?

-Absolutely.

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-It's printed on a very thin bit of...almost like japanned paper...

-Yes.

-..stuck to the glass.

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So it is actually translucent. You can actually see right through it.

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If I put my hand behind, you can see how completely transparent it is.

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And then, they've set it into this extraordinary surround.

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It looks as though it's been made to look like a picture frame.

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And somebody thought it was worthwhile even restoring it.

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This wonderful leaded restoration to it.

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-Yes.

-It's a marvellous thing.

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-It looks as though it's 1860s, but that's the date of the print.

-Yes.

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By the time it's been printed in colours and set up like this, it might have been the 1860s or '70s.

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-Yes.

-It's difficult to be categoric about it. How much did your husband pay for it? Can you remember?

-Yes.

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-£25.

-£25. And that was 30 or 40 years ago?

-Yes.

-Well, I think it was a jolly good investment.

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-I mean, it's not worth a fortune.

-No.

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But at auction it would make between £600 and £800, maybe even £1,000.

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And if it was set up nicely at the auction and lit so that people can see what a wonderful thing it is,

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it might do more than that. It's the most extraordinary bit of Victorian art that I've seen for a while.

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This is rather like looking into a wonderful pool of water,

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with the walnut figure like the ripples of water underneath this shiny surface of the glass.

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How did you come upon this really rather grand table?

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I purchased it in about...1967

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-for £156 and 10 shillings.

-Quite a lot of money in those days. What made you buy it?

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Er, it was being lifted into the window of the shop

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-and I thought, "How wonderful!" And I had £5 in my purse and put a deposit on it.

-Fantastic.

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That's a lovely story. It's got this sort of mixture of styles.

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It's got a tremendous flow in the frieze here,

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which is slightly Chinesey, the way it's cut.

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But yet, if you look at the legs, it gives you a feeling of 18th century,

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-of George I period. But the table isn't really pretending to be from that time at all.

-No.

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It's much more flamboyant.

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It's actually a classic, if you like, of its type,

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of the 1920s, 1930s.

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-Really?

-In a way, it's an antique of the future, it's not quite 100 years old yet.

-Yes.

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But it's got tremendous quality. I think you had good judgment to buy it when you did, for what you did.

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-Thank you.

-Now I suspect you would be wise to insure it

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-for around £1,000 - £1,200.

-Yes.

-It doesn't sound like an enormous amount of money,

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but the more you hold on to this, the more people are going to appreciate the quality

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and the very individuality of the style, even though it's calling on other things.

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A whole village of cottages and castles! Where do they live?

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They live in a corner cabinet,

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behind doors so that not too many little hands can pick them up.

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-Because originally they lived on the mantelpiece.

-Yes, I'm sure. Mine is already rather cluttered.

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-Well, they are, of course, ornamental objects, but they also have a function.

-Yes.

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-They have two functions. I want to know whether you've used them for either or both.

-Probably not.

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These very tall towers on the large flat backs

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and on these bone china pieces, these turreted objects,

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they are intended to hold the spills,

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the tapers of light with which you light your pipe from the fire,

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or light the fire itself.

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-Really?

-So those are highly functional objects.

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This one...if you put your pocket watch in there, it sits there.

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-Yes.

-So it tells the time as well.

-Wonderful.

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The rest of these pieces are pastille burners.

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-In the Victorian period, people smoked an awful lot more than they do today.

-Right.

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And they leave horrible smells in your drawing room and dining room, so a pastille burner was useful.

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The little ornamental cottage is given a pastille, a little tablet of sweet-smelling incense,

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-which is set afire and put inside there.

-Yes.

-And the smoke, in this case, drifts out of the windows.

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These were made in the 1840s, a little bit later for some of these, but that's the general period.

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-Right.

-Almost all of these are from Staffordshire, but most of them are bone china.

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The average value for a bone china pastille burner is £300 - £400.

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Some of the good ones will be worth more than that, but the earthenware ones, these two big ones,

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will fall in the £20 to £80 region.

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Most of the pieces I'm looking at now seem to be to do with a child.

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This is a little sleeve that would have been sewn onto the corner of a dress.

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It's interesting to me

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-that the pattern of the embroidery could come from as early as 1680, 1700.

-Really?

-That sort of date.

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This colour, yellow, is something that you don't find later on with modern dyes.

