Arundel Antiques Roadshow


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Arundel

Michael Aspel pays a visit to Arundel Castle. The specialists turn up many treasures, including a 14th-century jug and a supposedly haunted picture.


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We've come back to one of the Roadshow's most impressive venues -

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Arundel Castle, home of the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk.

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They've opened their doors to us before, so we know what to expect.

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Beginners, please.

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It still smells of seaweed. Why's that?

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It was actually covered with seaweed and full of silt when I found it

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-on the beach last week.

-Oh, right.

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And I was out fishing at the time,

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came across this, and I thought it was just a clump of seaweed on a rock

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and when I actually looked under it,

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it was covered with silt up to about that area.

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-Right. And then you saw there was a handle and...

-And everything else.

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-Great jug! So where was this beach?

-In Littlehampton.

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Off the seafront at Littlehampton.

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Right, well, did you know what you'd found?

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I knew it was some sort of jug, but I thought it was...

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-I thought it was a special garden feature.

-Yeah?

-But, er...

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But actually what you've found is a medieval jug.

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-Right.

-We're looking at a piece here that dates from the 14th century.

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-That early?

-That early, yes.

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Made probably in Surrey.

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What you've got here is some painted decoration,

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-which is very distinctive of these English medieval jugs.

-Right.

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And because of its sheer size when full, to help use it,

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they've put a little spout on there, which is always a nice feature.

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Underneath the barnacles, which I'm sure will clean up,

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you've got a typical bib of green glaze.

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That is glaze, is it? It's not seaweed or anything?

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The green colour is natural glaze.

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-Right.

-This is barnacles and things

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but there's the green glaze of a Surrey type.

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-So it's actually local?

-Pretty well local.

-Pretty well local.

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Yes, and it's pretty damaged but,

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even so, I think after a bit of repair and, and work,

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a jug like this is going to be...

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-somewhere between £1,000 and £2,000.

-That much?

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-That's not bad at all.

-Just to think where it's been all that time.

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-This heavy clock - somebody brought it in for you earlier.

-Yes.

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So I've had a chance to have a sneak preview, thank goodness, because

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it doesn't play very well, but it appears to play God Save the Queen,

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-or the King. Is that your...?

-It does, yes.

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Right. So, it's a bit of a mystery, to be honest with you.

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The dial is wrong.

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Mr Fisher, Fisher and Sons, exist...

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They were working 1790-1810 and that's probably fairly perfect

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for this clock, which was just around the end of the 18th century,

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beginning of the 19th century. But the dial has been changed.

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-OK.

-And I think, if you look at it

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and you look at the beautiful engraving and piercing

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of this fretwork and then you look at that dial centre...

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-Right.

-It doesn't cut it, does it?

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It's a bit crude.

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It might have been a painted dial.

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-Right, yeah.

-And somebody, perhaps 50 years ago, has thought,

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"No, I'm not going to repaint it, I'll make a brass dial to fit."

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-Right. OK.

-And I think that's what's happened.

-Right.

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So, I have never seen a clock,

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to my knowledge... I know it plays several tunes...

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that appears to play the National Anthem.

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-OK.

-And we adopted the National Anthem, apparently,

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sometime after the 1750s.

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MUSIC: "God Save The King"

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-You're right...

-CLOCK CHIMES

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..it is "God Save The King",

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as it would have been at this time, George III on the throne,

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played on a series of bells with quite an elaborate sort of tune.

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But as I've already said, I've never seen that before.

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Now, when you look at the movement, and I won't go into any real detail,

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the style of the engraving,

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the signature which we can just make out behind the bell here,

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that's all perfectly OK, and it reinforces what I've said before -

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you've got a very fine case,

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a very nice movement, beautifully finished,

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and this rather crude dial.

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So I think...I'm afraid I'm going to have to say conclusively

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that that was probably white-painted,

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the painting fell apart, and they've changed it to brass.

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And to be honest with you, if it was mine,

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I think I'd be tempted to repaint the dial.

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But, sorry, I haven't asked you where you got it.

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It was given to my great uncle, apparently from a titled lady

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who came from Plymouth, but I've no other history to it.

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OK. Value-wise, despite the dial,

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which I think would be quite easily spotted,

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it's probably worth something of the order of...

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£5,000...

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-even with the dial changed.

-Right.

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-It's got a certain appeal.

-Very good.

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This I like,

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and I like it particularly

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-because it's not what one might expect it to be.

-Mm.

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-Now what it is, is Japanese so-called Satsumaware.

-Yes.

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And it would date from around the end of the 19th, early 20th century.

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-Yes.

-I don't know if you've got any knowledge of...

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-Yes, our grandfather was going to Japan at that time.

-Was he?

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So I should think that's it, yes.

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He was in Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance.

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He was the general manager

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-and he travelled to Japan all the time on business.

-Ah.

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Well, what you might have expected it to be

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is by one of the great makers of Satsuma...

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Kinkozan, Yabu Meizan or Ryozan.

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-Yes.

-But it ain't.

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-No.

-It's by somebody one has seen before but doesn't see very often,

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-and his name is here.

-Yes.

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Unzan.

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-Unzan actually means "cloudy mountain".

-Mm.

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-And then you've got the Satsuma mon up here.

-Yes.

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And Kyoto. So it's not actually Satsuma,

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it's Kyoto, and actually many of the Satsuma factories were in Kyoto.

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-Yes.

-It's decorated, breathtakingly,

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with scenes of warriors in a landscape

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and a panel here of a painter.

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-He's painted this screen of a dragon.

-Yes.

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-And all the characters are coming to life.

-Ah. Fascinating.

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-Yeah, that's what's going on here.

-I see, yeah.

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And it's separated by this fantastic dragon here.

