De La Warr Pavilion Antiques Roadshow


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De La Warr Pavilion

The Antiques Roadshow teams up with an iconic modernist building, the De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill-on-Sea.


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If it's escaped your notice that the Antiques Roadshow

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is celebrating its 30th anniversary, then you really haven't

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been watching. We've talked a lot

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about the years between now and then.

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We've turned the speedometer back to 1977, the year the show actually began.

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In those days, to eager young petrol heads, the TR6 was the coolest seven wheels on the block,

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and fashion was extremely groovy.

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# ..Yesterday's gone Yesterday's gone... #

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It was a time when women walked tall in stacked wedges.

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Cutting edge flares were a menace to small children and dogs.

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Shirt collars were capable of lift off.

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And the velvet jacket wasn't just worn in private, it was in vogue.

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Just suppose we kept all that groovy gear in mothballs

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and the flash motor in mint condition.

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Well, back in the days when the Roadshow was sucking on its dummy,

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my TR6 was worth just over £1,300.

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Now it's worth £13,000 - a good investment,

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and that's what today's Roadshow is all about,

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making a smart investment for the future of my son.

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And we've found the ideal backdrop,

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get an eyeful of the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea.

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In its day, it was seen by some as brash and ahead of its time,

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just too modern for its own good.

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70 years on, it's a design icon.

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Which leads us to ask, what objects from our recent past should we cherish for the future?

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Eric Knowles is already in the groove.

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Looking at a gramophone such as this, this is the ultimate desire.

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This and an MGB GT was all I ever wanted back in the 1960s.

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This particular radio gramophone, to give its proper title I think,

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obviously was, was first introduced in 1956.

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-Right.

-Am I right?

-Yes, you are.

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Good. It is without question a piece of classic design. I mean, people use this term "icons of design"

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and this is, as it's revolutionary for its age. Back in 1956,

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nobody had ever seen anything quite like it, and what made it special

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was the fact that it had got this Perspex cover.

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I mean, this is Space Age in every shape and form.

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But I want to know how long you've been playing with it.

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Well, I bought it in '65 from a shop in London called Imhoff's.

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It was opposite then the new Centre Point.

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-Oh, yes.

-And we bought it from there cos we saw it and loved it, and the very same thing,

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we thought it was such a marvellous design and it was something you wanted to cuddle almost.

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It seems silly, but it's so lovely, and then, we've had it since then.

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-It's been in the loft for 30 years now.

-Oh, what a shame.

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It is, yes, but if now, this was 100 watts a channel,

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and stereo, I'd take all my hi-fi out and put this back because I like it so much.

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-It's the bee's knees.

-Yes.

-What's always made it endearing to me

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is the fact that it's always been referred to as Snow White's Coffin,

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for obvious reasons. Doesn't it? But shall we just have a quick,

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-quick look inside. It's Spartan, isn't it?

-It is.

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Um, there's no waste of space here.

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First of all, let's extol the virtues of the maker Braun.

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I mean, Braun lead the way here and everybody else followed.

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What I find interesting on your turntable,

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you've got 16 revolutions, 33 and 45. Well, 45 ruled the '60s.

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It ruled the '70s. 16, what do you use 16 for?

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-Mainly speech LPs and plays and things like that.

-Right.

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Very few produced, but it was there.

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OK, now, the big question is, what did you pay for it?

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I think it was 79 Guineas with the speaker.

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A lot of money in 1965.

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We couldn't afford the stereo version.

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No, that was a month's wages and more.

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-Yes.

-OK, well, today,

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its value is nearer £300.

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I've got to say that around about 10 years ago, they were making around about £400, £500.

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-It depends very much on the actual model. This is an SK...

-55.

-55.

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-And I think value does depend on the actual model itself.

-Yes, exactly, yes.

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So if we were saying £300 today, what are we going to say in 30 years?

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This is the bit where I wish I was working alongside Mystic Meg,

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but I dare say that you'd be looking probably nearer £1,000 in 30 years.

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I'll tell you what, let's make an arrangement now.

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We will meet here at the De La Warr Pavilion

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in 30 years, and we'll see how wrong, or how right, I might be.

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I'd love to do that. I don't think we will, but I'd love to.

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I'm forever the optimist.

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When I see that Biba logo, it sort of brings back

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the whole of my teenage years. And opening up the catalogue,

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there we see one of those terribly evocative photographs,

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but also, what's even better, of course you've got the real thing.

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Now, who is the Biba nut? Sorry, this is a colloquial term, we're amongst friends.

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Well, probably both of us, but my sister was the one who introduced me to it,

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because she used to go up to London and...

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-So you were the older sister?

-Yeah.

-OK, so...

-We shared a bedroom so...

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Oh, say no more.

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But for any girl of our age...

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-Absolutely.

-..it was THE destination, Saturday morning, off you'd go and...

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-It certainly was, yes.

-Tell me your reminiscences actually of the shop itself, describe it to me.

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Well, my reminiscences were first of the Kensington Church Street branch where...

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it was so atmospheric. I mean, um, I was into Art Nouveau,

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and it's all very much in tune with that.

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Exactly. They ended up, of course, in Derry & Toms

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-in Kensington High Street, which was this shrine really...

-It really was, yes.

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..to girlie consumerism. It was a real destination. I mean,

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they had cafe, they had homewares,

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-they had a whole floor devoted to the sort of kasbah scene...

-That's right.

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..with Moroccan and Turkish artefacts and so on, and of course, make-up.

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-This is what...a cake tin?

