Chichester Cathedral Antiques Roadshow


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Chichester Cathedral

Michael Aspel's team of experts assess antiques. They visit Chichester Cathedral and are excited to see an original manuscript by 19th-century adventure writer RM Ballantyne.


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Here shall the actor strip his very soul

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To clothe it in another's charactery

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And eloquence, like a flight of doves

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Shall circle in the clear, expectant air

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And inspiration, reaching for the stars

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Glean a rich harvest here.

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That was part of a poem to celebrate the opening of this,

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the Chichester Festival Theatre -

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the first major UK venue in the 20th century

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to have a thrust stage with the audience on three sides,

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the way they did it in ancient Greece.

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Laurence Olivier was Chichester's first artistic director in 1962,

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and his season of plays performed by the same ensemble

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is a tradition honoured again when the festival opens its doors from April to October.

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Chichester Cathedral has drawn us back today.

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The shrine to St Richard, who was bishop here in the 13th century,

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still attracts thousands of modern pilgrims.

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The building has suffered its share of catastrophe -

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it was consecrated for the third time in 1199,

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having been twice destroyed by fire.

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In 1861, the 15th-century spire collapsed,

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and restoring it took 100 years and a huge amount of money.

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But the separate bell tower from around 1400 has fared rather better

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and is now unique in England.

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So here we are in the welcoming depths of Chichester's cathedral.

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Let's join our choir of experts.

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-Let's take it out. You know it's a covered bed?

-Yes.

-From experience?

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Oh, yes, I slept on it. For how long?

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-Emergencies?

-From about five to about 35. 30 years on it.

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-You're familiar with it.

-Yes.

-Straight on it?

-We had a mattress.

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-So you couldn't fold it up?

-No.

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I suspect that the original user of this was probably a servant.

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-Yes.

-And slept on a very, very thin mattress...

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-Probably.

-..so that it could be folded up and put away.

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Yes, put away during the day.

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It's amazing to see one of these with their original bed. Mostly, they've been dismantled.

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-Let's put it away. It's very beautifully but simply made, isn't it?

-Yes.

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It's held together with these leather strap hinges.

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These wedge-shaped bits of framework block it all into position and make it very secure.

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Right, when do you think it was made originally?

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I think it could be up to 200 years old.

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It IS about 200 years old, between 1810 and 1820, something like that.

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It's certainly English and was made somewhere in the countryside. It's not a London-made piece.

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-It came from Norfolk.

-That's where you used it?

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-No, my mother was a Norfolk person.

-Right.

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And she brought it from Norfolk to Sussex when they were married.

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Right.

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Unfortunately, its main value lies in ripping the thing apart

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and turning it into a piece of furniture with a very definite modern use, ie a television cabinet.

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People would die to hide away their TVs, videos, hi-fis,

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computers, all that sort of modern electrical gubbins

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-into this piece, but then you've lost its original insides.

-Oh, yes.

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It would be a very sad thing to do, but in pounds, shillings and pence terms, that's where its value is.

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£500, £600 - not a fortune, given how interesting it is.

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It's the amount of use and money that needs to be spent on it that limits its value.

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Anyway, jolly nice to see it, and I'm pleased to have met somebody who's slept on one of these things.

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You get no draught round the head!

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-The pillow doesn't fall off the back either.

-No!

-Brilliant.

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You've got so many of these, but you don't know what they are!

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I've got an idea they are Japanese.

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Yes.

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Um, they could be Mandarin buttons.

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Mandarin buttons - I don't think we get Mandarins in Japan.

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Oh.

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-Well, I don't really know.

-Where did they come from?

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-I bought them when I was in my 20s.

-Really?

-Yes, at various places.

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And may I ask how long ago that was?

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Well, I'm 94 now.

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-You're 94?!

-Yes.

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-You bought these in your 20s.

-Yes.

-Good time to buy. What did you pay?

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-Oh...nothing over £2.

-Really?

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-Yes.

-OK, well, I'm going to tell you what they are.

-Yes.

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-They are Japanese.

-Yes.

-They're kagamibuta - a form of netsuke.

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-Yes.

-They're a little toggle. The cord went through there,

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and that went... was tucked up under your belt,

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and you hung a pouch

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or a little box called an inro from it.

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But these served another function.

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You tap out the contents of your pipe into it, so it was an ashtray.

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Oh, that's interesting!

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Now, the Japanese, when they smoke a pipe, they have a tiny little bowl, only about that big.

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The Japanese take one pinch of tobacco, light it,

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smoke it in one puff and then tap it out into one of these.

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My favourite is this one,

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which is all ivory, beautifully carved

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with a shishi with its pup, playing with a brocade ball,

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which has been stained and inlaid.

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On the base we've got another very well carved shishi and a signature.

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-What kind of age?

-I was just about to say,

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they're all the same sort of date. They're mid-19th century.

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This one's going to be worth more than the £2 you paid for it.

