Bridgend Antiques Roadshow


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Bridgend

Michael Aspel and the team examine antiques in Bridgend. Fascinating finds include a Victorian Welsh hat, a bow-fronted barometer and a valuable whale's tooth.


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The Antiques Roadshow has responded to the promise

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of a welcome in the hillside.

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We've come to Wales, to Bridgend,

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a thriving town in Mid Glamorgan halfway between Cardiff and Swansea.

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The Welsh version of the town's name is Penybont-ar-Ogwr.

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The Ogwr being the river that flows under this 15th-century bridge.

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Above Bridgend is one of a trio of fortresses the Normans erected to protect their border from the Welsh.

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They underestimated Prince Owain Glyndwr

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who besieged all three river crossings and did particular damage to this one - Newcastle.

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Famous sons of Bridgend have been a diverse band of achievers.

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There was Dr Richard Price, known as the father of life assurance.

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Then there was Dr William Morgan who stumbled across the marvel of X-rays

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many years before the official discovery in Germany.

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And there was John Thomas, harpist to Queen Victoria, and the star of many an eisteddfod,

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who, probably more than anyone, made the world aware of Welsh culture.

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In the late 1800s, there was yet another invasion...

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by people fleeing from deprivation and poverty in Northern Italy.

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The Italians came with nothing apart from a readiness to work,

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a spirit of enterprise and their cooking skills.

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Boys sold custard ice cream from handcarts and the newcomers set up cafes with a welcoming atmosphere.

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By the 1930s, there were more than 300 Italian cafes in Wales.

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Most of them are still here - an indispensable part of the community. Salute.

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Coffee from the old country is still imported to the Ogmore valley

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where it's roasted and delivered to the trattorias, bringing a taste of la dolce vita to the Land of Song.

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And it's time to say croeso, ben venuto, and a warm welcome to Bridgend Recreational Centre

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and today's Antiques Roadshow.

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It was given to my wife by an elderly neighbour

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she always said that she remembers playing with it as a child with her governess.

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-That explains some of the subsidence and structural damage.

-Yes.

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The whole house is slightly ropey. Let's turn it round.

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A fraction of the roof is missing and we've got cracks all the way round.

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What a shame.

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And some repairs. Well, I'm going to put that to one side.

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Now, do you know the family names of the lady who originally owned this?

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Er, she was a Miss Jones, daughter of a Reverend Jones.

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What I really wanted you to say that she was "Miss Teapot"

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-or "Miss Kettle".

-No.

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Because that presumably is what the original artist - when painting the model - was referring to.

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I think she must've been Miss Kettle.

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This was done in 1833.

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This is a pastille burner.

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Around this time, people smoked heavily and they would have

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-special ways of making the atmosphere smell sweetly afterwards.

-Right.

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And they'd have a pastille burner. Usually they are about this size.

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This is the biggest cottage pastille burner I've ever seen.

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There would have been something in the middle...?

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They put pastilles - little tablets...

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-They were burned?

-They were burned and they would infuse the air through the open windows

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and usually through the chimneys.

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It was almost certainly made in Staffordshire.

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This is pearl ware, bluey glazed pearl ware.

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Um...

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I suppose a pastille burner collector would want to own this,

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-simply to say, "Have you seen a bigger one?"

-Yes.

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I'm going to put a valuation on it for somewhere in the region of...

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-£2,000 to £3,000.

-Goodness gracious.

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Well, it is such a rare object.

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MUSICAL BOX TUNE PLAYS

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That was the unmistakable sound of a slightly distressed disc musical box.

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Now, tell me your family relationship with it.

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It was given to me about five years ago by an elderly neighbour and it was his grandfather's before him.

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-Oh, lovely! So it had been something much treasured in his family.

-Yes.

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Well, let's have a look. It's a very simple box,

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probably pine which has been finished with a transfer print or a decoration

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to make it look like rosewood, it isn't actually rosewood.

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So it would have been quite a cheap thing to produce and made by a company called Symphonium,

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a German company that made a lot of these disc musical boxes and, in date, between about 1900 and 1910.

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But what that makes it special is the bit that I'm hiding here...this.

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When that goes on the top,

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it changes it from being a standard small disc musical box

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into something much more entertaining - an automaton.

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Let's just get it going.

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TUNE PLAYS

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-Oh, it's great, isn't it?

-Yes.

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If it just had its little disc, and didn't have this extra piece on the top,

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it's a box that might be worth perhaps a couple of hundred, £300,

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but this puts it into a completely different price category.

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Terribly popular in America and all over Europe people collect them,

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and it means that a box like this today is going to be worth

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between about £1,000 and £1,500.

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TUNE PLAYS

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My husband bought it for me in 1960 as a wedding anniversary present.

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-I was moaning I didn't have a desk and he did.

-Well, you have a desk!