-Yes, I mean, I just loved it because it was

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that sort of 1930s style that I loved, um, and just the colours.

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I think the colours together, the gold and black

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-and the red, are just perfect.

-And terribly brave at that stage.

-Yes.

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We are looking at it with the benefit of hindsight, when we all know about Art Deco and about

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the colour schemes that were used, but actually in the '60s, this was really cutting edge, really new.

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It was, because, er, I think in the '60s, everything was very modern and it was going back to that sort of...

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-you know, era that you know, very much in the past.

-Exactly.

-And had been swept away really.

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Exactly, this was the era when everybody was burning their Victorian furniture on bonfires, you know,

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and Barbara Hulanicki, who started Biba in 1964, went right against the trends because she was,

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she was using these dusty pinks, these plums,

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dark browns, greys, and I think she described it as "aunty colours,"

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the sort of things perhaps your maiden aunt would be wearing.

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And I mean, the coat is fabulous,

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and that's what I call traditional Biba style, what they set out to do,

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and this is obviously much more...

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Yes, psychedelic, because I was kind of into that at the time

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-and this was the closest they did to the wilder patterns.

-Exactly.

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-That's why I went for it really.

-Exactly.

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Now, we've got lots of memorabilia here. I want to know...

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-how sad is it?

-Yes.

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How sad is it that somebody here...

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keeps a bag, with the receipt...

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I didn't know the receipt was still on it until I fetched that out.

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-I don't believe you for a moment! Well, it's 26th June 1974.

-I know.

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And I can look that up in my diary, because every time I went to London, I had to go to Biba's,

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-it was just...

-It was a pilgrimage, wasn't it?

-It was, and I had to buy something,

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-and I just kept them because they were too lovely to throw away.

-Absolutely.

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I mean, as far as value's concerned, prices vary you know, from...

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perhaps £30 or so, £40 perhaps for a catalogue,

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up to £100, £150, maybe £200 for a simple piece of clothing...

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-Right.

-..to something perhaps a little bit more for, for the coat that you've got on.

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But how much was the biscuit tin originally?

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Well, there we go, originally 40p.

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Er, today, I would have thought...£15.

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-Really?

-I think if you, if you ever decide that you want to add to the collection,

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you will find plenty of venues out there which will enable you to feed your habit.

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Thank you very much.

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Well, it's a sunny but windy day here in Bexhill,

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so I'm very glad you brought your heater.

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Perhaps we can turn it on.

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-And it works.

-It works, even better. But why have you brought your heater?

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Because it was a wedding present to us when we were married in 1961.

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-Right.

-Having met up there in the ballroom on the dance floor.

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-So you met in this building?

-Yes. In 1959, yes.

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-Across a crowded room, our eyes met.

-And it's been wonderful ever since.

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-Wonderful, hasn't it?

-Yes.

-So, this heater comes into your life

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-when you get married in, what was it, 1961?

-Yes.

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And were you modernists?

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Well, we actually had no furniture at all really apart from bits like this, so I think we were modernists.

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-I was, I'm not sure that Richard was.

-We had to be minimalists, we couldn't afford anything else.

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-So, minimalism is to do with having no money.

-Yes.

-When you're first married.

-Yes.

-A new definition.

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This is an iconic object of that period, this is very much the contemporary look,

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spiky legs and all that sort of thing.

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It has that sort of Space Age feel about it, and this is a very collectable object,

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they're not rare, they fetch anything from £50 to £150,

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depending on condition and colour. There were different colour ways, and it's just nice that you have it,

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you still use it, and it links so precisely to the building.

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It is the style that was outrageous in the 1930s,

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by the 1950s and '60s had become in a sense accepted, But the great thing is,

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-this is a record of coming together here.

-Yes, yes, yes.

-It does go very well with the building, doesn't it?

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-When you see it here.

-It's the perfect setting.

-Perfect setting.

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If you can, cast your mind back to 1977. If you can't, ask your dad.

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As I recall, it was the Queen's Silver Jubilee,

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Virginia Wade won Wimbledon, and Star Wars was on its way to becoming one of the top films of all time.

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But apart from the birth of the Antiques Roadshow, what was telly up to in 1977?

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And time to come alive with some hit music and jive on this week's Top of the Pops!

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Did you know you can do multiplication sums on your fingers?

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-This may look like an ordinary piece of corrugated iron.

-..France!

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Here is the news from the BBC.

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I loved him, loved his music.

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# Are you lonesome tonight?

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# Do you miss me... #

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Elvis Presley will still be the king of rock and roll to me,

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-he really and truly will.

-# ..we drifted apart... #

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Hello and welcome to "Ask Aspel".

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Five thousand and fifty.

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OK, girls, let's get to the, to the bottom of this.

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Tell me how you got started, because we are surrounded by...

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-well, it's sort of Starsky & Hutch heaven really, isn't it?

-It is for us.

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What was the first thing you bought?

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That would be the Starsky doll, and notice the cardigan.

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-I am noticing that cardigan.

-It was knitted by my mother in 1975.

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-Sheer devotion, sheer devotion.

-And did she knit you that one at the same time?

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-No, my friend here knitted this one.

-And who made the jacket?

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I made the Hutch jacket, yes, matches the Hutch doll.

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-So... So, you became, this is not your life. You have more lives.

-No.

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Yes, we do have lives, yes.

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But you, you share this extraordinary passion for Starsky and Hutch?

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-We do.

-We do.

-So there you were, glued to the TV sets every, what was it, Wednesdays it went out?

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-Saturday.

-Saturday, yeah. Time flies.