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-That's something.

-They all are.

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-We're looking at an average price of around £200 or £300.

-Oh, really?

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This one, £1,000 to £1,500.

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-Goodness me!

-You have a very good eye.

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-Thank you for bringing them in.

-Thank you. I've enjoyed it.

-Good.

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-How long have you had this for?

-More than 50 years,

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because it was a wedding present.

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-So you've been married for over 50 years. It's a very fashionable, popular object these days.

-Yes.

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Made of tortoiseshell, veneered in a very nice casket form.

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This has got a sort of caddy top and it's still got, in the front here,

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a key escutcheon, because at this time of about 1820, tea was still an expensive commodity,

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and the servants were not allowed access, so the lady of the house had the key.

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If we open it up, we've got twin canisters -

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you could have a selection of tea.

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You take the tea out of here, mix it in a bowl,

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and then put it into your teapot.

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Velvet lined at the top.

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-These are made of ivory.

-Are they?

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Little turned ivory buttons.

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Pristine. They're not broken.

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They're fragile, so it's nice to see them here.

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And you're still using it.

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-Indeed I am.

-Isn't that lovely?

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You have got tea bags in there that fit absolutely perfectly.

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It's so nice that people use something like this,

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because usually, they're just a decoration.

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Be careful not to get steam on this,

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-because it will take the nice patina off the tortoiseshell.

-Oh, yes, yes.

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Because it's quite a valuable thing.

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Well, I suppose so!

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Well, if I tell you it's worth £1,500...

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Well, yes. That IS a lot of money!

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It's a lovely dish - massive thing!

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Um...and transfer printed - this is a blue print, not a hand painting,

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but splendid and intended to be a hanging plaque.

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You've got these little holes for hanging it.

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This is safe and strong, cos it's massive. How long have you had it?

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I bought it in an antique shop in Torquay for £40

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about 20 years ago.

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The mark is interesting.

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Watteau, the name of the pattern and Doulton, the factory who made it.

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But down here,

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there's the mark of the original factory

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-that Doulton bought up in the 1880s.

-Yes.

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Pinder Bourne. Doulton bought up Pinder Bourne.

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This is an original plaque acquired by Doulton's,

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-so they put the print on it.

-Yes.

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Made in 1881 and it's splendid, isn't it?

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-You like it, do you?

-I LOVE it, yes.

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So the 40 quid has risen up to £200 or £300, which is nice. Nice increase,

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-but the pleasure of the pot is more than value.

-I think so, yes.

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This is charming. Look at that page.

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Her bleeding heart, I assume, and things like that.

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Absolutely wonderful.

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I've seen 19th and 20th-century picture puzzle books,

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but I've never seen a 17th-century one, and this one - not printed,

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but actually an original manuscript.

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-Where did you get it?

-My husband inherited it from his grandfather,

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and we find it quite curious, the fact that it seems to have shorthand on one side...

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Shorthand on one side, yes.

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..the little texts with the puzzles and the beautiful little drawings.

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But it's a wonderful way to teach children.

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"Mourn much poor heart

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"Stand that friends must part."

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And so it goes on.

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"The young must die, old must die,

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"Something fade and so must you and I."

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It's lovely.

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-I presume the answer is on this side.

-Right.

-But in shorthand.

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I don't know shorthand, I'm just guessing.

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-Looking at the binding, there's not much left of the spine to it, but that can be repaired.

-Yes.

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I think it ought to be tidied up.

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Here is a date - wonderful date on the end - 1694.

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-Um, possibly the shorthand was added later as a further exercise.

-Right.

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But that's the beauty of these books, and this one is so pretty.

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I wouldn't be surprised if you could see this at £2,000. Oh, God!

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-Possibly more, but I think that would be conservative.

-Right.

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Somebody would look and say, "It's a silly old child's book, it's dirty."

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-But it...

-But it's got it!

-It has.

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-It's colourful, it's beautiful, it's clever.

-It's clever.

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It's cleverer than me!

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This is my grandmother and she gave the necklace to my elder sister.

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-So that would date from when?

-About 1917.

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That would tie in with the piece of jewellery,

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which is a very interesting design.

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It's by the firm Murrle Bennett,

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who made silver jewellery in the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau style.

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This geometric design

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is more like the German and Austrian Art Nouveau designs,

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which tend to be rather geometric.

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-It's silver. The stones are amethysts.

-Are they?

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And a very nice little chain,

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with this very typical fastening -

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this bar through a ring, which looks dodgy,

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but is completely secure.

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My sister's always worried the clasp could come undone.

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You could put a safety chain on it.

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I would, certainly for insurance, place a value on this

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-of somewhere in the £1,000 to £1,200 range.

-Really? Oh, my goodness!

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-Amazing, isn't it?

-Yes!

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It's been in England, North America, South America

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over the time we've had it in the family.

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-It's obviously been looked after.

-Definitely so.

