Leeds 2 Antiques Roadshow


Leeds 2

The programme makes a return visit to Leeds Town Hall as Fiona Bruce and the team of experts set up for another busy day.


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Transcript


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We've really hit a high note here at Leeds Town Hall,

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in fact, so much so that our experts can conduct a whole new programme.

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So welcome to a Second Symphony from the Roadshow in Leeds.

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For 150 years, Leeds Town Hall

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has proudly watched over the city's evolving skyline,

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and from its inception, music has played a central role

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in the life of this remarkable building.

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The town council considered it essential to have a built-in

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instrument here to bring musical events to the people of Leeds.

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A vital organ, you might say.

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In harmony with the splendour and scale of the town hall,

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this is the largest three-keyboard organ in Europe,

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containing a staggering 6,500 pipes,

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one for every pound it cost to construct.

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At 50 feet high, 47 feet wide and 27 feet deep,

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this was such an enormous undertaking that the workshop

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where it was assembled had to be rebuilt to accommodate it.

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And the swell box, which amplifies the sound,

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is so cavernous that a dinner party was once held inside it.

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Our experts are getting in tune too.

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Will there be the odd bum note, or a perfect rhapsody?

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Let's find out.

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What a super Parian model.

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It's, of course, made by Minton, as you probably know,

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and well-marked but I think it's absolutely wonderful.

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-Yes.

-Marvellous girl and the lion, isn't it? How have you come by it?

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Um she was given to my parents by a next door neighbour

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quite a few years ago, and when my Dad died, I retrieved that

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from everything else that was going for clearance really, yes.

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-So saved?

-Saved, yes.

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-And now loved.

-Yeah.

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It's a super model, isn't it?

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This girl is cutting the toe nails of this lion, a most improbable thing to do.

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-Yes.

-Of course the subject is called The Lion In Love.

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-Is it?

-And the lion is in love with the girl.

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-Oh.

-I'd like to be that, and she's looking up at him.

-Yeah.

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I wonder what face she's pulling? She's cutting his toe nails.

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He looks quite wild.

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But that's a lovely thing to do, cutting one's toe nails.

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I mean, my wife does it for me and I know it's because she loves me

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but otherwise she wouldn't do it, but he's great.

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It was modelled by Klagman, who modelled it in 1864

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and the actual figure was made in 1864 when he modelled it.

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-Ah.

-So it's not a very common model to find.

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-No.

-And it was modelled from a great marble that was in the Great Exhibition in 1851,

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-so modelled directly from that but reduced, of course, in size.

-Yes.

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The original marble model would be seven times as big as this one

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but this is in a Parian body and I think it's absolutely wonderful.

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So have you ever wondered how much it's worth?

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I often...yeah, I have done, really she's...

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she's hidden away most of the time because she's so big.

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But when I do see her, I do think, "I wonder how much she's worth?"

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-Yes, yes, she is big. Difficult to display but it should be out and enjoyed.

-Yeah I know, yeah.

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-It is absolutely beautiful.

-Yes.

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-I reckon you're looking at something between £800 and £1,000.

-Really?

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-She's absolutely beautiful.

-Yes.

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-So The Lion In Love, you're in love with the lion.

-Yeah.

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He's a great chap, isn't he?

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I think it's a marvellous lion. Ah!

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I think everybody knows what a rocking horse looks like,

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or at least they think they do

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until they see a rocking horse like this and it is completely different

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to every rocking horse that one's familiar with in this country.

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What was your relationship with it?

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Is it something that you sat on as a...

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well, I think probably not recently, but did you sit on it as a child?

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I certainly did, yes, yes, I certainly did,

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it was in my aunt's house.

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-Yes.

-In Headingley, a little house, occupied the hall,

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virtually filled the hall

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and, yes, I used to go and see her every Saturday, have a little ride.

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Fantastic, what a wonderful excuse to go and see Auntie.

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So it's been restored?

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-Yes.

-And I must say a beautiful job has been done on it, and I can see you're grasping photographs.

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-Oh, my goodness... so this is how it was?

-Yes.

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-This is off its stand.

-Just before it was restored, yes.

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It had been fairly badly treated.

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I wanted to restore it but Yvonne wanted a proper man to do it.

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And, as wives usually do, she got her way.

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-Exactly, yes.

