Banqueting House Antiques Roadshow


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Banqueting House

On their second visit to London's Banqueting House, Michael Aspel and the team unearth even more treasure. An inheritance of old pots turns into a substantial windfall.


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Welcome back to our second Roadshow from the magnificent Banqueting House in London's Whitehall.

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It's the kind of place that makes your own front room look shabby.

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This was built as a house of fun by James I in 1622...

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dignified fun of course...

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plays, masques and state occasions.

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But the greatest jollity was reserved for a space below where I'm standing.

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They called this vaulted basement the undercroft.

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It was designed as a drinking den for the King and his special friends. The undercroft...

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good name for a night club.

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Young royals, please note.

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Not everyone came here for wine and merriment.

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According to long tradition, in the run up to Easter, the poor would arrive to receive Maundy money

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and other benefits from their sovereign.

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Another ancient custom that was brought back by the Restoration

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was called "touching for the King's Evil".

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The theory was that the painful skin disease of scrofula could be cured by a touch of the royal hand.

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The king wore long gauntlets over boxing gloves...

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only joking.

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It's more the Midas touch we're thinking of today,

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so back to the experts as they get their gloves off for round two of our Whitehall Roadshow.

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Now, we've got a wonderful embossed folio

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that doesn't really tell you very much about what's inside.

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I've always dreamt of finding an Admiralty model here on the Antiques Roadshow,

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and thank you very much, you've found one for me.

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Because we just open it up,

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and here on the left is a standard drawing, architectural drawing

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of a couple of Royal Naval vessels dating from, where?

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1706 is HMS Diamond and HMS Greyhound, two ships of the line

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from the beginning of the 18th Century, and the history of this...

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it was deposited with the, er, Royal Library at Windsor

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and it was given to the Royal United Services Institute, which is just next door to the Banqueting House,

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in the beginning of the 20th Century

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by specific orders of the King to be preserved and to be displayed.

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That's fantastic, because in my whole experience,

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I've only ever seen one other. And that's over 30 years,

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so when I say "rare", it's extraordinarily rare.

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But the whole purpose of this was to encourage the Board to commission the vessels.

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aSo either you built a model or very carefully,

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you could wow them with opening the model like that,

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which shows all the construction inside, so you can see all the ribs,

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you can see all the cannons, and actually was very important to members of the Admiralty,

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athey would show how it would be decorated.

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If you can imagine Pepys and all that crowd round there, all the Admiralty Board looking at this,

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and then the designer would have popped this up and they said, "We'll have one".

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-Or two, in this case.

-Or two, in this case, yes.

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So...fantastic condition.

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I've seen one sold at auction, it was much smaller,

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um, and it wasn't as early as this,

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and that made, I think £8,000.

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This is earlier, much more elaborate.

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At auction, I would think £25,000 to £30,000.

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So for insurance, we're probably thinking about £40,000 or £50,000.

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I'm so excited at seeing it, thank you very much for bringing it in.

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Thank you.

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I've never seen so many brooches as you've brought me today.

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Tell me about them, what, how did all this start?

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Well, it started about two years ago.

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-Two years ago? My goodness.

-Yes, I, er...

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I was looking for a brooch for a friend and I looked in the internet trying to find something new, and...

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And you did.

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-Yes, it's new.

-How many are there?

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-Um, I have about 200.

-200. In two years, that's 100,

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100 a year, that's pretty good, isn't it?

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Tell us about the value of these, what are you buying these for?

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Well, you can buy something for as low as five dollars plus shipping, some a little bit more.

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-I paid 100 for that one.

-Mm.

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But usually, they're pretty cheap.

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-Well, I think that's...

-Affordable.

-I'm very bad at mathematics,

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-but 5 times 200 sounds all right, doesn't it?

-Yes.

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areI spent about, more than 2,000 already.

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-More than 2,000.

-Fortunately, I keep an excel sheet

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with all the things that I've purchased and I can easily add up, and that's sometimes scary.

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But they are absolutely fantastic, and flowers are obviously desperately important in all of this,

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-because they've all got separate meanings, the flowers, haven't they?

-Yes, we learn a lot about that

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-from watching you on the Roadshow.

-Do you? Well, it does apply.

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Here's a pansy flower which stands for, "think of the giver,"

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and I think it meant that just as much in the 1950s, which I reckon is when that's made,

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-as it did in 1850 really.

-Yes.

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And in a way I've brought you to this table under slightly false pretences.

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Can you guess why? Because there's a jewel here that's really a very, very remarkable one indeed

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and it's not on the table, and it's not on the board behind me,

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-but it's on your neck.

-Oh.

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And that's one of the greatest reasons for bringing you here,

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is that's the most dramatically beautiful 18th Century,

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presumably Spanish gold and diamond

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pendant jewel that I've seen,

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it's a lovely one. Tell us about that one.

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Well, that's one my father bought for my mother in Salamanca,

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and that was in the '80s,

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and my parents were in a jewellery shop buying for something else,

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and the owner told my father that he had something very special

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-that a family had the need to sell, unfortunately.

-Yes.

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And that perhaps he would like to buy it.

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-And they fell in love with it and bought it.

-Yes, how marvellous.

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They're very interesting diamonds. They're sort of,

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almost steely and grey, and they're foiled at the back,

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they're closed back and indeed, the steely greyness

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probably comes from silver foil that's deteriorated behind

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and has gone black and, um, and it's highly distinctive Spanish work,

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very rich gold colour,

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and if we were to shovel all the value of all these brooches

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-into that, we might not be able to acquire it, would we?