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He said it was a travelling companion so that when we went away,

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I could do my thank-you letters,

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-then, when it's turned over, I could darn his socks.

-Absolutely.

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Well, if you open it, I have no doubt that we have a sewing compartment inside.

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Absolutely beautiful.

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These writing desks, are really little bit of English social history.

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They were first made around the beginning of the 19th century

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and they were really conceived for officers and their families when travelling abroad.

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This piece probably dates to around 1900,

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so it's at the further end of the history of this sort of campaign writing tables.

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-Campaign?

-Yes.

-Ah, right.

-They were used when people were living under canvas.

-Yes.

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They tried to have as many home comforts as they could.

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You've got a lovely original green morocco interior,

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pouches for envelopes, for letters, for stamps,

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a blotter,

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a little inkwell, something to probably hold quill pens.

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On the reverse, you have compartments for your sewing equipment.

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And there were firms like Shawbreads,

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the Army and Navy Stores, Barker, who were in New Bond Street,

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and they specialised in this sort of furniture and this is going to be made by one of those makers.

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It's a very nice. Are we able to discuss prices if this was...?

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-It was bought in 1960 from an antique shop in Cardiff.

-Yes.

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It wouldn't have cost an awful lot, I would have thought probably about £10 to £15. But it was 1960.

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Well, I think today it's a very desirable piece

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that somebody with an interest in military history might well like to have in their collection,

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-so I would put a valuation of nearer £1,000 on it.

-Really? That's fine.

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It belonged to my great-great-great grandfather, who was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons.

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He was with Wellington and he also fought at the Battle of New Orleans,

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where General Packenham was killed.

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Right.

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I believe it's about 1825

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and he was serving at the time in Corfu.

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Right. Oh, well, that's lovely to have all that background.

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The regiment itself is the 18th Regiment of Foot, which was the Royal Irish Regiment,

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so a very good regiment of the time,

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one of the lower numbers in the serial numbers of the British Army

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and this type of tunic, it's known as a long-tailed coatee.

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And here we... here we see the reason for it.

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In the period that you mentioned, when he was in the Peninsula War, he wouldn't have worn this tunic.

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-No.

-He would have worn a short-tailed coatee,

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and then after the Napoleonic Wars, this type of tunic was adopted.

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In fact, it went on to 1855.

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The only thing that stopped this type of coatee being worn

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was the severe winter in the Crimea in 1854-55.

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They actually went to war in the Crimea, dressed like toy soldiers, all this splendour,

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and they were decimated through disease and a severe winter,

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so this coatee, as I say, had a life up until 1855.

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But I would place this... I believe you said, didn't you? 1825.

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Well, 1825-30, around that time. Has he got anything in his pocket?

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-Did you know there was a pocket there?

-No, I didn't know.

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No. You never know, I might have found a sovereign!

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Anyway, these coatees do not survive, there are so few about.

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Regimental museums have got their own examples usually,

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but it's not often you see them

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and to be in the same family, this is wonderful.

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Now, if this was put into auction,

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I feel that it would fetch something in the region of £1,500.

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-Does that surprise you?

-I thought it was a couple of hundred pounds.

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-Really?

-Yes.

-Oh, well, then, that's good news.

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This is what we ought to see - Welsh Pottery, made by Dylan and Co.

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-Are you a collector?

-Yes, yes.

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And are all the pieces coming out - are these all going to be Welsh?

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That's what I want to find out.

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This is marked Nantgarw which is nice to see, should be incredibly white.

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It is very white when you hold it up to the light.

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-It's also very heavily potted.

-Very heavy, yes.

-Very heavy for Nantgarw.

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-That's a nice one, I think.

-So, you've got a complete mixture.

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You've got pottery from Swansea, porcelain from Swansea, Nantgarw.

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-Which of these is your favourite?

-Um...

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-This one.

-Yeah, I like this one, too.

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Probably made sometime around the 1830s with a ship that is somewhat older.

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It's probably 30 or 40 years out of date, but it's a lovely thing.

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In Wales, I can see that in a shop window with a price of £150 on it,

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-so at auction, you might be lucky to get as much as £100 for it.

-I see.

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-We've had the magnifying glass on it.

-On the signature?

-Yes.

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And everybody thought, "We know about antiques..." Nobody knows.

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-It's David Woodlock.

-David Woodlock.

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He's a Liverpool artist.

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-That's right.

-And I didn't have to look at the signature.

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-Well, I asked you to.

-Because I knew exactly who it was by.

-Right.

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Basically, he's a painter around the turn of the century and later.

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Woodlock has...

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this wonderfully decorative style,

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a woven tapestry of colour in a way.

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That's right, which amazed me, it being so old, that it still has that richness of colour in.

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All the richness of the reds and the blues is there.

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And it's a wonderful thing.

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-I think it's worth £2,500 to £3,500, maybe a bit more.

-Lovely, lovely!

-It's very, very pretty.