-Amazing.

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This particular type of horse was patented in 1862.

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It is, in fact, an American horse.

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-Oh.

-American?

-No family connections with America?

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-None at all, no.

-None.

-Isn't that interesting.

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From the head, coming down, underneath the belly,

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we've got this strip of metal.

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-Yes.

-Which acts as a sort of governor, if you like.

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-That's right, yes.

-And at the base,

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you have these wonderful concentric flat springs

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which are then attached to the legs here and so, when a child is on it,

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-it gives an incredibly realistic ride.

-It does, doesn't it?

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-Completely different to one on rockers.

-Exactly, exactly.

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The inventor, a man called Jesse Crandall, just got it right.

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It wasn't his first invention using springs, but he gradually,

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over the years, perfected it,

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so that this really was the ultimate sprung horse

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and I could certainly see that this would have been made

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-round about the turn of the century.

-Right.

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-The 20th century, of course.

-Yes.

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Does it still have a life?

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-Oh, yes, yes, yes. We have grandchildren.

-Yes.

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At Christmas there were two on him and one hanging on in front.

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-Oh, my goodness, so it does...

-Oh, yes, um, when we had him restored,

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the restorer said that he should be in a museum, and I said,

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"No, he's part of the family, he's going to be used."

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Now, it would have been quite an expensive toy when it was purchased,

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I mean, these were luxury goods by any stretch of the imagination,

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and it's a valuable toy still.

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I'm going to ask how much you paid for the restoration.

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-£600.

-600?

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-I think that's very, very good value, I must say.

-I didn't.

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-You, you had to write the cheque and you thought it was a lot of money?

-Exactly, yes.

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I have to say, I do think that was money well... really well invested,

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showing what it was like before and what it's like now.

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If you wanted to sell it, which I'm sure you wouldn't,

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but an auction price for something like this

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would be in the region of perhaps £3,000, so I think your £600...

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-Really? Good, good investment.

-"Good," he says, exactly.

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-Your £600 has actually made this object.

-Yes.

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So I get the impression that you've known this a long time,

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but I'm not sure about that, what's the story?

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-No, the story behind that one is it's my brother-in-law that actually gave that to me.

-Right.

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He just said to me, all he knew about...

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it's French, it's a French person,

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but I don't know anything about it whatsoever.

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And what about the big beast?

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And this one is my grandma's, she'd had this for years.

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It was always up on top of the little dresser that she had and I always admired it,

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-and she said, "One day that will be yours, Karen."

-Gotcha.

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So, in fact, I'm right, you have known these

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-for different lengths of time.

-Different.

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And the reason I say that is that there's a general rule

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that signed glassware is more valuable than unsigned glassware.

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That's a fact. Now this one has the word "Galle" written across here,

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-have you ever heard of Emile Galle?

-Not really, no.

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Emile Galle was one of the greatest glass makers ever in history.

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He's just an absolute... a genius in glass making.

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French, 1900, and this looks exactly like his work, except it's fake.

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-Oh.

-So if it were right, and it really truly was by Galle,

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then it would be worth £500 or £600.

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As it is, it's worth a bit less.

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-This one, on the other hand, has no signature at all.

-No.

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But it's much more interesting than that.

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-How are we doing so far?

-Well, I don't even understand what it is, or where it...

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we thought it could be for a candle, something for a candle.

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I think you're right, I think you're right.

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-This piece at the top is a socket for something.

-Mm.

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So what it is, it probably was a candlestick

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that's missing its sconce.

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It was made in Bohemia, what is now modern Czechoslovakia,

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in about 1860-1870,

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it's concentric layers of glass laid on top of one another,

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cut through, gilded and hand painted.

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-Right.

-And whereas some people might think this is a sort of

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fairly ghastly piece of kitsch - there is that school of thought.

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-Yes.

-Others still like it a lot, particularly in the Middle East,

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where it's very popular and whereas the value of many antiques

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has gone down, this sort of taste has stayed constant.

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-Right.

-So, let's do what they're worth.

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Well, the vase is worth about 20 quid.

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-Oh, right.

-Your wedding ring that I found in it...

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is... Geoffrey Munn tells me worth is about 150,

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-so you can have that back.

-Thank you.

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-The vase is worth £600 to £1,000 at auction.

-Right.

