Rochester Antiques Roadshow


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Rochester

Antiques series. The team returns to Rochester Cathedral, toasting the festive season with Napoleon's drinking glass.


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Welcome back to the ancient and atmospheric

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cathedral of Rochester,

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setting for Charles Dickens' last novel The Mystery of Edwin Drood.

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The organ here has nearly 4,000 pipes...

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roughly the number of characters in the average Dickens novel.

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And let me show you something else that's very interesting that I've found here.

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ORGAN MUSIC PLAYS

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Have you ever wondered why a cathedral is called a cathedral?

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It sounds so grand and yet it all boils down to a chair, admittedly a very grand one.

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It's the Bishop's chair.

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The Latin word for this impressive object is "cathedra"

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and apparently the purpose of a cathedral is to house the bishop's seat.

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This is Rochester's.

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I would ask John Bly to value it, but he's busy in the nave with the rest of the experts.

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-Well, it's a bit rough isn't it?

-It...yes.

-Where's it been?

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-It's been in the shed for two, two and a half years.

-Dear, oh, dear.

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So tell me the story behind it.

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I bought it from a junk shop, second-hand furniture and junk shop,

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-I wanted to buy some more practical furniture, some chest of drawers.

-Right.

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And this caught my eye, tried to negotiate a better price

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-for the chest of drawers and the chap sort of threw this in as the bonus.

-This was your discount?

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-Yes, yes.

-"What's your best price?"

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"That is my best price but I'll give you this sideboard."

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-Indeed, yes, yes.

-Well, it looked like this, obviously, this bit's broken off,

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and if you put that up there...

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we can't leave it there... but that starts to make it look something.

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And, in fact,

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this was, when made, an extremely expensive bit of furniture.

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This cost a lot of money.

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Imagine making that...

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the wastage of material to make that,

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and these doors, I mean look at this!

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Look at the depth there. It's like a vase, it's three-dimensional this thing, fabulous, fabulous.

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That's a hugely important piece of furniture of its time

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and its time was 1860.

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It was very expensive, very exclusive, and if you look...

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they didn't want to spoil those doors by putting a keyhole anywhere,

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so they put the keyhole in a secret little opening round the side.

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So it looks immaculate.

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-Fantastic quality and a waste of huge amounts of material to make it.

-Yes.

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-Trays in one end, cellaret here for the wines.

-That's right, yes.

-Phenomenal.

-Oh, for the wine?

-Yes.

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-Oh.

-Yeah, you put ice in there.

-Oh, right, OK.

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Or beer, if you like, I don't mind, but that's what it was for.

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You don't need to do much to this.

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I mean, it wants mending and it wants nicely, lightly cleaning.

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Do not have it polished, have it nicely waxed, it'll look wonderful

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and it's worth £2,500.

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-Is it really?

-Absolutely, absolutely.

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Oh, that certainly is good news, well thank you, cheers.

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You'll go back to that shop again.

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No!

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THEY LAUGH

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Most people who have three works of game birds basically,

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are fanatical shots.

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-Can I ask you, are you a wonderful shot?

-No, not at all, no.

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-Don't shoot at all?

-Not at all, no.

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-Are you a great countryman?

-Er, no, not really.

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Your family? No, nothing like that?

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-No, no, not at all.

-So how come you've got three wonderful works

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in your collection, if you don't shoot or like the country very much?

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-Well, um, my dad, his step-father was a bricklayer.

-Right.

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And he done a job for somebody.

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-Yeah.

-Who couldn't afford the payment for the job so, um, the guy gave

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my dad's stepfather these as part payment for the job.

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-Do you know what the debt was?

-No, not at all, no.

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-Guess. Few hundred quid?

-Yeah, probably about that, yeah.

-Few hundred quid.

-Yeah.

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So tell me, do you like these pictures?

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Er, I think they're OK, I mean I'm not a big fan of paintings really.

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-OK, of paintings.

-No, not really no.

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Do you hang them in your house or do they sit under the bed?

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No, my mother hangs them in her house.

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-Ah.

-Up until ten years ago they were just wrapped in brown paper.

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-Really?

-And then we thought, well we'll put them into the frames

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and they've been on our wall for about ten years.

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-Do you know anything about these works?

-Not at all, no.

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Well, you can see very faintly in the corner of each one,

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there's the artist's name,

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George Edward Lodge,

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and he actually was an incredibly important painter of

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animal and bird life, he was a great naturalist and his best friend

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was the greatest of these naturalists called Archibald Thorburn.

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They paint very much in the same sort of style, so very realistic, very...

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almost photographic portraits of birds.

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Now there is a big hierarchy in purchasing of birds.

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Now song birds - not very desirable really. I mean, they're OK but a robin's very sweet and all that,

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a thrush...not so easy, a starling - not very commercial, but game birds are always commercial.

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The great thing is they're alive, they're not dead game birds as well,

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so we have three fantastic works by George Edward Lodge.

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What do you think, probably painted around 1900-1910?

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So they've got a bit of age to them, so let's look at the top one.

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Partridge in a sort of meadow, really beautifully done

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and you've really got the atmosphere of that nice low countryside

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and then below, we have two pictures of pheasants.

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Have you any idea what you think they might be worth?

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Er, no, not at all.

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OK, so if I gave you £1,000 for the lot, would you be happy?

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-He's tempted.

-Tempted, yeah.

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Well, we can't do that on the BBC, of course, but I think...

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I think they're absolutely wonderful.

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I would say they were worth between £1,500 and £2,500 each.

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-Really?

-So even by my maths, that's quite a lot of money.

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-It is, yeah.

-Well done, I mean, you know, for a small debt...

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-or maybe a big debt.

-Yes.

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You've made a big investment, so congratulations, enjoy them.