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It's got a lot of green in it, and it's a very difficult colour to reproduce nowadays.

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-You just don't find it.

-I love the vibrancy of it.

-It's very good.

-Yes.

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Somebody had such a good eye, who collected these things, and I wonder whether they were family pieces.

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They came from my wife's family, but we have no idea where they came from.

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I would advise you to go to the Victoria and Albert Museum and show them to the lace expert there.

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I'm not nearly good enough to be able to tell you exactly where these were made, but they're so rare.

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-Really?

-It's an exceptional collection.

-I had no idea.

-Early lace is highly collectable.

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-You could be talking about thousands of pounds for this collection.

-Really?

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-I think you do need to go and have it looked at. They'll give you the benefit of their advice.

-Thank you.

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One of the questions most asked of us is "How does the furniture arrive at a Roadshow?"

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Well, this is how you do it! I've not had a chair arrive on a little pram before.

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-Certainly not a Chippendale chair. That's what this is.

-Is it?

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Certainly from the workshops of,

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as indicated by these curious little scoops

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out of the timber on the frame,

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which allowed Chippendale's own -

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and he claimed I think a patent - clamp when the chair was being made.

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That was a spring clamp which tightened up the joint,

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rather than the traditional outer clamps which everybody else used.

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And as you look at the chair, of course I'm sure that the proportions are going to be wonderful.

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I just want to draw your attention to this little French scroll foot,

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which just lifts the chair, even from a distance.

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And I think we'll find when we turn it over, it's going to be rather wonderful, wonderful proportions.

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And a back leg to die for. Now...

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it's an open-arm chair, 1770 - 1780, that sort of period.

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-Is there any family history to it?

-It came from my mother's family.

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-I won't have it done up without... having it looking so over-restored that it would spoil it.

-I know.

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It's not a very valuable chair, they turn up from up from time to time.

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For insurance purposes between £4,000 and £5,000 would be ample.

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The thrill of seeing a Chippendale chair on a pram at a Roadshow has made my year!

0:18:450:18:51

My children's pushchair. It's been very useful. That in itself is 45 years old so...

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I'll bring that in my next life.

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"Aldous's mild medicine for the thrush".

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It's actually my brother's. In the late '80s, he knocked down a fireplace and found this behind.

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He just stuck it in his cupboard all that time ago, and just asked me to bring it along here.

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-How absolutely extraordinary! This was made round about 1700.

-Really?

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It's made of pottery rather than porcelain.

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It's got a very thick opaque glaze, quite bluish in this case, which is known as Delft,

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named after the Dutch town of Delft. But what's important about this one is the fact that it's inscribed.

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Inscribed Delft pieces are ever so much rarer than ordinary ones.

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It was made as an ointment pot.

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-You'd be certainly looking at £1,500 upwards.

-Really that much?

-Absolutely, at auction.

0:19:460:19:52

If I'd seen it on a car boot for 20 pence, I wouldn't have picked it up.

0:19:520:19:57

-What's your connection with Russia?

-I'm married to a Russian

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-and we have two children who have a dual nationality.

-Did all these Russian things come with your wife?

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No. They didn't come with her. These are all items that we have found locally to Ipswich.

0:20:120:20:18

-So they've all been bought in this area?

-Yes.

-Everything here.

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-Every single item on the table.

-Has come from Suffolk. Tell me about this painted wooden panel.

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-We believe it was painted around 1900 in Russia.

-The style is right for that.

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Although it is signed, we have not been able to find the artist.

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We believe it's after the Russian artist Surakov, who painted a lot of women in this...

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Yes. If that's the right date, that was the period when there was a fascination in local costume.

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It's the period of Russian ballet, of Laryonov, and other artists who were looking back to folk culture.

0:20:520:20:58

And this would seem to be a reflection of that, Russia in a sense reinventing its past.

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-Is that a fair thing to say?

-Yes. It's shows a noble lady in 18th-century costume...

-Yes.

0:21:040:21:10

..drinking tea in a refined way.

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It becomes further intriguing because the plate is dated "Bombay 1931".

0:21:130:21:18

Oh, yes, on the back. So how did it get to India?

0:21:180:21:23

Who is Harry? It's inscribed to Harry, and then winds up in an antique shop in Suffolk.

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Well, one could only invent that story!