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-I think it could make more. It could make...

-£2,500?!

-..on a good day, up to £5,000.

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-But I would say £2,500 to £3,500 seems like a reasonable valuation.

-Excellent! Thank you very much.

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It was my grandmother's and it came down to me when she died.

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She used it every day in the days when the milk was delivered on a wagon

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and you went out with your jug and the milk poured in from a measure.

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-Oh, yes, so this was the jug?

-That was the jug.

-So it was in daily use.

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There's a mark on the bottom which is a GB. Does that mean anything to you?

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No. Not a thing.

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This was painted by a lady called Grace Barnsley

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who was a member of the Barnsley furniture family in Chipping Camden in the Cotswolds, in that area...

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-You're looking worried.

-No, it's just that I moved here from Cirencester

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-and Barnsley is just down the road.

-Yes.

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Well, in that case it must have been bought in that area.

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In the 1920s, Wedgwood was an avant-garde firm.

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They reintroduced hand decorating for their table wares,

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and Grace, who knew Tom Wedgwood, was encouraged to do some decorating,

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so she got Wedgwood blanks and developed her own patterns,

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working under the guidance of artists like Millicent Taplin who were in charge of the hand-decorating girls.

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She made a range of things, which all have this lovely decorative quality, lovely colours,

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lovely soft brush work, and her things became quite collectable,

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-because of the Barnsley connection. Now, do you think it has any value?

-No, I wouldn't think so.

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-Just a pretty thing?

-Yeah, I would say an everyday...

-Well, how about £150?

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Very nice!

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I've often seen silk merchants' sample books with prices in, but this one is extremely strange.

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Not only is it entirely hand-written in French, "principes de fabrique" there,

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but it also has - which I think is unusual - all the instructions about how to make this stuff,

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so this is in fact the trade secrets which is quite incredible, and it is a most wonderful volume

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because it has not only - as I say - all the samples in,

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but actually notices here of all the things that you do to make it.

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-Where did it come from?

-I think my great-great grandfather was a silk merchant in Spital Square, London.

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I think it was probably about the 1840s or something like that. He probably started the business.

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I acquired it from my father when he died and it's been in the family as far as I know ever since.

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I love this. This is so bright. It's been in this book, this book dates from about 1850, I would have said.

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But it's so bright and so wonderful, and to see the big watercolour plan here of the silk,

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and then to see it actually made up into these tiny little samples.

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-It really is just wonderful, and they're so bright, I mean just...

-They are.

-..lovely, very exciting.

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And, as I was saying, the unusual thing is he tells you how to make it.

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"Systeme de la mechanique a la Jacquard," and here it all is.

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-It's the famous loom, isn't it?

-Yes. It's unusual to see how to do this.

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Yes, late 19th century, everybody would have known how to make it,

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but I can't see that in the mid-19th century that everybody would have known how to make this sort of silk.

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I'm delighted that you brought it in. I'm going to put a value on it

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-of £2,000.

-£2,000, you reckon.

-And I think probably any museum

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would be fascinated to have it and to see what's going on in here.

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-I've had it about 45 years.

-Yes.

-And I acquired it then.

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-I used to use it in my younger days.

-Yes.

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But haven't used it for years. I've just kept it in the drawer.

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-But you never considered that it was unusual?

-No, I didn't.

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Leica made a camera called the Leica One in 1931 and they produced very, very few

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and they were called the Luxus range.

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Luxus meant that they were a very luxurious camera.

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They were finished with snakeskin.

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They were gilded and they had very ornate crocodile cases. Now, hold your breath,

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because one of those some years ago sold for £30,000 at auction.

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Now, what is very interesting about this is that it's got a pretty early serial number, 88840.

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Now, that to me, is a Leica Two. That is 1932 for this particular model.

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-Right.

-A standard Leica Two has a black body

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-and I have to be quite frank with you, I've never seen one with a gilded body like this.

-Oh.

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That makes this a particularly interesting camera. These cameras are faked a great deal.

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I've seen some very good fakes in Eastern Europe.

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Now, this one is not in very good condition

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and if someone was faking a camera, they wouldn't go to the trouble of producing all this wear on it.

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-Yes.

-Now the other thing is

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if we detach the lens from the front of this camera, which unscrews,

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the copies have a sprocket inside

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which is generally square, but the real ones have a circular sprocket.

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And if I look inside it, it has a circular sprocket, we can see that.

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So there is no doubt in my mind that this camera is absolutely correct in every respect.

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It's difficult for me to put a price on this because Leica collectors, they're a law unto themselves.

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They look for things that are interesting and different.

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A black-body version of this camera is just worth a few hundred pounds,

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-but I think I can tentatively put an auction price of £3,000 to £5,000 on this camera.

-Really? Gosh.

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-I would hope that it would do that and better.

-That is a surprise.

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I didn't realise it was worth that.