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-Yeah, thank you.

-Thank you.

-A pleasure.

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Now although this looks like a fantastic radiogram, I actually know it's more than that, as you do.

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Now let's see what we've got here, let's open it up.

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So what appears to be a radiogram is actually much, much more.

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-Yes.

-Because we've got the gramophone, we've got the radio.

-Yes.

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But most important, here we've got the television.

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Now, my memories of television start,

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like so many people of my generation, in 1953 watching the coronation.

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-Yes.

-When do your television memories start?

-I would think

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they go back to, um, because I was a war baby and I grew up with this,

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-so I would think in the '40s, mid '40s, late '40s and onwards.

-Right, was this working then?

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Absolutely right, yes, my father bought this

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brand-new in Harrods and he paid 101 guineas for it.

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-Right.

-He was married in 1936 so it was to actually celebrate my parents' wedding.

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Right, so in a sense it was like a grand celebration of a great occasion.

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-Yes. Yes.

-Do you play the record player?

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All the time, all the time.

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My father was always playing opera there, Edmundo Ross, Caruso.

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I can remember when I was a teenager putting on, um, Elvis Presley...

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-So Elvis was played on here?

-Absolutely. On the old 78s. Yes. Because you'd put eight...

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It's only a 78 gramophone?

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-Yes, yes.

-Maybe we should look a bit at how this works.

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The problem with early televisions was the screens were tiny

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and so, very cunningly in this particular design,

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they arranged for the image to be projected onto a mirror which was a way of actually

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seeing it larger, it also meant that the cathode ray tube,

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which is very big, could be arranged vertically

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rather than having a hugely deep cabinet behind, and so you'd sit over there, as I imagine you did.

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-I did.

-And you'd watch it in the mirror.

-All the time.

-I've got something to show you.

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-Thanks to the wonders of the internet.

-Yes.

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-Here is the catalogue of this particular machine.

-Oh, right.

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It's the "model 703, television,

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"six-valve, four-waveband radio receiver and automatic gramophone".

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-Oh.

-And it had the wonderful title of the "Marconi Phone Mastergram".

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Marconi were pioneer television producers, there were others.

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They made 13 different models between 1935 and 1939

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and, of course, by 1939 it all came to a stop because of the war,

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but in 1939 there were about 19,000 televisions in Britain.

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It had taken off in quite a big way even though viewing was very limited,

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so your father was a real pioneer.

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Now what this also shows, tells us, is that it cost 120 guineas.

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Yes, I thought he said 101 but it could have been 121 or something.

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-So that's what it was.

-Yes.

-So it was a very, very expensive thing.

-It was.

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I mean that was the price of a car.

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-Yes.

-So if you were buying a television today, it would be

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-in equivalent terms of about £6,000 or £7,000 or even £8,000.

-Really?

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It was very, very expensive.

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Now I gather that this is a very rare machine.

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I think in the world at the moment there are only

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-about four or five of these known.

-Really? Oh.

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Now when it was new it cost 120 guineas, or £5,000 or £6,000.

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Well, things have changed. In a sense this is useless.

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You can play the radio, you can probably play the gramophone.

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You'll never watch the TV without fiddling with it beyond reason.

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So what's it worth?

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I think a collector's going to pay somewhere between £3,000 and £4,000.

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-Really?

-So not quite what it was worth when it was new, but getting there.

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-No, no, well thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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-William Stephen Coleman, W S Coleman, and it's dated 1905.

-Right.

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-He was a very interesting artist because he started life off in training as a surgeon.

-Oh, really?

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-And he turned to art and both his sisters painted as well.

-As well, good grief.

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-He also worked for the Minton factory designing, er, designs for tiles and pieces of ceramic.

-Right.

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-Beautiful designs, and I'm very used to seeing his oils and watercolours which are of Egyptian girls.

-Right.

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-Young girls, some Roman scenes with marble, very Classical.

-Oh.

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-So he's quite a prolific painter?

-Not that prolific.

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-You see a lot of pictures and a lot of prints of his work, there are a lot of reproductions.

-I see.

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When he does something like this, these country garden scenes, they are superb.

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-There's a lot of detail.

-Oh, yeah, and I prefer these to the oils, and when you look at this, you've got...

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-well you've got irises here, you've got poppies.

-Oh, yes.

-Cabbage.

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So soft. He's very, very like Birkett Foster in some ways.

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-Yes.

-But actually almost more loose and impressionistic.

-Right.

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Wonderful picture.

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Have you ever thought what it might be worth?

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Um, I must admit the thought has occurred to me but, I mean, I have no idea.

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Well, given the subject matter and the strong colour,

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I mean that would make at least £3,000 to £5,000 at auction.

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-Really? That much?

-Yeah, and maybe £4,000 to £6,000.

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It's a really, really good image.

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-Oh, right. Not bad.

-Everything good about him is in that picture.

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So you want me to tell you what it says on here I expect.

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Yes. Yes, please really and...

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I hate to disappoint you, I can't.

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-Oh.

-I can't read it, it's in Chinese but the text on that side is almost

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-certainly related to the scene we see on this side.

-Right.

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Which is two young ladies reading,

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I guess some sort of a romantic story from their book on this table.

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-Beautifully painted.

-Do you know approximately what sort of year it is?

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-Yeah, it's about, it's about 1860 but you can date it almost from the style of the painting of the faces.

-Yeah.

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That's a really good clue and then these under-glazed blue borders.

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It's a nice little teapot and I want to know, do you actually use it?

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-No it sits at my mum's still, on top of the wardrobe.

-Do you, do you go for picnics?

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Yes, but I wouldn't take something like that, no.

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-Why not?

-Too scared of damaging it. Because my grandad brought it back from the Navy.