-You think so?

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I don't think so, no, I don't think you'll get that for 2,000.

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Tell us about the value of that one.

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Um, I think my parents paid about £350.

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I think that's a fantastic bargain.

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I wonder what it's worth today, maybe, maybe closer to £3,000 today.

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-Yes?

-And a great thing, very difficult to value, you wear it highly effectively,

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it's a very Spanish look on you, I must say, and have you come a long way to us today?

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Yes, my husband and I have come from Barcelona,

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-specifically for the Roadshow.

-Well, how marvellous, and what a joy to bring it all here.

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You've given us a sight that we'll never forget, thank you very much.

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Well, it displays beautifully here, it's just amazing to look at them.

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I'm proud to be the owner of this and owner of this.

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These are two very impressive sights.

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That, and yourself, tell us about yourself first.

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Myself, I'm the Yeoman Gaoler at the Tower of London,

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and I'm basically, the 2IC of the Body of Yeoman Warders, the Body of Yeoman Warders...

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headed by a Chief Yeoman Warder, myself...

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and 33 Yeoman Warders and we all live and work inside the Tower of London.

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Right, and now the weapon.

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The weapon itself. Well, this is the axe,

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and it was never used for beheading anybody,

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but it's a staff of office. And myself, accompanied by Yeoman Warders,

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would take a prisoner from the Tower of London, of which there was many,

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up to Westminster or Guildhall or wherever they were to be tried.

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If they're found guilty, I'd bring them back to the Tower of London.

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The axe was like an advertisement, so if they were coming back by boat

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down the River Thames from Westminster, if this blade of the axe was pointed away from the prisoner,

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then the prisoner wasn't to be executed.

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But if the axe was...

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pointed towards the prisoner,

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the prisoner was to be executed. And so the people of London

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would recognise straight away if this prisoner was to be executed.

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So the axe itself never executed anyone, but do you know the names of any of the victims?

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Well, certainly, Queen Anne Boleyn when she was escorted from the Tower,

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she was escorted by the gaoler and Yeoman Warders.

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Now, I would assume that the gaoler had his axe with him.

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This axe? I don't know, but certainly the gaoler would have escorted her,

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brought her back again and displayed the axe with the blade towards her.

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-And when was it last used?

-Well, I would say in Simon Fraser,

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Lord Lovat's time, because he was the last man to be publicly beheaded on Tower Hill in 1747.

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How often is it allowed out these days?

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I don't think this axe has been out of the Tower for about 50 years,

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so it's still, it's a day out for it.

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Talking of that, one last thing...

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would you turn it away from me, please?

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-There you are, Michael.

-Thank you.

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One of the challenges of the Roadshow which is always unpredictable is that sometimes,

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one has material to deal with which is quite difficult,

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and I don't mean in value terms, I mean in subject matter.

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Did you ever see a Roadshow a few years ago, a couple of years ago, where Lars Tharp

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did some bowls that had been discovered in the ruins of Hiroshima?

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-Yes, I did.

-So you remember that item?

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Did you remember it because of the nature of the item it was?

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-More the fact that it was a real object from that time.

-Exactly.

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These are the same, these are real objects from that time.

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What you've brought me here is a portfolio of lithos...

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of lithographic prints...

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by this artist, Henri Pieck,

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-of views of Buchenwald Concentration Camp.

-Yep.

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-Why have you got them?

-Um, my mum volunteers in a charity shop,

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and this is a donation. And she pulled them to one side not knowing what do with them,

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-they're not the kind of thing to sell on the High Street.

-You can hardly put them on a shelf.

-No.

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So they pulled them apart, put them back and kept them aside.

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-Then we saw the Antiques Roadshow was in London and I brought them along.

-Let's start at the beginning,

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printed in Holland, Dutch artist, and he is relatively well known as an artist...

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"The Long Dead", as a painter, as a print maker.

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The most important thing is that he was, he spent quite a long time in a concentration camp,

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presumably Buchenwald, because he was a Communist,

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so he had, you know, he had the most impossible experience. He survived,

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and obviously what he then wants to do is record his experiences so the world knows what it was like.

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-How did you feel when you saw these?

-Erm...they're just very emotive,

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and you look at them and for me, there's no sort of personal attachment to them,

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so I look at them and think it's just desperate, they are desperate.

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Mmm, but I think what they reveal is, as you say,

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the sheer desperation of life in the camp,

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and if you weren't killed, you didn't die,

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this is how you lived, week after week...

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Can you imagine?

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You know this is the labour,

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pouring rain, cold conditions, no food, you know.

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It's...looking round at everybody in this room,

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you know, it's beyond our imagination.

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I mean, you came here quite rightly to say, "What are they and what do we do with them?"

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I just think they're such a powerful record

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of a time which we are in danger of forgetting.

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Yes.

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They have a value.

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Um, it's very hard to value because I haven't seen a set sold before.

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We're looking at...judging by him as an artist, £600 to £800,

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-£500 or £600, it's that sort of area, but who's going to buy them?

-Yes.

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Do you give them to a museum? Maybe you do, maybe they go to something like

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The Imperial War Museum, they've got a very big Holocaust, concentration camp collection.

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If they haven't got this set, they may love to have them..

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I started talking about the Hiroshima bowls, which you remember.

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These are the same, you know, these are real objects from that time and they're telling the same story.

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We have to accept that we have done terrible things,

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and we mustn't forget, and these do exactly the same as that bowl.

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Forget the value,

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see if the War Museum have got them.