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That was repeats on the Wednesdays.

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-And they were a complete phenomenon really from day one, weren't they?

-Yes, they were, yes.

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To put it into context, there weren't any similar hard-hitting detective series at that time.

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-No.

-And at one point, I think that the censors were getting really worried about Starsky and Hutch

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-because it was too violent.

-It was.

-We think of it as kind of...

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-things made for kids, but it wasn't, was it?

-No.

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-Well ahead of its time.

-Absolutely, serious issues.

-Yes, prostitution, drug addiction.

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-Yes.

-And yet the nub of the show, the friendship between the two men, is what made it so long lasting.

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And they were good looking.

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-I know it's a minor point, but...

-Not for me it wasn't.

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-I know.

-I have to say, he was my favourite.

-Oh!

-Yes.

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-Fifty-fifty...

-So, tell me, you said that you bought this at the time,

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were you both buying at the time?

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I was, I was buying quite avidly, my poor mum, she had to spend so much money,

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but we bought them, the magazines which were monthly,

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-the bubble gum cards.

-The bubble gum cards.

-Yeah.

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So you were collecting from the start, and were you also?

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Well, I'm a bit older, so it wasn't quite right for a mature woman,

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22 I think, to collect at that time, but I did go and buy the magazines.

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-Right.

-Because those are, those were so special

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and every month more pictures, more letters, more stories.

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-And I can see he touched this page.

-Yes.

-It's signed.

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I mean, there are some things here that one sees relatively regularly.

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The Corgi toys, something that you see, and some of these games turn up.

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-I must say, there are some things that are rarer, this for instance I, I don't remember seeing.

-Yes.

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I mean, when one's talking about, um, valuing a collection like this,

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I guess value is kind of not what it's about.

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It's priceless to us. Priceless, yes.

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But I mean, the price for instance that Corgi...

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-This one.

-The, the Torino there with the sort of spread-eagled guy, I mean that varies between about £100

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and £250 on the internet depending on which day you're looking and I mean the great thing is,

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because there is an international fan base, that a collection like this

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is going to go up in value, more and more people are going to become fans.

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This was a time of innocence, not having to worry about your mortgage or your children or anything else,

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just whether your mum was going to give you enough money to buy a Starsky and Hutch magazine.

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Who can ask more from a collection than to do that?

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Than to take you back to a time when you were happy and carefree and were just looking forward to the next...

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-to the next programme.

-Yes.

-I don't suppose either of you can remember the theme tune.

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-The theme tune, let me see.

-Give it a go?

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THEY HUM THE STARSKY AND HUTCH THEME TUNE

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I feel very comfortable sitting here.

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I feel I could spend a long time chatting around this table.

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Is this something you use a lot?

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We have used it a lot in the past, particularly sort of family dinners, things like that.

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This I think is interesting because we've got a whole ensemble...

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here, sideboard, chairs, table, and it's becoming extremely fashionable,

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retro furniture, but you said you've had it for quite a long time. So, when did you get it?

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In the late 1950s, leading up to 1960, when we got married.

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We were working in London at the time and places like the Design Centre in the Haymarket

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and Libertys, they were all the sort of places we tended to visit

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and, um, the sort of teak and stainless steel look was, was coming in at that time.

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We decided we wanted it and ordered it at a local store in Maidstone, and they got it for us.

0:18:520:18:57

-Fantastic. So you were very design conscious when you were, when you were young?

-Yes.

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And did you know when you bought this set that it was designed in 1959?

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I don't think we knew that at the time but I'm a retired architect now and at the time,

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people like John and Sylvia Reid, who were the designers,

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we were aware that sort of thing was going on.

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But I think it's worth looking at what really makes it so interesting as a design.

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-You've got this lovely oval table, and it extends?

-It does, yes.

-So, how many leaves does it have?

-One.

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-It's got a centre leaf, which is stored underneath.

-But it makes a very elegant shape,

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it's very much of its period, isn't it? This sort of modern, simple,

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streamlined shape, and then the chairs are very simple...

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metal legs as the table, and this sort of slightly geometrical elliptical shape to the back.

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-Yes.

-And it's interesting I think picking up the metal legs, that really is a pre-Second World War

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feature that came in through Bauhaus and so on, but also this kind of back

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-really is looking to Danish or Scandinavian design as well.

-Yes.

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So that you're really combining the two elements

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of German modernism and Scandinavian humanism, if you like, in the shape.

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So, let's move over here and see what we've got behind it.

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Because also getting a whole ensemble in terms of design was something relatively new for...

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when I say ordinary people rather than the kind of aristocratic design...

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commissions of the 18th and 19th Century, and the little stool here.

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-The chairs have been reupholstered at some point?

-Yes.

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-And this is the original fabric.

-Right, yes.

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There is the manufacturer's label - Stag,

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and you mentioned John and Sylvia Reid, and they were the modern designers for Stag,

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but what's also interesting is to look at the kind of construction, because it's

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not the very highest engineering quality, it's quite simple, isn't it?

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-This was the accessible face of the new design.

-Yes, yes.

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And the sideboard here too, er,

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stylish little pulls here, I like that, the cutlery drawer inside.

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Can you remember what you paid for it?

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No, we've been trying to think of that, it's almost impossible to think back to those times.

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It was probably...

0:21:180:21:21

sort of £30 or £40 type of money,

0:21:210:21:24

which was a lot then when we weren't earning that much.