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-Yeah.

-It's something he really sort of looked after, my mum wouldn't sell it, I wouldn't sell it.

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It's something that will stay in the family.

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-But it is a picnic teapot.

-Oh, it's for picnics.

-Yeah, well you've got the original padded box.

-Yes.

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And in fact you could almost say that the padded box

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is almost better than the teapot itself.

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-Oh.

-It's a wonderful...

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They've even left a little nozzle for where the spout of the teapot sits.

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And once you've brewed up your tea, you stick it in there

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and it sits nice and snugly in this lovely little wicker basket.

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It's basically a sort of 19th century thermos.

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-Right, with you, yeah.

-But even today in China you can buy

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-kits like this.

-Right.

-An age-old design, it's absolutely timeless, it's a nice object.

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Well, the teapot on its own is really actually not worth that much money.

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Let's put the whole thing together, the teapot with its container,

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probably worth somewhere between £100 and £200.

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Right, yes, I wouldn't sell it.

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-Time for a brew up.

-Yeah, yeah, I'll see if she wants to take it on a picnic, but I don't think she will.

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Deep in the Roadshow is a small but very select club,

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it has only three members - Simon Bull, David Battie and Roy Butler.

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Apart from being all Bs

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they're the only experts who've been with this show in every series since it began 30 years ago.

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But, Philip Hook,

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as an art expert, you did a very respectable 25 years.

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I did, yes, and I...

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I remember the beginnings, that first series.

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We were making it up as we went along really, I mean we just didn't know what was going to happen.

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Would anyone bring anything in?

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Would anyone turn up?

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What would they bring in?

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You were a very young expert.

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Well, I'm absolutely staggered looking at the footage of that first programme

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30 years ago, of how young I did look, it's been of great amusement

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to my daughter who's seen the footage.

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And ironically I remember at that time thinking "Oh, if only I had grey hair,

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"people would take me more seriously as an expert" and now it's a different story.

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Between £200 and £300 now at auction.

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I think another interesting difference was that in that first series,

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no-one knew very much when they came in. I think the Antiques Roadshow

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over the past 30 years has really educated people, educated the public with the result that

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people now come in knowing more, and perhaps with a greater degree of expectation,

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so in that first series we were giving more people very happy and pleasant surprises.

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And what was it about the show that kept you coming back year after year? Apart from being asked.

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Well, it was the objects. But it wasn't just the objects

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that people brought in, it was the people, it was the owners -

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they were such a wonderful mix of characters.

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And I remember one great garage owner

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who brought an L S Lowry in, in Manchester.

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Three years ago I was doing a job for a chap in London

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on an E type Jaguar and he was short of the payment

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of about £250 and he asked me would I like to take this painting,

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and I took it and that's how I acquired it.

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And when I had to tell him that, er, that his L S Lowry was not actually genuine, he was a bit crestfallen,

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and then he brightened up and he said that it didn't really matter

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because the car repair had fallen off the next day anyway.

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So all's well that ends well. What's your own personal favourite find?

0:16:210:16:25

Well, there were many wonderful things that one finds over the years,

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but I suppose one particular one sticks in the mind.

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It was at a north London Roadshow.

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The owner hadn't intended to come but he was sitting in a cafe

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outside the venue, having a cup of coffee, watching the queue

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get slightly less and then suddenly on a whim he got up, nipped round the corner back to his house -

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he was an American guy - and picked up a picture his father had left him.

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He didn't know what it was, what it was worth,

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and when he brought it in and I was able to tell him, he was absolutely flabbergasted.

0:16:580:17:03

Down in the corner here we've got this signature here.

0:17:030:17:06

T Foujita.

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Here we have the most important Japanese painter in a Western style, of this century.

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Well, I suppose, I suppose...

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How can I put it? I think you should probably insure it for £50,000.

0:17:190:17:24

And I am sure there are plenty of Japanese lurking round the corner

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who would probably pay you even a bit more for it.

0:17:330:17:37

-Wow.

-He's the most desirable name for Japanese collectors.

-That's the best cup of coffee I ever had.

0:17:370:17:42

And then one thing the cameras didn't get at the end,

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was him turning to this little old lady in audience just next to him,

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who'd he'd never met before in his life,

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and he said, "Want to marry me now?"

0:17:540:17:56

Now I have to say, this looks like

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a very simple ring, almost like a wedding ring.

0:18:060:18:08

Is it a wedding ring from your point of view? What's the story behind it?

0:18:080:18:12

No, um, 25 years ago I was digging the garden, digging the potatoes up,

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talking to my next door neighbour. My mother was with me and she bent down,

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and picked something up

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-and she just opened her hand and there sat this ring.

-Oh!

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Do you know anything about the people who were living in the house,

0:18:290:18:33

-who might have owned the garden, going back a few hundred years?

-No.

0:18:330:18:37

Originally it was a cherry orchard, before we had the bungalow put on it.

0:18:370:18:41

And what have you done with, with the ring since?

0:18:410:18:45

Well, I used to wear it, because I had it valued

0:18:450:18:49

-and they said it would be about £7.

-£7, yes, OK.

-Yes, so I thought,

0:18:490:18:52

"Well, I might as well wear it."

0:18:520:18:54

If they said £7, first of all did they tell you what it was made of?

0:18:540:18:58

-Um, no.

-So from your own point of view, this is the first time anyone's seriously studied it.

0:18:590:19:04

-Yes, yes.

-Well, although,

0:19:040:19:06

um, it does have an appearance of a rather simple gem ring, there's something

0:19:060:19:10

slightly more interesting about it. It is in fact an old mourning ring.

0:19:100:19:14

-Right.

-And if it was £7 you would assume it was made of something like

0:19:140:19:18

base metal, but of course it's very high carat yellow gold.

