Dundee Antiques Roadshow


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Dundee

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts are in Dundee, unearthing treasures.


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We like each Roadshow to be a voyage of discovery

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and this week we've come to a place which has close ties

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to some epic journeys of exploration.

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Welcome to Dundee.

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Here's an interesting little fact. Did you know, at one time,

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there were more millionaires in Dundee

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than any other part of Britain?

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It's all down to this - jute, harvested from a plant in India.

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Now, it may not look like much

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but it was one of the most familiar products of the 19th century.

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This is how it came out of the plant in its natural form,

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and it then went through a variety of processes

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to be used in all sorts of things like string, rope, cloth, sailcloth,

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flooring, clothes and it was all made here in Dundee.

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Some 50,000 people worked in the industry.

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Not surprisingly, it made some individuals very wealthy,

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including jute baron Sir James Caird.

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Caird, like everyone in Dundee,

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watched the exciting launch of this ship, the Discovery,

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on its maiden voyage in 1901 to Antarctica.

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Below deck, it's easy to imagine life on board.

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Basic with few home comforts.

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This is the captain's cabin.

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Robert Falcon Scott was appointed expedition leader.

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Scott of the Antarctic, of course, and he was immensely courageous.

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It's incredible to think that on its maiden journey,

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this ship was stuck in the ice for three years before it was rescued.

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Sir James Caird was so impressed

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by the bravery of the men on the Discovery

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that he later helped fund Shackleton's epic journey

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on the Endurance to the Antarctic via the South Pole.

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As we know, it became one of the most incredible adventure stories

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of all time, when the expedition became stranded on the ice.

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Just when things looked hopeless,

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Shackleton launched a heroic mission to get help on a lifeboat.

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That lifeboat was named after Sir James Caird

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and it saved their lives.

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Sir James Caird left many legacies here in Dundee.

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He funded the construction of this magnificent hall, Caird Hall,

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which is the venue for our journey

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into the uncharted waters of today's Roadshow.

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Here we are, Edinburgh Castle Peep Show. Absolutely splendid.

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In three languages - the chateau of Edinburgh, in French,

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Das Schloss, in German,

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and the castle of Edinburgh.

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So, it was designed for tourists, really.

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Now, I'm going to ask you to help me open this

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because it's a lovely peep show.

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Let me... I've got it open.

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You hang on to the bottom.

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And, if we go through it,

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we can see the whole streets of Edinburgh,

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and it's vibrant in its colour.

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And I can see somebody in what looks like a kilt at the end, there.

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Is that right?

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Yes. Yes, that'll be in the Grassmarket in Edinburgh.

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I was there the other day, and I have to say,

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I don't recognise this building here on the left.

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I don't recognise that

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-but the others are completely clear. That's the back of the castle.

-Yes.

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That's Castle Terrace here and the old High Street goes down from here.

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-Yes.

-Towards Holyrood.

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-The Royal Mile.

-The Royal Mile.

-The Royal Mile.

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So, tell me, where did you buy this wonderful thing 40 years ago?

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I got it in...more of a junk shop than an antique shop, in Perth.

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-Yes.

-And when I came across this, I just couldn't resist it.

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Well, I couldn't resist it either.

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I mean, apart from the box being rather tatty,

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the inside is as bright and as vibrant as ever -

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that's because it's been kept out of the dust

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and it's been handled with care.

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Nowadays, something like that,

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you'd be paying somewhere in the region of £600 or £700.

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-Really?

-Yes, absolutely.

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I didn't expect that!

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-So, there you are, you've done rather well.

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you for bringing it in.

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So, what is a nice lady like you

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doing with an extraordinary carriage clock like this?

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Well, it was part of a collection my father had.

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All his pieces were not naughty pieces like this,

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but it just happened to be the nicest one

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I liked to look at and play with when I was young.

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Later on, I was able to take only one piece

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from our house with me

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because things were getting very dangerous in Germany where I grew up,

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close to the end of the war,

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and my parents by this time were no longer with me

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and I just grabbed this and fled.

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How extraordinary! And were the Russians advancing at this time?

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-Yes, yes.

-Were they really?

-Very close, yes.

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How did you manage to get out?

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Well, we just stood by the end of the road and hoped for a lift,

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which I got eventually from a German military bus.

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And this being a small little carriage clock...

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-Yes, I had it in my coat pocket.

-Yes, fantastic.

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-Yes.

-And do you remember it in your childhood?

-Yes.

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As far as I remember it never went,

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I mean it was never looked upon to get your time,

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it was just a piece, an ornament, you know.

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-It has the most extraordinary enamel panels.

-Yes.

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Yes, my father must have fancied the panels.

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Yes, it's got a little bit of a male...

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My daughters, they tell me now that when they were little,

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they used to look at it and giggled and thought,

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"We'd better not let Mum know

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"we're looking at these naked ladies," you see.

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I think that's terrific.

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-Well, it's a very pretty little Swiss carriage clock.

-Yes.

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With silver gilt construction of case,

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-made around 1915, 1920, that sort of period.

-Yes, yes.

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And of course the great feature about it

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are these lovely enamel panels with the semi-naked women.

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-They're not erotic, they're very lovely.

-Yes.

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So, as I said, Swiss made.

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-Yes.

-With a nice white enamel dial and a silver gilt case,

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-but most of the gilding has come off the silver.

-Yes.

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-Obviously too much polishing.

-Yes.

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Well, it's still a highly desirable clock, in this sort of condition,

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-a little bit less than normal.

-Yes.

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But still every collector in the market

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-should pay between £1,500 and £2,000.

-Really, really?

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-Oh, I am surprised.

-That was worth pinching off the shelf

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-before you ran for it!

-Yes!

-Thank you for bringing it in.

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-It's fantastic.

-It's been a pleasure, thank you.

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When I initially looked at this, I thought,

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"Another writing desk," and they come in quite regularly,

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but this is something really special,

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because not only is it a writing desk,

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it's the world's first copying machine.

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-Is it yours? Is it something you bought?

-It's a colleague of mine,

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he has a special interest in writing slopes - we're both journalists.

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So let's have a look at it, let's have a look, so we open this,

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and a standard writing slope.

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What's in here?

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-Oh, couple of candlesticks.

-These... That's right, go on there.

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Like so...

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And then, like every writing slope, it has some secret drawers...