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Failing that, there are other Holocaust museums, see if they've got them, see if they want them.

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I'm sure they will. They are powerful, emotive, as you say, they're our history.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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So, what do you keep in this?

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Well, it really belongs to my son and he used to keep his linen in it until he discovered that...

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when he took the linen out, the edges were all covered with black marks from the little spindles.

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At the moment, I think he keeps an old video

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and a defunct computer and some knitting in the bottom drawer.

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-It's a junk cupboard, really.

-It's, it's a box room.

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-OK, do you know where it comes from?

-Well, when I bought it,

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I bought it in Newbury in the auction rooms and it was sold to me as a Breton cupboard,

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-so I assume it comes from Brittany.

-How long ago was that you bought it?

-'61-'62, it cost £32.

-OK.

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Lot of money.

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Mmm, OK, let's hope there's been an investment, but we'll come to that in a minute, we'll see.

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Quite right, a Breton cabinet.

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What's fascinating about French furniture is it's very highly regionalised,

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-it's obviously a very big country.

-Yes.

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And they've got local sources, woods, craftsmen with their own traditions,

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and you can relatively easily work out whether something's from Burgundy or Bordeaux,

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which has rich mahogany furniture because of the port, all the things that came across the Atlantic

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into the port of Bordeaux, and this is Breton, a little bit crude.

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I think it must have been made by a local carpenter who did furniture on the side.

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That's a very good point, I wouldn't have said that,

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-but if you said it...

-I said it.

-We're singing from the same hymn sheet.

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I found this very interesting, have you noticed that this spiral,

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or barley twist as it's sometimes called, or "Solomonic columns,"

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this one is facing to you and the other one on your side is facing to me, they're reversed.

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-On purpose?

-On purpose.

-Yes.

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-But they couldn't do that, or didn't do that sort of turning until the machine age.

-Yes, yes.

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And I think this is probably a hundred years old.

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-I'm trying to ascertain your accent, you're not from Newbury, are you?

-No, I'm from Iowa.

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I met this English sailor in the war,

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I met him on the...

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17th February, and we were married on the 14th March.

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-Blimey, so you're a GI Bride.

-I'm a GI Bride in reverse.

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-Lovely. So, valuation.

-Go on.

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We should know what the retail cost of this would be,

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-just to give you an idea.

-Yes.

-£1,000 retail.

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Fine, OK, I don't think I'll buy it though.

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-I haven't got the space for it.

-OK.

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So here we are in Whitehall, surrounded by very important government buildings,

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and it's really exciting to have a painting from the Palace of Westminster, just across the road,

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and of course, a very valuable thing and it's been guarded, happily for us, the first time on the Roadshow,

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by these two gentlemen. And you're Malcolm Hay, you're the curator of the Palace of Westminster.

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What is it, when was it done?

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Well, we're looking at the old chapel of the Royal Palace,

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which went on to become the debating chamber of the House of Commons.

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From our point of view, it's the earliest painted image

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of the House of Commons in session, and it's painted by a man

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called Peter Tillemans, shortly after. He comes from Antwerp.

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And the interior at that time, it's rather difficult to judge,

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but it's the interior of the Royal Chapel of the Old Palace.

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And by the early 1700s when this was painted, the...

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what would have been very fine paintings all over the interior of the chapel, had been panelled over,

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-so the wooden panelling by Christopher Wren masks wonderful religious...

-It's concealing them?

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It's concealing the paintings. One point is that the layout of Members of Parliament

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sitting in pews facing each other is a church layout,

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and that continued, that tradition continues even today in the post-war Chamber.

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They also put in a false ceiling.

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So over half of the original chapel is hidden above the ceiling.

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-And I've got a small drawing here...

-Oh, yes.

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..which was done in 1834,

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and it shows the layout in that area immediately above.

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So this is above this ceiling, and there's a sort of...

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some kind of gallery that you can sit in and look down, is that right?

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-Well, to follow the logic, if you look at the chandelier on the main painting.

-Yes.

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..it goes up into the ceiling into a large ventilation block

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and that ventilation block is the format round which...

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women, or ladies at that time, could sit and they could hear.

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In fact, they could not only hear the debate, on the basis that hot air rose, they could also

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see the feet of the Members of Parliament in the Chamber and indeed the Clerk's table and the Speaker.

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I see. How completely fascinating.

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But they look all very elegant, very 18th Century. And each one of these

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seems to be a portrait, they do look like individual faces.

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How fascinating. And then of course, the whole thing was destroyed by a disastrous fire,

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and this is the morning after the day before, as it were.

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So, who painted this wonderful painting?

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Well, George Scharf Senior

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thought this would be an incredible opportunity to come to the building,

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literally, the morning after, and he spent the next six months perched on the top of Westminster Hall,

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throwing any health and safety considerations to the wind.

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Pretty, pretty dangerous place to sit, I should think.

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But when did it happen, this fire, and how did it start?

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Well, it happened on the night of 16th October 1834,

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workmen had been burning tally sticks -

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an outmoded form of accounting - at that point,

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in one of the larger fireplaces in the House of Lords.

0:19:200:19:22

When they went off home, the flue of the fireplace caught fire.

0:19:220:19:26

Amazing, a tiny spark and...disaster.

0:19:260:19:29

It's almost still smouldering.

0:19:290:19:32

It was certainly smouldering when George Scharf began painting it.

0:19:320:19:36

He charted various things including the old Victorian fire engine.

0:19:360:19:40

-Oh, yes.

-But also the people coming to view, to see what had happened to the old buildings.