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Well, if only these artefacts could talk. Is this something that's been in your family?

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Yes, it's been passed down several generations.

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-It is a box of tricks when you open it up, isn't it?

-And it's heavy.

-Yes.

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-It must have been all over the world, I suppose.

-I think it has.

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This is something that every grand gentleman or lady would perhaps take around with them.

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-Look. I love that.

-There's monogrammed envelopes in there...

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Isn't that terrific?

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-..from my gran's mum's brother.

-Yeah.

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-Yes.

-And even little silver mounts on the leather writing slide.

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-Yes.

-Really quite magnificent, the way it's put together.

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-I mean, it is a myriad of objects in here, isn't it?

-Mm-mm.

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And they've got absolutely something for every occasion, but mostly for personal hygiene I suppose, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-Um, wonderful glass and silver bottles, silver mounted.

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This one, in particular, is great

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because it has scent at one end and cologne at the other.

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You can unscrew the cap.

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And beautifully ridged swirled glass and it's very, very carefully made

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-so that everything is airtight.

-Yes.

-Wonderful.

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It's hallmarked. It's 1886 so getting on for 115 years old, aren't we?

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-Yes.

-The little inkwell.

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-The travelling inkwell with some kind of...

-Absolutely.

-..cork above it.

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-It needs obviously to be liquid tight.

-Yes.

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Really terrific. They're quite difficult things to value

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-because there's so much amongst the objects.

-Yes.

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And there are people who collect scent bottles in particular

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who might cry out just for that.

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-One would be expecting, I suppose, probably £300 somebody might pay for that.

-Just for the one bottle?

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-They are particularly sought after.

-Gracious me.

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I think that we would, in an auction today,

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probably estimate something in the region of £1,500 - £2,000.

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-Gracious. Really?

-Quite a... quite a grouping of things.

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Well, these are by Allen Jones and you knew him?

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Absolutely, yes, I met him in London in 1959. I was a neighbour of Allen's and then we became friends.

0:22:240:22:31

Good, and this was done, I assume, when he was at Hornsea.

0:22:310:22:35

-Yes.

-Studying with Alan Braund. Do you like this print?

0:22:350:22:40

Not really, no, I don't, actually, because when Allen completed this,

0:22:400:22:45

I just couldn't see what he was painting and then he explained to me

0:22:450:22:50

the window was open in his bedroom and there was white net curtains just fluttering in the breeze

0:22:500:22:57

and that's how he could see his garden through his window.

0:22:570:23:01

-Interesting, because I wouldn't look at it that way.

-Yes.

-I just feel this great vortex of wind.

-Yes.

0:23:010:23:08

-The face is part of the garden in a way.

-Yes.

0:23:080:23:11

So, he goes from Hornsea School of Art, where this was painted, to the Royal College.

0:23:110:23:17

-This is a Royal College picture?

-Yes.

0:23:170:23:20

And there's a reason why I assume that, because he then entered the revolution that was going on,

0:23:200:23:26

which had been Peter Blake to start with, with Pop Art and when he was there it was David Hockney and Kitaj

0:23:260:23:33

and there was a feeling of Hockney here in this face, and Kitaj,

0:23:330:23:37

and he's grasping at new languages and trying to express himself,

0:23:370:23:42

so I look at these both as seed pictures

0:23:420:23:46

because his revolution was different,

0:23:460:23:50

his revolution was the communication...

0:23:500:23:54

the two-dimensional communication -

0:23:540:23:57

the strongest and most popular form of communication, which in a way is the poster. What do you think of it?

0:23:570:24:04

Um...I just...

0:24:040:24:07

I think it just jumps out at you, as you said. It's a poster, isn't it?

0:24:070:24:13

It's so different, and I just think it's wonderful. I just love that.

0:24:130:24:18

How do you translate this? Or you don't?

0:24:180:24:21

-I've always assumed that was Allen's face.

-Right. Could be anything, couldn't it?

0:24:210:24:28

-I think it's Allen's face.

-Do you? I think it's a rhythm of bodies.

0:24:280:24:32

-No, I think it's Allen's face.

-Right.

0:24:320:24:35

I've always thought that.

0:24:350:24:38

So there you go. Anyway, it's wonderful.

0:24:380:24:41

Now, the interesting thing about this - not from your point of view

0:24:410:24:46

because these are personal possessions - but from the general public's point of view,

0:24:460:24:52

here is a very important figure in the history of art since the war,

0:24:520:24:57

and people say there's nothing to collect,

0:24:570:25:00

but a poster like this is only worth £300 or £400.

0:25:000:25:05

You can buy an Allen Jones, so I think it's a wonderful area to buy.

0:25:050:25:12

A great Allen Jones, for instance, is only £4,000.

0:25:120:25:15

-Mmm.

-And I'm sure it's not going to last, but here is a wonderful area.