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Headline - "Des won't ride at Epsom on Monday. Comedian Des O'Connor,

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"who holds a licence to ride as an amateur jockey,

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"had hoped to ride in the Moet et Chandon Silver Magnum next Monday at Epsom,

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"but has been advised by professional jockeys that it was a bit early to take the risk."

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-I knew he rode. There's nothing of him, is there?

-No, he's not a heavy chap.

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-Where did you find this?

-I bought press photos from...a boot sale would be the nearest description.

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I was looking through and I suddenly thought, "That's a familiar face" and couldn't quite click who it was.

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When I looked over on the reverse, I saw it was Des O'Connor.

0:22:150:22:19

-He looks very determined, doesn't he?

-Yes.

0:22:190:22:22

-You know, he and I share a birthday.

-Do you really?

-He'll always be a year older than me.

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Many of these have direct Revolutionary references.

0:22:280:22:32

Others have a cultural history. This one, for example, again goes back to Russia's past, doesn't it?

0:22:320:22:38

Yes, this shows Grand Prince Dmitri

0:22:380:22:41

accepting the defeat of Prince Mamay of the Golden Horde at the Battle of Kulikovo in 1380,

0:22:410:22:46

-the Russian equivalent of our 1066.

-The start of modern history.

-Yes.

0:22:460:22:52

-When that was painted there was no certainty that the new culture would succeed.

-No. This porcelain...

0:22:520:22:59

They used Imperial blanks that survived from Imperial factories.

0:22:590:23:03

One finds on the back the Revolutionary marks which indicate the date, which indicate the artist.

0:23:030:23:10

This is another example of that, slightly more confusing, I think, subject matter.

0:23:100:23:15

The artist - Shchekotikhina-Pototskaya -

0:23:150:23:19

did two versions of this. One with an old man and one with a new man. We have the old man here,

0:23:190:23:25

which is a call for the old Russia to wake up.

0:23:250:23:29

Of the Russian Revolutionary porcelain, the most desirable ones are the figures,

0:23:290:23:35

because they represent the new Russia, images of the noble worker, particularly the women.

0:23:350:23:41

She has lost her hand, which should be shielding her face...

0:23:410:23:46

and this one is about the famine of the early 1920s, because it's about importing American grain.

0:23:460:23:52

But represents these heroic figures of the new Russia.

0:23:520:23:56

We were looking through the loft, found this book and this happened to fall out.

0:23:570:24:02

And he's filled it in himself. "The village where I live, Ayot St Lawrence, has no public transport.

0:24:020:24:08

"My professional business involves communication with London by road,

0:24:080:24:14

"for the transaction of affairs which result in the import of American dollars." I love that.

0:24:140:24:20

"For this, I must have at my command a large, fast car, as my age is 91."

0:24:200:24:25

That's lovely. And he's signed it, "December 1947. George Bernard Shaw".

0:24:250:24:31

Normally I would say an application for rationed petrol was not very interesting.

0:24:310:24:37

But because it's George Bernard Shaw...

0:24:370:24:40

-That stands out, doesn't it?

-That's it. I would value it at £300.

0:24:400:24:45

Fantastic!

0:24:450:24:46

-What do you pay for these sort of things?

-The most expensive piece was the bell-ringer plate. It was £230.

0:24:460:24:53

What do you think they're worth?

0:24:530:24:56

-As far as I know, they're worth what we paid for them. They've been bought in the last year.

-Recently?

0:24:560:25:02

-Very recently.

-These are very desirable, very rare. You've got to think of at least...

0:25:020:25:08

£500, £600 possibly £700 for that one.

0:25:080:25:12

That one is going to be less because of the hand,

0:25:120:25:16

but this is such a famous image, I would have it restored. It's one of the great classics.

0:25:160:25:22

-Perfect, she would be £1,500, £2,000 possibly more.

-As much as that?

0:25:220:25:27

This one is probably about...

0:25:270:25:30

£500 to £800.

0:25:300:25:32

This one, which is, I think, the best, regardless of the subject,

0:25:320:25:37

is probably about £2,000.

0:25:370:25:40

I'm glad I'm sat down.

0:25:400:25:43

This is harder for me to value.

0:25:450:25:47

-What did you pay for that?

-£65.

-Yeah.

0:25:470:25:51

If it IS by the artist you think it might be,

0:25:510:25:55

to a Russian specialist £250 - £300. So you've got an eye, you've got great luck. Long may it continue!