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Because it is a little treasure.

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You've brought some evidence to show when it was...

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-What year is this photograph?

-1902 - it shows my grandfather's house.

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You could keep everybody busy if we could retrieve all the objects here,

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but here it is on the top right-hand corner of the mantelpiece

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and here it is 100 years later. Documentary evidence, wonderful.

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Let's have a look at it.

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This was made in Austria by a firm called Loetz. Loetz specialised in iridescent glass

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and for a long time, they've been regarded as poor man's Tiffany

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which is very, very unfair, because they were making this type of glass before Tiffany,

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-so it's worth knowing.

-Wow.

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Now, the glass itself, if we look at it,

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on the inside, it's a cobalt colour.

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The surface is covered with this amazing iridescence,

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which is a bit like a butterfly's wing.

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In fact, Loetz called this papillon glass.

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-Oh?

-And this silver...

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is achieved using electrolysis.

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It's immersed in an electrolytic bath,

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having covered the areas where they didn't want the glass to anneal.

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This would have been either wax or a rubber resist

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to prevent the actual silver building up in those specific areas.

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I'm not sure how long it would be in that bath, but several days,

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for that level of silver to build up,

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but obviously, it's got to build up enough

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for the decorator then to trim away and then carve in the decoration.

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It's one of my favourite bits of Art Nouveau glass - that is the style,

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with the floral decoration and the...

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-It's just such a sensual pot. It's shaped like Mae West!

-It is.

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It is a wonderful pot, and there's very much of an organic feel to it,

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so it's a combination of emulating nature

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and top technology to bring all these elements together.

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Just another thing to look at -

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99 times out of 100,

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you should have this feature, which is a ground pontil mark.

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This is the area where the pontil rod, used in the glass making, has been connected,

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snapped off and then it's polished away.

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It's always a sign of quality on any type of glassware.

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So we've got to come to terms with...with value.

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I know it's a family treasure, and I know it's probably priceless,

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-but if it was mine, I'd be insuring this for at least £1,500.

-Thank you.

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It's been a treasure in the home ever since I can remember.

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This is a wonderful collection of miniature tools.

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My father actually made it.

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He was a coppersmith and a blacksmith in the dockyard

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-and he made all the pieces gradually over the years.

-Terrific!

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He had a fantastic eye for detail and quality. If we have a look at one or two of them -

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this is a spirit level. Wonderful detail on the brass, there.

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A little drill. The nice thing is,

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they are all in working order.

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-Yes.

-So do you have a particular favourite or not?

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-I think the plane's quite nice.

-Oh, yes, a miniature plane here.

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-It's got a blade in, underneath.

-Yeah.

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How long would it have taken him to make a single one, do you think?

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It probably took him about a month, I suppose.

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-A labour of love, and he just did it as a hobby.

-Yeah.

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Yes, a pair of shears I see here. Again, they work terrifically well.

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-A bow saw. They're almost all made of brass.

-Brass and copper.

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-That was his favourite metal?

-Yes.

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-It was a relaxation, although almost a busman's holiday for him.

-Yeah.

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A terrific craftsman. He made most of them when? In the '50s and '60s?

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Yeah, yeah, up until probably about the mid '70s, I suppose.

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Individually, they're not of great value.

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But I would think, as a collection, they must be worth £1,500 to £2,000.

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-Pleasure to see them.

-Thank you for looking at them.

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It's a lovely collection of portrait miniatures.

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How did you come by this lot?

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They were collected by a family friend of my parents,

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and he left them all to my mother.

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-Uh-huh.

-And, er, there was a larger collection.

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When my mother died last year, in her will, it was split three ways,

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so we laid them out on the floor,

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and in turns, one, then my sister and then my brother took one, so unfortunately some are split.

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Which ones do you like best?

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I like that one and I particularly like that one as well, it's lovely.

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I love the beautiful gowns and the colours of it.

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-I just think they're pretty.

-They are very pretty.

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I hoped you might pick this one - the frame is made up of piano keys.

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-Is it? Oh, golly!

-And it's all made up to look like an old miniature.

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This is not a rare miniature, but it's very pretty.

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If I could choose one to take...

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-Yes.

-This lady here is beautiful,

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and whilst I have to say I don't know who she's by,

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there's something lovely about it, with this extraordinarily long neck

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and lovely hair and so on, and I suppose she's, er, about 1825,

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so that's rather lovely.

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And you've got here something which is quite out of the range.

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-Were there other oil paintings?

-Not that I'm aware of.

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But for a collector, that's not a portrait miniature

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like these are. These are nearly all on card or ivory,

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whereas this is on a thin copper panel

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and, um, is Continental,

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whereas almost all of these are English,

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except for the two on porcelain.

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So we have a Continental portrait,

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probably northern European, about 1740.

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It's the earliest of the pictures.

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-I can't value what your brothers and sisters have.

-No.