0:21:240:21:28

For a while this kind of thing, as I'm sure you know, was completely out of fashion, nobody wanted it at all,

0:21:280:21:34

and now it's becoming much, much more fashionable, but it's still up and down, if you,

0:21:340:21:40

if you look on internet sites, you can probably find a set of chairs for, I don't know, £100.

0:21:400:21:47

Elsewhere, I've seen a set of dining sets just like this one,

0:21:470:21:51

in nice condition, as this is, going for...

0:21:510:21:54

at auction this is, er, about £850.

0:21:540:21:58

And the sideboard, you might be lucky and buy one for around £200,

0:21:580:22:03

or you might have to spend at auction £600. So, it's still one of those markets

0:22:030:22:10

which is very, very fluid, but I think it's going to become much more fashionable in the future

0:22:100:22:15

as people begin to see how comfortable it is to live with,

0:22:150:22:19

-how simple the designs are, how elegant the designs are.

-I don't know if the children will want it, but...

0:22:190:22:25

Oh, well, you convince them that this is, this is the new Chippendale and you'll be away.

0:22:250:22:30

So, we've got 30 years of the Antiques Roadshow

0:22:340:22:36

and 30 years of the Star Wars saga of course, this being the 6th film.

0:22:360:22:40

You were presumably a fan as a child?

0:22:400:22:42

Yeah, just really never seen anything like it before really.

0:22:420:22:46

So this being an actually quite important poster,

0:22:460:22:48

do you know why this is such an interesting poster?

0:22:480:22:51

Their name, they changed the name at the last minute from "revenge" to "return".

0:22:510:22:55

That's it, I think they felt, that George Lucas felt that revenge

0:22:550:22:59

wasn't something that a Jedi should really have. So a little bit un-Jedi like, so they changed it.

0:22:590:23:04

-The other interesting thing about this poster is that it's probably one of the most faked movie posters.

-Yes.

0:23:040:23:09

And there are three pointers that I tend to look at. One of the very recent reproductions was actually

0:23:090:23:14

effectively taken from one of the folded posters, so you have to look very closely at the fold marks

0:23:140:23:19

to make sure that through the actual fold there aren't other marks

0:23:190:23:23

within the poster. That will indicate it's a reproduction.

0:23:230:23:26

The other side of it is the fact that the "Star Wars"

0:23:260:23:29

running along here is quite often in orange and not this yellow.

0:23:290:23:33

-And there's a little red line at the top.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:23:330:23:36

Yeah? And then the Fox logo is normally slightly blurry

0:23:360:23:41

-on some of the reproduction posters.

-The one in the corner?

0:23:410:23:44

In the bottom corner, yes.

0:23:440:23:46

And sometimes it's a much darker blue.

0:23:460:23:48

So we haven't got fold lines,

0:23:480:23:49

we've got a solid black, a nice light blue,

0:23:490:23:51

and a yellow here across the "Star Wars".

0:23:510:23:53

My feeling is that it's based on that,

0:23:530:23:56

and that they're the normal hallmarks of it being a reproduction or a fake.

0:23:560:24:00

-I think this is brilliant, I think it's absolutely correct.

-Oh, good.

0:24:000:24:04

But it's also very good news from the financial side of it as well, because I don't know what you paid for it.

0:24:040:24:09

I paid around just short of 100.

0:24:090:24:13

Well, if it was a fake, I think you'd have been looking around sort of £10,

0:24:130:24:17

-it's purely decorative value.

-As little as that?

-Yeah.

0:24:170:24:19

But an authentic one like this,

0:24:190:24:21

I can see fetching anything from sort of £250, £300, maybe a little more.

0:24:210:24:25

It's a sort of notorious poster, it's an iconic poster,

0:24:250:24:29

Darth Vader of course, you know, featuring large is a good thing.

0:24:290:24:32

-And I don't know if you've noticed this, have you ever looked at the light sabres?

-The wrong way round.

0:24:320:24:37

They are the wrong way round, exactly, it's another interesting feature.

0:24:370:24:41

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:24:410:24:42

Now, I was around in the 1970s, and I think I was reasonably up to date, you know, fairly pacey,

0:24:420:24:48

I never had an LED watch, I don't know why,

0:24:480:24:52

just never sort of grabbed me, but obviously it's grabbed you.

0:24:520:24:55

When I was a kid in the late '70s, me dad bought me a cheap LED watch that I used to, of a night,

0:24:550:25:01

lie under the bed sheets, pressing the button till it wore out looking at the red LED glowing,

0:25:010:25:05

but then I realised that with these watches, they are quite collectable, the early models, so...

0:25:050:25:11

So, when did you start again?

0:25:110:25:13

Well, it was about ten years ago, I bought a fashion magazine,

0:25:130:25:15

I was flicking through the article and there was a picture of an Omega LED watch and I thought,

0:25:150:25:21

"I remember when I was a kid owning one of them watches,"

0:25:210:25:23

so I thought, seemed a good thing to collect, so I started to go back as a kid and collecting them.

0:25:230:25:28

So you were going back to your childhood in a sense?

0:25:280:25:31

-Yeah, just reminiscing.

-Where did it start? Have you got it here?

-It starts there with...

0:25:310:25:35

-That one? The Pulsar?

-Yeah,

0:25:350:25:37

the Pulsar P1, that come out in, er, early '72.

0:25:370:25:41

Everybody saw that and thought, "God, we'd better make those," so Omega do it, everybody else does it.

0:25:410:25:47

Yeah, soon after the Omega was the first European LED watch,

0:25:470:25:52

but Pulsar was the first, that was very expensive back in the early '70s to buy.

0:25:520:25:56

So what would that cost then?