0:19:400:19:46

The element here of course shows the burnt-out chapel,

0:19:460:19:49

so that's where the Commons debating chamber had been and in order to take note, the dome-headed...

0:19:490:19:57

Norman windows are very obvious in the painting by Tillemans.

0:19:570:20:02

For George Scharf, this was a painting that he felt was hugely important,

0:20:020:20:06

he got permission, he spent six months working on the immense amount of detail,

0:20:060:20:14

-and he hoped that by selling prints of it, he could make money.

-I see.

0:20:140:20:19

And, well, it never went that way, and in fact shortly before he died

0:20:190:20:23

in 1860, he still had the painting,

0:20:230:20:26

and he sold it for the pathetic amount of money...

0:20:260:20:31

-he got two pounds and ten shillings for the painting at that point.

-No!

0:20:310:20:35

I suppose the only other finer point to make on this painting is that

0:20:350:20:38

-this was found in an antique shop in South Africa.

-Was it really?

0:20:380:20:42

Back in about 2001, and it came into our collection in 2003 in fairly awful, fairly ropey condition

0:20:420:20:49

and the Tate Gallery spent a year conserving it and putting it in condition as now.

0:20:490:20:54

Well, it looks great.

0:20:540:20:55

I can't imagine how you would value pictures like this, but you know, I suppose they're so closely bound up

0:20:550:21:02

with England's heritage that they'd have a premium if they ever came onto the market,

0:21:020:21:06

but you've got to take a bit of a flying leap with the value, haven't you, sometimes?

0:21:060:21:10

If you do lend them out, you've got to insure them. Well, my feeling is that,

0:21:100:21:15

between the two of them, there must be at least a million pounds worth of pictures,

0:21:150:21:19

with where they've been and what they are, that two pounds doesn't sound like very much.

0:21:190:21:25

We've seen some fantastic treasures here today, and that's a cue for me to remind you

0:21:340:21:39

that this is our 30th year and we are taking the occasional stroll down memory lane,

0:21:390:21:43

to relive some great moments. Here are some more.

0:21:430:21:47

Good God, no!

0:21:490:21:50

Really?!

0:21:500:21:52

Now, that is exceptionally rare.

0:21:540:21:57

It's quite incredible. I think we're looking at about £10,000 for a sword like this.

0:21:570:22:01

You're not being serious?

0:22:010:22:03

I am being deadly serious.

0:22:030:22:05

I don't think I've ever seen...

0:22:050:22:07

I don't know if I've ever seen a pig, a pig being ridden before.

0:22:070:22:11

If I were you, I'd stick to your day job.

0:22:110:22:14

My great-granddad was prepared to just take it all down to the dump.

0:22:160:22:20

-This is a £3,000 carriage clock.

-Oh!

0:22:210:22:24

It's a major discovery.

0:22:300:22:31

-Is it really?

-It's so exciting, I'm shaking, holding it.

0:22:310:22:35

Why me, God, why me?

0:22:370:22:39

I wouldn't have shrunk from telling you

0:22:460:22:49

-that it was worth £20,000.

-20?! You're...

0:22:490:22:52

Your five pieces are going to be worth somewhere around £20,000 to £25,000.

0:22:580:23:05

Ah, oh, that's heavy, isn't it?

0:23:080:23:10

You look like a bride, tell me, is this something that you wore as a...

0:23:190:23:25

on your happy day?

0:23:250:23:26

I didn't. I was going to, but I decided not to in the end.

0:23:260:23:30

Oh, so tell me about it, I mean because you look, I have to say, a million dollars.

0:23:300:23:35

The dress that you actually wore for your wedding must have been a real knockout if this was rejected.

0:23:350:23:41

Is it a family thing that's been handed down?

0:23:410:23:44

No, it's not, I bought it from an Art Deco fair in Eltham Palace last year.

0:23:440:23:48

Oh, I know. I know. So you went there looking for a wedding dress?

0:23:480:23:52

No, just for the exhibition, the fashion show that they had on.

0:23:520:23:55

-Were you engaged at that point?

-Yes.

0:23:550:23:57

Oh, fine, OK, so the fact that you then bought a wedding dress,

0:23:570:24:01

-you did kind of know there was a wedding happening.

-Yes, I did, luckily.

0:24:010:24:04

Let's just talk about it because standing back here, you do look like one of the columns

0:24:040:24:10

here in the Banqueting House, and that's what it was all about.

0:24:100:24:13

In the mid-1930s, the designers went in for this...

0:24:130:24:17

incredibly fluid shape, using this very heavy satin.

0:24:170:24:23

-It is very heavy.

-It's heavy to wear?

-Yes.

0:24:230:24:26

-That's interesting, because it hangs so beautifully, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:24:260:24:30

-Um, you can't move, can you?

-No.

-Your heels are too high.

-My heels are too high.

0:24:300:24:34

I want to have a look at the back, because the back is, is just as it should be.

0:24:340:24:39

You stay there like a kind of object,

0:24:390:24:42

because the back is just as it should be because of course as a bride,

0:24:420:24:45

the most that people see is the back of you,.

0:24:450:24:48

-Correct.

-And you've got this wonderful row of self-covered buttons

0:24:480:24:51

going along behind, this great train coming round, all bias cut.

0:24:510:24:57

So there you are, Art Deco queen, queen of Eltham Palace, what does a queen have to pay for her dress?

0:24:570:25:04

-£60.