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Thank you, mmm, that surprised me, yes.

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I mean, they look quite like the sort of remnants

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of a watch repairer's stock or something. How did you get them?

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My father-in-law was very interested in clocks and watches

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and it was a hobby of his and he used to go round collecting them

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and try and repair them where he could.

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People would bring him old watches and, you know,

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if he could get them working, he would repair them to give them back.

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Others would just say, "I don't want it".

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So maybe he thought these were beyond repair...

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this is the residue, is it?

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Probably, we found lots of little parts of them as well.

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And any more watches in this envelope or not?

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Um, there's a couple of wrist watches, a few bits and pieces.

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-Do you mind if I just pour them all out?

-No, I don't think...

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If they're like the last lot, there's not anything of great...

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That's about it.

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Um, well, on the whole it's nothing special, really,

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-a lot of stainless steel schoolboy type watches.

-Right.

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-But that sort of suddenly makes it all come alive a bit, doesn't it?

-Yes.

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Typical World War I silver wrist watch.

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Did you know this was in there?

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No, no. Well, I knew there was watches, but I hadn't really looked at them in any detail.

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How do you know it's World War I?

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The dial is the absolute giveaway.

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These large numerals and the hands,

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some dials were left plain but many had luminous paint.

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This one has not got luminous paint.

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-Right.

-And hopefully there'll be a set of hallmarks inside

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so I'll be able to tell you whether it's,

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sort of, 1914, 1918, something like that.

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And, actually, it's rather nicer than that.

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Because there is the word "Rolex"

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and there's "W" and "D", which is the Wilsdorf case,

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and you've got a full set of import marks,

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it's come in through London in 1916.

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-Oh, very old then.

-For a wrist watch it is quite old.

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-Yes.

-It's also signed "Rolex" here, so it's the real thing.

-Wonderful.

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And this is the jewel amongst...

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if I can be so rude to say the rest of the rubbish.

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-Brilliant.

-And you, you never thought that that actually was a good piece on its own?

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Well, it doesn't say "Rolex" does it?

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It doesn't on the dial, no, it doesn't.

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If it said "Rolex" on the dial it would be even better

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but then, of course, you wouldn't have missed it, would you?

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-No, no, absolutely not.

-Now we know what it is, £600 at auction.

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Brilliant, that's wonderful.

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-Are you happier?

-Yeah, that's lovely. Thank you.

-Good.

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Do you know, if my granddad could come back from the dead

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to find that his grandson was paying the best part of twelve shillings for a bottle of water,

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that's 60p to a certain generation,

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he'd want me certified. We just take water for granted though, don't we?

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-We do.

-We really do and you've brought along what has to be

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the most incredible Art Deco water filter that I've ever cast eyes on.

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So are you going to tell me that this was originally in

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The Queen's or The Griffin Hotel here in Leeds and was, you know,

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sort of people were supping that, you know, in the '20's and '30's?

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-Not really.

-No, well where's it been?

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It's been on a farm.

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-In a shed, it's been.

-No, no, it originally started in a farmhouse.

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Me Gran and me Grandad had it in farmhouse

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and it was handed down to me parents and then handed down to us.

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-Right.

-But originally it was on the draining board of this farmhouse

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and me grandparents had two drums, oil drums,

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outside on each side of the door as you're going in, full of rainwater,

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and I think that's what they were doing, purifying the rain water.

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I'm not quite sure about it really.

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Right, well it's remarkable to think that more people died

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through drinking water than they ever did anything else,

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-so small beer was a safer option.

-Yes.

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But I've had a sneaky look underneath this.

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I don't know who made it, all I know is it's the first one I've seen

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and I just love this decoration,

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this wonderful decoration, nice stylish, geometric. What's it worth?

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-How do you value something you've never seen before?

-Don't know.

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Um, well I think, you know, bearing in mind I don't know the maker, there's no mark,

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it's got to be £300 or £400 of somebody's money.

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I'm just trying to work out how many bottles of water that would equate to.

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What I call this is, to me, is a universal friend.

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Oh, I see, a universal friend.

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-What do you call it?

-It thought it was a chaise lounge.

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-Right.

-A little one.

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Yeah, absolutely, it is a little chaise longue, the reason why

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I say that is because it's got an interesting story behind it.