0:25:150:25:21

I don't think one would necessarily find such early ones as this,

0:25:210:25:26

but they would be just a few hundred pounds if you did. It's exciting.

0:25:260:25:32

-What does it say on the top here?

-I'm not very good at reading Welsh.

0:25:360:25:40

"Tarian Goffa Iorwerth Glyndwr John."

0:25:400:25:44

A shield in memory of Iorwerth Glyndwr John.

0:25:440:25:48

-And who was that?

-We don't know.

-Where does it come from originally?

0:25:480:25:53

This is the first copy of the original shield that was found in the Thames a long, long time ago.

0:25:530:26:00

And they used it for the Eisteddfod prizegiving.

0:26:000:26:04

The reason we have it is that my mother-in-law's father was a choirmaster back in the '20s,

0:26:040:26:10

and the choir that he was with won the National Eisteddfod four times in six years.

0:26:100:26:16

-Ah! And this is the arts we're talking about?

-Oh, yes.

0:26:160:26:20

About 20 years ago, my daughter knocked it and broke it,

0:26:200:26:25

so I took it to Bristol and they repaired it

0:26:250:26:29

and said that it was an interesting piece,

0:26:290:26:33

-so it's back hanging up again.

-Good,

0:26:330:26:36

because it deserves to be hanging.

0:26:360:26:39

The maker is Berge of London,

0:26:390:26:41

and it says "late Ramsden". Now, that is Matthew Berge,

0:26:410:26:46

who took over Jesse Ramsden's business in 1800.

0:26:460:26:52

Ramsden was one of the finest instrument makers in London,

0:26:520:26:57

and the premises was in Piccadilly and this man died in 1819.

0:26:570:27:02

From the style of the barometer,

0:27:020:27:05

I would say it was from the first few years of the 19th century,

0:27:050:27:09

-just after 1800.

-Hmm!

0:27:090:27:12

Now, it is a silvered scale,

0:27:120:27:15

it is the bow-fronted type of barometer with flame mahogany -

0:27:150:27:21

you can see it here, you've got that lovely long thermometer tube

0:27:210:27:25

in Fahrenheit and Reaumur,

0:27:250:27:28

and then down here, the cistern cover is an ebony urn,

0:27:280:27:32

and, on these canted corners here, little ebony inlays.

0:27:320:27:37

It is as good as you will find.

0:27:370:27:40

So for a barometer just after 1800, what sort of figure do you reckon?

0:27:400:27:44

-I don't know.

-Right.

0:27:440:27:47

This man is one of the finest makers

0:27:470:27:50

and these bow-fronted stick barometers have zoomed over the last five years on the market.

0:27:500:27:56

At auction now this would make at least...

0:27:560:27:59

£7,000, at least,

0:27:590:28:02

and would retail with a barometer specialist probably around £12,000.

0:28:020:28:07

-So...

-Oh!

0:28:080:28:11

Yes. Mmm. Right.

0:28:110:28:14

When I was a little girl, if I was very good, I was allowed to wear this on St David's Day.

0:28:140:28:20

-Very suitable.

-It's been in my grandmother's family, I don't know how long for.

0:28:200:28:26

-This is quite an early one, isn't it? Your grandmother's family?

-Yes.

0:28:260:28:30

-This is sealskin...

-Sealskin, is it?

-Yeah.

0:28:300:28:34

It's a very traditional style and certainly like a Victorian one.

0:28:340:28:39

-Any idea about their value?

-No, no.

0:28:390:28:41

Victorian ones are very collectable and very desirable,

0:28:410:28:45

even in this condition. It could be as much as £600 or £800.

0:28:450:28:49

-You're joking.

-No, no. They're very rare things to find.

0:28:490:28:54

I believe it's made of oak.

0:28:560:28:59

It's come to me via my mother and aunt and uncle,

0:28:590:29:03

-originally from the west of England.

-The first thing I should tell you -

0:29:030:29:08

-it's not oak.

-Oh.

-It is, in fact, true ebony.

0:29:080:29:12

It's a very dense wood and that accounts for its weight.

0:29:120:29:16

Have you any idea where it was made?

0:29:160:29:19

-None at all.

-Well, for many years,

0:29:190:29:22

particularly in the 19th century,

0:29:220:29:25

they were believed to date from the period of Charles I

0:29:250:29:28

and to be English.

0:29:280:29:31

They were much admired by collectors in the 18th and 19th century,

0:29:310:29:36

and, in particular, Eliza Ashmole, whose collection formed the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford,

0:29:360:29:43

owned these chairs which were published in the early 19th century

0:29:430:29:47

as being from the time of Charles II. In fact, we now know differently.

0:29:470:29:52

They're, in fact, made in Ceylon

0:29:520:29:55

and date probably to the... 18th century

0:29:550:30:01

and some of them date to the 19th century. This one, I am sure, is an 18th-century example.