-Gosh I'm shocked at that, I mean, I wouldn't have been surprised

0:25:040:25:08

if you'd said three times that, and indeed,

0:25:080:25:11

I could imagine that in a vintage dress shop at easily £200 to £250.

0:25:110:25:17

-Really?

-I think it's just gorgeous, and...

0:25:170:25:20

when you renew your vows, I don't know, in 20 years time, wear it then, because it just looks fantastic.

0:25:200:25:27

Thank you.

0:25:270:25:28

Well, here we have the most magnificent picture of the inside of Westminster Abbey,

0:25:290:25:34

and it's a picture of the coronation of George IV where he's being presented to all the Earls and Lords

0:25:340:25:41

and all the rest of it, this is the promotion.

0:25:410:25:44

Here he is in the middle, and here is the Archbishop there,

0:25:440:25:48

actually showing him off to the congregation.

0:25:480:25:53

Now, the theme here is obviously Westminster Abbey,

0:25:530:25:56

because you've got some other things there as well.

0:25:560:25:59

So, you're a clergyman, out with it.

0:25:590:26:01

I'm the Dean of Westminster.

0:26:010:26:03

-You're the Dean of Westminster. Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:030:26:08

It was this particular coronation, George IV, where they all dressed up in medieval clothes.

0:26:080:26:13

-Oh, yes.

-Very elaborate, very expensive,

0:26:130:26:16

it's a wonderful book, absolutely splendid. Here's the title...

0:26:160:26:20

"..An Impartial And Historical Narrative Of Those Momentous Events

0:26:230:26:27

"Which Have Taken Place In This Country

0:26:270:26:29

"During The Period From The Year 1816 To 1823."

0:26:290:26:32

The most important one, as far as I'm concerned,

0:26:320:26:35

and as far as you're concerned,

0:26:350:26:37

-is Westminster Abbey.

-Absolutely, the coronation.

0:26:370:26:39

That is a splendid piece of history.

0:26:390:26:41

-But this is the most elaborate one.

-This is even more precious,

0:26:410:26:46

and absolutely extraordinary. This is from 1953,

0:26:460:26:49

from the Queen's coronation.

0:26:490:26:52

-Yes.

-And this was the full music edition of the Order of Service which belonged to Sir William McKie,

0:26:520:26:58

the organist and Master of the Choristers at the time.

0:26:580:27:01

But this is not only what he used, I think, during the service itself,

0:27:010:27:04

but it's been signed by the other musicians who were there, as well as by the Archbishop of Canterbury,

0:27:040:27:11

-Geoffrey Fisher...

-Geoffrey Fisher.

-And the Earl Marshall.

0:27:110:27:14

-The Earl Marshall, Duke of Norfolk.

-Sir Ralph Vaughan Williams.

0:27:140:27:18

Who wrote a piece of music for it.

0:27:180:27:19

-Herbert Howells, Ernest Bullock, who had been one of Sir William McKie's predecessors.

-Yes.

0:27:190:27:24

And the self-effacing William McKie.

0:27:240:27:26

If you turn over, it's also been signed by Her Majesty the Queen.

0:27:260:27:32

-Absolutely splendid.

-And it's a very beautiful edition.

-Yes.

0:27:320:27:36

Absolutely splendid, of which this is number one.

0:27:360:27:40

Number one of a limited edition of 150.

0:27:400:27:42

That is quite quite extraordinary absolutely splendid.

0:27:420:27:45

I have to come clean too, I was a chorister at Westminster Abbey,

0:27:450:27:49

-and Sir William McKie was my first Organist and Master of the Choristers.

-Wonderful.

0:27:490:27:54

-You don't want to know the value of any of this.

-No.

-Unfortunately, the people who are watching do.

0:27:540:27:59

-You're not going to sell them, so it doesn't really make any difference.

-Absolutely not.

0:27:590:28:03

The fabulous colour plate book of Westminster Abbey would now be worth

0:28:030:28:08

somewhere in the region of £800 to £1,000 and this one, which is in fact

0:28:080:28:15

I suspect my favourite, I love, I love all those association signatures inside - best part of £1,000.

0:28:150:28:21

I mean, it's so unique and so bound up really with the Abbey

0:28:210:28:26

that if I saw that in a second-hand bookshop, I'd fall off my...

0:28:260:28:30

-whatever it is.

-I've got Sir William Mackay's coat hanger in my wardrobe, as well,

0:28:300:28:35

-I wonder what that's worth.

-Absolutely splendid, thank you for bringing this in

0:28:350:28:39

and taking time off on a Sunday, I mean, it must be very difficult.

0:28:390:28:43

Great pleasure, very nice to meet you, thank you very much.

0:28:430:28:46

These are a lovely pair of pistols,

0:28:480:28:50

just to see them, the quality...

0:28:500:28:55

Spanish, of course, double-barrelled percussion,

0:28:550:29:00

and probably small holster pistols as opposed to travelling pistols.

0:29:000:29:05

I notice that they were made in 1839, but tell me the background.

0:29:050:29:09

Er, they first belonged to this man, which was Don Toribio Ansotigay,

0:29:090:29:15

and he was my great-great-great grandfather.

0:29:150:29:20

They were presented to him by the King of Spain because of his help

0:29:200:29:24

in the first Carlist Wars, and his advising role in the second Carlist Wars.

0:29:240:29:31

Obviously, they must have held him in high esteem to present a pair of

0:29:310:29:36

pistols like this, because the sheer quality, and these lion hammers...

0:29:360:29:42

But they've beautiful springs on them

0:29:420:29:46

like very very strong, and I don't suppose they've ever been fired.