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Well, it was made by my great grandfather for me father

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-but unfortunately he only died about three months after me grandfather was born.

-Really?

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Yes, because in those days they put it on a hand cart,

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they couldn't get it in the back of a wagon and, pushing it round,

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he caught his leg on a rusty nail,

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got gangrene in it and unfortunately he died.

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-Oh, what a sad way...

-Yeah, yeah, sad that, really sad, yeah.

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-In fact, I've got a photo of me grandfather.

-Let's have a look.

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Thank you, and this is the gentleman who made it?

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That's the gentleman who made it, yes, yes.

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So me grandfather sat in it,

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me father sat in it, me brother and meself have sat in it,

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my daughters have sat in it,

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and the grandchildren are sitting in it now, so...

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So that's why I give it the term 'universal friend'.

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-Yeah, because everybody's been...

-Who hasn't sat on it?

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-Even me wife's sat on it, yeah.

-Really?

-Oh, she has, yeah.

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Oh, it's lovely, it's a real treasure as a piece as a whole

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because, you know, to find one in scale is quite unique

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-because you see these miniature pieces and they don't quite work.

-No.

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This, to me, works in every way.

0:16:350:16:37

What date is this... when was it made?

0:16:370:16:40

Well, me granddad were born 1904 so it would be around that,

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you know 1904 or 1903 when me great grandmother were expecting,

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you know, and me grandfather was alive.

0:16:510:16:53

Are you familiar with the wood? Do you know what wood it is?

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Well, it's mahogany it is, yeah.

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-It's actually walnut.

-It's walnut is it? Oh, right.

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Yes, a lot of people would have thought, at first glance, it is mahogany but it's actually walnut.

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Oh, that's bad news because I'm a cabinet maker and I've been one all me life and...

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We all make mistakes.

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I thought it were mahogany.

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No, it's walnut.

0:17:150:17:17

-Um, these are the original castors, these ceramic castors.

-Yeah.

0:17:170:17:22

With little gilt lacquer collars.

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-Obviously the upholstery...

-Oh, it's been reupholstered, we had that done.

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But when you squeeze it, you can hear the horse hair underneath so that's original.

0:17:280:17:33

-Oh, my friends, the old style upholstery.

-Brilliant.

0:17:330:17:35

I mean, all the turnings are individually turned because they're all not exactly the same.

0:17:350:17:40

They're all slightly different, aren't they?

0:17:400:17:42

Yes, I did notice that yeah, every one just a slight variation on a theme.

0:17:420:17:46

-And this incised carving.

-Yeah.

-It's sweet, it's absolutely sweet.

0:17:460:17:49

This is a real collector's piece

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and I would put a value on this between £600 and £800,

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but this would sell very, very quickly

0:17:560:17:59

-because it's just so desirable.

-Yeah, yeah.

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But, please assure me, it will not leave the family.

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Oh, no, it won't leave the family, it won't leave the family.

0:18:040:18:07

Well, this is a magnificent ring, isn't it?

0:18:070:18:10

-Tell me, where did you find it?

-In a field just outside Doncaster.

0:18:100:18:13

-And how did you find it?

-With a metal detector.

0:18:130:18:15

-Ah, and what do you think about him with a metal detector?

-I think it's very interesting.

0:18:150:18:19

-Do you go out with him?

-No, no, no.

-Is it the other woman, really?

-Yes.

0:18:190:18:23

There always is another woman in one way or another, this is the best sort.

0:18:230:18:26

What did you feel like when you found that?

0:18:260:18:29

-It was quite near to the A1.

-Yes.

0:18:290:18:31

And I'd been there a few days prior and the only thing I'd found was a couple of cruddy Roman coins.

0:18:310:18:37

-Cruddy Roman coins! Well, that would satisfy me actually.

-Yeah.

0:18:370:18:41

But you've raised the stakes enormously, haven't you,

0:18:410:18:45

because what you've found is an utterly magnificent

0:18:450:18:48

courtly gold ring with a crystal intaglio on the inside.

0:18:480:18:52

Tell me what you know about it.

0:18:520:18:54

Well, the... it's called the brazen serpent.

0:18:540:18:57

The intaglio on the front is called the brazen... the subject matter of the...

0:18:570:19:01

The subject matter, yes, is called the brazen serpent.

0:19:010:19:04

-Yes.