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-Dragon, yes.

-But the bit I love...

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These spuming waves are just magical,

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absolutely superbly done. Now...

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-I didn't notice. I didn't look at it closely enough.

-You haven't?

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Well, people don't, you know, nobody looks at their own objects.

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Where does it sit at home?

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It usually sits on a bookcase in the sitting room.

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OK, and who dusts it?

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-We do.

-Seldom.

-Right, ah, that's what I want to hear.

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Seldom dusting is what I like.

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-No cats?

-No!

-No pussy cats, no.

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I mean it is in stonkingly good condition

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-and it's a wonderful vase.

-Yes.

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And I think it would probably make around...

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£2,000 to £4,000.

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-Would it really? My goodness, yes.

-Wonderful!

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

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Reading these articles,

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it's quite clear that this picture scares some people rigid.

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Yes, it does, indeed. I mean, it scared a few of our friends.

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When we moved house,

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and friends came to the house, our friends said,

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"You've got that man here again."

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Friends do think that his eyes do follow them, definitely.

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And you think it might also be haunted.

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-Yes, I do.

-Because certainly the

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-information that you've handed me suggests that he is.

-Yes.

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But before we come to that,

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let's talk about the man himself. Do you know anything about him?

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Yes, his name's John Whiteley,

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but he's otherwise known as John Almighty.

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And you can see here that he's the lynx-eyed thief-catcher general...

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And...yes, indeed.

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For Halifax in 1832.

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His followers at the time painted this painting for him.

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He was a local dignitary, a local landlord.

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He married the local landlady

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of The Star public house in Sowerby Bridge in West Yorkshire.

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-He started up a preaching group within the pub.

-Nice one!

-Yeah.

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-So, pulled pints and gave religion!

-And a religious preacher as well.

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But the picture has a little bit of a past

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and it worries people and it haunts people.

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-Have you been haunted by it yourself, did you say?

-We have.

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When it hung in our Yorkshire cottage my husband and I were downstairs

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and recently had our daughter who was three months old asleep in bed,

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well, in her cot, and we had the baby monitor on.

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Everything was very quiet and suddenly we heard Brahms' Lullaby

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being sung over the monitor, and I was really quite frightened.

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-I bet you were.

-I sent my husband immediately up the stairs,

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I couldn't go up myself,

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and I said, "I'll just stay down here and continue to listen,"

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and the moment he got to the top of the stairs, it stopped.

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I tiptoed and got to the very top stair opposite the bedroom,

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and, as my foot touched the landing, the music stopped immediately.

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-That's spooky.

-It was spooky.

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And reading the articles back here

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about the history of the picture, when it used to hang in the pub,

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-clearly it's got a haunted past as well.

-It has.

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Oh, yes, yeah. There are newspaper clippings there

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from the 1950s and this is when the locals starting hearing songs

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mysteriously coming about.

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-Much like your experience.

-Much like ours.

-Yes.

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Well, this is fascinating.

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I reckon there's a reason why people think it's haunted, although having

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said that, when I touched the glass earlier on, the glass broke.

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-It did.

-It did.

-Haunted or what?

-Must be.

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About this time, portraiture is very formal,

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we're talking about the 1830s and '40s.

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Regency glamour is beginning to subside and it's very stiff,

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but here we've got a meritocrat,

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someone who's not part of society as we know it,

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he's a concentrated eccentric, one might say a brilliant weirdo,

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so it's allowed the portrait painter, who is no great painter,

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-let's face it...

-No.

-And the condition is not great either.

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It's a primitive work but it's allowed a little bit of chuckle,

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a bit of mirth, and as a result, the character presents itself,

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it almost exudes a bit more.

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Eyes following you round the room... You've heard of that, we all have.

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-Yes.

-This is the type of picture, because the artist is not working

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within the harness of society, that sort of reaches you.

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It doesn't surprise me at all

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that this has got a haunted past, or a haunted association.

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It's an unusually characterful work

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by a primitive painter who hasn't any of the constraints

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that society portrait painters normally suffer from.

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Presented with that history, in that frame, with all those ghosts

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batting around the place, I'd value it at around about £2,500.

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-Thank you very much.

-Yes, OK.

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This is a fantastic example of modern political correctness

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allied to Victorian commercial expediency.

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-Really?

-I'll explain all this later, but what do you know about it?

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Well, my grandmother purchased it in a junk shop

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in Greenwich in the early 1920s.

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Right, I imagine that was a good hunting ground.

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I would think it was a very good hunting ground,

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and she didn't know what was inside it.

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You obviously know what's inside,

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I've obviously had a quick look, but let's look together.

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And it is spectacular!

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Row upon row

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of tiny butterflies with identification numbers,

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graduating down

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to larger butterflies - wonderful colour, wonderful condition...

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..to the bottom drawer with the largest of all.

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Now, why I say

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it's politically correct is, of course, they're not butterflies.

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They're made of paper,

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they are not actual butterflies, and these were taken from a book

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printed in England in the middle of the 19th century, about 1850-1855,

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of British butterflies and moths.

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They were cut out of the book and coloured after.

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-They're lithographs.

-Oh, my goodness.

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So it's English book printing paper.

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-Oh, right.

-With a lithograph print and later hand-coloured.

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So some enterprising entrepreneur somewhere had these books

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or had the pages printed and was able to supply any number

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of aspiring Victorian gentleman naturalists

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without having to go to the trouble of finding butterflies.

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The case that it's in is also English but it's decorated to look

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-like a Japanese lacquer casket.

-Yes.

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Because so many of the painted butterflies were Oriental,

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on rice paper, and it's quite

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a common decorative and fashionable finish

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of the period. It's charming.