0:25:550:26:03

-Look at this, Michael.

-Yes.

-It looks a very fine old antique.

0:26:030:26:08

On the one hand it is, but it's not a period piece. It's Spanish.

0:26:080:26:13

And it purports to be something that's 250 years old, because...

0:26:130:26:18

-And it's not?

-No.

0:26:180:26:19

It was made in late Victorian time, 1880 - 1890, but purely a reproduction.

0:26:190:26:25

It's an odd size, isn't it? What does that qualify as, then?

0:26:250:26:29

Well, it's a left-hand dagger.

0:26:290:26:32

-Left-hand?

-Left-hand, used in the left hand.

0:26:320:26:35

-How do you know it's for the left hand?

-They fought with two weapons -

0:26:350:26:40

a sword in the right, a dagger in the left, touch of the Errol Flynns.

0:26:400:26:45

-Yes, or Basil Rathbone.

-Yes, indeed, yes, yes.

0:26:450:26:48

It looks as if it's had a bit of use. Is that from you or forbears?

0:26:480:26:53

Both. It belonged to my late father-in-law and subsequently my husband.

0:26:530:26:59

We have three sons who do use it occasionally. It comes with a track, which is circular.

0:26:590:27:05

-It is in full working order.

-Fantastic. What we're looking at

0:27:050:27:09

is a 440 locomotive. There are two clues to the maker.

0:27:090:27:14

One at the front here, which is a monogram

0:27:140:27:18

-of the initials GBN.

-Yes.

0:27:180:27:22

And at the back here...we've got...

0:27:220:27:26

another trademark sign, which is a figure

0:27:260:27:30

and on her shield are those same letters, GBN.

0:27:300:27:34

So on the basis that they may be a good clue,

0:27:340:27:37

it actually means Gebruder Bing of Nuremburg. That's the maker's name.

0:27:370:27:43

One of the most collected of all the German toy manufacturers...

0:27:430:27:48

Sometime between 1902...

0:27:490:27:52

and 1911.

0:27:520:27:54

-I would have said between £800 and £1,200. Thanks very much for bringing it.

-Thank you.

0:27:540:28:00

-Hilary, no racecourse is complete without one of these.

-I have this sinking feeling!

0:28:000:28:06

Have you ever seen one before?

0:28:060:28:09

What on earth have we got? Oh, very good!

0:28:090:28:13

Votes for women.

0:28:130:28:14

This one shall have a vote! The pretty one has a vote and the ugly one...

0:28:140:28:20

-You don't suppose it's Emily Pankhurst, do you?

-The ugly one?

-Have a bell, go on.

0:28:200:28:26

-It's badly cracked.

-Yes, it's a shame.

0:28:280:28:31

-What a shame! But suffragette things - terribly rare.

-Yes.

0:28:310:28:35

-That's lovely.

-Is it lovely?

-Where is this conversation going?

0:28:350:28:40

I'm very, very suspicious when you arrive with something. Is it lovely? Why?

0:28:400:28:46

YOU said it was lovely. I didn't.

0:28:460:28:48

-But suffragette collectors would pay £100 for that?

-I'd have thought so.

0:28:480:28:52

-She needs to go into hospital!

-Tell me how you came to have her.

0:28:530:28:58

-Well, I ran a toy shop, didn't I, Clare?

-Yes.

0:28:580:29:03

In Devon. And an old lady came one day and said to me would I like to buy her...

0:29:030:29:09

..because she felt she ought to get rid of her before she died,

0:29:100:29:15

and give her a good home. And I said yes. So that was about 1975.

0:29:150:29:20

Yes. And did you pay a lot for her?

0:29:200:29:23

I paid her what she asked, which was £100, which I thought was a lot at the time.

0:29:230:29:29

-Yes. There is a pair to this - i.e. they're known as either Hansel or Gretel.

-Yes.

0:29:290:29:35

By the manufacturers - Kammer or KAY-MER, with an umlaut on the "a", and Reinhardt.

0:29:350:29:41

-Yes.

-A German manufacturers who were operating in Thuringia,

0:29:410:29:47

-which is now the centre of Germany, and was in the East.

-Oh, really?

0:29:470:29:52

There were very big porcelain-making factories and doll factories in that part of Germany. Sadly, few remain.