-And there's the cruciform with the serpent wrapped round it, Moses praying and a corpse at the side.

0:19:040:19:09

-Yes.

-And if you look in the book of Numbers, Chapter 12, verse 8, it tells you all about it.

0:19:090:19:14

And you're so in love with this thing, that you can do it just like that, chapter and verse.

0:19:140:19:18

Well, I'm telling you, if I found this thing, there would be nobody more in love with it than me.

0:19:180:19:23

It presumably dates from about 1580.

0:19:230:19:26

It has been to the Northern European Museum and they said 1500 to 1520.

0:19:260:19:32

Yes, and we know it's a very high status ring because it does have a rock crystal intaglio on the front,

0:19:320:19:37

which would have been coloured at the back and foiled with silver.

0:19:370:19:41

-Yes.

-And it would be a very bright effect.

0:19:410:19:43

Curiously enough, these references to Biblical quotations,

0:19:430:19:46

these rebuses, which is what it is,

0:19:460:19:48

it's a visual interpretation of the Bible,

0:19:480:19:51

are not only what they are at face value,

0:19:510:19:53

but they also have a talismanic significance all of their own.

0:19:530:19:56

The brazen serpent is associated with all things medical.

0:19:560:20:00

-Yes.

-And it may be that the owner of this courtly ring was worried about his health,

0:20:000:20:05

he may even have been a medical practitioner who was using it as a talismanic purposes of his own,

0:20:050:20:10

and as I look at it here,

0:20:100:20:11

I can see that there are traces of black enamel - champleve enamel -

0:20:110:20:15

it's dropped into the surface of the gold and the condition of it is very far from perfect.

0:20:150:20:21

-Yes.

-And, in a funny way, that couldn't matter less to me, I don't really mind at all.

0:20:210:20:26

I can see everything that the goldsmith wanted to tell us.

0:20:260:20:30

I can almost see the owner of this passing over the field where you found it, in some way or another,

0:20:300:20:36

and your joy in finding it is exactly paralleled by his anxiety in losing it,

0:20:360:20:40

so here we have one of your ancestors, one of mine,

0:20:400:20:43

-losing something of very high status indeed, going through all the agonies of that.

-Yes.

0:20:430:20:48

And then, 400 years later, you come along

0:20:480:20:51

and it's immediately paralleled by your excitement and your ecstasy at finding it.

0:20:510:20:57

You can value these, because the only reason that we recognise what they are is through precedent,

0:20:570:21:02

and there are magnificent collections of rings

0:21:020:21:05

in the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum.

0:21:050:21:07

If such a ring was perfect,

0:21:070:21:09

-it would be immensely valuable if it was in mint condition.

-Yes.

0:21:090:21:13

It really would be.

0:21:130:21:14

I mean, £25,000 would not be out of the question for this ring.

0:21:140:21:18

But, life being what it is, the plough has hit it,

0:21:180:21:22

it's been turned over and the intaglio is cracked.

0:21:220:21:26

The shape of it is distorted, the enamel has gone.

0:21:260:21:30

I don't mind a bit and, in this condition,

0:21:300:21:34

perhaps it's worth £4,000, £5,000. Who cares?

0:21:340:21:39

It's got all the magic of something from the English Renaissance

0:21:390:21:42

and I couldn't be more thrilled to see it, thank you very much.

0:21:420:21:46

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:21:460:21:48

-I saw this from a distance and I knew instantly what it was.

-Yes.

0:21:480:21:54

Japanese lacquer, inlaid in ivory,

0:21:540:21:57

showing the scene of a Japanese hero killing a serpent

0:21:570:22:03

and then I got close to it and thought, "Ooooh."

0:22:030:22:08

-It's brilliant.

-You don't regret then, picking on it?

0:22:080:22:12

-No, I don't, I think it's a magical object.

-Yes.

0:22:120:22:16

-Well, we can see what it is from the back.

-Yes.

0:22:160:22:20

-Royal Worcester.

-Yes.

0:22:200:22:21

Printed mark, and the date, 1876.

0:22:210:22:27

-Yes.

-And also the impressed mark as well.

-Yes.

0:22:270:22:33

Now, Worcester was one of only two or three factories

0:22:330:22:39

who satisfactorily, at this date, in the '70s and '80s,

0:22:390:22:46

made copies, or inspired by,

0:22:460:22:49

Japanese lacquer, ivory, wood, you name it.