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My guess is that to a decorative antiques dealer it's worth somewhere

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-in the region of £800.

-Really?

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Might try and sell it for a bit more, but not a lot.

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No.

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I think one of those bits of

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information that everybody has in school days - I certainly did,

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and I'm sure you did - is that

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penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming.

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-Yes, very much so.

-Graham Bell did the telephone.

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-Yes.

-And Fleming did penicillin.

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But this material all seems to relate to Fleming,

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so where do you fit into the Fleming story?

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Well, my father went to work directly from school at the tender age of 14

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in the Inoculation Department of St Mary's Hospital,

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-where Fleming was working too, as a bacteriological researcher.

-Right.

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And my father stayed there until he retired in 1967.

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So what date did he join?

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It would have been in 1921.

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Right, at a very early age indeed.

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-Just before penicillin was discovered.

-Right.

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-Penicillin, I think, is 1928 or something?

-That's right, yes.

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So he was actually there when this great discovery was made?

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Initially very much as a general boy, cleaning and that sort of thing,

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but in due course, he qualified as a medical laboratory technician...

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-Yes.

-And he became a technical assistant to Fleming.

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And did he talk about that moment of discovery?

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Well, I don't think he was so

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much conscious at that time, he was still fairly young,

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but it did become part of his life after that.

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So it wasn't a "eureka" moment?

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I don't think so. Well even for

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Fleming it wasn't, really, because it wasn't recognised for about 10 years.

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-Yes.

-It was very difficult to

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extract the penicillin from the mould itself that produced the penicillin.

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-Right.

-And initially they could only produce little odd amounts,

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just enough to experiment on terminal patients, and so that,

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at least, did have some effect.

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-So which is Fleming?

-Fleming is here.

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-Is your father in this?

-No, this is just the doctors.

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-Because he was too junior?

-Very much so.

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-He didn't make the cut?

-No.

-So, that's Fleming?

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-That's Fleming.

-OK. And this is Fleming again, isn't it?

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This is a portrait, actually endorsed

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in original by Fleming to my father.

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That's - "To Dan, with best wishes".

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-Yes.

-So, it was a sort of acknowledgement of his help?

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-Oh, very much so, yes.

-Very much so.

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I have an original mould here which is endorsed by Fleming on the back.

0:16:460:16:53

-Hang on, so this is the culture?

-That is what the mould looks like.

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Fleming was a very untidy man.

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And he used to experiment on what are called Petri dishes,

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and he went off on holiday one day

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leaving a large quantity of these lying around unwashed.

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And when he came back, he happened

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to look at them and he found that several of them had got odd moulds

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something like this on them, and all around the bacteria had been cleared.

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-So it was pure chance?

-It was pure chance.

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Now, I think we all know the impact of penicillin really, was in WWII.

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-Very much so.

-I mean suddenly, ghastly wounds, gunshot wounds

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-and so on, could be cured.

-Yes.

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"The mould that produced penicillin, Alexander Fleming 1951".

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-That's correct.

-So this must be a very rare thing?

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It is a very rare thing.

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-One was sold at auction for £20,000.

-Good God!

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I'm fully aware that with auctions it's up and down,

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-you need two people...

-I think all we can say

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-is that it's a very valuable, very rare item.

-Yes.

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And if you were concerned with medical history,

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a piece of the original culture,

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endorsed by Fleming, it must be the gold bar - there is nothing like it.

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-Are you keeping it?

-Yes.

-Good.

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We were thinking of selling, but my son said,

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-"You will not!"

-I think he's got the right idea.

0:18:040:18:06

So thank you, tell him to hang on to it, this is great history.

0:18:060:18:09

-Yes, that's right.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:18:090:18:12

Do you know, I'm tempted to describe this classical female

0:18:150:18:19

as a fine figure of a woman.

0:18:190:18:21

Yes, I'm sure.

0:18:210:18:23

And she's actually looking into

0:18:230:18:25

a mirror and I can see from this side, it actually is a mirror.

0:18:250:18:28

-I know.

-Incredible! But the detail is fabulous.

0:18:280:18:31

So it begs the question - how long has she been reflecting,

0:18:310:18:35

and is she a member of your family for some time?

0:18:350:18:39

Well, I've grown up with it really,

0:18:390:18:42

and when my grandmother died, the ornaments were dispersed.

0:18:420:18:46

-Yes.

-And I got these two.

-You lucky lady.

-I'm very lucky.

0:18:460:18:49

Very lucky lady.

0:18:490:18:50

From an anatomical point of view, she's very, very well carved.

0:18:500:18:54

-Isn't she?

-It's, you know, taking the figure into account,

0:18:540:18:57

she's patinated bronze,

0:18:570:18:59

which is in lovely condition,

0:18:590:19:01

and the ivory is good also. These figures, their value is affected

0:19:010:19:05

by cracks that often appear,

0:19:050:19:07

so be careful with air conditioning and suchlike.

0:19:070:19:11

But it's a bit of a compromise, as you've got this classical maiden,

0:19:110:19:15

and then you've got this fabulous Art Deco base.

0:19:150:19:19

So we're obviously talking 1930s

0:19:190:19:21

with something like this, and it's in Brazilian green onyx, OK?

0:19:210:19:26

Now I can't pretend to be psychic,

0:19:260:19:28

-but if there's a signature on this piece - and there is?

-Yes, there is.

0:19:280:19:33

-OK. I bet your life it says "F Preiss".

-Yes, yes!

0:19:330:19:37

-Ferdinand Preiss.

-You're on.

0:19:370:19:39

Well, she's a fine looking lady and she's probably going to be worth

0:19:390:19:43

somewhere in the region of around about £4,000 or £5,000.

0:19:430:19:47

-Really?