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..and in here we have...

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a brush...

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-..and a handle.

-We need that.

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You need that.

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Thank you. This goes in here, like so.

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Just wind there...

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There we go.

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So what we have here is something that was invented by a Scotsman.

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That's right, Sir James Watt.

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James Watt, you know all about him.

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Um, and then when he was working

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between his Birmingham factory and the mines down in Cornwall,

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he was travelling backwards and forwards a lot,

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and he obviously needed his documents copied,

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so the only way to do that would be to sit here writing the letter

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and then write a copy,

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send the letter off and keep the copy for his files.

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-Very time consuming.

-Very time consuming.

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Being a great engineer, he thought,

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"I want to find something simple that works,

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"then I can actually copy my letters

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"without having to hand-write them again",

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so he developed this, and it was patented back in 1780,

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and this came into production about 1790.

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So it's well over 200 years old, and how it works is,

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although I haven't got a letter,

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I have got a great Antiques Roadshow brochure here.

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You would have written your letter in a special ink,

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and then you would have wetted... wetted the tissue,

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and I think we've got some tissue somewhere, probably at this side.

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There we are, there's some... Ooh, there's some letters here as well.

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The drying book.

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You would have wetted the tissue

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and then you would have put the letter and the tissue together,

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put it on here, and then you would have wound the handle.

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Hopefully it would go in, and inside here

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there are two rolling plates, and you pressed the two together

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and you would get an offset of the actual letter

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you had written in the first place.

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-Mm-hm.

-You turn that around, and then you get a fair copy,

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-so you could actually read it. A fabulous invention.

-Ingenious.

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Absolutely ingenious, simple, but it worked and, you know,

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this was invented way before, obviously,

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photocopying or even the typewriter,

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so it's an extremely ingenious

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and beautifully constructed bit of engineering,

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-and it's also a piece of furniture.

-Absolutely, yeah.

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It's extraordinary that in my whole career, which is, I hate to say it,

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but it's coming up to 30 years, I've only seen three examples,

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one of which I actually handled, and we saw one at Ascot,

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slightly different design, earlier in the series, so like all things,

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you never see one and then two come along together.

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-Yeah.

-But, extraordinarily rare.

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I think in the first year, they only made 150.

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The last one to sell at auction sold for £26,000.

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-British sterling?

-British sterling, yeah, not guineas, £26,000.

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-Oh, right.

-The one that came up at auction, I have to say,

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had a great provenance, that it came from the Watt family,

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so that added quite considerably to it

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but, without a doubt, I would see this at auction

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at £12,000 to £15,000 and it could easily make more

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because it's in fabulous condition.

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-Wow, there you go.

-Great fun to use.

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It's a fabulous piece, thank you so much for bringing it in.

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Wonderful. Thank you very much.

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This is a little rectangular blue leather box

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about three inches wide,

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and on the lid we have the letters "MV Clytoneus"

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that's "merchant vessel".

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-Yes.

-Clytoneus.

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Launched 9th of the 4th, 1948.

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-Clearly not by you, ma'am.

-No, certainly not.

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So who did launch this vessel?

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Um, it was my great aunt who launched it, um...

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Did she talk about it at all? I mean do you know much about it?

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Well, um, she did mention it once or twice,

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but, I mean, I was only about 11 when she died, so...

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-Oh, I see.

-Yes, but she left this to me.

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Well, it's quite a small box, quite clearly,

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and therefore it's not going to have a grand, opulent content,

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-but the contents are incredibly pretty, aren't they?

-Yes.

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-What we have in the box is a sweet little bow-shaped brooch.

-Yes.

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-In platinum and diamonds.

-Right.

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Now the style of the brooch is interesting,

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because, now - can we just come back,

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-reel this back to the year that this launch took place, 1948?

-1948.

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Well, may I tell you that there is no way

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that that brooch was made in 1948.

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-Really?

-No. I don't think so,

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I think that the retailer who have put this brooch in the box

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have bought maybe a second-hand brooch

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and they've put it in their own case

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and they've put the, you know, little motif...

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-Embossed the...

-On the front.

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The brooch itself is very strongly of a period

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of around about the First World War.

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Now, the diamonds in the frame are what we call pave set,

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they're in touching formation,

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but the key to this brooch, which I know it's only very, very little,

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but the key to this brooch is that when you look at it

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with the lens through the side, you notice that engraved

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on the centre, at the side,

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are the magic words "Cartier Ltd."

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Now that's a whole new ball game.

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-Yes.

-So the value changes dramatically.

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Now, all right, we're not suggesting

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we've got a large important-size Cartier diamond brooch.

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-No, no.

-But I don't know about you -

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-I think it's incredibly pretty.

-It is, yes.

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and wearable... I don't know whether it's something you wear.

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Not usually. I wore it at my wedding but I don't think I've worn it since.

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Well, I think that such a brooch,

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if it was sold on the open market,

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-not that it will be, I appreciate that.

-No.

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-It would be...

-Sentimental value.

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a lot of interest in it, actually because it's so small and so sweet.

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-Yes.

-So what are we talking about with prices?

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The fact it's by Cartier means that if you were selling it,

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it would fetch in the region of a couple of thousand pounds.

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-Right.

-Nice piece that she gave you.

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-Yes, yes, beautiful, yes. I love it, thank you.

-Thank you.

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It's amazing being up here in Scotland

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and looking at a watercolour like this,

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because it's like one of the Scottish artists.

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-Yes, the Glasgow School.

-The Glasgow School.

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At the bottom here we have a signature

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and it's by Johann -

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and an almost unpronounceable middle name,

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which is Zoetelief Tromp.

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He's an artist that was born in Indonesia, so Dutch East Indies,

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and came over and studied in Holland, in the Hague.

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Because he was born in the 1870s, this would have been painted

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probably about 1910, 1920,

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but it's extraordinary to find this picture,

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which is so like the Scottish watercolourists,

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really, of the Glasgow School over here,

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so how did a Dutch painting like this land up here?

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Well, according to my uncle it was bought by his father, my grandfather,

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probably in the 1930s.

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It was certainly bought in Dundee but we know no more about it than that.

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I just love the composition. I mean when you look at it,

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it's a little girl on the swing, there,

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-and on the left here is the sister, dying to have a go.

-Indeed.

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But she's got to wait her turn.

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-And I think she's rather impatient, looking at it.