0:19:180:19:21

-Oh, it's not!

-It is.

0:19:210:19:24

So that's the first good thing.

0:19:260:19:28

The second thing that's quite interesting is that using my lens,

0:19:280:19:32

I can see right into the hoop itself and there is an inscription.

0:19:320:19:37

-Yes.

-And, um inside the hoop is engraved as follows -

0:19:370:19:42

-"William Back..."

-Yes.

0:19:420:19:44

-"William Back..."

-Yes.

0:19:440:19:47

"..obd..." - died -

0:19:470:19:49

-"..7th November 1718".

-Yes.

0:19:490:19:53

In other words we've got a ring here that is nearly 300 years old.

0:19:530:19:57

Does one assume that it was lying forgotten in your potato patch...

0:19:570:20:02

-Yes, yes.

-..for all those years?

0:20:020:20:06

Well, OK, the top of the ring is set with

0:20:060:20:09

a blue stone and it is not contemporary with the ring.

0:20:090:20:13

What's the story there? Do you know anything about that?

0:20:130:20:16

Well, I was having a driving lesson and I think I must have hit it on the steering wheel

0:20:160:20:22

and it was like crystal and it fell out and I couldn't find it.

0:20:220:20:26

-Right.

-So the jeweller...

-That would figure,

0:20:260:20:29

because mourning rings were mounted with little crystals at the tops,

0:20:290:20:33

-but often contained a little lock of hair underneath.

-Oh.

0:20:330:20:36

That's dropped out and a jeweller's put this blue lapis lazuli in.

0:20:360:20:39

So it must have been really small because I didn't see a hair at all,

0:20:390:20:44

so it must have been really small.

0:20:440:20:46

Well, your lucky find in your potato patch -

0:20:460:20:49

you've been told it's worth £7 -

0:20:490:20:52

I think it's probably worth something like £300 to £400.

0:20:520:20:55

Now that was a good find.

0:20:570:21:00

I'm speechless.

0:21:000:21:03

And I used to wear it.

0:21:030:21:05

Well, these are items of war,

0:21:080:21:10

but we're standing here in a place of peace, Rochester Cathedral,

0:21:100:21:14

and this is your cathedral, so tell me how they got here.

0:21:140:21:17

I can't answer for my ancestors, but in the 17th century

0:21:170:21:20

amazingly, the cathedral employed six militia men.

0:21:200:21:23

Those militia men were kitted out with muskets and swords and they were told to keep the peace.

0:21:230:21:28

We don't know whether just for the cathedral, or for Rochester as a whole, and this is part

0:21:280:21:32

-of what they were equipped with.

-And these were found recently?

-They were in the crypt.

0:21:320:21:37

We don't know when they were found in the crypt.

0:21:370:21:39

They've been passed on to the museum who look after them for us at the moment.

0:21:390:21:44

Let's look at them in a little bit of detail and talk about them.

0:21:440:21:47

They're both Civil War items from the English Civil War, this is what is called a mortuary hilted

0:21:470:21:55

back sword. It's called mortuary hilt because if you look at the hilt here,

0:21:550:22:01

-you see it's got masks. I don't know if you can see.

-Yes.

-Just there.

0:22:010:22:05

That's supposed to represent the severed head of King Charles.

0:22:050:22:09

-How nice(!)

-And that's why it's called a mortuary hilted sword.

0:22:090:22:13

What interests me about this however, is that I think this composition -

0:22:130:22:17

I think this has been put together.

0:22:170:22:19

Now this hasn't been put together 400 years ago, 300 years ago, this has actually been put together,

0:22:190:22:24

-I suspect, in the last 50 to 80 years.

-Really?

0:22:240:22:28

But it's still a nice object and it's an early object

0:22:280:22:31

and it's certainly mid-17th century.

0:22:310:22:33

Let's go to the musket next

0:22:330:22:36

because actually this is more interesting.

0:22:360:22:40

Although this is scarce, this sword is rare, the musket itself

0:22:400:22:43

is as rare as hen's teeth.

0:22:430:22:45

This is called a dog lock and it's a dog-lock musket

0:22:450:22:50

from the Civil War period, and they're incredibly scarce.

0:22:500:22:53

-Really?

-They are incredibly scarce.

0:22:530:22:56

They would have been used.

0:22:560:22:57

These are objects of war - they would have been used

0:22:570:23:00

in battle I suspect. You mention six militia men who were here during the Civil War.

0:23:000:23:05

In theory, there's no reason to suspect that they weren't using

0:23:050:23:10

these very weapons that were found in the crypt.

0:23:100:23:13

But cathedrals were used for many things, and what was the cathedral used for during that Civil War?

0:23:130:23:19

It would be nice if we had a film, a documentary of what was happening but we know, for instance,

0:23:190:23:24

that horses were stabled here during the Civil War. Some people have said that's in the crypt

0:23:240:23:28

but I suspect they might have been in the nave.

0:23:280:23:31

-Now, as a matter of interest, you've got them in the museum, do they have them insured?

-They do.

0:23:310:23:38

OK, they need to have them insured for quite a substantial amount.

0:23:380:23:41

Are you going to tell me how much?

0:23:410:23:43

Well, I saw three or four muskets like this selling at auction last year, made a lot of money.

0:23:430:23:49

-So let's start with the sword.

-Mmm.

0:23:490:23:52

The sword you should insure for £3,000.

0:23:520:23:57

The musket...

0:23:570:23:59

you should insure for

0:23:590:24:02

-£10,000 to £11,000.

-Right, well...

0:24:020:24:07

-These are nice objects.

-Very nice objects.

0:24:070:24:09

-I hope the museum looks after them well.

-I hope they do,

0:24:090:24:12

especially in the light of what I now know.