-Nothing to you people in Arundel, nothing to you people in Arundel!

0:19:470:19:51

But as much as I like this girl, I like the twins.

0:19:510:19:55

Now let's have a look at this clock,

0:19:550:19:57

because this is where we've got a connection between this catalogue,

0:19:570:20:01

which is for Phillips and McConnell,

0:20:010:20:04

who were the fine art galleries in New Bond Street.

0:20:040:20:07

But just looking through, I had a sneaky look and I noticed

0:20:070:20:13

that here, we've got a very similar clock.

0:20:130:20:16

Not identical but, I mean, I think obviously you had a choice of dial,

0:20:160:20:21

but the geometry of the thing is an absolute joy, isn't it?

0:20:210:20:25

But having looked at this, as I say, I can't find a signature,

0:20:250:20:29

so we're looking at Ferdinand Preiss here,

0:20:290:20:33

but here we've got nothing to go by, but...

0:20:330:20:36

I make a bee line for the feet, and I check out...

0:20:360:20:41

I could have been a podiatrist in a previous life, because

0:20:410:20:44

you check out for the toenails, and they're so exquisitely carved.

0:20:440:20:49

And I'm looking at the faces and the technique with the eyes is very,

0:20:490:20:53

very similar to the work of Preiss.

0:20:530:20:56

I can't see this being anybody else at the moment but Ferdinand Preiss.

0:20:560:21:00

Who was he? Who was Ferdinand Preiss?

0:21:000:21:02

He was quite an interesting character.

0:21:020:21:06

He was basically taking an art that had been established

0:21:060:21:10

in Germany and in Bavaria, in the way of ivory carving

0:21:100:21:14

throughout centuries, really bringing it up to date.

0:21:140:21:18

I mean, you would find that the characters were

0:21:180:21:21

usually so typical of their age.

0:21:210:21:23

These girls, they've got bobbed hair,

0:21:230:21:25

so they've got to be sort of 1925-1930 flappers.

0:21:250:21:29

By the same token he would often do sort of very Aryan-type subjects,

0:21:290:21:33

so you might get sportsmen, tennis players, javelin throwers...

0:21:330:21:36

You might even get Amy Johnson, the great aviator of the age.

0:21:360:21:41

So the great thing about these figures is they reflect the period.

0:21:410:21:44

-You know, from 100 yards away, this is Art Deco, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:21:440:21:49

So I think you get a double whammy with the clock -

0:21:490:21:53

you get a functional object and you get two very lithe ladies.

0:21:530:21:57

So I wouldn't be surprised to see that being estimated somewhere

0:21:570:22:02

-in the region of around about £6,000 to £8,000.

-Wow!

0:22:020:22:08

Great man, good name.

0:22:080:22:10

The minute I saw these lovely milky vellum bindings,

0:22:100:22:13

with their original ties, I knew we were in for a bit of fun.

0:22:130:22:17

Nobody could do a title page as well as that.

0:22:170:22:21

And this is Beowulf and it's designed by Burne-Jones

0:22:210:22:27

for William Morris, the Kelmscott Press.

0:22:270:22:30

And we've got two Kelmscott Press books

0:22:300:22:32

here in absolutely superb condition.

0:22:320:22:34

Where did you get them from?

0:22:340:22:36

I got them from my godfather, who left them to me in his will.

0:22:360:22:40

He'd only had them three years.

0:22:400:22:42

He bought them as an investment and then he died,

0:22:420:22:45

and left them to my wife and me, and we've treasured them ever since.

0:22:450:22:49

And, knowing that they are,

0:22:490:22:52

I would say, unique, we've been very reluctant to open them

0:22:520:22:56

unless we really had to, because of the fear of damage, even fingers.

0:22:560:23:00

Oh, yes, absolutely. Fabulous, fabulous.

0:23:000:23:03

-Isn't it wonderful?

-Absolutely fabulous.

0:23:030:23:05

-And printed in colours too.

-All in colour.

0:23:050:23:08

Red and blue and black,

0:23:080:23:09

-but it's so unusual to have the original ties.

-Indeed.

0:23:090:23:13

You're very fortunate that we have.

0:23:130:23:15

-Why?

-Well, that one in particular,

0:23:150:23:18

the ties are getting a little tatty,

0:23:180:23:22

and my wife was tempted to replace them.

0:23:220:23:25

I don't believe it! You can't go round doing things like that.

0:23:250:23:28

-The original ties - I mean, that's incredible.

-Well, all is well,

0:23:280:23:31

because she was dissuaded from doing so

0:23:310:23:34

and here they are in mint condition, I hope.

0:23:340:23:36

Absolutely fantastic. So we've got Beowulf here.

0:23:360:23:39

-Beowulf there.

-And this one is signed by William Morris.

-Indeed.

0:23:390:23:42

And show me the title page of that one.

0:23:420:23:43

This is Love Is Enough.

0:23:430:23:45

There it is, quite simply, Love Is Enough, or -

0:23:470:23:50

The Freeing of Pharamond: A Morality, written by William Morris.

0:23:500:23:55

Yes, it's absolutely superb. Well, I think that's fantastic.

0:23:550:23:59

-Now, what about value?

-Oh! Heaven only knows!

0:23:590:24:02

We treasure them, but I wouldn't have the foggiest idea where to start.

0:24:020:24:07

Well, I think this one, this one which is actually

0:24:070:24:11

by William Morris but not signed,

0:24:110:24:14

is going to be the best part of £800 to £900,

0:24:140:24:19

whereas this one, which is signed by William Morris

0:24:190:24:23

and has all the same characteristics

0:24:230:24:25

as all his books have, is going to be in the region of £1,500.