-Yes.

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But you know, when you look at a picture like this,

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-which is impressionistic...

-Yes.

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Look at the way that's constructed. it's very broadly painted.

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You stand back to look at it for it all to come together.

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-Indeed.

-But it's so cleverly done and I have to put a value on this,

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because this is your heirloom,

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and I think at auction that would make certainly £4,000 to £6,000.

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Heavens, that's a surprise, I didn't think it would be as much as that.

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Oh, my uncle will be delighted,

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I can see him buying a high definition television now.

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Well, that's rather sad. I think I'd rather have that.

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Now, quite rightly in Dundee,

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we've talked quite a bit about the Discovery,

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you know, and the crucial role it played in Antarctic history,

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but there is more to that story, isn't there?

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-And you're from the Discovery Point Museum.

-That's right.

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And I think you want to explore with me, a lesser known aspect of this.

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That's correct, and what I have here, really, is an example

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of the starting point for Captain Scott's Antarctic career.

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-So what is that? That's a cigarette case.

-It's a small cigarette case

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which was awarded to him in St Kitts

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in the West Indies in 1887.

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-He won a cutter race, in other words an oared rowing race.

-Yes.

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And was awarded this small cigarette case.

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The key point about this cigarette case is it happened at a time

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when another interesting Antarctic character, Sir Clements Markham,

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-arrived on the scene.

-Yes.

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He was invited by the Commandant of the West Indies Squadron

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-and was in St Kitts at the same time.

-So he saw Scott perform.

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He saw Scott perform and recognised in him the qualities that he thought

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might be useful for a leader of an expedition.

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Right, so Markham was a sort of talent scout.

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His job, unofficially, or officially, was to go round,

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look at young cadets, trainee officers, and say "he's going far".

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That's exactly what they did.

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-So without that...

-It wouldn't have happened.

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Nothing would have happened, no Discovery.

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-No, no, we wouldn't have Captain Scott.

-No story. No, we can go home.

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-Exactly.

-So what's the book?

0:17:460:17:48

The book is probably one of our star items in the collection.

0:17:480:17:52

It's Sir Clements Markham's personal photograph album,

0:17:520:17:56

and on the first page, here,

0:17:560:17:58

the ship that took them all to Antarctica, the RRS Discovery,

0:17:580:18:03

which was built at Dundee, is here being launched.

0:18:030:18:05

-This is the launch?

-That's the actual launch, 21st March.

0:18:050:18:08

There she is going down the... down the, down the slips.

0:18:080:18:11

So he assembled... what - it's like a scrap book?

0:18:110:18:14

It's a scrap book, exactly that, with all of the photographs

0:18:140:18:18

that he acquired over the period of the National Antarctic Expedition.

0:18:180:18:22

Right, so it covers the ship, what else does it cover?

0:18:220:18:25

It covers also... Just have to open this a little bit more.

0:18:250:18:28

And this is a particularly interesting photograph,

0:18:280:18:30

this is a Who's Who of Antarctic exploration.

0:18:300:18:33

-They're all in it.

-They're all in it, you've got Scott in the centre,

0:18:330:18:37

-you've got Edward Wilson, the famous zoologist...

-Yes, yes.

0:18:370:18:40

You've got Lieutenant Royds, Armitage and then right behind there

0:18:400:18:44

in pride of place is Ernest Shackleton.

0:18:440:18:46

-Of course.

-Who everybody knows.

-Now what's happened here?

0:18:460:18:49

-Ah well, um, William Shackleton, same name, but...

-No connection.

0:18:490:18:54

..but no connection, was the physicist,

0:18:540:18:56

the original physicist on the expedition,

0:18:560:18:58

except he did upset quite a few people within the crew

0:18:580:19:01

and it was decided to take him off the ship.

0:19:010:19:04

-Yes.

-And Sir Clements Markham being who he was,

0:19:040:19:06

decided that he no longer fitted in with the expedition.

0:19:060:19:09

-So he just cut him out.

-Cut him out.

0:19:090:19:11

-It's like Stalin, isn't it?

-Yes.

-He doesn't exist.

0:19:110:19:14

Left the body and the legs.

0:19:140:19:15

Thought crime - along those lines, yes!

0:19:150:19:18

So, that in itself is a wonderful piece of history,

0:19:180:19:21

as you say, that is Antarctic history.

0:19:210:19:23

That is, it's the Who's Who.

0:19:230:19:24

-And what else?

-Turn it round again.

0:19:240:19:27

-So what's that?

-This is a particularly

0:19:270:19:29

-nice image of...

-A lovely shot.

0:19:290:19:30

-the Discovery leaving Lyttelton.

-So the beginning of the voyage?

-Yes.

0:19:300:19:34

Setting off from New Zealand.

0:19:340:19:36

Yeah, after having been in dry dock,

0:19:360:19:38

having been repaired, and off she goes,

0:19:380:19:40

-in a trip, really, which is a trip to the unknown.

-Yes.

0:19:400:19:42

-It's like going to the surface of the moon.

-Yes.

0:19:420:19:44

Well, all those trips were - the last great frontier.

0:19:440:19:46

-Yes, it was the last great frontier.

-I mean, I find these so exciting,

0:19:460:19:49

because I try to put myself in the mind

0:19:490:19:51

of people at that time, setting off on these voyages,

0:19:510:19:54

knowing they'd be away for years, possibly,

0:19:540:19:57

knowing...no idea about what was going to happen -

0:19:570:20:00

it's fantastic stuff.

0:20:000:20:01

I think this is a clear case where objects that superficially

0:20:010:20:05

have no particular significance, are very significant.

0:20:050:20:08

-Yeah.

-A cigarette case like that, without that inscription,

0:20:080:20:11

in that condition is £20.

0:20:110:20:13

-Yeah, that's right.

-Add that component

0:20:130:20:14

-and you're dealing with a vastly superior sum - hundreds.

-Yeah.

0:20:140:20:19

Because, as you say, without that, there would be no polar expeditions,

0:20:190:20:23

no Discovery, no Scott, no nothing.

0:20:230:20:25

The book is a different issue -

0:20:250:20:27

it's clearly a good provenance,

0:20:270:20:28

we're looking at thousands of pounds.

0:20:280:20:31

-Yeah.