0:22:490:22:55

They did it brilliantly.

0:22:550:22:57

Perhaps Worcester was the best.

0:22:570:23:00

The wheel is actually a Mon of one of the Samurai

0:23:000:23:05

and that's who this will be, and one can check it up.

0:23:050:23:11

Do you love it?

0:23:110:23:14

Yes. I fell in love with it the first time I saw it.

0:23:140:23:17

-A friend bought it in the '50s, for seven and six, at auction.

-Gosh!

0:23:170:23:21

And, um, this friend of mine said,

0:23:230:23:25

"Right, when I die, you can have that."

0:23:250:23:27

And maybe you were ticking the days off.

0:23:270:23:31

Not quite, not quite.

0:23:310:23:33

Well, a Royal Worcester collector would probably not want it.

0:23:330:23:38

-They like, sort of, peach bloom and little landscapes and stuff.

-Yes.

0:23:380:23:44

Um, the aesthetic movement people would be the ones who would want this

0:23:440:23:50

and I think, because they're into kind of quirky things,

0:23:500:23:55

this would be high up on their shopping list.

0:23:550:23:59

In 35-40 years, I've never seen this particular one.

0:23:590:24:04

I don't suppose they made many of it.

0:24:040:24:06

I think it would make... I'm going to go out on a limb here,

0:24:060:24:10

everybody's going to tell me I'm mad...

0:24:100:24:12

I think that would make between £2,000 and £3,000.

0:24:120:24:17

You've got good taste.

0:24:170:24:19

-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:24:190:24:22

-This has got to be the ultimate gentleman's toy.

-I'm sure.

0:24:220:24:26

From the Edwardian period, but I wonder how gentlemanly you might think it is

0:24:260:24:31

that he's comparing a rather glamorous beautiful looking Edwardian lady with a race horse.

0:24:310:24:37

I don't like it, the idea at all, really.

0:24:370:24:39

But it's a beautiful thing, I must admit.

0:24:390:24:40

It is a beautiful thing, he's favourably comparing this lady

0:24:400:24:43

with a race horse, but he's doing so, none the less.

0:24:430:24:46

On the bottom it says, "Where thoroughbreds meet"

0:24:460:24:49

which presumably refers to a race track where he finds

0:24:490:24:52

the two things he's most interested in...horses and Edwardian ladies.

0:24:520:24:56

-And women, yes.

-If we open it up,

0:24:560:24:58

we can see that it's hallmarked for London 1909,

0:24:580:25:01

which is, of course, the end of the Edwardian era

0:25:010:25:03

and a time where woman are thinking more about getting votes

0:25:030:25:07

and stopping being treated like race horses for a change.

0:25:070:25:10

-Indeed.

-It's 18 carat gold, it's beautifully enamelled on the front

0:25:100:25:15

with a very glamorous Edwardian lady tickling the chin of a race horse.

0:25:150:25:20

-Yes.

-And as you know, presumably, it's a vesta case.

0:25:200:25:24

-Is it?

-For striking matches. Have you always had it?

0:25:240:25:26

No, I believe it was my father's.

0:25:260:25:28

Ah, but he wasn't the first owner, I take it?

0:25:280:25:30

-No, it was given to him by... he forgot who gave it to him actually.

-What a lovely present.

-Mm.

0:25:300:25:35

And you approve of this comparison between ladies and horses?

0:25:350:25:38

Well, not really, no.

0:25:380:25:40

But I still think it's a beautiful thing.

0:25:400:25:42

It's a beautiful, beautiful thing.

0:25:420:25:44

-Vesta cases are extremely well covered as a collector's area.

-Yeah.

0:25:440:25:48

And this is a very rare vesta case.

0:25:480:25:50

As a consequence, good rare vesta cases tend to attract an awful lot of interest.

0:25:500:25:54

-Right.

-I think you'd be very hard pressed

0:25:540:25:57

-to go and buy this for less than about £3,000.

-Wow!

0:25:570:26:00

I think this is an astonishing image, because here is Ghandi,

0:26:020:26:06

as far as I can see, not only photographed

0:26:060:26:08

but I imagine actually in Britain and in the North of England.

0:26:080:26:12

How does this come about?