0:24:250:24:29

Wow! Well, I think my insurer is in for a headache.

0:24:290:24:33

Don't tell him, don't tell him!

0:24:330:24:35

Not one, not two, but three car mascots.

0:24:390:24:45

It's rather like the bus, isn't it?

0:24:450:24:46

You can wait for an hour and then suddenly three come along.

0:24:460:24:51

And three separate owners for three separate mascots.

0:24:510:24:55

Well, let's start with the bird.

0:24:550:24:57

-That's mine.

-Tell me about it.

0:24:570:24:59

Well, I know very little about it.

0:24:590:25:02

I gained custody of it when my husband and I split up,

0:25:020:25:06

so I'm very interested to know a bit more about it.

0:25:060:25:09

OK, well, the thing they have in common, these car mascots,

0:25:090:25:13

is this huge circular button.

0:25:130:25:16

You haven't got the radiator cap into which this screws,

0:25:160:25:20

but the other two illustrate exactly how that would have happened.

0:25:200:25:24

But it also means that we can see that there is a bit of chipping

0:25:240:25:27

on here, which we have to take into account when it comes to valuing.

0:25:270:25:30

Sadly, some of that chipping

0:25:300:25:33

actually eats into the name of the maker.

0:25:330:25:36

And the other thing they all have in common

0:25:360:25:39

is they are all by the same maker.

0:25:390:25:41

Now tell me about yours, because yours is the frog?

0:25:410:25:43

I was working on this house and the lady said,

0:25:430:25:47

"Clear out the sheds."

0:25:470:25:49

And I cleared them out, so it's been in the garage.

0:25:490:25:53

And you've kept the original radiator cap?

0:25:530:25:56

Well, I thought it was like a...screwed into the bonnet

0:25:560:26:00

of the car because it lights up.

0:26:000:26:03

It does indeed and if we actually unscrew it here,

0:26:030:26:06

let's just do that. There is the place where the electric wire

0:26:060:26:10

will pass through into the housing,

0:26:100:26:13

and inside the housing there is, or there should be, a little bulb.

0:26:130:26:17

And it's under that filter.

0:26:170:26:21

But what a shame, look at that, that's really serious damage.

0:26:210:26:25

But I suppose once it's inside that housing,

0:26:250:26:28

once that goes over the top of it,

0:26:280:26:31

-you don't see it.

-You don't, no.

0:26:310:26:33

So let's not worry too much about it.

0:26:330:26:35

But also on the side of there is the famous name, Lalique.

0:26:350:26:40

And then we come to the final

0:26:400:26:42

piece de resistance...

0:26:420:26:44

not one, but five horses.

0:26:440:26:47

Tell me about this one?

0:26:470:26:48

Cinq Chevaux, I think it's called.

0:26:480:26:50

-Cinq Chevaux, yes.

-It was my aunt's.

0:26:500:26:53

I understand it was on a five horse-power Citroen,

0:26:530:26:56

which is one of the earliest ones that Lalique made.

0:26:560:26:59

-My aunt had this on her mantlepiece and I got a transformer made.

-Yes.

0:26:590:27:05

So that she could have it alight in the early evenings.

0:27:050:27:09

So even though you haven't got the car,

0:27:090:27:11

you've got the whole thing lit up, as it would have been.

0:27:110:27:14

But what you've got inside here is a filter, or at least a piece

0:27:140:27:19

of two-coloured glass that has the effect of splintering the light,

0:27:190:27:23

so it gives you, presumably, a sort of, rather a refracted spooky light.

0:27:230:27:28

-Yeah.

-Right. OK, well, I'm going to put you out of your miseries.

0:27:280:27:32

The falcon... This magnificent, you know, thrusting along the corniche,

0:27:320:27:37

you can see it, can't you, with the light going?

0:27:370:27:39

That, in that state, is going to be somewhere of the order of £1,000.

0:27:390:27:46

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Wow.

0:27:460:27:48

That's not too bad, is it?

0:27:480:27:49

That's excellent. I didn't even expect...

0:27:490:27:52

Well, just didn't, no.

0:27:520:27:54

The frog, the much smaller, little baby frog, it is damaged underneath.

0:27:540:28:00

If it were in perfect condition, it would be worth a lot more.

0:28:000:28:03

But I'm going to say, even in this condition,

0:28:030:28:06

we're looking at the region of £3,000 to £5,000.

0:28:060:28:09

Cor... I'll throw my tools away!

0:28:090:28:12

OK, and what about the five horses?

0:28:150:28:17

That is, in fact,

0:28:170:28:20

probably the rarest of the trio,

0:28:200:28:23

and one is looking at a price

0:28:230:28:25

somewhere in the region of £6,000 to £8,000.

0:28:250:28:29

In fact, if you all club together, you could buy a car!

0:28:290:28:34

Thank you very much.

0:28:340:28:36

So would you say bravery runs in the family?

0:28:370:28:40

Definitely on my wife's side.

0:28:400:28:42

My wife was very brave to marry me,

0:28:420:28:43

and she's obviously inherited it from this man here.

0:28:430:28:46

This is my wife's grandfather,

0:28:460:28:48

-who was awarded a medal for bravery in the field.

-The MM group, exactly.

0:28:480:28:54

I mean it's a lovely group of medals here you've got,

0:28:540:28:57

and the great thing is, you've got

0:28:570:28:59

these bits and pieces that go with it and tell the complete story.

0:28:590:29:02

That's right, and we have photographs of him as a young man,

0:29:020:29:05

as a man at college...

0:29:050:29:07

And what was he actually awarded the medal for?

0:29:070:29:10

He was awarded the medal for particular courage

0:29:100:29:13

when laying cables under shell fire,

0:29:130:29:15

and communications was a very important part in WWI,

0:29:150:29:19

between February and August 1916.