0:29:460:29:51

When you look at the top of these nipples, they're so sharp and clean,

0:29:510:29:55

and obviously, as I see it, being kept purely as a...

0:29:550:29:59

presentation pair of pistols, but they're really gorgeous.

0:29:590:30:03

Nice ivory-tipped ram rods, beautiful.

0:30:030:30:06

And then of course the woodwork itself,

0:30:060:30:11

made by a craftsman.

0:30:110:30:14

-Now, tell me more about your ancestor.

-Um, he was a Don,

0:30:140:30:19

so he was the Spanish nobility, and he was also the Mayor of Madrid

0:30:190:30:24

-for a while.

-Oh, right.

-And his wife was the lady in waiting to the Queen of Spain at that point.

0:30:240:30:30

-Who would have been Isabella, I believe.

-Yeah. Isabella.

0:30:300:30:33

Well, you've got a cased pair of pistols here...

0:30:330:30:37

as pistols, worth something like £4,000 to £5,000, but because who they were presented by,

0:30:370:30:45

for insurance purposes, I would think you should insure them for £12,000 to £14,000.

0:30:450:30:51

Hope that pleases you.

0:30:520:30:54

Well, they won't ever be sold.

0:30:540:30:56

No, of course not, of course not.

0:30:560:30:58

-I've just heard that a very interesting piece of furniture has come in.

-Great.

0:31:000:31:04

The trouble is, it hasn't come in, you have to go to it.

0:31:040:31:07

It's too important or precious to move and it's over the road,

0:31:070:31:12

-across Whitehall in the Horseguards building.

-OK, and we're expected?

0:31:120:31:16

-They're dying to see you.

-Knock on the door and...

0:31:160:31:19

-Go for it.

-Now?

-Please.

-OK.

0:31:190:31:22

Here he is, it looks like St George to me,

0:31:230:31:26

and he's hanging over Whitehall behind.

0:31:260:31:28

Quite cool, isn't it? Um, does it come from a church?

0:31:280:31:32

I don't know where he comes from, because it was given me by my mother.

0:31:320:31:36

Yeah. And, er it was given to her by a friend of hers.

0:31:360:31:41

-What part of the world does he come from?

-From Coventry.

-Coventry.

0:31:410:31:45

-My mother lived in Coventry.

-Substantially re-arranged by the Luftwaffe, wasn't it?

0:31:450:31:49

-Yes, severely bombed out in the centre.

-Absolutely.

0:31:490:31:52

And the first thing to go in the Blitz is windows.

0:31:520:31:54

Do you think this was plucked from the wreckage of the Blitz?

0:31:540:31:57

-It could have been. It does have a slightly ecclesiastical tinge about it, doesn't it?

-It does, doesn't it?

0:31:570:32:03

-Yes.

-And if I was rifling through the wreckage, just going for a walk

0:32:030:32:07

and I saw that, I don't think I'd be able to resist it, it's wonderful.

0:32:070:32:11

-I think, I think I've got a suspect for who done it.

-Right.

0:32:110:32:14

-And I think it was quite possibly by Henry Holiday, who was a great admirer of Burne-Jones.

-Right.

0:32:140:32:19

And it's very much his style, he used to work for Powell and Company,

0:32:190:32:23

stained glass makers, in the 1880s and around that time, which is about the time of this,

0:32:230:32:29

and he was a very good artist and this is a very good thing, which helps, you know, helps along.

0:32:290:32:35

-It's a beautiful face, isn't it?

-It really is.

-Very sensitive and...

0:32:350:32:39

Valuable thing too, I suspect,

0:32:390:32:42

it's worth about £800 to £1,200.

0:32:420:32:45

Wow! I didn't think it was that...

0:32:460:32:49

-So small!

-It may be small, but it's a lovely piece of drawing, don't you think?

0:32:490:32:55

-And the colour's great.

-Yes.

0:32:550:32:56

This is really unusual for me. I don't think we've ever done this,

0:32:590:33:02

we've never come across to see a piece of furniture, it's always been brought into us.

0:33:020:33:06

-Why are we coming to you, rather than you to us?

-It's a very special desk.

0:33:060:33:11

Mainly because it was the desk used by Commanders in Chief, we don't know how far back...

0:33:110:33:17

you might be able to tell me, but we know for certain that it was the Duke of Wellington's desk

0:33:170:33:23

while he was here as Commander in Chief.

0:33:230:33:25

1827 was when the great duke was first Commander in Chief, and 1842, he was Commander in Chief

0:33:250:33:30

a second time until the year of his death in 1852, and it's been here ever since,

0:33:300:33:36

in the office of the Major General commanding the household division,

0:33:360:33:40

which is the job which I did for three and a half years.

0:33:400:33:43

So, I'm just thinking about the relevance of this wonderful print here, I mean, I just love this...

0:33:430:33:49

Well, it's the only bit of provenance we have, um, because there you can see the desk

0:33:490:33:54

as it virtually is now, in fact the same shape, and of course the...

0:33:540:33:59

the room itself, you know with the state portraits of George III and Queen Charlotte

0:33:590:34:04

as they were then, and even the decor, the paint is precisely the same, same colour.

0:34:040:34:09

Extraordinary, so here is definite proof that this is the desk.

0:34:090:34:12

The thought that he actually sat here is quite intimidating in a way.

0:34:120:34:16

-Mmm.

-Let me just think from my point of view about the desk, and sort of, in cold blood in a way...