0:29:520:30:00

This is one of the porcelain ones which was registered in 1909

0:30:000:30:06

by Kammer and Reinhardt.

0:30:060:30:08

Oh, really? It's much earlier than I thought.

0:30:080:30:12

I'm going to just show the back of the head to you.

0:30:120:30:16

I'm sure you've seen... It says,

0:30:160:30:19

"114" incised in the porcelain and fired again.

0:30:190:30:23

Now, if you were to call me and say, "I have a K&R114", I would know exactly what it looked like.

0:30:230:30:31

-Yes.

-Because it is a mould. They poured molten porcelain into a mould.

0:30:310:30:38

Now, underneath that, it says "49".

0:30:400:30:43

Now, that is the size, 49 cms.

0:30:430:30:45

-Oh, really?

-So that tells me pretty well all I want to know.

0:30:450:30:50

I just need to know that she's in good condition. I think someone's kissed the tip of her nose a lot.

0:30:500:30:56

-Yes, so do I, yes. It wasn't me.

-It wasn't you?!

0:30:580:31:02

You kept her very well. So, slightly rubbed on the nose...

0:31:020:31:07

-and little tiny bits of white here where little scratches...

-Her colour's good, though, isn't it?

0:31:070:31:13

She's got good colour and lovely painted blue eyes.

0:31:130:31:18

Had she glass eyes, she'd be probably worth double.

0:31:180:31:23

-Really?

-It's probably because they're rarer.

0:31:230:31:27

And to make her sit she has these...

0:31:270:31:30

very good joints.

0:31:300:31:33

-They're creaking a bit.

-Like me!

0:31:330:31:37

I haven't heard you creak.

0:31:370:31:39

Um, nice original dress.

0:31:390:31:42

-Not original shoes.

-I made them.

0:31:420:31:45

You made them? Oh, well, very well made!

0:31:450:31:49

-And a lovely little doll, all bisque, which is her baby.

-Yes.

0:31:490:31:55

-Sweet little doll.

-Yes.

0:31:550:31:57

If she were to go into a doll sale,

0:31:590:32:03

-you would probably get in the region of £3,000 to £3,500 for her.

-What?!

0:32:030:32:08

-It's going to her eventually, so...

-Aren't you lucky?

0:32:080:32:13

Really, why is she so valuable?

0:32:130:32:16

These Kammer and Reinhardts are extremely valuable.

0:32:160:32:21

-The world record for any doll at auction is a Kammer and Reinhardt.

-Really?

0:32:210:32:27

-£188,000.

-Golly!

0:32:270:32:30

The stones, as we can see, are held in these little claws,

0:32:300:32:35

and each of them weighs about 1.5 carats, 1.6 carats.

0:32:350:32:39

And they're lovely soft white, brilliant-cut diamonds.

0:32:390:32:43

-In this sunshine here that we've got today, they look fantastic.

-They do.

0:32:430:32:49

I think that they were probably mounted in platinum.

0:32:490:32:53

They aren't hallmarked, but I think they are.

0:32:530:32:57

Not many Spanish things are hallmarked.

0:32:570:33:00

I think when they were made, around about 1910-1915, a lot of jewellery didn't bear a stamp on it

0:33:000:33:07

-saying 18 carat gold or platinum or whatever it may have been.

-Yes, yes.

0:33:070:33:13

But, in today's market,

0:33:130:33:16

drops like this would sell extremely well.

0:33:160:33:20

Do you wear these yourself at all?

0:33:200:33:23

-I only wear twice.

-Twice?

-I have them in the bank, just in case I lose...

0:33:230:33:29

-What particular occasion did you wear them for?

-Showing off.

0:33:290:33:33

Everybody will wear plastic, so I wear the real thing.

0:33:330:33:38

-I should think they looked extremely smart.

-Absolutely wonderful.

0:33:380:33:43

Well, knowing how saleable drops like this are, I think that, in an auction,

0:33:430:33:49

-I would expect to get £5,000 at least, maybe £6,000.

-That's better.

0:33:490:33:55

You know, my colleagues often rib me

0:33:550:33:58

because, apparently, I say, "This is the best I've ever seen of its type." And maybe they're right.

0:33:580:34:05

But there are occasions when that is absolutely true,

0:34:050:34:09

and this wassail bowl is the best I've seen outside of a museum.