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But you've got a wonderful collection,

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and even ones like this, which aren't particularly old or valuable,

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are still worth £150 to £200 for that one.

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A really good miniature like these ones, or the girl there,

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are going to be worth £500 or £600 each.

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And this one here,

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-probably £700 to £900.

-Goodness me!

0:20:470:20:51

It's a substantial lot, so it must have been a great collection.

0:20:510:20:55

That's lovely, thank you very much.

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It was made in one of the loveliest periods of English clock-making,

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round about 1800, Regency period.

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Where did you get it? Was it something you bought?

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It was a clock my grandfather bought, I believe, in Croydon.

0:21:100:21:14

Because he ran a pub opposite the auction rooms

0:21:140:21:18

and he used to pop across there and buy things.

0:21:180:21:22

He made a good buy. We know who the maker is. If we open the front here,

0:21:220:21:28

it's signed indistinctly on the engrave there - Daniel de St Leu,

0:21:280:21:34

who was an English clock maker but, like so many,

0:21:340:21:38

was descended from Huguenot origins.

0:21:380:21:41

Two dials at the top there.

0:21:410:21:43

The one on the left is numbered up to 31 - that's a calendar dial.

0:21:430:21:48

The one on the right is numbered 0 to 60.

0:21:480:21:51

You wonder what that is - not a seconds hand.

0:21:510:21:55

-No.

-Do you know what it's for?

-No, I don't, I'm afraid.

0:21:550:21:59

We'll come back to that in a moment. Look at the back plate.

0:21:590:22:04

Beautifully engraved.

0:22:040:22:06

You've quite correctly put the pendulum in there for travelling.

0:22:060:22:11

-Yes.

-If we release that, away comes the pendulum and away it will tick.

0:22:110:22:16

Back to that dial, that mechanism on the dial which is numbered 0 to 60.

0:22:160:22:21

Have you seen what happens when you turn it round?

0:22:210:22:25

-No.

-Right, let's do it.

-Never bothered!

-OK.

0:22:250:22:29

-You look at the back there.

-OK.

0:22:290:22:32

-Look at the top of the pendulum. Can you see what's happening?

-Oh, yes.

0:22:320:22:37

-It's rising and falling - this is called a rise-and-fall mechanism.

-Ah.

0:22:370:22:43

And it's for the fine adjustment of time keeping.

0:22:430:22:46

-I've got you, yes.

-In other words, you can make the pendulum shorter or longer by that.

0:22:460:22:51

But you have to physically turn the handle, turn the dial on the front?

0:22:510:22:56

Yes, you can do that when the clock is working. You don't have to stop the clock.

0:22:560:23:01

A pendulum works rather like a dog's tail - the shorter it is, the faster it wags,

0:23:010:23:06

so to make a clock go fast, you make the pendulum shorter.

0:23:060:23:09

And this whole mechanism there is called the rise-and-fall mechanism. So...

0:23:090:23:14

a very lovely clock. Have you ever carried it by that handle?

0:23:140:23:18

-No.

-Good, good! I'll say straight away, "Good!" ..Don't!

0:23:180:23:22

It might have been what it was intended for when it was made,

0:23:220:23:26

but now the case is 200 years old, the glue's getting a bit dry.

0:23:260:23:30

You pick it up one day, it'll make a lovely noise as it hits the floor!

0:23:300:23:35

So always carry it from underneath.

0:23:350:23:38

Now, as to its value. I think a clock like this, at auction,

0:23:380:23:42

would fetch certainly £3,500. Maybe £4,500.

0:23:420:23:46

-Would it really?

-It would. And if you see this in a good antique shop...

0:23:460:23:52

somewhat more. It's a £5,000 to £6,000 clock.

0:23:520:23:55

-Is it really?

-A lovely clock indeed. Beautiful in every way.

0:23:550:23:59

In 1955, living in London in a flat,

0:24:020:24:05

we wanted as much storage space as we could get, and we saw this large piece of furniture

0:24:050:24:10

quite liked it, knew nothing about it, and bought it in the Kings Road, Chelsea.

0:24:100:24:17

It immediately suggests what I would call Biedermeier,

0:24:170:24:21

which is the sort of bourgeois furniture that becomes incredibly fashionable

0:24:210:24:25

in the first half of the 19th century.

0:24:250:24:28

And in Biedermeier furniture,

0:24:280:24:30

you tend to have this reliance on simple shapes, on some classical decoration.

0:24:300:24:35

And you have these very attractive sort of half-length pilasters here

0:24:350:24:40

with little bits of carved decoration,

0:24:400:24:43

which is more than you find on some Biedermeier pieces.

0:24:430:24:47

Pure Biedermeier is 1815 to 1830,

0:24:470:24:53

but it spreads more than that - 1815 to 1848, that sort of period.

0:24:530:24:57

But the fact that it's got these carved pilasters

0:24:570:25:01

is slightly different to a lot of the most obvious Biedermeier,

0:25:010:25:05

which has no carving at all.