0:25:560:25:59

-2,100 in...

-Gosh, so nearly £1,000.

0:25:590:26:03

Yeah, in '72 you would have...

0:26:030:26:05

-Which is a huge amount of money.

-Yeah.

-Now, when does it die out?

0:26:050:26:08

Um, around about '77, Pulsar closed because the LCD market took over.

0:26:080:26:14

But hang on, let's get this story, LED/LCD.

0:26:140:26:17

Yeah, Light Emitting Diode, LED, LCD - Liquid Crystal Display.

0:26:170:26:22

-Sure.

-And the battery life was a lot longer, whereas the LED...

0:26:220:26:26

-This is a short period in watch history?

-Yes, six years and it was pretty much done with.

0:26:260:26:31

-And then it's all over.

-Then it was all over.

0:26:310:26:33

-When I look at them now, I missed it at the time, like I missed quite a lot of the '70s I think...

-Yes.

0:26:330:26:39

..but I can see now what it is, you know, it has a very, very strong statement about its period,

0:26:390:26:45

-about its time, and that's why they're collectable.

-Yes.

0:26:450:26:48

They have that wonderful resonance of when they were made.

0:26:480:26:51

You wear them very much making a style statement.

0:26:510:26:54

Well, it's not often I wear a watch because...

0:26:540:26:56

-A watch...

-Oh, this one's...

0:26:560:26:58

This is a Girard Perregaux Sideview LED watch.

0:26:580:27:01

That sounds expensive.

0:27:010:27:04

Yeah, I mean, a lot of the watches,

0:27:040:27:06

-you know, big watch companies, did make the...

-Yes.

0:27:060:27:09

-..and GP was a company that made 'em.

-What do you pay for them now?

0:27:090:27:15

Well, I mean, the high end ones, I mean a lot of the, like the P1

0:27:150:27:19

or the Tiffany & Co calculators, they're very difficult to come by so...

0:27:190:27:24

-So this was 2,000 when it was new?

-Yeah.

-What is it now?

0:27:240:27:29

Well, if you was to find one in the box with the magnet,

0:27:290:27:33

it's got a gold magnet, it's gone as high as 17,500.

0:27:330:27:38

-17,000?

-Dollars, yes. 17,500.

0:27:380:27:41

So it really is the gold dust in...

0:27:410:27:43

Oh, it is, the Pulsar P1 is...

0:27:430:27:46

-But how many have you got?

-Around about 85 watches.

0:27:460:27:49

-And more to come?

-Well, there's a few key pieces I want,

0:27:490:27:52

but if they do come up for sale, there's a lot of collectors...

0:27:520:27:56

Does it cause domestic stress?

0:27:560:27:57

Well, she's got you know, many pairs of shoes, so she can't complain.

0:27:570:28:02

-But this is a bit more expensive.

-Now, this is a very important thing to tell the nation,

0:28:020:28:07

-us men collectors have to fight back.

-Yeah. Exactly.

-The only other thing I'd like to say is,

0:28:070:28:11

-I think those are great, and Andrew Grima...

-Yes.

0:28:110:28:14

..was a fantastic '70s jeweller,

0:28:140:28:17

he had a wonderful shop in Jermyn Street I think with a very stylish front,

0:28:170:28:21

it disappeared, the style went out, so I think in 30 years,

0:28:210:28:25

I don't know that I'd be collecting these watches,

0:28:250:28:29

but I'd certainly be picking the ones by great designers.

0:28:290:28:32

-Exactly.

-Thank you.

-Thanks very much.

0:28:320:28:34

The Sunday Times Magazine, September 11th 1977,

0:28:350:28:39

and the headline is, or the baseline should I say, "The King is Dead,"

0:28:390:28:44

and here's a fantastic picture of Elvis.

0:28:440:28:48

The Sunday Times was renowned for its fantastic photographic covers, but something else happened in 1977

0:28:480:28:55

of which we all here are all part of, which was the birth of the Antiques Roadshow.

0:28:550:29:01

So, how many of these things have you got?

0:29:010:29:03

We've got them all around us.

0:29:030:29:06

Well, I started collecting them in 1970 at the very beginning.

0:29:060:29:09

-Right.

-So I've got over 1,800 copies.

0:29:090:29:12

That's quite incredible.

0:29:120:29:14

Why did you start? Do you just like hoarding paper?

0:29:140:29:18

No, I don't think it was a decision that I just said, "I will keep them,"

0:29:180:29:22

I just happened to start keeping them, then I had a reason to keep them,

0:29:220:29:26

which was that we were due to have our first child at the end of 1970,

0:29:260:29:31

so I thought, here's something that might reflect

0:29:310:29:34

the period that she was born into, and thereafter.

0:29:340:29:37

-A sort of cabinet of curiosities.

-That's right.

-I think it's absolutely fantastic.

0:29:370:29:42

-This is particularly grim, they do quite a lot on Cambodia, don't they?

-Yes, all the world's hot spots...

0:29:420:29:47

And here's another lovely one with John Lennon,

0:29:470:29:50

"Ticket to Ride, unseen pictures of The Beatles

0:29:500:29:53

-"when they won the Wild West".

-Yes.

0:29:530:29:55

A very nostalgic picture there, and this of course I think is,

0:29:550:29:59

is quite remarkable, um,

0:29:590:30:01

photography in the womb, and this is how it appears

0:30:010:30:05

on the front of the Sunday Times Magazine

0:30:050:30:08

for September 16th 1990.

0:30:080:30:10

So, how much do you think you've spent over the years?