0:29:190:29:22

I mean, presumably they were blown up on a daily basis almost?

0:29:220:29:26

Well, I mean, when one looks at the history of WWI,

0:29:260:29:30

-life was very short in those days.

-Exactly.

0:29:300:29:33

This is from the War Office - that came with the bravery award,

0:29:330:29:38

which illustrates how he got the bravery award.

0:29:380:29:41

And we have an invitation from the Mayor of the Ville de Cassel

0:29:410:29:47

in France to the victory celebrations.

0:29:470:29:50

-How lovely.

-Along with the menu that they sported on that day.

0:29:500:29:56

Looks like quite a lunch on that one.

0:29:560:29:58

Yes, yes, I've thought of going back there

0:29:580:30:00

-and seeing if I could order the same thing.

-This is quite something.

0:30:000:30:04

I mean, he's got the war group there

0:30:040:30:07

and then the bravery, or the MM medal.

0:30:070:30:09

Really with the whole complete package here, it gives

0:30:090:30:14

a real insight into what life would have been like.

0:30:140:30:16

I mean, you've got the dispatches here...

0:30:160:30:20

"Shown particular courage and

0:30:200:30:21

"determination while laying cables under heavy shell fire".

0:30:210:30:25

Presumably they were telephone cables?

0:30:250:30:27

-Yes.

-Which under the heavy barrage of artillery day in, day out,

0:30:270:30:31

would have had to have been done

0:30:310:30:33

over time and time again, so it really is quite remarkable

0:30:330:30:36

what you've got. I mean really, and I know value will be of no interest

0:30:360:30:41

to you at all, because to have these is part of your family's history.

0:30:410:30:45

But, as a value, you'd put somewhere between £500 and £700 on as a group,

0:30:450:30:51

and I'm just delighted to have seen them.

0:30:510:30:54

Well, we'd never think of selling them, and particularly

0:30:540:30:57

this item here, which incidentally has the Cross of Lorraine on it.

0:30:570:31:00

That comes from the earlier Jacobite past of this family,

0:31:000:31:07

so maybe they were braver further back in those days as well.

0:31:070:31:11

-I mean, obviously his lucky charm.

-That's right.

0:31:110:31:14

I understand from reading in the newspapers recently,

0:31:160:31:19

that the habit of taking snuff is coming back into fashion

0:31:190:31:22

because of the ban on smoking.

0:31:220:31:25

And looking in front of us,

0:31:250:31:26

we've got a really quirky looking snuff container.

0:31:260:31:30

Is it a family piece or what can you tell me about its history?

0:31:300:31:33

Yes, it's come down through the family, several generations,

0:31:330:31:36

from a Lieutenant Colonel Kinnaird, who was commanding the garrison

0:31:360:31:40

in St Helena when Napoleon was in prison there.

0:31:400:31:43

-He gave this when they formed the officer's mess in 1820.

-Right.

0:31:430:31:47

And then, when it was disbanded in 1836, they gave it back to him.

0:31:470:31:52

And since then it's obviously

0:31:520:31:54

passed its way through the family and here it is now.

0:31:540:31:57

Well, the form of this is fairly well known to me.

0:31:570:32:00

They are pretty much uniquely Scottish.

0:32:000:32:03

And if we look at it in closer detail,

0:32:030:32:06

we can see it's got this great big Cairngorm on the top,

0:32:060:32:10

which is very typical of Scottish snuff containers,

0:32:100:32:13

or snuff mulls as they tended to call them in Scotland.

0:32:130:32:16

But what is absolutely typical is when it has all its tools for making

0:32:160:32:21

snuff and taking snuff with it, they're very much regimental pieces.

0:32:210:32:25

But what I find particularly interesting,

0:32:250:32:28

it's got a stand as well.

0:32:280:32:29

That apparently comes from a plane tree that was brought over as a plant

0:32:290:32:34

by Mary Queen of Scots, from France,

0:32:340:32:36

planted in Holyrood House and was then blown down in 1817.

0:32:360:32:41

That's what the inscription relates to.

0:32:410:32:43

That's what the inscription says, and somewhere,

0:32:430:32:46

I forget the date, blown down in 1817, I think.

0:32:460:32:49

So actually from the tree planted by Mary Queen of Scots.

0:32:490:32:52

And these sort of lovely feet are typical of the 1820s, and you can

0:32:520:32:56

just imagine this sliding along

0:32:560:32:59

a sort of mess table with them all taking snuff in turn.

0:32:590:33:04

It has got some lovely engraving on the horn itself.

0:33:040:33:09

These are the crests, presumably of the Kinnaird family

0:33:090:33:12

with a regimental crest there.

0:33:120:33:15

Inside, I see we've got a very strange-looking liner or container.

0:33:150:33:20

Well, we believe it was from Napoleon's first coffin,

0:33:200:33:24

and they discovered that when they

0:33:240:33:26

transferred him from St Helena to Paris. He was reburied in Paris.

0:33:260:33:31

And when they opened them up,

0:33:310:33:32

there was the lead and the tomb inside and he was inside that one.

0:33:320:33:37

So we really do have a terrific sort of historical document here.

0:33:370:33:41

With a bit of Mary Queen of Scots and Napoleon, and the fact

0:33:410:33:47

that it's a pretty good-looking object anyway!

0:33:470:33:50

I wouldn't be surprised to see something like that fetch...

0:33:500:33:56

£7,000 to £10,000.

0:33:560:33:58

Really?

0:33:580:34:00

Well, I am surprised.

0:34:000:34:02

Well, it's steeped in history, it's got everything going for it.