-Because this is such a rare association of images,

0:20:310:20:34

material, ephemera, which tells a very personal story

0:20:340:20:38

from the person who made it all happen.

0:20:380:20:41

Yeah, we were very, very excited to get it, obviously.

0:20:410:20:44

-I think so, I would be. Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:20:440:20:46

I bet these have pride of place in your dining room.

0:20:460:20:49

Well, they're actually in my mother's dining room,

0:20:490:20:52

on either side of the sideboard.

0:20:520:20:54

Right. What do you know about them?

0:20:540:20:56

Not very much at all. My grandfather bought them

0:20:560:20:59

and he was told at the time they came from the Duke of Hamilton's palace.

0:20:590:21:03

Right, right, that's a grand start, isn't it?

0:21:030:21:07

The Duke of Hamilton's palace, well, it was called Hamilton Palace.

0:21:070:21:11

It was sold, the contents were sold in 1882.

0:21:110:21:15

-It's a very famous auction.

-Right.

0:21:150:21:16

One of the most famous auctions in the 19th century.

0:21:160:21:19

Oh, I didn't know that.

0:21:190:21:20

These candelabra are clearly, to me, what's called Rococo Revival,

0:21:200:21:26

which started in popular taste in about the 1820s, 1830s,

0:21:260:21:30

but for a big, very wealthy noble family like the Hamiltons,

0:21:300:21:34

who were in London buying all the best French things,

0:21:340:21:37

they would be buying French early revival things

0:21:370:21:40

in the 1810s, 1820s, so, when he got married,

0:21:400:21:43

or almost certainly in 1819 when he became the Duke.

0:21:430:21:46

Just to explain very quickly

0:21:460:21:48

how I can date these - they look like French 1730s or '40s

0:21:480:21:52

but they're a little bit more clumsy

0:21:520:21:55

which takes me to England possibly, or France,

0:21:550:21:58

in the 1820-1830 revival period,

0:21:580:22:00

but the most charming thing - have you noticed the dragon?

0:22:000:22:03

No, I can't say I did.

0:22:030:22:05

You haven't had a good look at them, have you, ever really?

0:22:050:22:08

They've just always been there.

0:22:080:22:10

Gathering dust on mum's shelf,

0:22:100:22:11

there we go, but there's a lovely - you can see the tail

0:22:110:22:14

-here and it works all the way up into the dragon's mouth.

-Right.

0:22:140:22:18

-Do you know what they're made of?

-No.

0:22:180:22:20

I don't. Honestly, I don't know anything about them.

0:22:200:22:23

Are they gold?

0:22:230:22:26

I don't think so, but I don't know.

0:22:260:22:28

Well, they're gold plated, if you like - they're what we call ormolu,

0:22:280:22:33

which is actually brass or bronze which has had a coat of gold paste

0:22:330:22:36

put on with mercury and then it's fired and it just burns

0:22:360:22:40

itself onto the brass underneath.

0:22:400:22:42

They're fantastic things, I mean they're just great.

0:22:420:22:45

I think you're going to have to pay at auction

0:22:450:22:47

-a minimum of £2,000 to £3,000.

-Really?

0:22:470:22:51

And I think if you could ever prove the provenance,

0:22:510:22:53

ie the history of them,

0:22:530:22:55

I think you should double it.

0:22:550:22:56

Very good.

0:22:560:22:59

I usually talk about military items,

0:23:010:23:05

war items, but you've brought along a few items today that are anti-war.

0:23:050:23:10

-I have indeed.

-Tell me something about them and who they belong to.

0:23:100:23:14

These refer to my grandmother's brother.

0:23:140:23:16

His name was Bernard Douglas Taylor.

0:23:160:23:19

-This is him?

-That's him, yes.

0:23:190:23:21

Was he a Friend, was he a Quaker?

0:23:210:23:23

He was a Quaker, the whole family

0:23:230:23:25

had been Methodists but turned Quaker before the First World War.

0:23:250:23:28

Prior to the war starting, he took part

0:23:280:23:31

-in many anti-war committees and so on.

-Oh, did he?

0:23:310:23:34

And once the war had started, he helped out with other

0:23:340:23:36

conscientious objectors and so on.

0:23:360:23:39

When the time came for his drafting, he appeared before a panel

0:23:390:23:43

and pleaded his case for not having to join the military.

0:23:430:23:48

And what's this hand-written letter about?

0:23:480:23:50

That's his declaration to the selection panel.

0:23:500:23:53

-Oh, this is dated January 26th, 1917.

-Yes.

0:23:530:23:57

Um, he's written here, "I am not" -

0:23:570:23:59

underlined - "a soldier

0:23:590:24:02

"and no amount of coercion can ever cause me to become an instrument

0:24:020:24:08

"for the slaughter of my fellow man."

0:24:080:24:11

So quite clearly he,

0:24:110:24:13

he was a very intense man and definitely not one to, er...

0:24:130:24:18

-He was.

-go against his morals.

0:24:180:24:20

And whatever else he said to the panel,

0:24:200:24:23

they came to the unanimous agreement that, due to his statement

0:24:230:24:28

and his eloquence and his intensity,

0:24:280:24:31

that he should be fully exempted from military service.

0:24:310:24:34

Interesting. Now this photograph here puzzles me somewhat,

0:24:340:24:38

because this is, I guess, him, is it?

0:24:380:24:41

-That's him, yes.

-Well, why is he wearing military uniform?

0:24:410:24:44

What happened was, he decided that

0:24:440:24:46

the help he was giving out to dependants of "conchies" and so on,

0:24:460:24:52

he could perhaps do more, so he decided to go to France

0:24:520:24:54

to help out there.

0:24:540:24:55

Was this while the war was in progress?

0:24:550:24:57

It was still in progress, yes,

0:24:570:24:59

but what happened was, when he got off the ferry in Calais,

0:24:590:25:02

a gendarme came up, asked him his business and when he explained,

0:25:020:25:05

the gendarme said,

0:25:050:25:07

"What I suggest to you sir, is that you go to the nearest tailors,

0:25:070:25:11

"have yourself a uniform made and put it on immediately,

0:25:110:25:14

"because if the women of France

0:25:140:25:16

"see you in civilian clothes, a young, fit, hale man,

0:25:160:25:20

"they're going to tear you to pieces

0:25:200:25:22

"because their men have been dying at the front," and so on.