0:30:100:30:14

Well, it currently costs about £2 a copy, I suppose if you average it over 37 years,

0:30:140:30:19

it might be £1, so we're talking about £1,800.

0:30:190:30:22

£1,800. Does your wife resent it?

0:30:220:30:26

No, of course not.

0:30:260:30:28

And last, but by no means least, the, the chinful wonder

0:30:290:30:34

who we've all come to know and love,

0:30:340:30:36

who now presents the Antiques Roadshow, and this dates from 1970.

0:30:360:30:41

-Yes.

-This is Michael Aspel 37 years ago, not a grey hair in sight.

-No.

0:30:410:30:46

"Listen to what Michael Aspel has to say about

0:30:460:30:50

"the world's greatest work of reference."

0:30:500:30:53

And you get a free disc with it, it's quite incredible.

0:30:530:30:56

I mean, all these ones here,

0:30:560:30:58

-they're so exciting I could actually sit down and read them all over again.

-It's a good read.

0:30:580:31:02

-It's like a dentist's waiting room gone mad, isn't it?

-That's where I collected them from!

0:31:020:31:06

And to think that all these years,

0:31:070:31:09

I've been putting them out for the recycling,

0:31:090:31:12

but they are, and you're quite right, I can see it, they are a sort of,

0:31:120:31:15

a chronicle of the time we live in.

0:31:150:31:19

Well, I do know that over the internet,

0:31:190:31:21

certain numbers, you know, things, an Elvis number,

0:31:210:31:25

would certainly go for £10 or £15.

0:31:250:31:27

-I would imagine that Charles and Di would do the same, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:270:31:32

-But I think that you've got £5,000 worth I reckon.

-Very good.

0:31:320:31:38

These two lovely watercolours by Mary Fedden, are you a fan of hers?

0:31:570:32:02

Yes, I am, really on both occasions you know,

0:32:020:32:04

they more or less jumped off the wall of the gallery

0:32:040:32:07

and I decided in a matter of minutes that I would buy 'em.

0:32:070:32:11

And did you buy these in the years that they were painted, 1999,

0:32:110:32:14

-and 1998?

-No. No.

0:32:140:32:16

In each case I bought them about two years, I must be the second owner.

0:32:160:32:21

-She's a wonderful artist and very much in vogue now because she was born in 1915.

-Yes.

0:32:210:32:26

-And she's still painting as we're talking now.

-Yes, yes.

0:32:260:32:29

And lives in London and she was married to Julian Trevelyan, another artist.

0:32:290:32:33

Yes, I know she was married to Julian Trevelyan and she didn't paint very much during that time.

0:32:330:32:38

What is so interesting at the moment, the way the market taste has changed,

0:32:380:32:42

at the moment, people love these sort of modern images,

0:32:420:32:47

it's very whimsical this one on the right.

0:32:470:32:49

Yes, it's almost allegorical I think.

0:32:490:32:52

-Wonderful, and the one on the left here looks a bit Cornish.

-Yes.

0:32:520:32:57

-Do you know where it was painted?

-It was painted, it's called Lostwithiel.

0:32:570:33:01

-Is it?

-So, er, I assume it was painted there,

0:33:010:33:06

it was in a period when she was ill and she'd gone to Cornwall

0:33:060:33:10

to recuperate after this illness

0:33:100:33:11

and I think she painted a little bit, but not very much.

0:33:110:33:15

The one on the left here is a watercolour and actually it's got a bit of gouache on there,

0:33:150:33:20

heightened with gouache, and the one on the right here is watercolour with gouache, mixed media really.

0:33:200:33:25

She's actually an important artist now and as these artists get older, people are looking at their work,

0:33:250:33:32

-and certainly Mary Fedden and Julian Trevelyan, and they're considered very important British artists.

-Yes.

0:33:320:33:38

She taught at the Royal College of Art.

0:33:380:33:40

-Mm.

-She did murals for the Festival of Britain in 1951.

0:33:400:33:43

-Oh, right.

-Yeah.

-I didn't know that.

0:33:430:33:45

-And you know, she is considered important today.

-Mm.

0:33:450:33:48

What did you pay for these?

0:33:480:33:50

-Er, I think I paid about £1,500 for this one.

-Yeah.

0:33:500:33:54

And I paid about £3,000 for this one.

0:33:540:33:57

Well, what is interesting about what you paid for them then, and what's happened now, because,

0:33:570:34:02

-in the 21st Century, the taste has gone very much for the modern and also onto abstract artists.

-Yes.

0:34:020:34:09

-Right up to the contemporary with her...

-Yes.

0:34:090:34:12

And she has also gained huge popularity in the last few years.

0:34:120:34:18

The one on the left here is certainly worth...

0:34:180:34:22

in auction today £5,000 to £7,000.

0:34:220:34:25

-Yes.

-At least.

-Mm.

0:34:250:34:27

The one down here, on the right, I think is most unusual for her,

0:34:270:34:31

I'm sure you've seen many of her still life paintings.

0:34:310:34:34

Oh, yes, I have, a lot of you know, bowls of flowers in windows...

0:34:340:34:38

-Absolutely, and these...

-..and cats and, er...

-These are out of the ordinary for her, aren't they?

0:34:380:34:43

-They're different subject matter.

-Yes, they are.

0:34:430:34:46

So the one on the right here, I think would make certainly £6,000 to £9,000.

0:34:460:34:51

Yes.

0:34:510:34:53

-Well, I'm not thinking of selling them.

-Good, I think they're a very good investment,

0:34:530:34:57

-but you didn't buy them because of that.