0:34:090:34:14

There's the original lid which is absolutely wonderful.

0:34:140:34:18

Made of lignum vitae, one of the hardest woods that we know of.

0:34:180:34:24

A treadle was fixed to a springy larch, the rope went round the piece of wood, you trod down.

0:34:240:34:31

It spun one way, the spring took the thing back again and it spun the other way

0:34:310:34:37

to create something like that out of a material almost like bronze.

0:34:370:34:42

Is there any family history...?

0:34:420:34:46

Well, it belongs to my wife and she acquired it from her mother.

0:34:460:34:51

-Right.

-And I believe it came down to her mother from her mother's side of the family.

0:34:510:34:57

How long it's been in the family we don't know, but, certainly, at least a couple of hundred years.

0:34:570:35:04

It is a wassail bowl, traditionally used between Christmas and Twelfth Night, for making merry, really.

0:35:040:35:11

For drinking huge amounts of wassail.

0:35:110:35:13

A communal cup. It was passed from one to the other.

0:35:130:35:16

It could be 1640, it could be 1660, it's difficult to know which side of the Civil War it was made.

0:35:160:35:23

-Would it have been made in this country...?

-This is English made.

0:35:230:35:28

In today's market, this is worth around £10,000.

0:35:280:35:32

Wow! We knew it was valuable because it was old, but we had no idea, because it was wood...

0:35:320:35:38

I know, but the material doesn't reflect its value today.

0:35:380:35:43

Loving cups were very popular in the middle of the 19th century. This was made in Staffordshire.

0:35:430:35:48

The black is printed on as a transfer print and the other colours - pinks, blues and so on -

0:35:480:35:55

-have been touched in later.

-Oh, right. That's interesting.

-So it's partly printed and partly painted.

0:35:550:36:02

-Um, in the salerooms today, it would fetch in the region of £800.

-Really?

0:36:020:36:08

-But what about the horse?

-It's certainly not a racehorse.

-He's not.

0:36:080:36:13

He's also not from this neck of the woods.

0:36:130:36:17

The material's called pearlware.

0:36:170:36:20

It took over from an earlier material called creamware which was championed by Wedgwood.

0:36:200:36:26

It's called pearlware because it's got a slightly bluey glaze.

0:36:260:36:31

It's gone slightly bluey. They've added some cobalt oxide.

0:36:310:36:37

-This beast is English, but he would have been made in Yorkshire.

-Right.

0:36:370:36:42

Almost certainly in Leeds, actually. If you look at him from the front, he's got a terrific expression...

0:36:420:36:49

Are you sure that's not shock horror?

0:36:490:36:51

The way the eyes have been picked out is absolutely charming. They've been moulded in shallow relief.

0:36:510:36:59

For insurance, you need to be thinking around £10,000.

0:36:590:37:06

Bloody hell!

0:37:080:37:10

They're fascinating snapshots of India.

0:37:100:37:14

-Where did you get them?

-I bought them off a dustman about 15 years ago.

-Off a dustman?

0:37:140:37:20

-Yeah, he come in and said, "I've got some picture cards for you." He thought they were postcards.

-Really?

0:37:200:37:27

-What did you pay for them?

-£7.

-For the lot?

-Yes.

0:37:270:37:31

Well, they could easily be mistaken just for postcards, but, in fact,

0:37:310:37:38

each one of these is hand painted on ivory.

0:37:380:37:41

They were done by Indian craftsmen.

0:37:420:37:44

The link with the postcard

0:37:450:37:47

is that they were probably copied from photographs.

0:37:470:37:50

That enables us to date them - the second half of the 19th century.

0:37:520:37:57

-I would say 1860, something like that.

-Oh, I'm surprised. I thought they were '20s.

0:37:570:38:04

No, I don't think they are at all.

0:38:040:38:06

And they are quite exceptionally well painted.

0:38:060:38:10

The amount of detailed work on here is quite staggering.

0:38:100:38:15

You know, this is so beautifully drawn,

0:38:150:38:20

all with the single hair of a brush.

0:38:200:38:23

It's minute work. They would have been made for the British. These are not for domestic consumption.

0:38:230:38:31

This is for the Raj,

0:38:310:38:33

for administrators, um, people who were looking after taxes, that sort of thing, in India.

0:38:330:38:40

They were probably...