0:30:010:30:08

If you look at the carving on the back,

0:30:080:30:11

it's actually very, very beautifully carved, low relief,

0:30:110:30:15

but very much in an Oriental taste,

0:30:150:30:18

it's got a very Eastern flavour -

0:30:180:30:20

the way the flowers are done, the way the leaves are carved.

0:30:200:30:24

And these heads - although they're trying to depict Western figures, they've got an Oriental feel to them.

0:30:240:30:31

And so these are carved by people in the East trying to imitate the look of Western figures.

0:30:310:30:37

And if we turn it round,

0:30:370:30:40

it's also very, very beautifully carved on the back,

0:30:400:30:44

these turned spindles, which again relate to early English furniture,

0:30:440:30:48

so it's quite understandable why people believed them to be that.

0:30:480:30:53

-Is it something you've had valued or given any thought to?

-I've never had it valued. I've often thought...

0:30:530:31:00

-I really should find out more about it.

-Mmm.

0:31:000:31:04

One's probably looking at a figure of something like £5,000 for one chair.

0:31:040:31:09

It's a very, very good example.

0:31:090:31:12

This is Welsh porcelain as good as it comes. Are you a collector?

0:31:120:31:17

I am. My wife and I have been collecting for 20 years.

0:31:170:31:21

And these are choice pieces indeed.

0:31:210:31:24

Two different Welsh factories - two pieces of Nantgarw,

0:31:240:31:28

and this one here - Swansea. And this one...

0:31:280:31:31

one feels the factory is struggling because it's got no gold edge.

0:31:310:31:36

-I was attracted to that one purely for the decoration - very elegant.

-Yes, it is elegant.

0:31:360:31:42

I'm looking at these flowers here and see the hand of William Billingsley.

0:31:420:31:48

-Had you thought about the artist?

-I hadn't.

0:31:480:31:52

-Not Billingsley, anyway.

-But attributing the artists is tricky.

0:31:520:31:56

What matters is the style which is so classic.

0:31:560:32:00

This has the Swansea mark on the back,

0:32:000:32:03

so decorated at the factory, but never finished off.

0:32:030:32:06

It looks naked without the gold edge,

0:32:060:32:09

-but that gives a lightness which is really wonderful.

-Yes.

0:32:090:32:13

And two pieces, though with very different decoration, from Nantgarw.

0:32:130:32:17

Really superb porcelain made there - such difficult material to make -

0:32:170:32:22

a lot of it so beautiful, they sent it to London for painting.

0:32:220:32:27

And here we've got London decoration at its best. What is that?

0:32:270:32:32

A Virginia quail, I believe.

0:32:320:32:35

Oh, it tells us there, "Virginian Quail",

0:32:350:32:39

and one can just see the mark tucked in there - Nantgarw CW - China Works.

0:32:390:32:43

And the decoration here - London work rather than decorated at Nantgarw,

0:32:430:32:48

but stunning, isn't it?

0:32:480:32:51

And this one - that looks good painting...

0:32:510:32:55

-Incredible detail.

-Fantastic.

-Every inch of it smothered.

-Yes.

0:32:550:33:00

-All those flowers - they're so real.

-Yes. Many hours gone into that.

0:33:000:33:03

-I think it's superb.

-This is really magnificent London painting

0:33:030:33:09

and that reminds me of the finest Derby or George Complan,

0:33:090:33:13

a Derby painter of fruit. The detail is incredible

0:33:130:33:17

and that gold is all done by hand.

0:33:170:33:19

It looks so perfect. How on earth can anyone do that quality?

0:33:190:33:24

Splendid pieces.

0:33:240:33:26

So we know that they're good, quite expensive pieces too.

0:33:260:33:31

Yes, they were, yes.

0:33:310:33:33

-Do you know much about their values? You bought them recently?

-No.

0:33:330:33:38

They were bought between 8 and 10 years ago from a dealer in Swansea.

0:33:380:33:42

The market's been rising steadily

0:33:420:33:45

because people do realise how good they are.

0:33:450:33:48

-This is nice being Swansea decorated, although the lack of gold will reduce the value a little.

-Right.

0:33:480:33:54

A cracking plate...

0:33:540:33:57

-£2,000 today.

-Really? Oh, thank you.

0:33:570:34:00

Nantgarw plates are generally more expensive,

0:34:000:34:04

and a London-decorated plate like this, with a named bird...

0:34:040:34:09

-ooh, £3,200 - £3,500.

-Wow! Yeah.

-Hopefully, they're going up.

0:34:090:34:14

-More than I expected.

-Going up.

0:34:140:34:17

And how do you value a plate that's so nice? Um, let's guess...

0:34:170:34:23

-£5,000?

-..Really?

0:34:230:34:26

-Where do you get a better one than that?

-You won't.

0:34:260:34:30

This red chalk drawing of what appears to be a military gentleman

0:34:300:34:36

is inscribed - not signed, in my opinion, but inscribed - Lancret.