-No, I bought them because I liked them.

0:34:570:35:02

There are many times on the Roadshow where I'm confronted by a collection that...

0:35:020:35:06

stops me in my tracks, this is one of them.

0:35:060:35:09

This is the crown jewel in the camera world I think, for me, I have never seen a collection of Nikons like this

0:35:090:35:16

in one place at one time and I suspect I'm very unlikely to ever see a collection like this again.

0:35:160:35:21

Where have they all come from? What started you off?

0:35:210:35:24

Owning a Praktica 35 years ago.

0:35:240:35:27

-A Praktica?

-Yes.

-You see to me, that's a real workhorse, isn't it, that's the basic of basic cameras.

0:35:270:35:32

They were great cameras, I mean you could knock nails in wood, but...

0:35:320:35:36

having said that, they weren't very good, very reliable and the picture quality wasn't all it could be,

0:35:360:35:41

so, er, and the next step was to buy something half way decent,

0:35:410:35:45

-which was a Nikon F.

-A Nikon F.

0:35:450:35:47

Well, let's look at the history a little bit of Nikon because

0:35:470:35:50

-the company started as a manufacturer of military lenses and things, didn't it?

-Yes.

0:35:500:35:56

There was something like 25 factories, with 23,000 people working for Nippon Kogaku,

0:35:560:36:01

-which means the Japanese optical industry.

-Right. And in that period,

0:36:010:36:05

they were producing for mainly gun sites, all kind of optical instruments for military use,

0:36:050:36:11

but the end of the war came, and the allies forbid them

0:36:110:36:15

to produce anything for military purposes.

0:36:150:36:17

They were virtually bankrupt at the end of the Second World War,

0:36:170:36:21

and they were looking for a market, and the market was cameras, and they went with this product.

0:36:210:36:25

To me, when I think of Nikon,

0:36:250:36:29

I think of photo journalism, and we've got the F Series.

0:36:290:36:33

Well, the F has become a legend. It came out in 1959,

0:36:330:36:36

and has photographed every major incident around the world. It was there when Kennedy was shot,

0:36:360:36:41

-it was there when man walked on the moon.

-Let's pick out an F series.

0:36:410:36:45

Um, there are various ones, this one for instance,

0:36:450:36:47

a very early F, very basic.

0:36:470:36:50

Photo journalists wanted to use these cameras,

0:36:500:36:53

they were a good robust camera, the main people that we know, people like Tim Page,

0:36:530:36:57

photographers in the Vietnam War used these kind of cameras and would often say they were bullet proof.

0:36:570:37:02

-They were.

-I don't know how many Nikon Fs saved people's lives.

0:37:020:37:05

Quite a few, I've seen a few pictures of Nikon Fs where they've

0:37:050:37:09

been hit with a bullet there

0:37:090:37:10

-and the camera and the lens has stopped the bullet.

-Really?

0:37:100:37:13

-Yes.

-So there is a bit of reality in that.

-Of course, yes.

0:37:130:37:16

-It's not just an urban myth.

-And also they were wrapped up in plastic bags after being chased by Viet Cong and,

0:37:160:37:23

they were dumped in water and left there for maybe a week sealed in a plastic bag, you know,

0:37:230:37:28

with an elastic band around, and picked up later so the photographers would not lose the pictures.

0:37:280:37:33

Quite incredible. I'm staggered by this collection,

0:37:330:37:36

absolutely staggered. I could talk to you for days

0:37:360:37:40

about what is just on this table. Is this the whole collection, or...?

0:37:400:37:43

-No?

-No, it's about 5% of what I've got at home.

-5%?

0:37:430:37:48

But essentially, if I said there's £150,000 worth on this table,

0:37:480:37:52

-I'd be being conservative, would I?

-Very, yes.

0:37:520:37:55

-You'd get the half of it probably.

-That's it then! That's enough for me today.

0:37:550:38:00

This has got an amazingly ancient look about it.

0:38:030:38:07

Yeah, that's because it probably is older than the Dead Sea Scrolls...

0:38:070:38:11

Older than the Dead Sea Scrolls.

0:38:110:38:13

-Perhaps.

-Well, they were around...nought, weren't they?

0:38:130:38:18

-Um, this would be around the Han Dynasty.

-That's right.

0:38:180:38:23

Um, like the terracotta figures, a very unusual thing, where did you find it?

0:38:230:38:29

Unfortunately, it wasn't in my family, I found it in a flea market

0:38:290:38:35

in south east London a few years ago on a Sunday afternoon.

0:38:350:38:39

-OK.

-Yes.

-Did they tell you what it was?

0:38:390:38:42

Well, it was really unlikely, it was kind of amongst loads of just house clearance things,

0:38:420:38:47

and the guy didn't really seem very interested in it and, um,

0:38:470:38:51

I'd just finished a part-time archaeology course and my eye was just really intrigued by it.

0:38:510:38:56

-Ah, right.

-I knew because it had kind of sandy earth, I presumed it was some type of funeral offering.

0:38:560:39:04

-Er, yes, indeed these were grave goods.

-Right.

0:39:040:39:06

Almost invariably they were buried and having been dug up,

0:39:060:39:09

you get this incrustation and you get all this wonderful colour building up here.

0:39:090:39:15

-Is it cast bronze?

-This is, this is cast bronze,

0:39:150:39:17

and the copper is coming through,

0:39:170:39:20

and that's because of acid attack by the soil.

0:39:200:39:24

The thing that worries me is that this would normally be what we call a Bi Disc,

0:39:240:39:30

-B-I, which actually has a hole in the middle.