0:25:050:25:08

And also, these sort of lozenge-shaped drawers, which are very bold, very geometrical.

0:25:080:25:14

And it has its surprise when it pulls forward

0:25:140:25:18

and has this, I think, really lovely secretaire drawer inside.

0:25:180:25:24

It pulls down like that.

0:25:240:25:27

And what's interesting about it is on the outside

0:25:270:25:31

you have a native wood, walnut, and this is a paler wood -

0:25:310:25:35

it could be birch - and ebonised decoration,

0:25:350:25:38

which is also quite bold and dramatic on the inside.

0:25:380:25:43

But on the outside, you also have this use of symmetrical veneers.

0:25:440:25:49

Why no handles?

0:25:490:25:52

I think the handles were thought to get in the way of the whole simplicity of the front,

0:25:520:25:59

so it works on a key, which isn't the most practical thing, I suppose.

0:25:590:26:02

They're heavy to pull out once they're full. Very heavy.

0:26:020:26:06

Such things now aren't tremendously fashionable in this country.

0:26:060:26:09

-They're much more fashionable on the Continent. What did you pay for it?

-£25.

0:26:090:26:14

-£25 in...

-1955.

0:26:140:26:16

-Which was not nothing, then!

-No!

0:26:160:26:19

I think, nowadays...

0:26:190:26:21

..maybe £1,500 to £2,000 - something like that,

0:26:240:26:28

-which doesn't seem a lot for an extremely attractive piece.

-Well, it's a good profit!

0:26:280:26:32

We're talking plunder here, aren't we? Tell us about this dish.

0:26:360:26:39

1889, an iron steamship had a collision in the Channel just off the coast of Sussex

0:26:390:26:45

with a sailing ship - it was a wooden one. The iron steamship sank

0:26:450:26:51

and loss of life was nearly 50. The captain, also.

0:26:510:26:54

It was carrying at the time a lot of china - 600 tons -

0:26:540:27:00

some glass and some cotton.

0:27:000:27:04

-And where was it heading for?

-It was on its way to Madras and the china was picked up in Antwerp.

0:27:040:27:10

-It was collected there.

-Is this expensive?

0:27:100:27:13

It wasn't hugely valuable at the time. It was day-to-day types of stuff.

0:27:130:27:18

And how much has been recovered?

0:27:180:27:20

Over the years - since 1989 - quite a considerable amount of this has been recovered.

0:27:200:27:26

-And who is doing the recovering?

-A lot of it is done by sports divers.

0:27:260:27:30

You'd think the story would make it very valuable, wouldn't you?

0:27:300:27:34

Yes, but it's not hugely valuable.

0:27:340:27:37

I think Henry said earlier on that it's going to be worth maybe £40 per piece,

0:27:370:27:43

but it's got local interest to us - that's what we like about it.

0:27:430:27:46

They were done by my grandmother in the 1910s and 1920s.

0:27:460:27:53

They are extraordinary! Here's a bathing costume here...

0:27:530:27:57

Put that on there... And lovely dresses here. There must be about 50 or 60 dresses.

0:27:570:28:03

Yes, I remember as a child that I was allowed to play with them on high days and holidays.

0:28:030:28:08

-Yes.

-And, um...that I've always treasured them. They were given to me when I was a teenager.

0:28:080:28:14

She must have worked very hard because they are quite sophisticated

0:28:140:28:17

and they're all hand-drawn and they're all coloured in with watercolour.

0:28:170:28:23

She went to an art school in London and then became a dress designer,

0:28:230:28:29

-apparently for somebody called Raymonde - Raymonde somebody.

-Raymonde sounds terribly French!

0:28:290:28:35

Well, I don't know if it's male or female, but that's all I know.

0:28:350:28:39

And really I wanted to find out how I can find out more about fashion in the 1920s

0:28:390:28:46

and whether she really did design anything that was worthwhile.

0:28:460:28:50

You'd have to go to a fashion museum, or a fashion design museum.

0:28:500:28:55

-You could go to the clothing museum in Bath...

-Oh, right.

0:28:550:28:58

..and see what literature they've got and whether, in fact, they can trace him - or her - back.

0:28:580:29:05

-Right.

-But I think all of these are obviously, obviously good designs.

0:29:050:29:10

This one's interesting, because it's almost contemporary, isn't it?

0:29:100:29:14

You know, sort of very much off-the-shoulders,

0:29:140:29:17

but also with a contemporary tattoo.

0:29:170:29:20

And this one here...

0:29:200:29:23

It's hardly decent!

0:29:230:29:25

-No, well, she was a bit of a girl, I think, in her day.

-Right.

0:29:250:29:30

-The Roaring '20s!

-Absolutely Roaring '20s!

0:29:300:29:34

You've got about another 50...

0:29:340:29:36

-I think so, yes.