0:24:120:24:16

A rather battered box, what have you been doing to it?

0:24:160:24:21

Well, that's how it came to us.

0:24:210:24:24

I think what it did, it came out of Russia and then it was moved to France,

0:24:240:24:29

miles up in the Alps, but it lived in a wardrobe

0:24:290:24:33

under a load of shoe boxes because the person that owned it then felt

0:24:330:24:38

nobody would take the shoes and they wouldn't find the box.

0:24:380:24:41

-So there aren't any shoes in there?

-No shoes in there, have a look.

0:24:410:24:45

OK. And, of course,

0:24:450:24:47

what you've got is this fantastic fitted flatware service.

0:24:470:24:52

Not its original case. So when did it come out of Russia?

0:24:520:24:57

Well, I guess sort of, you know the Revolution time

0:24:570:25:01

-I'm thinking, I don't know.

-Ah, now, we've got a clue here

0:25:010:25:05

because if you look on the box itself, the box says,

0:25:050:25:09

-"Savory and Sons".

-Yes.

0:25:090:25:10

Now, Savory's were a very important London firm

0:25:100:25:15

that ended in the late 19th century.

0:25:150:25:19

So it has to have come out of Russia before the Revolution.

0:25:190:25:22

-Right, OK.

-So we're looking at the Victorian period.

-Right.

0:25:220:25:25

But it is quite an amazing service.

0:25:250:25:30

It's not unusual to come across Russian spoons like this.

0:25:300:25:34

It's a particularly good Russian spoon

0:25:340:25:37

because we've got this decoration here which is known as niello work.

0:25:370:25:41

Yes.

0:25:410:25:42

Basically what they did was to carve the surface

0:25:420:25:47

with that decoration. What you see as black was carved out.

0:25:470:25:51

Then they put the niello powder on the surface

0:25:510:25:54

and they fired that in, but the whole surface then would be black.

0:25:540:25:58

-OK.

-Then they rubbed it back

0:25:580:26:02

until they got to the original surface

0:26:020:26:05

and that left the black as an infill.

0:26:050:26:07

So let's have a look and see just what date we're looking at, 1837.

0:26:070:26:11

It's earlier than I thought, mmm.

0:26:110:26:14

Yeah 1837 and we've got there the mark for Moscow

0:26:140:26:18

which is Saint George and the dragon,

0:26:180:26:20

-because Saint George was the patron saint of Moscow.

-Yes.

0:26:200:26:24

And we've got really everything going on here.

0:26:240:26:27

These knives are interesting as well.

0:26:270:26:30

We've got the same decorative scheme

0:26:300:26:33

-but that is not a Russian blade.

-Oh.

0:26:330:26:37

And what you see there is "Savory"

0:26:370:26:41

so they were re-bladed when they came to England.

0:26:410:26:45

Why would that have been?

0:26:450:26:48

-Probably because the original knife blades were already worn out.

-OK.

0:26:480:26:52

Does that detract from the quality, the fact that they've been re-bladed?

0:26:520:26:55

Not really, so many knives are re-bladed at some stage.

0:26:550:26:59

I mean, clearly, it would be that much nicer if they were

0:26:590:27:02

the absolutely original knife, but to get Russian knives like this, is so unusual.

0:27:020:27:06

So what a service.

0:27:060:27:09

Now it's an extraordinarily difficult set to value

0:27:090:27:13

because odd spoons do come on the market.

0:27:130:27:17

I cannot remember a set like this ever coming on the market,

0:27:170:27:22

-but of course the Russian market is a very good market at the moment.

-Yes.

0:27:220:27:27

A lot of money in Russia - well, certain individuals -

0:27:270:27:30

and, of course, they absolutely love and want

0:27:300:27:34

pieces like this. I mean, this is absolutely right for the market.

0:27:340:27:38

I would not be surprised, and this is a guesstimate,

0:27:380:27:42

-that this might sell for about £15,000...

-Really?

0:27:420:27:47

-..because of the Russian market.

-The Russian market.

0:27:470:27:50

Paul, Rochester Cathedral

0:27:520:27:54

is becoming the spiritual home of the Antiques Roadshow

0:27:540:27:57

with so many people claiming connections, but yours is impressive.

0:27:570:28:00

I think I can claim the best one ever.

0:28:000:28:02

Francis Atterbury, Bishop of Rochester.

0:28:040:28:07

We're actually descended from his brother,

0:28:070:28:09

so it's co-lateral, not quite, but it's a pretty good claim I think.

0:28:090:28:13

-Bishop of Rochester?

-Yep. Well, he was actually quite a guy.

0:28:130:28:16

He was born in the 1660s.

0:28:160:28:19

He was a cleric all his life.

0:28:190:28:21

He became Bishop of Rochester in 1714.

0:28:210:28:25

The trouble was, after that, he became Dean of Westminster

0:28:250:28:29

and then he got into trouble, as you might say, by backing the wrong side.

0:28:290:28:32

He became a Jacobite, or he'd always been a Jacobite, and he was seen as a rebellious cleric.

0:28:320:28:38

When George I came to the throne, he was actually sentenced to death for saying the wrong things

0:28:380:28:44

and was exiled to France, where he died. So he simply made a bad choice at a certain point

0:28:440:28:50

and whether I've inherited those traits I don't know.

0:28:500:28:54

-You've certainly inherited something - very noble hooter of the Atterburys there.

-Oh, the big conk?

0:28:540:29:00

-Let's be honest about it.

-The Atterbury hooter, very distinguished.

0:29:000:29:03

Yes. He's, in a sense, my only claim to fame

0:29:030:29:07

because when I was a child,

0:29:070:29:09

we were often taken to Atterbury Street in London by my grandmother which is beside the Tate Gallery,

0:29:090:29:15

and she always used to say "that street is named after your..."