-Yeah, I've seen those.

-You've seen those?

-Yes.

0:39:300:39:35

And were they buried under the elbows and above the head?

0:39:350:39:38

-They were all over the place.

-Yes.

-And nobody has any idea what they were meant for,

0:39:380:39:43

-it's supposed to be for discerning the future and stuff.

-Yeah, I read somewhere when I was researching it,

0:39:430:39:49

-the really rich people had like shrouds of jade...

-That's right,

0:39:490:39:53

this would have been buried with somebody with, of serious..

0:39:530:39:56

-What sort of level of...

-Oh, serious, highly important official.

0:39:560:39:59

-Like a priest?

-Probably not a priest,

0:39:590:40:01

but a highly important official would have this.

0:40:010:40:04

Now, how much did you pay for it?

0:40:040:40:06

Well, he wanted like £50, and I had no money and I bartered him down to 30 quid.

0:40:060:40:12

OK, now I'm going to put you out of your misery.

0:40:120:40:15

-How old is it?

-Couple of years.

0:40:150:40:18

Oh, no! You're joking, are you joking?

0:40:180:40:21

-Are you joking?

-I'm not.

0:40:210:40:23

-Oh, no!

-I'm sorry, I'm sorry.

-Oh!

0:40:230:40:28

-I'm really upset.

-But hang on, I haven't finished yet.

0:40:280:40:31

-I haven't finished yet.

-Oh, God, my life's over.

0:40:310:40:34

-No, it's not.

-I thought it was important...

-It's not.

-OK.

0:40:340:40:38

Listen, we are looking to the future.

0:40:380:40:42

-This class of ware, this class of ware is coming from China.

-Mmm.

0:40:420:40:48

They are casting it, they are carving it...

0:40:480:40:50

-Yes.

-..because they still can afford the skilled craftsmen to do it.

0:40:500:40:55

-This is...

-Is it cast from an original?

-No, I don't think so. It's a fantastic bit of work.

0:40:550:41:00

-This is my prediction for the future.

-Yes.

-Now, you will not normally hear an expert,

0:41:000:41:07

-as so called, predicting that a forgery was something to buy.

-It's like a stab to the heart!

0:41:070:41:14

But if you can find that for 30 quid, go out and buy them.

0:41:140:41:20

Your children are going to thank you.

0:41:200:41:24

-Oh, God!

-Thank you for being so brave.

0:41:250:41:28

-Oh, I'm so upset about that.

-I'm sorry.

-I love it though.

0:41:280:41:32

-I'll always keep it.

-For 30 quid, I would have bought that...

0:41:320:41:35

I'd always envisaged, I thought it was like 2,400 years old...

0:41:350:41:39

Listen, if this was real, it would be worth close on a million pounds.

0:41:390:41:44

Oh, God! Oh, I love it though, thank you for letting me know about it.

0:41:440:41:48

It feels like a real party atmosphere today, here we are in the sunshine at the sea front.

0:41:510:41:55

-What we really need's a bit of rock and roll, thank you for bringing it.

-My pleasure.

0:41:550:41:59

-So, Rock-Ola, Chicago Company, 1960s jukebox.

-Yes.

0:41:590:42:04

Are you a passionate jukebox man?

0:42:040:42:06

Jukebox and rock and roll, yes.

0:42:060:42:08

-I'd never have guessed!

-No.

0:42:080:42:11

So this is one of what, several jukeboxes you've got?

0:42:110:42:14

I've got two and I've got a third one on its way.

0:42:140:42:17

And a whole lot of records, it looks like.

0:42:170:42:19

Hundreds and hundreds.

0:42:190:42:21

-So there are what, 50 in here?

-Yes, 50.

-50 in here.

0:42:210:42:25

And I mean, the thing about this, which is a small Rock-Ola because you know,

0:42:250:42:29

sometimes they're much wider, bigger,

0:42:290:42:31

is I suppose this fits into a small, more domestic scene rather than a cafe or a club.

0:42:310:42:37

Well, this particular model we used to have in the '60s

0:42:370:42:40

in the coffee bars in Tunbridge Wells where I used to live. This model was in all the coffee bars.

0:42:400:42:45

-So, that's why I got it, as nostalgia.

-So it takes you right back.

-Right back.

0:42:450:42:50

OK, so it's a piece of nostalgia, but it's a valuable piece of nostalgia.

0:42:500:42:54

I would have thought today we're talking about £2,000, £2,500.

0:42:540:42:59

And I think we ought to just let it play out, when what else could it play us out on, except...

0:42:590:43:05

-J9?

-J9.

0:43:050:43:07

MUSIC: "Summertime Blues" by Eddie Cochran

0:43:120:43:17

Can you jive?

0:43:240:43:26

I can.

0:43:260:43:27

Well, I think that's what's known as a successful exercise.

0:43:510:43:54

We have confirmed that modernism is alive and well and has a great future.

0:43:540:43:58

I have to admit to a great affinity with this building, the De La Warr Pavilion,

0:43:580:44:03

because we were both dreamed up in the same year.

0:44:030:44:06

The difference is, the building still looks exciting.

0:44:060:44:09

Many thanks to everyone who helped us with this special edition, and from Bexhill-on-Sea, goodbye.

0:44:090:44:15

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:370:44:41

The Antiques Roadshow teams up with an iconic modernist building, the De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill-on-Sea. It's the perfect place to identify items from our recent past that we should cherish for the future. The team cast their eye over a feast of colourful modern collectables.