-..sets of drawings.

-Yes.

0:29:360:29:39

So a fabulous collection of costume design of the 1920s.

0:29:390:29:45

These 50 have to be worth somewhere in the region...

0:29:450:29:48

Very hard to value, but I would have thought between £500 and £1,000.

0:29:480:29:53

Goodness me!

0:29:530:29:55

They were my grandmother's. When my grandmother died,

0:29:550:29:59

-my mother had them. When my mother died,

-I

-had them.

0:29:590:30:02

Well, they're really lovely

0:30:020:30:06

and just about the prettiest sort of work that was done around the start of the century.

0:30:060:30:10

And, actually,

0:30:100:30:12

looking at them more carefully, I don't actually think that this...

0:30:120:30:16

-ever had anything to do with that.

-Really?

0:30:160:30:19

This doesn't fit and the enamelling's quite different,

0:30:190:30:23

-so I don't think it ever went together at all.

-Well, I never!

0:30:230:30:28

These were made abroad. And this one's got an import mark.

0:30:280:30:31

They were made probably either in France or Switzerland,

0:30:310:30:35

but they've got all this beautiful enamelling and it's all engine-turned underneath.

0:30:350:30:41

And then you have this translucent enamelling on top,

0:30:410:30:45

so that you get this lovely play of light through the enamel.

0:30:450:30:49

It's just a delightful little miniature carriage clock.

0:30:490:30:53

This is just for your rings...

0:30:530:30:55

and of course this for scent. Really charming and delightful.

0:30:550:31:00

Very difficult to do this type of enamelling so beautifully.

0:31:000:31:04

How old do you think they are?

0:31:040:31:06

Well, this was imported into England in 1913,

0:31:060:31:10

so it has a London import mark for that year,

0:31:100:31:13

and the other pieces are of a similar period.

0:31:130:31:17

Well, if you had to replace just this little clock alone,

0:31:170:31:22

it would cost somewhere round...

0:31:220:31:24

the £1,500 to £2,000 mark.

0:31:240:31:27

-What, for that little clock?!

-Yeah.

0:31:280:31:31

Absolutely! And the scent bottle and the stand

0:31:310:31:34

-I would say is probably another £1,500 to £2,000.

-Good grief!

0:31:340:31:40

Well...!

0:31:400:31:42

I know he's English because I looked him up. An English artist.

0:31:420:31:46

-What else did you discover about him?

-That he exhibited a lot.

-Yes.

0:31:460:31:52

-Nothing else?

-No.

-OK.

0:31:520:31:55

He was actually a very successful Victorian watercolourist

0:31:550:31:59

and largely socially, because he taught the Queen how to paint.

0:31:590:32:04

He was one of Queen Victoria's painting masters

0:32:040:32:08

-and that, of course, takes you a very long way in Victorian society, as you might imagine.

-Yes.

0:32:080:32:13

I wouldn't say that he's one of England's greatest watercolourists.

0:32:130:32:17

I'm not making great claims for him, but it's just that he firmed up

0:32:170:32:21

on a very lively, colourful style

0:32:210:32:24

that you can see very easily in this watercolour.

0:32:240:32:29

-Isn't it a very lively little picture?

-Yes, I love it!

0:32:290:32:33

-Was it painted in Holland or here?

-It looks more Dutch to me.

0:32:330:32:37

But I can't be sure.

0:32:370:32:39

I'd say it's probably worth...

0:32:390:32:42

£800 to £1,200,

0:32:420:32:44

which is quite a nice figure for a little thing like that.

0:32:440:32:47

-Yes.

-Yes?!

0:32:470:32:49

A wonderful set from 1790.

0:32:540:32:57

These are carefully-designed botanical drawings.

0:32:570:33:01

Sometimes the flowers are rather strange specimens...

0:33:010:33:03

but these are nice. They're all British flowers...

0:33:030:33:06

each one, looking through the different designs,

0:33:060:33:10

were taken from the Botanical Magazine.

0:33:100:33:12

It came out as a monthly periodical and each month you would acquire a few more pages...

0:33:120:33:17

-Ah, yes.

-..with different illustrations of wonderful flowers drawn by Curtis.

0:33:170:33:23

And the pottery factories would acquire the books and copy the designs onto them. Lovely specimen!

0:33:230:33:29

It's always labelled clearly on the back of it.

0:33:290:33:33

Yellow-flowered dog's-tooth violet. They were an education in botany.

0:33:330:33:37

-You'd learn your flowers from looking at the service.

-Yes.

0:33:370:33:41

Many potteries, especially in Staffordshire, produced these sets.

0:33:410:33:45

-They don't have a maker's name...

-Yes.

-..but they are Staffordshire rather than Leeds,

0:33:450:33:50

because they're whiter pottery. Leeds was creamier.

0:33:500:33:54

-It's had a bit of a hard life, hasn't it?