0:25:220:25:25

Yes, yes, that's extraordinary.

0:25:250:25:27

You've also brought along an armband. Tell me about this.

0:25:270:25:30

I know nothing about it.

0:25:300:25:31

I presume it's part of a Quaker voluntary organisation's motif.

0:25:310:25:36

Well, in fact, I do know what this is.

0:25:360:25:39

This is the Quaker star.

0:25:390:25:41

-Oh, I see.

-And it's the badge of the Quaker relief organisation.

0:25:410:25:47

-That's good to know.

-And so he would have worn

0:25:470:25:50

the Quaker star on his arm.

0:25:500:25:52

As far as I know, he had no other form of insignia on the uniform,

0:25:520:25:56

-solely this.

-Yes, he would have worn

0:25:560:25:58

this armband to show who he was, to show that he was a Quaker.

0:25:580:26:01

-Right.

-And also, of course, to support the other Quakers who were

0:26:010:26:04

-also over there.

-Yes, indeed.

0:26:040:26:06

Because he wouldn't have been alone.

0:26:060:26:08

But it must have been the most appalling thing,

0:26:080:26:11

actually, to be the subject of people's ridicule,

0:26:110:26:18

because he would have been ridiculed at home, in Britain.

0:26:180:26:21

I don't know that ridicule is the word.

0:26:210:26:23

I would say disliked to the point of being hated.

0:26:230:26:26

Hated? It's a strong word.

0:26:260:26:27

Yes, but the feeling in the country against conscientious objectors

0:26:270:26:32

was very, very strong indeed and in fact, if you open that,

0:26:320:26:35

-you'll perhaps see what I mean.

-This envelope?

-Yes.

0:26:350:26:38

What's this dated? 1916, it looks like from the postmark.

0:26:380:26:43

Oh, it's a letter to him.

0:26:430:26:45

You'll see.

0:26:450:26:48

Oh, my oh, goodness me,

0:26:480:26:51

it's a white feather.

0:26:510:26:53

It's a white feather - as in the Four Feathers film.

0:26:530:26:56

It says, "Noble sir, if you are too proud or frightened" -

0:26:560:27:01

underlined - "to fight, wear this".

0:27:010:27:05

-And the white feather.

-And this has been kept.

0:27:050:27:07

It's been kept, yes, it was kept by my grandmother

0:27:070:27:11

just to show the feelings that some human beings have

0:27:110:27:14

towards others, so...

0:27:140:27:16

-He obviously was a man of deep beliefs.

-Absolutely.

0:27:160:27:18

But how must he have felt when he received this?

0:27:180:27:23

How would you feel if you'd received this?

0:27:230:27:25

I don't know, I think from what I've read of his background

0:27:250:27:29

that he would have accepted it

0:27:290:27:31

as an example of how human beings can look upon

0:27:310:27:34

each other and feel sad and sorry for perhaps, for the person who wrote it.

0:27:340:27:39

Well, that's an interesting perspective, isn't it, I suppose.

0:27:390:27:42

And I have to say that I've never seen another

0:27:420:27:45

-white feather letter, ever.

-Yes.

0:27:450:27:47

Because I doubt whether anybody kept them. I would have thought that...

0:27:470:27:50

I think most people would have been very anxious to get rid of them

0:27:500:27:53

-completely, very quickly.

-Exactly.

0:27:530:27:55

I actually feel quite privileged

0:27:550:27:57

to be able to see it, to... it's quite incredible.

0:27:570:28:01

And I wouldn't mind betting

0:28:010:28:03

-that if this was actually sold - I'm sure you don't want to do it.

-No.

0:28:030:28:06

But if this was sold, at auction today, you'd get a number of people

0:28:060:28:11

willing to pay probably £500, £600 for it, because it's most unusual.

0:28:110:28:16

-I think this is an indictment on war itself.

-Oh, quite.

0:28:160:28:20

And also an indictment

0:28:200:28:21

on the sort of person that would have sent that letter.

0:28:210:28:25

Yes. The whole country felt the same way at the time.

0:28:250:28:27

Of course they did, we were very patriotic,

0:28:270:28:29

but I find this in today's world, I find this very moving.

0:28:290:28:33

Thank you for showing it to me.

0:28:330:28:35

Thanks very much.

0:28:350:28:37

This beautiful stars and stripe dress, obviously fancy dress.

0:28:390:28:44

Tell me the story of it.

0:28:440:28:45

Well, it was designed and made by my grandmother for my mother, in 1926.

0:28:450:28:50

Mummy was aged 18 but Granny was very thrifty

0:28:500:28:54

and she was a superb needlewoman. They both designed and made clothes,

0:28:540:28:58

so you can see how she's used this red and white and blue cotton sateen

0:28:580:29:03

fabric, cut the red into stripes and put the whole thing together.

0:29:030:29:06

I think the headdress looks rather like something

0:29:060:29:09

out of a Lyon's Corner House waitress's outfit.

0:29:090:29:11

Well, it certainly looks a bit like Wonder Woman, doesn't it?

0:29:110:29:14

-Doesn't it?

-But I mean what's fantastic about

0:29:140:29:17

this is that when I think when I was sent off to fancy dress parties,

0:29:170:29:20

I always used to go as a pirate or a nurse, because it was easy.

0:29:200:29:22

This is something quite more delightful.

0:29:220:29:26

And I wore it to a fancy dress party in 1981, I wore it with silver lame

0:29:260:29:30

Mary Quant tights and I danced the Charleston in it.

0:29:300:29:33

-Wow.

-It was such fun.

0:29:330:29:36

The wonderful thing about this dress is that

0:29:360:29:38

at that period, mid-1920s, women, after the First World War,

0:29:380:29:43

women were partying, they were smoking, wearing much more make-up.

0:29:430:29:46

-Mummy wasn't allowed to smoke.

-Mummy wasn't smoking, well that's...

0:29:460:29:49

-And no nail varnish either.

-No nail varnish, either.

0:29:490:29:51

It's a wonderful example of something from the 1920s,

0:29:510:29:54

just before the Crash, people were still partying then,

0:29:540:29:57

it got very much more sombre after that,

0:29:570:30:00

but this is fabulous and just beautiful,

0:30:000:30:03

thank you so much for bringing it.

0:30:030:30:05

-Thank you.