0:26:120:26:14

These are my two grandparents, Percy Davis and Kathleen

0:26:140:26:18

and my grandfather owned three cotton mills

0:26:180:26:21

and in 1931 he knew that Ghandi was going to come over to England

0:26:210:26:25

and he wanted to invite Ghandi to come up to the cotton mills

0:26:250:26:29

and look at the effects of the boycott the Indian Government

0:26:290:26:33

was putting on the Lancashire cotton mills,

0:26:330:26:36

look at the effect on the workers. It was causing unemployment.

0:26:360:26:40

-Right, well let's go back a bit.

-And hardship.

0:26:400:26:42

The British textile industry was very dependent upon the Indian trade since the Victorian period.

0:26:420:26:48

We...one of the purposes of Empire was to have a market for our goods,

0:26:480:26:53

-a guaranteed market, and we sold textiles to India steadily through the 19th century.

-Yes.

0:26:530:27:00

But also, of course, in the fervour that built up towards independence,

0:27:000:27:05

which was very strong in the 1930s, there was essentially - as you say -

0:27:050:27:10

a boycott about not importing or not buying British goods,

0:27:100:27:14

so it was very much a politically driven event.

0:27:140:27:17

-Yes.

-Which Ghandi, of course, was absolutely at the head of.

-Yes.

0:27:170:27:21

Um, non violence and all that,

0:27:210:27:23

but trade wars as aggressive as you like,

0:27:230:27:26

and so I think it was very brave

0:27:260:27:28

of your grandparents to get him involved,

0:27:280:27:32

but he agreed, he came up here.

0:27:320:27:34

Yeah, I think the whole visit was arranged by this particular man here.

0:27:340:27:38

-Yeah.

-And so he came to stay in my grandparents' house.

0:27:380:27:41

-So he stayed there?

-Yeah, he slept in my father's bedroom,

0:27:410:27:44

and my father was away at school actually,

0:27:440:27:47

-but my uncle was there at the time.

-So that's your grandmother again.

0:27:470:27:50

-Yeah, that's right.

-Is that at their house?

0:27:500:27:53

-Yeah and that's my uncle there, Uncle Ron.

-Right.

0:27:530:27:55

The other one, I mean, I like very much this picture

0:27:550:27:58

because, of course, this is about the change of idea.

0:27:580:28:01

Here is Ghandi meeting mill workers' families.

0:28:010:28:05

-Mm, that's right.

-And he could see the problems,

0:28:050:28:07

the hardships that his policy was causing,

0:28:070:28:10

and I think this is a very important change of direction because,

0:28:100:28:14

I mean, he went back and he changed it, didn't he?

0:28:140:28:16

I gather it changed a couple of years later or so, I'm not sure.

0:28:160:28:20

Yes, I mean he didn't drop the boycott completely.

0:28:200:28:23

But he realised that you couldn't generate, sort of, world peace

0:28:230:28:26

by putting people out of work.

0:28:260:28:28

Yeah. I think he was very sympathetic to the workers

0:28:280:28:31

but he did say that his workers were affected far more,

0:28:310:28:34

far more people affected in India than they were in Lancashire.

0:28:340:28:38

-I think it's true, but he still took this on board.

-Yeah.

-Now what's this?

0:28:380:28:41

That's the letter from Ghandi.

0:28:410:28:43

-God, it's a letter, signed "Ghandi".

-Yes, signed by Ghandi.

0:28:430:28:45

That's a wonderful thing, so this is after he's stayed.

0:28:450:28:48

"I have delayed too long in thanking you and your husband

0:28:480:28:51

"for your wonderful kindness to me and all my party when you received

0:28:510:28:54

"as guests in your beautiful farmhouse last Saturday and Sunday."

0:28:540:28:58

-So he stayed for the weekend.

-Yeah.

0:28:580:29:00

"I shall not forget the peace and beauty of that Sabbath

0:29:000:29:02

"and I deeply hope that its results may lead to permanent goodwill and friendship."

0:29:020:29:07

-He's saying it all, isn't he?

-Yeah.

0:29:070:29:09

He's sorted this out, negotiated a peaceful development to both advantages.

0:29:090:29:14

-I think it's, it's a wonderful vision on a bit of history.

-Yeah.

0:29:140:29:18

And I think your grandparents were obviously also very good politicians.