0:34:020:34:07

I just think there are some serious collectors out there that

0:34:070:34:11

would be very interested in trying

0:34:110:34:13

to buy this for quite a big price, should you ever come to sell it.

0:34:130:34:17

Which I won't.

0:34:170:34:19

What would we do without pockets?

0:34:210:34:24

I mean, I've got glasses and a mobile and a handkerchief and...

0:34:240:34:29

The Japanese had a real problem back in the 18th and 19th century -

0:34:290:34:34

no pockets.

0:34:340:34:36

So they had a little box called an inro,

0:34:360:34:41

and in the inro went medicines, spices, seals,

0:34:410:34:46

little objects which they needed to carry round with them.

0:34:460:34:51

And then, from the inro,

0:34:510:34:53

which could have a number of different cases to it,

0:34:530:34:57

you had a string and a ball with a hole through it

0:34:570:35:03

which tightened up the cases.

0:35:030:35:06

And that's called an ojime.

0:35:060:35:09

And on this particular one,

0:35:090:35:12

it's been inlaid in mother of pearl,

0:35:120:35:16

in tortoiseshell, in stained ivory,

0:35:160:35:21

with flowers and an insect,

0:35:210:35:25

sort of locust or mayfly, I think that is.

0:35:250:35:28

That's the bit I used to love as a child, the little insect on the bead.

0:35:280:35:32

-You've known this all your life?

-My father was a self-made businessman

0:35:320:35:36

who sent my mother out to buy a present for a client,

0:35:360:35:40

and she went to the Pantiles in Tunbridge Wells and purchased this.

0:35:400:35:43

-Really?

-And, very unlike her,

0:35:430:35:45

she didn't give it to my father to give to his client, she hung onto it.

0:35:450:35:50

And years later, when I was grown up,

0:35:500:35:52

and started to be interested in antiques, I discovered, you know,

0:35:520:35:55

that it was an inro, that was about as far as I knew.

0:35:550:35:58

-And you nabbed it?

-Well, I did actually, I did.

0:35:580:36:02

And I took it, yes, I did.

0:36:020:36:04

And this bit is called the netsuke and goes under the belt,

0:36:040:36:10

and acts like a toggle, so the belt's there and it hangs like that.

0:36:100:36:13

So not between the fingers? I always assumed they carried it

0:36:130:36:16

-between their fingers.

-No, under the belt.

0:36:160:36:18

Right, right, thank you.

0:36:180:36:19

Now this is in the form of a gourd, or a double gourd really,

0:36:190:36:24

and is made of lacquer, which is not a common material

0:36:240:36:28

for making netsuke from -

0:36:280:36:30

they're usually wood or ivory,

0:36:300:36:32

occasionally bone.

0:36:320:36:35

That netsuke is worth around £600 to £1,000.

0:36:350:36:40

That? Really?

0:36:400:36:45

Oh, dear... Gosh.

0:36:450:36:47

The ojime which you so liked, with the insect on, is worth about £500.

0:36:470:36:54

-Heavens!

-Which leaves us with the inro.

0:36:540:36:59

Pull back the ojime like that

0:36:590:37:02

and we are able to separate this into sections.

0:37:020:37:07

And if we put it back again,

0:37:070:37:11

we can see that it's decorated

0:37:110:37:15

in mother of pearl,

0:37:150:37:17

stained ivory,

0:37:170:37:20

tortoiseshell,

0:37:200:37:22

coral,

0:37:220:37:24

coconut shell

0:37:240:37:27

and probably lacquer there,

0:37:270:37:29

on a burnished gold ground,

0:37:290:37:33

within a silver rim,

0:37:330:37:36

on a ground of very finely-sprinkled gold dust.

0:37:360:37:43

Gosh, amazing in something so small, I haven't...

0:37:430:37:48

It is extraordinary, wonderful work, in a technique we call Shibayama.

0:37:480:37:53

We've got a scene here of a festival cart with flowers.

0:37:530:37:59

I think it's probably spring.

0:37:590:38:01

Wonderful, but...

0:38:010:38:04

-that's the real joy.

-Oh?

0:38:040:38:08

Believe it or not, it says, "Shibayama, Kasuyuki".

0:38:080:38:13

Now I don't know Kasuyuki, but he's one of the family,

0:38:130:38:15

so this is actually made by

0:38:150:38:17

-the Shibayama family.

-Good.

-Very exciting thing to find.

-Gosh.

0:38:170:38:22

It dates from about 1880, somewhere around there.

0:38:220:38:26

So your childhood love,

0:38:260:38:29

your mother's decision to hang onto it, rather than give it away...

0:38:290:38:34

She told me what she paid for it, incidentally.

0:38:340:38:36

-Go on, go on, go on.

-£12.

-And this was in...?

0:38:360:38:40

Well, it was about 50 years ago.

0:38:400:38:41

£12, 50 years ago, was a good punt.

0:38:410:38:44

-It was a lot of money.

-Quite a lot of money.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:38:440:38:46

On the other hand, it has gone up a bit.

0:38:460:38:49

It's not gone up 10 times which would make it £120,

0:38:490:38:54

it's not gone up a hundred times, which would make it £1,250.

0:38:540:38:58

It's actually worth about £5,000.

0:38:580:39:01

5,000! Gosh.

0:39:010:39:04

-Oh, I wish she was still alive.

-Yeah, she would have loved it, wouldn't she?

0:39:040:39:07

She would have loved it. And my dad would have specially loved it because

0:39:070:39:10

he didn't appreciate old things, he always called them "second-hand".

0:39:100:39:13

Great stuff! This is the kind of second-hand I like.

0:39:130:39:15

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you very much for bringing it in.

0:39:150:39:18

Thank you for telling me so much about it.