0:34:160:34:21

it's a lovely mahogany desk, and this oval shape

0:34:210:34:24

is very typical of the late Hepplewhite Sheraton period,

0:34:240:34:30

so I'm going to date it to about 1780-1790.

0:34:300:34:33

It's a partners' desk, you've got the kneehole on this side, and exactly the same kneehole on the other side.

0:34:330:34:40

I sat at it for 3.5 years, I never found it terribly comfortable being slightly tall,

0:34:400:34:44

I had to rather sort of, you know, squat, and actually there's no room for one's legs to go through,

0:34:440:34:50

but even so, it was a great privilege to sit here for 3.5 years.

0:34:500:34:54

I think between us, we're going to have to try and value this.

0:34:540:34:57

As a piece of furniture without the historical factor, it's relatively easy, it's a rare desk,

0:34:570:35:02

it's a very good desk, but how on earth do you value that provenance?

0:35:020:35:06

It's impossible, here we've got one of...Britain's...

0:35:060:35:09

the world's leading figure of his time, and we're trying to put a value on that.

0:35:090:35:14

I really find that very difficult, and almost too much of a challenge.

0:35:140:35:17

We always do value things on the Roadshow, so I can't get out of it

0:35:170:35:20

and I think for retail replacement purposes, this should be insured for £100,000.

0:35:200:35:26

Good heavens, fascinating.

0:35:280:35:29

I can't thank you enough for inviting us to look at it, it's a great privilege. It's just fun to see

0:35:290:35:34

really good furniture, and the historic provenance, wonderful, thank you.

0:35:340:35:39

Certain viewers will no doubt recoil when they reflect on the subject matter here,

0:35:430:35:48

I gather there's an inscription bottom right, what is going on?

0:35:480:35:52

It's telling us that the monkey and the dog are fighting,

0:35:520:35:56

and it's a fight to the death.

0:35:560:35:57

We learn that the monkey dies later on in the day, but...

0:35:570:36:01

the poor bitch dies on the spot, very non-PC, don't you think?

0:36:010:36:05

-Well, it's...

-Gruesome.

0:36:050:36:07

How did you come by this picture?

0:36:070:36:09

I bought it because I'm interested in astrology. In Chinese astrology

0:36:090:36:13

I'm the year of the monkey, and I thought that my younger brother was year of the dog,

0:36:130:36:17

and as we were always fighting as children, I thought, what great fun for his birthday present.

0:36:170:36:22

Turns out he's year of the rooster, so he didn't get the painting and I kept hold of it.

0:36:220:36:26

How do you find the painting goes down with your friends?

0:36:260:36:29

I don't show too many people, the political correctness thing

0:36:290:36:33

is so huge now that, um, I keep it kind of hidden, but I like it.

0:36:330:36:37

This is a very interesting picture in many ways. It's unpalatable

0:36:370:36:41

to a lot of people, but it throws a glimmer of light on a sinister,

0:36:410:36:46

unattractive side of London life, but none the less, something that did go on, this is an event that took place,

0:36:460:36:52

so there's social history here, but there's also another element which appeals to me and that is...

0:36:520:36:57

the quality of the painting. The more you look at it, the more you realise

0:36:570:37:01

that this is by a good artist, it's not by one of your jobbing painters.

0:37:010:37:06

-Can I ask you how much you paid for it?

-Yes, I paid £50.

0:37:060:37:10

I thought that was just about right for my brother's birthday present.

0:37:100:37:14

Had you any idea at the time who it might be by?

0:37:140:37:16

I've got no idea and it actually didn't concern me very much, I just loved the painting for what it was.

0:37:160:37:22

This will be rather tantalising for both of us, because...

0:37:220:37:25

if I may shine a torch on the bottom left hand corner, can you make out

0:37:250:37:29

those initials there?

0:37:290:37:33

I can't see anything at all, I'm surprised you can.

0:37:330:37:36

This is what you can do with a torch.

0:37:360:37:38

TW, now I don't know who TW is, it's a monogram.

0:37:380:37:43

Now, we're going to find out one day who TW is.

0:37:430:37:47

I can't do it now, but I can tell you that this is by an artist of considerable accomplishment.

0:37:470:37:52

There are various techniques which suggest he knows what he's doing, or possibly she knows what she's doing.

0:37:520:37:57

In the background, those glazey strokes, they're rather masterly.

0:37:570:38:01

I also think the way that the monkey's face is done and the...

0:38:010:38:06

-moment of contact between the two is by someone who understands animal anatomy.

-Yeah.

0:38:060:38:11

-So you paid £50 for it?

-Yeah.

0:38:110:38:13

Well, it would be very interesting to know who the artist is.

0:38:130:38:17

But I can confidently say, given its quality, that this is worth in excess of £1,000 to £1,500.

0:38:170:38:24

Well, that would have been an even better birthday present for him, wouldn't it?

0:38:240:38:28

-Rooster or no rooster.

-Absolutely.

0:38:280:38:31

They were found in two individual boxes when I was sorting out

0:38:330:38:37

my aunt's house when she passed away, the beginning of the year.

0:38:370:38:40

-When you unpacked them, what did you think?

-Wow!

0:38:400:38:42

-They were stunning and amazing.

-You like them, do you?

-Yes.

0:38:420:38:46

Here, we've got a group of...

0:38:460:38:51

classic Royal Worcester porcelain

0:38:510:38:55

from the early years of the 20th Century. At that time, they were...

0:38:550:39:01

painting scenes of highland cattle,

0:39:010:39:06

birds like that, and they were all the rage at the time, and honestly,

0:39:060:39:11

you know, I don't know how many times these have come up on the Antiques Roadshow over the years,

0:39:110:39:16

hundreds, I would think.