-Well, they were in London during the war

0:33:540:33:59

-and we had a bomb 50 yards from the house and they got a bit chipped then.

-So a bit chipped further.

0:33:590:34:04

Nowadays, usually these sets are split up, which is a sad thing.

0:34:040:34:08

Individual plates, like these with nice flowers...

0:34:080:34:11

A single plate like that would normally cost today

0:34:110:34:16

-round about £500.

-Would it?!

0:34:160:34:19

A dish like this is certainly going to be £400 or £500

0:34:190:34:24

and you've got here 11 plates, even with some damaged.

0:34:240:34:28

-Yes.

-I suppose we could be looking at a set here worth...

0:34:280:34:31

perhaps about £4,000.

0:34:310:34:34

Ooh, are we?!

0:34:340:34:36

I shall have to be more careful with it! Thank you very much.

0:34:360:34:41

-Is this a family piece?

-Yes, it is.

0:34:410:34:44

It's my late husband's maternal grandparents'.

0:34:440:34:49

-I believe it was a wedding gift.

-Good heavens!

0:34:490:34:52

Well, I've seen a number of these over the years.

0:34:520:34:57

They normally date from, er... the early part of the 20th century,

0:34:570:35:02

between sort of 1900 and 1920,

0:35:020:35:05

and, um...I expect

0:35:050:35:07

-you may have seen pictures of baskets strapped onto the back of motor cars...

-Yes.

0:35:070:35:13

..for picnicking in the grand style!

0:35:130:35:16

And what I love about these sets is that they're not so much...

0:35:160:35:20

the silver or the plate,

0:35:200:35:23

it's the engineering - that they managed to get so much into such a wonderful compact basket.

0:35:230:35:30

So let's just take a piece out.

0:35:300:35:33

It's a nice weight.

0:35:330:35:35

Good heavens!

0:35:360:35:38

Do you know, this is, I think, probably the first one

0:35:380:35:42

I've ever seen with silver fittings inside.

0:35:420:35:47

Here we've got a set of hallmarks - made in Birmingham

0:35:470:35:52

and the date letter for 1900, so was that when they were married?

0:35:520:35:57

I don't exactly know, but all I know is their first child was born in 1904, so it would be about then.

0:35:570:36:03

So that sounds about right. But that is exceptionally unusual

0:36:030:36:07

to have them made in silver.

0:36:070:36:09

Just look at the quality of this kettle here.

0:36:090:36:13

It says...

0:36:130:36:16

"Remove this lid, also cap from the spout before lighting lamp. Drew & Sons."

0:36:160:36:22

Well, Drew's were a firm operating in Piccadilly

0:36:220:36:27

at the late 19th century, early 20th century, and specialised in making these sort of things.

0:36:270:36:33

And, um...what I particularly like is attention to detail.

0:36:330:36:39

I mean, these spoons...

0:36:390:36:41

-just the way they slot into these little holders!

-Clever, isn't it?

0:36:410:36:45

But look at that - a lovely little fleur-de-lys at the top, nice big hallmarks down the stem...

0:36:450:36:51

You know, they really thought about doing everything in great style.

0:36:510:36:57

-The spoon has got a small chip in it.

-A little bit on the bowl,

0:36:570:37:02

-but we can forgive it that because at least it's still here!

-It's never used.

0:37:020:37:07

-It sits in a cabinet.

-Well, that's where it belongs nowadays.

0:37:070:37:11

But originally made for mustard. The little mark underneath, the little crescent mark,

0:37:110:37:16

-a tell-tale sign...

-Yes.

-..which means Worcester.

0:37:160:37:21

-About 1770.

-Yeah.

-And the fence pattern - a popular pattern.

0:37:210:37:25

Well-made, beautiful condition, nicely-made little object.

0:37:250:37:29

So a mustard pot and cover like that is worth about, um...

0:37:290:37:35

£500. The spoon alone...

0:37:350:37:37

-with a chip, about £800.

-Is it?!

0:37:370:37:40

Golly!

0:37:400:37:42

We've got more... more treasures inside.

0:37:420:37:46

We've got cups...

0:37:460:37:48

and this is probably for sugar.

0:37:480:37:51

Ah! Here we are.

0:37:530:37:55

-"Drew & Sons en route..." I like that!

-Excellent, isn't it?

0:37:550:37:59

"Piccadilly Circus, London West."

0:37:590:38:02

This is...a rarity. A great rarity in superb condition.

0:38:020:38:08

-That's what collectors like. That's what buyers like.

-Yes.

0:38:080:38:12

I think this is such a nice set, I think it should be insured

0:38:120:38:17

-for at least £10,000.

-My goodness! How lovely!

0:38:170:38:22

I don't know how many pieces of commemorative ware I've seen today,

0:38:220:38:27

but 10...20...

0:38:270:38:30

Some of them go back to Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

0:38:300:38:36

And what are they worth?

0:38:360:38:39

£20 to £30.