-Valuation of these things is, is so difficult because really

0:30:050:30:08

it's a very personal thing,

0:30:080:30:10

I mean, it would certainly be of great interest at auction,

0:30:100:30:14

I could see it making £150, £200.

0:30:140:30:16

Well, I mean I treasure the fact it's still in the family

0:30:160:30:19

and I love having it, thank you so much.

0:30:190:30:22

Our jewellery expert John Benjamin

0:30:280:30:30

was seen coming off the plane last night at Dundee airport

0:30:300:30:32

staggering under the weight

0:30:320:30:34

of something very, very heavy in his suitcase.

0:30:340:30:36

I found out today what it is, because we asked him

0:30:360:30:38

if, heaven forfend, his house should go up in flames,

0:30:380:30:41

what two objects would he rush out with, clutching one in each hand,

0:30:410:30:44

and John you brought along...

0:30:440:30:45

this, I know, is very heavy.

0:30:450:30:47

neither of the bits you brought are jewellery, which intrigues me.

0:30:470:30:50

-No.

-But let's start with this one. Why have you brought this along?

0:30:500:30:54

All right, well this is a bowl that was fashioned -

0:30:540:30:56

it's actually called "The Greedy Squirrel".

0:30:560:30:59

The story behind this bowl was this.

0:30:590:31:01

When I was 17 I left school.

0:31:010:31:06

No qualification to speak of. I was very lucky to get a job

0:31:060:31:11

working in a jewellery shop located in Bloomsbury called Cameo Corner.

0:31:110:31:16

Cameo Corner was started by this man. I'll show you a picture.

0:31:160:31:21

-There we are.

-What's his name?

0:31:210:31:22

Moshe Oved a mystic, a sculptor, a jeweller

0:31:220:31:27

started the shop up with nothing, and by the time he died,

0:31:270:31:32

some of the customers of the shop

0:31:320:31:34

were extraordinarily important people including Queen Mary,

0:31:340:31:36

who had her own armchair in the shop,

0:31:360:31:39

that no-one else was allowed to sit in.

0:31:390:31:42

For the four years I worked at Cameo Corner,

0:31:420:31:45

this squirrel sat on the counter

0:31:450:31:48

in the corner, right next to where I worked.

0:31:480:31:51

When I left Cameo Corner, that, of course, I left.

0:31:510:31:55

About, I don't know, three or four years ago,

0:31:550:31:58

the thing appeared at auction, and I was told about it and I thought,

0:31:580:32:02

"I have to have the squirrel".

0:32:020:32:04

That squirrel had been winking at me for four years, so I bought it

0:32:040:32:09

and it weighs a ton, doesn't it?

0:32:090:32:11

Ooh, yes, it does weigh a ton. I've got to say, John,

0:32:110:32:14

if you don't mind, it's not the most attractive thing

0:32:140:32:16

-I've ever seen.

-You don't like it?

-I'm not wild about it, but obviously

0:32:160:32:20

it means a lot to you.

0:32:200:32:22

It means a great deal to me because it represents my young life

0:32:220:32:25

in the jewellery industry, so there we are.

0:32:250:32:28

-And what about this object here?

-Well, that is a silver sugar sifter.

0:32:280:32:33

12 or 15 years ago, a telephone call from one of our branches.

0:32:330:32:36

Could I go down to visit a local client,

0:32:360:32:39

who it turned out had a large box of jewellery.

0:32:390:32:42

I went to visit this client,

0:32:420:32:44

sure enough the jewellery was astonishing,

0:32:440:32:47

and it turned out that the collection was owned by her father.

0:32:470:32:51

He had made it all.

0:32:510:32:53

He was called Henry George Murphy.

0:32:530:32:56

Henry Murphy was a goldsmith and silversmith who owned a shop

0:32:560:32:59

in Marylebone called The Falcon Studio

0:32:590:33:03

and in 1928 up to his death in 1939 he churned out the most amazing

0:33:030:33:09

jewellery and silverware.

0:33:090:33:11

Well, how did I come by this?

0:33:110:33:13

I researched the man's life, we photographed all his jewellery,

0:33:130:33:19

the client said that up in the loft

0:33:190:33:21

they had the entire archive of the Falcon Studio.

0:33:210:33:24

-It was a time bubble upstairs.

-What a find.

0:33:240:33:27

And what happened was that we recogn... I say "we",

0:33:270:33:31

because I collaborated with one of our own colleagues

0:33:310:33:34

on the Antiques Roadshow, Paul Atterbury.

0:33:340:33:36

We wrote a book about Murphy

0:33:360:33:39

and they gave me the silver sugar caster.

0:33:390:33:42

They gave it to you?

0:33:420:33:43

-Yes, they gave it to me.

-And what's it worth, this?

0:33:430:33:46

-Do you know?

-Do you know something?

0:33:460:33:48

I don't care what it's worth.

0:33:480:33:50

I have something that means a great deal to me,

0:33:500:33:53

because that is a thread in my life,

0:33:530:33:56

and for me, that is a very personal piece.

0:33:560:34:00

-John, thank you.

-Thank you, Fiona.

0:34:000:34:03

This is the kind of thing I could only have dreamed

0:34:050:34:08

would arrive at my table today. Here we have perhaps, how can I say,

0:34:080:34:13

one of the legends of golfing history.

0:34:130:34:16

And this is Old Tom Morris. Can you tell me where this came from?

0:34:160:34:20

It was, um, in my father's house after his death,

0:34:200:34:23

and when we cleared the house out, we found it.

0:34:230:34:27

-Right, so it wasn't hanging on the wall?

-No.

0:34:270:34:29

OK, well, let's talk about Old Tom Morris because essentially here

0:34:290:34:32

we have a superb photographic image of Old Tom Morris

0:34:320:34:36

on the course at St Andrews.

0:34:360:34:38

He's in a bunker,

0:34:380:34:39

which actually is probably not that usual for old Tom Morris,

0:34:390:34:42

because Old Tom Morris was an exceptional golfer,

0:34:420:34:45

he was regarded as absolutely invincible on the course.

0:34:450:34:49

He actually won the Open at Prestwick four times,

0:34:490:34:52

starting in 1861 I believe, and here he is at St Andrews.

0:34:520:34:56

There's a slightly more poignant history to Old Tom as well,

0:34:560:35:00

because he had a son, Young Tom Morris,

0:35:000:35:03

and Young Tom Morris won the Open four times as well,

0:35:030:35:07

but the sad thing is that he died at the age of 24.