0:29:150:29:19

however many great-great-great uncle it was,

0:29:190:29:22

and so there are photographs of me standing beside Atterbury Street sign,

0:29:220:29:26

my children standing beside Atterbury Street, the sign,

0:29:260:29:29

and so it goes on.

0:29:290:29:32

CHOIR: # Away in a manger... #

0:29:320:29:35

Rochester's Cathedral Choir have been in fine voice this weekend

0:29:350:29:39

and where better to celebrate the coming of Christmas

0:29:390:29:42

than the place where Charles Dickens drew inspiration for his heart-warming novels -

0:29:420:29:47

as full of convivial and sprightly characters as any Antiques Roadshow.

0:29:470:29:51

With that, let's wallow in seasonal nostalgia as we welcome the cheerful ghosts of programmes past.

0:29:510:29:58

He was my father's, who was born in 1907

0:29:580:30:01

and he's been looking after our Christmas trees, as a family, for 90 years.

0:30:010:30:07

-How wonderful.

-So every single year he...

0:30:070:30:09

-And was he used this Christmas?

-This last Christmas, yes.

0:30:090:30:12

Lovely, well he's got his little Christmas tree here

0:30:120:30:15

and he's dressed in what would have been a bright red coat.

0:30:150:30:20

-Maybe in the folds you can see it's a little bit brighter...

-Yes, yes.

-..than what it's faded to now.

0:30:200:30:26

The first Christmas card was invented by a man called Henry Cole

0:30:260:30:29

in England, and I think it was 1849, late 1840s.

0:30:290:30:33

And so all the nonsense we go through, the rituals today, are part of our Victorian legacy

0:30:330:30:38

and the cards like this, I think,

0:30:380:30:40

are a wonderful mirror of what the Victorians thought about it.

0:30:400:30:43

Particularly desirable are these ones

0:30:430:30:46

with pierced paperwork, fantastically complicated in their technology.

0:30:460:30:50

What fascinates me, though, is his head because what we have here

0:30:500:30:54

is a bisque head which one associates with pretty smiling attractive dolls

0:30:540:31:01

-of the period.

-Yes.

-But this is anything but.

0:31:010:31:04

He's got a very pointed nose,

0:31:040:31:07

he's got lines here on the bridge of his nose, he's wrinkled,

0:31:070:31:12

he's obviously an old man

0:31:120:31:14

and that makes it really quite an interesting doll.

0:31:140:31:18

Now, these are the most desirable sort because here we have a church saying "Happy Christmas".

0:31:180:31:23

And what you do, is,

0:31:230:31:25

you pull the ribbon, and it animates - it all comes to life.

0:31:250:31:29

And there inside is the church, the stained glass,

0:31:290:31:33

and inside the children praying, as a wonderful image of Christmas.

0:31:330:31:38

Now, of course, in collector terms they're not particularly desirable,

0:31:380:31:42

I mean they range from £5 to £15 but that's completely irrelevant.

0:31:420:31:46

-Yes.

-For once we're not talking about money. For the total album it might be £200, £300, £400

0:31:460:31:50

but it's not the money, it's what it represents about Victorian life.

0:31:500:31:54

And Santa Claus, as a figure, is actually very widely collected

0:31:540:31:59

-and a little figure like this could easily realise between £800 and £1,200.

-No!

0:31:590:32:06

-And in the right sort of venue.

-Yes.

0:32:060:32:09

-I think next Christmas...

-We'll keep him in a parcel rather than putting him on the tree.

0:32:090:32:14

We have it hanging at Christmas.

0:32:190:32:21

At Christmas?

0:32:210:32:23

-Yes.

-Just every Christmas I can remember, we just bring it out.

0:32:230:32:26

-So you treat it like a Christmas decoration?

-Yeah.

0:32:260:32:29

It comes out with the decs at Christmas. I know.

0:32:290:32:32

That's extraordinary. If I owned this, I'd want to look at it all the year round.

0:32:320:32:35

How long have you had this?

0:32:350:32:38

About 20 years I think.

0:32:380:32:40

My husband actually bought it from a book dealer in Edinburgh.

0:32:400:32:43

-Yes.

-And when he died, his wife wrote to my husband to say

0:32:430:32:48

how much they loved having it in their family, and we hope we get as much pleasure in our family.

0:32:480:32:53

-It's obviously a watercolour that's charm generates that kind of personal interest, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:32:530:32:58

-I think so.

-Yes, so do you know about the artist, Kate Greenaway?

0:32:580:33:02

Um, a little yes, I know she was a Victorian watercolour and I think she...

0:33:020:33:07

didn't she paint a lot of children?

0:33:070:33:09

-Absolutely her thing.

-Yes, yes.

0:33:090:33:11

I just love that little detail of the child asleep

0:33:110:33:14

and the way the light is falling on her, presumably moonlight...

0:33:140:33:17

just caught the features of her face and her lovely eyelashes, it's beautifully done.

0:33:170:33:23

-Yes, it is, isn't it?

-It's really sweet and I find it interesting that

0:33:230:33:27

-it was bought from a book dealer because it's possible that this was a book illustration.

-Right.

0:33:270:33:32

And then again it occurred to me that it might even have been a design for a Christmas card.

0:33:320:33:37

-Yes. Well, we actually had a Christmas card made.

-For yourself?

0:33:370:33:40

-For ourselves, and sent it out.

-Such a good idea.

0:33:400:33:43

-In my opinion, it's worth at least £6,000 to £8,000.

-Right.

-Gosh.

0:33:430:33:49

Yes, that's amazing.

0:33:490:33:50

Now, according to this piece of paper

0:34:000:34:03

it says "Wine glass of first Emperor Napoleon...