0:39:180:39:20

So these are children's book illustrations by Annie Anderson.

0:39:240:39:28

Now, when you first brought these to me, I thought,

0:39:280:39:30

"Oh, prints, prints, prints."

0:39:300:39:32

I see so many of this kind of thing. And then I thought,

0:39:320:39:35

"Better check..." So we're going to check.

0:39:350:39:37

While I'm tearing the back off this...do you mind?

0:39:370:39:40

-That's fine.

-While I'm tearing the back off this...

0:39:400:39:43

because the only way you'll ever know

0:39:430:39:45

is if you actually take the glass off and have a proper look...

0:39:450:39:48

you can tell me how you came by them.

0:39:480:39:50

My dad bought them in Hampstead in the early 1980s.

0:39:500:39:54

And they've been in my bedroom, and now

0:39:540:39:56

-they're in my daughter's bedroom.

-Ah, I see.

0:39:560:39:59

But there are five, but my mother

0:39:590:40:01

had four and my dad had one, and now finally they're together again.

0:40:010:40:05

Oh, that's great.

0:40:050:40:07

So what you have to do is, you have to take the back off,

0:40:070:40:10

and straightaway you can see that they're inscribed on the back.

0:40:100:40:16

Now that's interesting because it says,

0:40:160:40:18

"Mrs Alan Wright, Little Audrey".

0:40:180:40:20

Now I know that Annie Anderson

0:40:200:40:22

was married to another illustrator called Alan Wright,

0:40:220:40:25

so straightaway that's great,

0:40:250:40:27

and it looks to me like it's the bottom of an artist's board.

0:40:270:40:30

So first of all, I think that we may be looking at original works,

0:40:300:40:35

which is exciting, actually.

0:40:350:40:37

And then if you take it off and away,

0:40:370:40:40

you look in a sort of raking light,

0:40:400:40:42

you can actually just see that there's a texture

0:40:420:40:45

to the thing, that wouldn't work if it was a print.

0:40:450:40:49

There's a sort of shine on a print and this is very matt.

0:40:490:40:52

And you can also just see the sort of slight sheen on the graphite

0:40:520:40:57

that he's used as well.

0:40:570:40:59

-Have a look for yourself.

-Thank you.

0:40:590:41:01

It's quite good.

0:41:010:41:02

-Do you see that?

-Yeah.

-So you're looking at original watercolours.

0:41:050:41:08

-So you had to take it to bits to find out.

-It's the only way really.

0:41:080:41:12

-Yeah.

-But I think that's great because,

0:41:120:41:14

you know, I know this artist so well from reproductions.

0:41:140:41:16

We have to assume the rest of these four are originals.

0:41:160:41:20

Can't be certain, you may want to, you know just...

0:41:200:41:22

-Take those to bits as well.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:41:220:41:24

I was about to send you away and say, you know, they're worth...

0:41:240:41:27

-Forget it!

-Yeah, well, you know,

0:41:270:41:28

"Decorative value, madam, might be sort of £20 or something like that".

0:41:280:41:32

But she was such a good illustrator, and I think these are lovely.

0:41:320:41:36

What about this one, this little one here? It's rather sweet.

0:41:360:41:39

Probably worth about...original,

0:41:390:41:43

going to be worth about £300 or £400, which is quite nice, isn't it?

0:41:430:41:48

That's just for the little one,

0:41:480:41:50

which is rather good, and then, and then this one...

0:41:500:41:53

do you like that one?

0:41:530:41:55

-I love it.

-It's so sweet, isn't it?

0:41:550:41:57

I mean that, that's really a sort of children's thing.

0:41:570:42:00

You grew up with that, didn't you?

0:42:000:42:02

-Yeah.

-I think that that one's

0:42:020:42:04

probably worth about £600 or £800, that sort of thing.

0:42:040:42:07

And then this one, which is very pretty actually,

0:42:080:42:11

it's a sort of fairy sweeping clouds away.

0:42:110:42:13

They are quite girlie, aren't they?

0:42:130:42:15

-Yeah.

-They're really nice, nicely done.

0:42:150:42:17

Luckily my brother didn't end up with them!

0:42:170:42:20

-Yes, exactly, they're sort of more pink than blue...

-Yeah.

0:42:200:42:23

But that's probably about, oh, I don't know, £800 to £1,200,

0:42:230:42:27

I would have thought, something like that.

0:42:270:42:31

-You're serious?

-Yes, of course, I'm serious...

0:42:310:42:33

Deadly. And then down here,

0:42:330:42:35

this really pretty one of the little girl sitting on a bubble,

0:42:350:42:40

well, I think that the audience would go crazy for that.

0:42:400:42:44

I really do. We're probably talking about £2,000,

0:42:440:42:46

that sort of thing, upwards maybe of that.

0:42:460:42:49

It's all right, I'm not doing this in an aggressive way, I promise.

0:42:520:42:56

-It's just nice to know that these things you've loved.

-I love them.

0:42:560:43:00

But I'm just so glad they're not prints.

0:43:000:43:03

-It's a real thrill to find that they're not.

-Yeah.

-Well done!

0:43:030:43:06

Thanks very much, that's excellent, thank you.

0:43:060:43:10

An extraordinary thing about Arundel Castle is that although

0:43:130:43:16

it is huge and imposing, it has been a family home for nearly 870 years.

0:43:160:43:22

So thanks again to the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk for having us.

0:43:220:43:26

And for now, from West Sussex, goodbye.

0:43:260:43:30

Michael Aspel and the team enjoyed the hospitality of the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk so much that they pay Arundel Castle a second visit. The specialists turn up many treasures, including a 14th-century jug that was reeled in by a local fisherman and a supposedly haunted picture that sings when nobody's looking.