0:38:390:38:41

So for the person who bought them for, I don't know, two shillings in 1887,

0:38:410:38:46

-no way have they proved a good investment.

-Correct.

-No.

0:38:460:38:50

And I don't believe that any of these will. I mean, a lady came in earlier...

0:38:500:38:55

..with a plate for the Golden Jubilee.

0:38:570:39:01

She'd just bought it - I don't know whether it was this morning! -

0:39:010:39:06

and she said, "Should I keep this as an investment?"

0:39:060:39:10

-I said, "Don't think of it on those terms."

-No.

-"That is not the point.

0:39:100:39:14

"The point is - do you like it?"

0:39:140:39:16

"Oh, yes. I like it." Well, that's what it's all about.

0:39:160:39:20

You've had, obviously, pleasure putting together these commemorative pieces,

0:39:200:39:26

which range from the Jubilee pieces

0:39:260:39:30

through the coronation of George V.

0:39:300:39:36

-You've got...

-Edward VII.

0:39:360:39:38

Edward VII. We've got three of Edward VIII. Why three?

0:39:380:39:43

They just happened to come along at the time and my son was just getting interested in this

0:39:430:39:48

and I asked him if he was interested. He said, "Oh, yes. I'd like to buy those."

0:39:480:39:53

Right. ..Well, this is, I think, the nicest one, really.

0:39:530:39:58

-Beautifully transfer-printed.

-Beautiful.

-With hand-colour on.

0:39:580:40:02

It goes all the way round. The date - May 12th, 1937.

0:40:020:40:07

And on the bottom in gold, um...

0:40:070:40:12

"A perpetual souvenir..." Well, only if you didn't drop it!

0:40:120:40:17

"..in Paragon china". Paragon was a good factory, in fact.

0:40:170:40:23

"Crowned Westminster Abbey, May 12th, 1937." Well, of course...

0:40:230:40:27

-It didn't happen.

-Didn't happen!

-He abdicated.

0:40:270:40:30

And people imagine that because he abdicated,

0:40:300:40:34

these pieces are worth a lot of money, but he was a hugely popular Prince of Wales

0:40:340:40:41

and enormous numbers were made for the Coronation in advance,

0:40:410:40:46

and, er...that was that.

0:40:460:40:49

-George VI came along.

-Correct, yes.

-The bulk of what's here...

0:40:490:40:54

-is £5 to £30.

-Yes.

0:40:540:40:58

But this one is going to be worth

0:40:580:41:01

-£200 to £300.

-Phew!

0:41:010:41:04

-So...

-I thought that was just pretty!

-And we just like them.

0:41:040:41:08

-They're good quality. That's what sets THESE aside from those.

-Yes.

0:41:080:41:14

-And if one is buying commemoratives, always go for the best quality that you can find.

-Absolutely.

0:41:140:41:20

This is quite remarkable - I can hardly believe it's walked in here!

0:41:230:41:27

But you've brought me in the original manuscript

0:41:270:41:30

of RM Ballantyne's "The Lighthouse". Explain yourself!

0:41:300:41:34

Well, RM Ballantyne was a friend of my grandfather's. My grandfather got married in 1869

0:41:340:41:40

and the date of this is 1865,

0:41:400:41:44

so they were bachelors together

0:41:440:41:46

and he was - my grandfather was - the keeper of the manuscripts in the British Museum

0:41:460:41:52

and the keeper of the muniments in Westminster Abbey.

0:41:520:41:55

-Good heavens! My old alma mater!

-Yes?

-I sang in the choir there.

0:41:550:42:00

But this is quite remarkable.

0:42:000:42:02

Ballantyne was quite remarkable.

0:42:020:42:04

He was born at the beginning of the 19th century in 1825.

0:42:040:42:08

He died towards the end in 1894.

0:42:080:42:11

And the first thing he did - one of his first jobs -

0:42:110:42:15

was to work for the Hudson Bay Fur Company.

0:42:150:42:17

-Oh, yes?

-And I suppose he got a lot of his ideas

0:42:170:42:21

for the many, many boys' books

0:42:210:42:23

from Canada. But The Lighthouse is actually set in Scotland, isn't it?

0:42:230:42:28

-Yes.

-It's set off the coast of Forfarshire, or somewhere like that.

0:42:280:42:32

But this is very exciting!

0:42:320:42:35

-I'm going to say £8,000 to £10,000.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:42:350:42:39

-You don't sound surprised.

-Well, I AM! I think that's wonderful.

0:42:390:42:44

And now I think I'll have a stroll around the cloisters, so from Chichester Cathedral, goodbye.

0:42:440:42:49

Michael Aspel's team of experts assess antiques brought for scrutiny by the public. They're excited to see an original manuscript by 19th-century adventure writer RM Ballantyne, as well as continental furniture and glass, a rare mustard spoon and a silver picnic set. Plus a trip to Chichester Cathedral.