0:35:070:35:10

So we have two generations of a family, both exceptional golfers,

0:35:100:35:16

both exceptional Scottish golfers, and Old Tom here lived to, I think,

0:35:160:35:22

around about 1904, 1905 - sadly his son died in around about 1875.

0:35:220:35:27

And it's a very poignant story,

0:35:270:35:30

but added to that we have a man here who,

0:35:300:35:33

to collectors, is literally the god of the golfing world

0:35:330:35:37

-and what is more, we have a signed photograph here.

-Yes, yes.

0:35:370:35:42

And I wonder, had you ever considered a value

0:35:420:35:44

-on this photograph?

-No idea.

0:35:440:35:46

No, well this picture is worth £2,000 to £3,000.

0:35:460:35:52

I've been offered £1,000 for it.

0:35:520:35:55

-You haven't been offered enough.

-No.

0:35:550:35:57

Because it's an absolute classic of its time and, to be honest,

0:35:570:36:01

-to come to Scotland and find it in Scotland...

-Yes.

0:36:010:36:04

-..has kind of made my day.

-That's what I thought it would, yes.

0:36:040:36:06

Thank you, it's great.

0:36:060:36:08

-Thank you ever so much for bringing it along.

-Thank you.

0:36:080:36:11

-This bowl, I love it, I really, really love it.

-Good.

0:36:110:36:14

It's fantastic, a visual feast of best pottery folk art you can get,

0:36:140:36:18

it's a gorgeous thing,

0:36:180:36:19

-everything's going on.

-Yes, it is, yeah.

0:36:190:36:22

It's lovely that it's dated, 1862. I mean, what's that?

0:36:220:36:27

I don't know, but I love the fact that the top hat was coming off.

0:36:270:36:31

-I mean it's extraordinary, man in a top hat on a bucking bronco.

-Yeah.

0:36:310:36:35

It's an assortment of random images,

0:36:350:36:37

we've got this wonderful steam train here, we've got

0:36:370:36:41

two ships. It's a fantastic slipware bowl.

0:36:410:36:44

-Uh-huh.

-Technically about slipware, it's pottery which is then coated

0:36:440:36:48

-with a very, very thin layer of another coloured slip.

-Right.

0:36:480:36:52

Which is basically liquid clay, which is then carved into

0:36:520:36:57

this sgraffito effect.

0:36:570:36:59

-The history of slipware...

-Yeah.

0:36:590:37:00

Goes right back into medieval times.

0:37:000:37:02

This, being a 19th century piece, it became popular throughout,

0:37:020:37:06

really, the UK, North Devon is very, very famous for slipware.

0:37:060:37:10

-Yes.

-Barnstaple and so forth, but we're up in Dundee.

-Yeah.

0:37:100:37:14

Where did you get this one?

0:37:140:37:16

This I found in my mother's attic when I moved my mother and father

0:37:160:37:20

to a smaller home this year,

0:37:200:37:22

and Margaret Morren was my great-great-aunt.

0:37:220:37:27

Fantastic, so this has gone down from person to person to person.

0:37:270:37:32

-Yeah, it has indeed.

-And lives in the attic.

-It was in the attic.

0:37:320:37:35

I think I shall be displaying it now.

0:37:350:37:37

Would Margaret Morren have made it?

0:37:370:37:40

-Have designed it?

-It's very unlikely.

0:37:400:37:42

It's more likely it was made perhaps as a present for her birth.

0:37:420:37:45

-Oh, for her birth?

-But I mean your family records may be able to

0:37:450:37:48

-tell you something about her.

-I need to look into it.

0:37:480:37:50

-You need a genealogist in the family.

-I do, I do.

0:37:500:37:52

-I think it's a gorgeous thing.

-Good, thank you.

0:37:520:37:56

I suppose got to think about what it might be worth.

0:37:560:37:59

I suppose in auction, £2,000.

0:37:590:38:02

Is it as much as that?

0:38:020:38:04

Oh, goodness, no, I'd no idea,

0:38:040:38:06

no idea at all, just thought it was a family piece, great.

0:38:060:38:10

It's lovely, it's really, really nice.

0:38:100:38:11

-I'm sure I shan't be selling it.

-I covet it.

0:38:110:38:14

Good. Oh, well, I'll take it to my home.

0:38:140:38:16

-You could come and look at it sometimes.

-Thank you.

0:38:160:38:19

Thank you very much, thanks.

0:38:190:38:21

The first thing I'd love to ask you is what did you have for breakfast?

0:38:230:38:28

-Was it toast and marmalade?

-It was, yes.

-It was.

-It was.

0:38:280:38:31

And did you turf the bread out of the bread bin first

0:38:310:38:34

-before you put the clock in? Did you really?

-I did.

0:38:340:38:37

That's fantastic, I love that.

0:38:370:38:38

But we're not here to look at a bread bin,

0:38:380:38:40

we're here to look at this extraordinary machine inside.

0:38:400:38:43

-Can I take it out?

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:44

There we go.

0:38:460:38:49

Well, it's terrific fun, love it to bits.

0:38:490:38:51

I saw it poking out of the top of the bread bin

0:38:510:38:53

and I thought to myself, "Please let that be what I think it is,"

0:38:530:38:56

and it's exactly what I think it is, which is great.

0:38:560:38:59

So it's called a skeleton clock.

0:38:590:39:01

The reason it's called a skeleton clock

0:39:010:39:03

is because the movement plates have been pierced out so that you

0:39:030:39:07

can see straight through them and you can examine the wheel work

0:39:070:39:11

in between the two plates, whereas normally with a clock you'd have

0:39:110:39:15

-brass plates and you couldn't see any of the wheel work.

-Right.

0:39:150:39:17

So we call this a skeleton clock. So how is it such an extraordinary

0:39:170:39:22

machine arrives here in Dundee?

0:39:220:39:24

Well, it came into our family in the Second World War. My grandfather

0:39:240:39:29

was a farmer in Dumfriesshire and a local businessman approached him

0:39:290:39:33

at Christmas time - he wanted some geese that my grandfather had.

0:39:330:39:36

-Geese?