0:34:360:34:41

Now, tell me what you feel about the drawing and a little bit about it.

0:34:410:34:46

Well, the...drawing has been in my possession for 40 years or so.

0:34:460:34:51

It was given to me by my father, who took it from a portfolio given to him by his brother, an art dealer.

0:34:510:34:57

-Right.

-So that's the background.

0:34:570:35:01

I believe that you're right that the signature doesn't match the drawing,

0:35:010:35:06

-but what I'd like to know is who actually did it.

-Yes, well,

0:35:060:35:10

I'm not absolutely convinced I'm going to be able to tell you.

0:35:100:35:14

But it's interesting this question of whether it actually could be English

0:35:140:35:18

or whether it could be French and I think that is one of the things that we must consider.

0:35:180:35:25

Now, Lancret was a pupil of Gillot and a fellow pupil with Watteau,

0:35:250:35:32

who was probably the greatest figure draughtsman in 18th-century France,

0:35:320:35:41

but really...the style of Lancret is much more sophisticated.

0:35:410:35:49

Um...sometimes there was a kind of ease and facility about his work

0:35:490:35:55

which doesn't appear in this drawing.

0:35:550:35:57

The hands, the foreshortening here, is a bit inadequate,

0:35:570:36:01

so perhaps it's not, after all, by an absolutely top-flight artist.

0:36:010:36:07

One of the people who I consider it might be by - and I'm saying MIGHT,

0:36:070:36:12

because it's as far as I can get just now -

0:36:120:36:15

is William Hoare who, funnily enough, went to Bath like Gainsborough,

0:36:150:36:20

but he was a few years earlier, and he did numerous portrait drawings.

0:36:200:36:25

Now, before we talk about the price, in an oblique light,

0:36:250:36:31

there is a suspicion of a watermark - a shield.

0:36:310:36:36

It would have been good if we'd got the whole watermark and seen whether it was a French or an English paper,

0:36:360:36:43

but I suspect that it's a Dutch paper which both the French and the English would have used, anyway!

0:36:430:36:49

So the only thing one could have been sure of is that it's a certain date,

0:36:490:36:53

but probably wouldn't have indicated who did the drawing.

0:36:530:36:57

If it's by somebody like Hoare of Bath - I'm not saying it is -

0:36:570:37:02

the value, I'm afraid, will be much less than if it was by Lancret.

0:37:020:37:06

If it was by Lancret, we'd be talking about tens of thousands of pounds,

0:37:060:37:11

even though he was an imitator of Watteau. As Hoare of Bath,

0:37:110:37:16

-around £1,500 to £2,000 would be a fair figure for it.

-Thank you.

0:37:160:37:21

-That's most helpful.

-Good.

0:37:210:37:24

This belongs to a club I'm a member of.

0:37:250:37:29

-It's called Ye Pirates Club...

-Ah.

-..in Porthcawl.

0:37:290:37:33

I think it would have been given to the club - it was formed in 1928 -

0:37:330:37:39

-I would think within ten years of its founding.

-Oh, this is great.

0:37:390:37:43

"On Chile's coast my death I found,

0:37:430:37:46

"Killed by the Harriet's jovial crew.

0:37:460:37:48

"My body is in the barrels bound, My teeth exposed to view.

0:37:480:37:53

"My race 'tis true have often died And cherished many a sinner.

0:37:530:37:58

"My flesh was partly boiled and fried And made a Christmas dinner."

0:37:580:38:03

The last two lines are...appropriate to what's caught on Christmas Eve!

0:38:030:38:08

-First of all, it's a sperm whale tooth, but you knew that.

-Yes.

0:38:080:38:13

It's got a lovely colour, and the thing about whalers

0:38:130:38:16

and whaling ships is that it was a real entrepreneur's,

0:38:160:38:22

a real sort of adventurer's type of ship.

0:38:220:38:27

Incredible risks were taken and incredible fortunes could be made,

0:38:270:38:32

because the actual, you know, whale oil, one has to remember,

0:38:320:38:35

was the equivalent of petrol. It powered everything. It was heating, it was lighting,

0:38:350:38:40

it was the prime energy source for the home.

0:38:400:38:44

Now, the ship Harriet - and this is very interesting - the ship Harriet

0:38:440:38:48

was built in 1810 and was registered in New York.

0:38:480:38:53

However, in the 19th century, round about this time,

0:38:530:38:57

there was a nice little bit of trade embargo going on, with the Brits,

0:38:570:39:04

and the Brits started putting, um... not exactly an embargo,

0:39:040:39:09

but they put restrictions on whale oil coming from American whalers.

0:39:090:39:14

So what did the American whalers do?

0:39:150:39:17

Some of them came across the Atlantic

0:39:170:39:21

and re-housed themselves in the British whaling ports,

0:39:210:39:25

so you can see that these sort of circuitous routes to get past laws

0:39:250:39:32

have been going on for ages. We've got here,

0:39:320:39:36

"South Seaman" and the captain, James Jones.