0:39:160:39:18

On the other hand, these are more unusual, do you know what they are?

0:39:180:39:24

Just Wedgwood.

0:39:240:39:26

-Just Wedgwood.

-Just Wedgwood.

0:39:260:39:28

Josiah Wedgwood was a one-legged potter, chemist, businessman,

0:39:280:39:35

a highly important man of his time, not only in the pottery industry, but outside as well.

0:39:350:39:42

And he developed many bodies, and one of them was this black basalt...

0:39:420:39:50

or basalts, it can be spelt.

0:39:500:39:53

And I've got a feeling he was experimenting with it

0:39:530:39:56

in 1769 is the year that comes to mind, but I may be wrong there.

0:39:560:40:01

These are slightly later than that,

0:40:010:40:04

this is obviously for boiled eggs at breakfast,

0:40:040:40:10

and...this would have stood on the sideboard,

0:40:100:40:14

you would have had salt in there,

0:40:140:40:17

-and I think that would probably sell for around £600 to £800.

-Mmm.

0:40:170:40:22

This candlestick is more unusual,

0:40:220:40:26

in that you've got the application

0:40:260:40:29

called sprigging...of rosso antico,

0:40:290:40:35

which was his red body, much less common.

0:40:350:40:38

And it's a very good bit of Neo-Classical design.

0:40:380:40:43

The sad thing is, one candlestick.

0:40:430:40:46

-Mmm.

-There's nothing sadder than one candlestick.

0:40:460:40:51

But you know, it's a good example, I can see that making...

0:40:510:40:57

£700 to £1,000.

0:40:570:40:59

-Just the one?

-Just one?

0:40:590:41:01

-Just one.

-Wow!

0:41:010:41:03

And then we've got this extraordinary

0:41:030:41:07

desk set.

0:41:070:41:08

There's the inkwell, and in this one we've got the sander,

0:41:080:41:14

-do you know what that's for?

-No.

0:41:140:41:16

Well, you put very fine sand in that and when you've written your letter...

0:41:160:41:20

off you go. No blotting paper.

0:41:200:41:23

-Oh.

-And the sand absorbs the ink, and so you just...

0:41:230:41:29

and you've got a dry letter.

0:41:290:41:32

And we've got a canopic jar,

0:41:320:41:35

and the canopic jar holds a pen holder and another inkwell.

0:41:350:41:41

It's actually a very rare piece, one doesn't see them very often,

0:41:410:41:46

difficult to date but late 18th, early 19th Century.

0:41:460:41:52

And what one should have,

0:41:520:41:55

and indeed does have, is a mark.

0:41:550:42:00

This is a particularly amusing mark.

0:42:030:42:05

Wedgwood...and underneath, "Pearl".

0:42:070:42:10

-Oh, right.

-Do you know what it refers to?

0:42:100:42:13

-Pearl? No.

-Well, Wedgwood developed a new glaze at the end of the 18th Century, and he called it Pearl Ware.

0:42:130:42:20

What's happened here is that the potter has picked up the wrong tool,

0:42:200:42:26

and he's picked up a Wedgwood Pearl tool and gone...

0:42:260:42:31

and put the wrong mark on it, isn't that wonderful? I love it, it's good stuff.

0:42:310:42:35

Well, I like that very much, um...

0:42:350:42:42

This is much later. This is Wedgwood again,

0:42:420:42:45

decorated at the end of the 19th Century, I think probably by a man

0:42:450:42:50

called Harry Barnard, looks like his work to me.

0:42:500:42:54

And although that's a late piece in Wedgwood terms,

0:42:540:42:57

-that's going to be worth around, um, £600 to £1,000.

-It's stunning.

0:42:570:43:03

-You like it, do you?

-Yeah, love it.

-Beautiful.

-Best?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:43:030:43:06

-We love it.

-OK.

0:43:060:43:08

Would you swap it for that?

0:43:080:43:12

-Obviously, that's worth more the way...

-The way you're coming across.

0:43:140:43:18

-You reckon?

-Yeah. But that is prettier.

0:43:180:43:20

Ah, you girls always go for the pretty.

0:43:200:43:23

-This is yours.

-Thank you.

0:43:230:43:25

And the other one's mine.

0:43:250:43:27

-That's worth £4,000 to £6,000.

-Ah!

-Ah! You're joking!

0:43:270:43:34

-£4,000 to £6,000.

-No!

0:43:340:43:36

And I actually failed to put a price on this stuff, didn't I?

0:43:360:43:39

-Yeah.

-Well, another £15,000 there.

0:43:390:43:45

You're joking!

0:43:450:43:46

-Thank you for coming in, thank you, Auntie.

-Oh, God...

0:43:490:43:53

I'm shaking!

0:43:530:43:55

I think I need the gin!

0:43:570:44:00

A thing of beauty may be a joy forever but a television programme I'm afraid,

0:44:030:44:07

only has a certain amount of time, and ours is up for this week.

0:44:070:44:10

So from the glories of Banqueting House in Whitehall,

0:44:100:44:13

the Roadshow heads back to its humble headquarters in Bristol.

0:44:130:44:16

It's good enough for the likes of us.

0:44:160:44:18

Until the next time, goodbye.

0:44:180:44:21

On their second visit to London's Banqueting House, Michael Aspel and the team unearth even more treasure. An inheritance of old pots turns into a substantial windfall, and there's a grisly tale to tell when an axe from the Tower of London arrives.