0:38:400:38:43

When they came to go home, they wanted a souvenir of all the scenes in the local area

0:38:430:38:50

and they would have gone to a local shop which specialised in these.

0:38:500:38:55

-Are they very common?

-You do find these little miniatures,

0:38:550:38:59

not infrequently, but they're often nothing like as good quality.

0:38:590:39:05

These are spectacularly finely painted.

0:39:050:39:09

The frames are quite interesting, they're Indian rosewood.

0:39:090:39:14

But, of course, also, the whole concept is really English rather than Indian.

0:39:140:39:21

I think the £7 you paid for them was an extremely good investment.

0:39:210:39:26

-We're looking at somewhere between £2,000 and £3,000 here.

-Oh.

0:39:260:39:31

-And rising.

-I was thinking more £200 or £300.

0:39:310:39:35

No, I think £2,000 or £3,000 is more realistic. Well done.

0:39:350:39:41

This is the most wonderful, striking image of, probably, an Indian prince.

0:39:410:39:49

Now, tell me something about the painting.

0:39:490:39:53

We don't know very much about it at all. It's been in our family, we think, for about 150 years.

0:39:530:40:00

We think my great-grandfather, in fact, who died in about 1870, purchased it.

0:40:000:40:07

But, apart from that, it's been with our household ever since.

0:40:070:40:12

Just looking at the face, firstly, I think what is rather unusual and to me compelling about it,

0:40:120:40:19

is the way that the eyes look confidently at the artist. There seems to be some connection there.

0:40:190:40:25

Whether it's because they knew each other, or he, being a man of substance, was very confident.

0:40:250:40:32

These crossed and folded arms,

0:40:320:40:34

again, in a way, indicate to me a kind of body language that says,

0:40:340:40:39

"I'm somebody special. I'm not just here to be painted as just an ordinary subject."

0:40:390:40:45

And then the head piece, with this wonderful flash of colour here and then heavy impasto painting here.

0:40:450:40:52

Then we go up into all the other colours and textures

0:40:520:40:57

and finish off in a much more lightly painted way with these feathery ends to the silks.

0:40:570:41:03

They're beautifully expressed and just expertly done.

0:41:030:41:10

This line where the paint has been dragged and pushed is exquisite.

0:41:100:41:15

-We couldn't see that. We had it restored and this was virtually black through tobacco or whatever.

-Really?

0:41:150:41:22

-Had it been over a fireplace?

-Not in my memory, no. It just hung in the farmhouse hall at home.

0:41:220:41:30

Now, who actually painted it? I don't really know.

0:41:300:41:35

But there is an artist, Francesco Rinaldi,

0:41:350:41:39

who is a Welshman, of Italian extraction.

0:41:390:41:43

And there's a missing portrait of an Indian prince by Zoffany,

0:41:430:41:48

and that would be quite...that would be quite a name to conjure with.

0:41:480:41:53

Unfortunately, for such a wonderful picture there's a great deal of speculation.

0:41:530:41:58

I'd love to be able to answer it spot on, and it's a bit unfair when one comes to consider the price,

0:41:580:42:05

because, unless one knows specifically who it's by,

0:42:050:42:09

-we can't really say how much it's worth. But these pictures are really sought after.

-Right.

0:42:090:42:16

And I think, unless we've misjudged it - and I don't think I have -

0:42:160:42:21

then I think we're talking about a figure which might be in the region of £100,000 or even more.

0:42:210:42:28

Wow! Thank you very much indeed.

0:42:280:42:32

It's been a breezy and beautiful day here on the borders of Suffolk and Cambridgeshire.

0:42:320:42:36

We've seen some items to match the breathtaking surroundings.

0:42:360:42:40

From Newmarket, goodbye.

0:42:400:42:42

Subtitles by BBC Scotland 2001

0:43:060:43:08

Michael Aspel and the experts gather in the parade ring at Newmarket racecourse and not surprisingly find many items with an equine theme: a bronze of the Classic winner Ibrahim with a 'wonky ear', a loving cup with 'Steeplechase' inscribed on it and a pearlware horse with a Yorkshire pedigree.

An ointment pot found in a fireplace, and framed ivory pictures of India bought from the dustman for 7 pounds, turn out to be bargains. And a striking portrait of an Indian prince could be worth a king's ransom if only the artist could be identified.