-Some geese to give to his workers at Christmas time,

0:39:360:39:39

but he couldn't afford to

0:39:390:39:41

pay my grandfather for the geese so he said "I'll give you a clock"

0:39:410:39:44

on the condition he could have a look at it every now and again

0:39:440:39:47

on the mantelpiece and we've had it ever since in the family.

0:39:470:39:50

What a fantastic story - did your father have an interest

0:39:500:39:52

-in clocks, in horology?

-No, not that I know of.

0:39:520:39:54

But he had a good eye, obviously, he was a canny Scottish farmer.

0:39:540:39:57

He was, yes, he was.

0:39:570:39:59

And what sort of date was that? Second War?

0:39:590:40:01

Yeah, I think it was 1941 that it came into our possession, uh-huh.

0:40:010:40:04

Was it? 1941? Well, I'll tell you a little bit about the history of it.

0:40:040:40:09

Made around 1830, that sort of period.

0:40:090:40:12

On the front we've got a maker's name of R Hess of Liverpool.

0:40:120:40:17

-Right.

-Now it's my belief that Mr R Hess

0:40:170:40:19

never made this clock, I suspect he was a jeweller

0:40:190:40:22

and it was his shop clock,

0:40:220:40:25

or shop timepiece,

0:40:250:40:27

and it would have been a wonderful looker

0:40:270:40:29

and it would have attracted people into the shop.

0:40:290:40:31

They would set their watches by the time on the clock.

0:40:310:40:34

-Oh, right.

-A lot of jewellery shops had a shop's regulator

0:40:340:40:37

or a shop's mantel clock, sometimes in the window,

0:40:370:40:40

but often they wanted to draw people into the shop

0:40:400:40:42

so they had a clock sitting on the table, or as a long case clock.

0:40:420:40:46

People would come and regulate their pocket watches

0:40:460:40:49

every day, or every week,

0:40:490:40:50

and they were very useful at bringing people in.

0:40:500:40:52

But what is particularly fun about this clock is the balance wheel

0:40:520:40:56

that oscillates backwards and forwards just there.

0:40:560:40:59

That has this lovely snaky which holds the spring which keeps

0:40:590:41:02

the tension for the balance wheel to oscillate backwards and forwards.

0:41:020:41:05

Now the faster the balance wheel oscillates,

0:41:050:41:08

-the faster the second hand goes round, OK?

-Oh, right.

0:41:080:41:11

And you can make the balance wheel go faster and slower

0:41:110:41:13

by adjusting the balance spring,

0:41:130:41:15

this spring that's coiled down that the snake is holding.

0:41:150:41:18

But what is even more wonderful about this

0:41:180:41:21

is the way that the two plates of the movement

0:41:210:41:23

have been pierced out in this lovely geometric design,

0:41:230:41:27

and when you turn the clock around it becomes even more apparent

0:41:270:41:31

because it's pierced out at the back,

0:41:310:41:34

but it's the layered design that particularly appeals as well.

0:41:340:41:38

It's just beautifully laid out

0:41:380:41:41

and the one last thing that's really good quality is when you look

0:41:410:41:45

at the quality of the wheel work, you will notice I don't know whether

0:41:450:41:48

-you've seen it, but each wheel has six spokes to each wheel.

-Right.

0:41:480:41:54

Now the average clock has four

0:41:540:41:55

spokes to each wheel, a good quality clock has five spokes,

0:41:550:41:58

but a really good quality clock has six spokes,

0:41:580:42:01

it's a sign of exceptional quality.

0:42:010:42:03

-Good.

-So, now...

0:42:030:42:06

the last question I have to ask - did it ever have a glass dome?

0:42:060:42:10

Not as far as I know.

0:42:100:42:12

-We've actually had a dome made for it.

-You have?

0:42:120:42:14

-You just didn't bring it with you.

-But didn't bring it with us.

0:42:140:42:17

And you don't, you didn't have the original base with it at any time?

0:42:170:42:20

-Wasn't original, no, no.

-Well, that's a shame

0:42:200:42:23

because the original base and the original dome is important to have,

0:42:230:42:26

you know, it's just a lovely thing to be able to have with it,

0:42:260:42:29

and, you know, that's life, they break.

0:42:290:42:31

My wife will kill me for saying this,

0:42:310:42:33

but she was dusting some bits and pieces off a shelf

0:42:330:42:36

-and an ornament broke my skeleton clock dome the other day.

-Oh, right.

0:42:360:42:40

And she rang me in tears. I was slightly in tears as well.

0:42:400:42:43

they're incredibly difficult to replace.

0:42:430:42:46

OK, well, much collected, this is...

0:42:460:42:49

a skeleton clock collector's dream.

0:42:490:42:52

I'd love to own it, a fantastic clock, so it has a market value.

0:42:520:42:57

Um, from a flock of geese.

0:42:570:43:00

-A good deal.

-I wonder how many it was -

0:43:000:43:02

and they would have gone by Christmas,

0:43:020:43:04

whereas here this clock is now.

0:43:040:43:05

-I've still got it.

-Um, open market value for this clock,

0:43:050:43:08

take a little bit off

0:43:080:43:09

for the fact that it's missing its base and its dome.

0:43:090:43:11

-Right, right.

-But certainly a collector today would pay

0:43:110:43:15

between £8,000 and £12,000 for it.

0:43:150:43:19

-Oh, good news.

-Thank you very much for bringing it in.

0:43:190:43:25

-It's a terrific clock.

-Thank you, right.

0:43:250:43:27

This is probably my favourite item of the day. It dates from 1602

0:43:290:43:33

and it's a pirlie pig. "Well, it doesn't look much like a pig"

0:43:330:43:36

I can hear you say, but up here in Scotland a pirlie pig

0:43:360:43:38

is what they call a money box,

0:43:380:43:40

and it used to be used in the Council to fine town councillors

0:43:400:43:43

if they couldn't be bothered to turn up for a meeting,

0:43:430:43:46

so it must have had a few bob in it.

0:43:460:43:47

They could probably do with something like this

0:43:470:43:49

in the House of Commons, if you ask me.

0:43:490:43:51

Well, now it's going to the local McManus Art Gallery and Museum here,

0:43:510:43:56

and our time here is almost up.

0:43:560:43:57

We've had an interesting and eclectic mix of items,

0:43:570:44:00

I think it's fair to say,

0:44:000:44:01

so from the Roadshow in Dundee, bye-bye.

0:44:010:44:04