0:34:030:34:08

And if we look inside we find...

0:34:190:34:22

..that, which looks to me

0:34:240:34:28

precisely

0:34:280:34:30

like a Napoleonic wine glass. So what's the story?

0:34:300:34:34

The only thing that I know about it is that my father had it

0:34:340:34:40

and when he died it passed on to me,

0:34:400:34:43

but I've tried to find out about this inscription and had no success at all.

0:34:430:34:49

-Right, you don't know where he got it?

-No, I have no idea at all

0:34:490:34:53

-where he got it from.

-So he wasn't a friend of Napoleon's?

-I don't think so.

0:34:530:34:56

-Slight age problem there.

-Yes.

0:34:560:34:58

Well, let's look at the evidence here, what have we got before us?

0:34:580:35:02

We have precisely Napoleon's cipher.

0:35:020:35:05

-That's what it looked like, that's absolutely correct.

-Yes.

0:35:050:35:09

We're talking about a piece of exactly the right form and date.

0:35:090:35:12

We have a nice coin-disc foot, star-cut base.

0:35:120:35:17

We have hexagon facets up the stem, solid bottom bowl.

0:35:170:35:23

-Weighs a tonne, doesn't it?

-It is quite heavy, yes. Heavy lead crystal. Yeah.

0:35:230:35:27

What do you think a glass like that was used for?

0:35:270:35:31

-You wouldn't drink out of that, would you?

-No.

-If I served you wine...

-Wouldn't get enough in there.

0:35:310:35:36

Not enough in it. So it was for toasting.

0:35:360:35:39

-Oh, right.

-So this glass

0:35:390:35:41

conformed to the etiquette of the period which was that you didn't have the glasses on the table.

0:35:410:35:47

You would toast to your neighbour. You'd say "cheers"...

0:35:470:35:50

down the hatch and then the glass would leave the table, be refilled

0:35:520:35:56

-and come back, that's why it's so small.

-Same glass, mmm. Good.

0:35:560:36:01

So I reckon that's a pretty hot bit of stuff and it's ironic is it not,

0:36:010:36:05

that while Europe was blazed and was destroyed by Napoleon and his armies,

0:36:050:36:09

his little wine glass, perhaps the most fragile thing around him, has survived to the present day!

0:36:090:36:15

Brilliant.

0:36:150:36:17

Value, I reckon that the auction estimate would start at £3,000

0:36:170:36:22

and if it sailed past £5,000 I wouldn't be at all surprised.

0:36:220:36:26

-That's very nice.

-Isn't it just?

-Very, very nice.

0:36:260:36:29

What a nice man you are.

0:36:290:36:31

Can't help it. Born like it, gal.

0:36:310:36:35

Well, I went to the verger after I saw you with this service

0:36:350:36:38

and I asked him if we could borrow one of their candles and he's very, very kindly obliged.

0:36:380:36:44

But before I get all romantic over the candle, you tell me about this tea service.

0:36:440:36:49

Well, I really want to know, we know a lot about it, but I've taken it

0:36:490:36:53

-to one or two places and I wanted to know really where it was made.

-Yeah.

0:36:530:36:59

A name for it. We're more worried about the provenance than the value.

0:36:590:37:03

Your provenance, your own family, you've been using this as a tea service.

0:37:030:37:07

-No.

-You haven't been using it?

-It's on the wall on shelves.

0:37:070:37:11

OK, because look, going through it individually

0:37:110:37:13

piece by piece we've discovered that maybe 40% of the pieces

0:37:130:37:17

are damaged or imperfect in some sort of way.

0:37:170:37:20

-That's why we had it.

-So somebody obviously enjoyed using it.

-Way back.

0:37:200:37:23

And maybe were a little bit rough with it. Maybe there wasn't enough light where they were using it.

0:37:230:37:30

-Maybe.

-Maybe they were working in candlelight and tallow light

0:37:300:37:34

and so things got a bit chipped.

0:37:340:37:37

-Possibly, yes.

-Do you know how old the service is?

0:37:370:37:40

No, I know the man, John, um, Sleigh, we've chased him back on our family tree

0:37:400:37:47

-and he bought it, he didn't inherit it, and he was born in 1872.

-OK.

0:37:470:37:53

This is going to be earlier than that.

0:37:530:37:55

This takes us back to the Regency, this is something you might see

0:37:550:37:59

in one of those television dramas about young women, usually by Jane Austen.

0:38:000:38:05

In the Regency period - we're talking about the early 19th century,

0:38:050:38:09

the early 1800s - it became more and more popular to take tea,

0:38:090:38:14

and one of the things that you would do is, especially with a service like this,

0:38:140:38:19

you would take tea in the evenings

0:38:190:38:22

when the light was low and when the candles came out.

0:38:220:38:25

And this particular service really answers to and resonates

0:38:250:38:30

-to that late Georgian desire for brilliance and sparkle.

-Oh, really.

0:38:300:38:35

You'll see there is absolutely tonnes of gilding on here,

0:38:350:38:39

acres, I should say, and the whole reason is if you are...

0:38:390:38:42

if you are taking tea by candlelight,

0:38:420:38:45

then it really does show off in a way that the other colours don't.

0:38:450:38:51

The essential idea of this is Japanese.

0:38:510:38:54

These radiating semicircles and circles

0:38:540:38:57

-are what the Japanese would recognise as heraldic devices called "mon".

-Oh.

0:38:570:39:02

Here the English have made it all their own, this is English porcelain. We turn it over...

0:39:020:39:07

you can see that characteristic dark blue...rather soapy texture.

0:39:070:39:12

But no markings.

0:39:120:39:14

-No marks. I've been through every single piece.

-No.