0:39:360:39:39

It's registered that the captain was a Mr Jones and the owner was a Mr Riley, so we know all about the boat,

0:39:390:39:46

which is great.

0:39:460:39:49

The other interesting thing here is the date - 1821.

0:39:490:39:54

It's very, very early for a tooth to be dated 1821.

0:39:540:39:59

There's a whole series of teeth produced by an American whaling ship called the ship Susan,

0:39:590:40:07

dating from around 1827,

0:40:070:40:09

-and it's very unusual to have anything dated from before that.

-Is that so?

0:40:090:40:16

So, all in all, I think you've got a very interesting -

0:40:170:40:21

and, I have to say, historically important - piece of scrimshaw here.

0:40:210:40:27

What's it going to be worth?

0:40:270:40:30

Well, there's no documentary evidence to support the fact

0:40:300:40:34

that this was off the coast of Chile in 1821, but why disbelieve it?

0:40:340:40:40

Everything about the tooth feels right -

0:40:400:40:43

the patina, the type of writing here,

0:40:430:40:46

everything about it feels good, so I am not doubting it at all,

0:40:460:40:51

and I think you should insure it, or Ye Pirates should insure it

0:40:510:40:56

for about £10,000.

0:40:560:40:58

-Goodness gracious! I know they all say that, but we thought £2,000.

-No.

-It's a lot more.

-It's fantastic.

0:40:580:41:08

-You looked it up?

-Yeah.

-Now, how did you look it up?

0:41:080:41:10

-It's got a sign underneath that I thought was important.

-Right.

0:41:100:41:15

-So what did you find out?

-That it was the Dutch India Company

0:41:150:41:21

that used that insignia on their porcelain and that it was...

0:41:210:41:26

-You've done your homework.

-A bit.

-I can't tell you anything about this.

0:41:260:41:30

-OK, I'm going to ask you to pronounce what that stands for.

-No idea.

0:41:300:41:35

-It says VOC...

-Right.

0:41:350:41:37

..which you quite rightly say is the insignia of the Dutch East Company,

0:41:370:41:42

which, if you'll forgive my Dutch, is Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie.

0:41:420:41:46

-Oh, right.

-The United East India Company.

0:41:460:41:50

And it is an insignia which a lot of people collect,

0:41:500:41:54

whether it's on porcelain or on metalware,

0:41:540:41:57

guns even carried the same insignia, it was a very important monogram.

0:41:570:42:02

-How did it get to you?

-I bought a box of china in an auction 10 years ago

0:42:020:42:07

because I wanted a particular teapot - I collect Denby ware -

0:42:070:42:12

and this was in the bottom, and I washed it and looked at it

0:42:120:42:16

and I offered it to my niece, who refused it because it was chipped,

0:42:160:42:20

and I said, "Fine, I'll keep it." It's sat on my bookcase ever since.

0:42:200:42:25

-What's the maximum you've ever paid for a piece of Denby ware?

-Oh, £10.

0:42:250:42:29

-£10?

-Yes.

-So this is an also-ran.

0:42:290:42:32

-Yes, yes.

-This is a bonus?

-It was £4 for the box, yeah.

-£4.

0:42:320:42:36

-So anything I tell you that this is worth will be...a plus?

-Got to be.

0:42:360:42:40

Well, let me tell you about the shape - a wine-bottle shape,

0:42:400:42:44

and then this decoration along the edge is called octopus scroll or caracusa scroll.

0:42:440:42:50

-It is, sadly, damaged.

-Yeah.

-You've got all this chipping round the edge

0:42:500:42:54

-and you've got chipping around the sides.

-Yes.

-You've dated it?

-No.

0:42:540:42:58

I couldn't - I'd no idea.

0:42:580:43:00

-OK, well this dates to about 1680 or 1690.

-Never!

0:43:000:43:06

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:43:060:43:08

Wow!

0:43:080:43:10

And badly chipped, it's sadly only going to be worth somewhere around...

0:43:100:43:15

-£1,500.

-You're joking.

0:43:150:43:18

-£1,500?

-Yeah.

-Wow! My grandsons will have their new surfboards!

0:43:180:43:26

SHE CHUCKLES

0:43:260:43:29

Pretty well the whole of Bridgend came to the Roadshow. It's been an astonishing turnout.

0:43:290:43:35

Thanks to everyone for showing us their treasures and for letting us share their memories.

0:43:350:43:40

From Wales, goodbye.

0:43:400:43:42

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:050:44:09

Michael Aspel and a team of experts invite members of the public to bring along their antiques for examination. Fascinating finds include several plates from the Nant Gawr and Swansea potteries, a Victorian Welsh hat, a high-quality, bow-fronted barometer and a valuable whale's tooth.