-We've got this stippling on the foot rim,

0:39:140:39:19

that's also quite characteristic.

0:39:190:39:21

So we know it's English from the actual colour of the paste.

0:39:210:39:25

I think this is by a Coalport factory.

0:39:250:39:27

-Coalport.

-Yeah, and of course you know the name.

0:39:270:39:31

Coalport's one of the great names of English porcelain.

0:39:310:39:34

It's absolutely typical of what they did. This would have been a very expensive service when it was new,

0:39:340:39:40

in around the 1820s. This would be state of the art, very expensive, high fashion, high taste.

0:39:400:39:47

I know that you're not interested in the value but antiques do go up and down with time, with fashion,

0:39:470:39:52

-and today you could probably buy a service like this for under £1,000 at auction.

-Mmm.

-Yeah.

0:39:520:39:59

-So I think it's a superb service and I'm thrilled that...

-We do.

0:39:590:40:04

-..the verger let us use one of his candles.

-Yes.

-I think we'll offer a little prayer

0:40:040:40:09

to the verger, and thank you for bringing this huge service in.

0:40:090:40:12

Thank you for all that information, Lars.

0:40:120:40:15

I can't believe that two such diverse pictures have been brought in by one person today.

0:40:170:40:23

Now, how come you've got these two very different pictures?

0:40:230:40:26

Well, my dear uncle, a retired GP in Bristol,

0:40:260:40:29

it's been his lifelong hobby collecting antiques and particularly paintings.

0:40:290:40:34

He goes to the big auction rooms and purchases and, er, gets catalogues of things.

0:40:340:40:40

He's down-sized from a bungalow to a flat and he just lives in a room.

0:40:400:40:45

Every time we've been very fortunate that he's allowed us to choose

0:40:450:40:49

maybe what we like, if he doesn't want them to be put up in his room.

0:40:490:40:53

This one is in memory of my grandma who died in 1977

0:40:530:40:57

and this was one of them that's always been on the wall which I really rather like.

0:40:570:41:02

The first one up here is really interesting because in fact it's Dutch.

0:41:020:41:06

-Yes.

-It's 17th century.

0:41:060:41:08

It's by an artist, or attributed to an artist, called Van Brekelenkan.

0:41:080:41:13

I'd catalogue this as "circle of this artist".

0:41:130:41:15

In the 17th century, the Dutch were very, very keen on doing interior scenes.

0:41:150:41:20

You can look at Ostade and Teniers, you know, wonderful detail. This is quite good -

0:41:200:41:26

very good detail on here.

0:41:260:41:28

But it is a bit thin

0:41:280:41:29

and it's thin because it's had over-cleaning at some time

0:41:290:41:33

and also it's had the split in the panel, but it's a nice painting.

0:41:330:41:38

When we come down to the bottom here and we've got a 20th century picture.

0:41:380:41:42

-Yes, yes.

-And it is signed

0:41:420:41:45

-by Munnings, 1908.

-Mmm.

-And I'll just tell you about Munnings.

0:41:450:41:50

Munnings is actually one of the favourite artists of mine.

0:41:500:41:53

-Oh.

-He is very famous for painting horses, he was an equestrian artist later on in life.

0:41:530:41:58

He was born in 1878.

0:41:580:42:01

This is 1908 and it would have been painted when he was 30 years old.

0:42:010:42:07

-Oh.

-But really lively painting and you look at the way that he gets the blossom on the tree.

-Yeah.

0:42:070:42:12

And just a few brush strokes to get the water, really positive.

0:42:120:42:15

And, you know, when he was very young,

0:42:150:42:18

he started off working for Colman's Mustard doing the design for their cans. Yes, I've seen

0:42:180:42:24

some of the original designs and then... He was a genius really.

0:42:240:42:27

In the early 1900s painting like this and becomes very famous for his horse paintings

0:42:270:42:31

in the '20s and '30s. He actually became President of the Royal Academy

0:42:310:42:36

and gave a very famous speech in the '50s where he derided modern art and he was not a popular man.

0:42:360:42:42

-Oh, right.

-But this is fantastic.

0:42:420:42:45

We have to come to values now.

0:42:450:42:47

I hate talking about values because it's such a nice picture. But the top one here...

0:42:470:42:51

-Yes.

-..um, I think today if one had this as attributed to Brekelenkam

0:42:510:42:56

I would say...

0:42:560:42:58

somewhere in the region of, er, £3,000 to £5,000.

0:42:580:43:05

The one down here is absolutely sensational.

0:43:050:43:09

-I know that this is worth £20,000 to £30,000.

-No!

0:43:090:43:15

-I thought the top one would be the expensive one.

-Wow.

0:43:150:43:18

And having told you that, it could even go on more

0:43:180:43:21

and make £30,000 to £35,000. It's a really lovely picture.

0:43:210:43:26

He would just be so thrilled

0:43:260:43:27

to know that... He bought it in memory of his mum and he'd be so thrilled.

0:43:270:43:33

A day of delightful discoveries

0:43:370:43:39

including some extraordinary personal links

0:43:390:43:41

between the Roadshow team and Rochester Cathedral.

0:43:410:43:45

Relatives have included one dean, one canon, one verger

0:43:450:43:49

and assorted members of the choir.

0:43:490:43:52

My own father was born just down the road in Chatham

0:43:520:43:55

but he never achieved high office

0:43:550:43:56

and he wasn't much of a singer either.

0:43:560:43:58

Many thanks to everyone who's joined us today,

0:43:580:44:01

and from Rochester in Kent, goodbye.

0:44:010:44:03

Micael Aspel and his team of experts pay a return visit to Rochester Cathedral to examine more local heirlooms. They toast the festive season with Napoleon's drinking glass, and uncover a very early piece of television technology.