0:29:180:29:22

They were Socialists, yeah.

0:29:220:29:24

-Yeah, but they were battling for the Socialist principles which he, Ghandi, could share.

-Yeah.

0:29:240:29:29

I think it's a great story. Have you got tons of other stuff?

0:29:290:29:33

-I've got quite...

-I've got a lot of other stuff.

-A basement full.

0:29:330:29:36

-Really? Yeah. A big story.

-Big chest full.

0:29:360:29:39

Well, the little bit I've seen here, as a vision of history,

0:29:390:29:42

I think is probably, to a collector, worth, oh, you know, £5,000.

0:29:420:29:48

-You know, in Indian history this is important.

-Yeah.

0:29:480:29:52

-Indians are great collectors.

-Yeah.

-They would all buy this back now.

0:29:520:29:56

-Really?

-It's their history as well as our history.

0:29:560:29:59

Yeah, that's interesting.

0:29:590:30:00

So it has a great future as a great story.

0:30:000:30:02

I understand this is a relic from the BBC's past so, Geoff, tell me about it.

0:30:060:30:11

Well, um, in about the late '70s

0:30:110:30:13

I was doing sound effects for the local drama group

0:30:130:30:17

and I needed something to switch things and amplify things on stage

0:30:170:30:22

so I came across this in a local warehouse in Leeds

0:30:220:30:26

and it turns out it's a BBC outside broadcast unit from the '50s.

0:30:260:30:31

I don't even know where to begin...

0:30:310:30:32

-so you've got a light, is this a cue light?

-That's your cue light, yes.

0:30:320:30:36

OK, that I am familiar with.

0:30:360:30:37

So I can switch that on and off from here, from the control panel

0:30:370:30:41

and you'd have somebody stood in front of the microphone

0:30:410:30:44

on tenterhooks waiting to speak and you say,

0:30:440:30:46

"When the red light goes out, you can start," you see.

0:30:460:30:49

Oh, I see, what I'm used to is when the red light goes on.

0:30:490:30:52

-And then it's recorded on here?

-Yeah.

0:30:520:30:54

Now, so what kind of things did they used to say into this, into this kind of kit?

0:30:540:30:58

Well, I mean, I've been told that this is actually 1950 onwards

0:30:580:31:03

so they wouldn't have done war time broadcasts, but you can imagine,

0:31:030:31:06

"Boom, boom, boom, boom... this is London calling."

0:31:060:31:09

Everyone's nodding behind you here, yeah.

0:31:090:31:12

Everybody...a load of people here remember it

0:31:120:31:15

but I've got a couple of little scripts here which I've prepared

0:31:150:31:18

and these are actual, these are actual broadcasts.

0:31:180:31:21

-OK.

-Which Alvar Liddell did during the war.

0:31:210:31:23

Oh, I've got to have a go. Right, shall we have a go?

0:31:230:31:26

What do you think? All right, into this.

0:31:260:31:28

Are you ready, so when the red light goes out...

0:31:280:31:30

-Will you record it?

-I'll get recording, OK?

0:31:300:31:33

Here is the news and this is Fiona Bruce reading it.

0:31:330:31:36

"The three fighting services have carried out another small night raid, details are not yet available.

0:31:360:31:42

"Our bombers have attacked aerodromes in the Low Countries

0:31:420:31:45

"and again mined enemy waters." What do you think?

0:31:450:31:47

-Very good.

-Oh, you're just saying that. Can we hear it back?

0:31:470:31:53

I think you probably can, yes.

0:31:530:31:55

'Here is the news and this is Fiona Bruce reading it.

0:31:560:31:59

'The three fighting services have carried out another small night raid...'

0:31:590:32:03

I don't think that's posh enough for then.

0:32:030:32:06

No, no, you're not quite right for BBC sound radio.

0:32:060:32:09

I'm going to need elocution lessons.

0:32:090:32:11

I have heard they're setting up a new service called the television service.

0:32:110:32:14

Right, I might give that a go.

0:32:140:32:16

Seek out a new career,

0:32:160:32:18

Geoff, thanks very much.

0:32:180:32:20

It was on an internet site.

0:32:230:32:24

I were after a garden statue, I'd just finished the back garden,

0:32:240:32:28

I put a bid in on it and I left it for three days,

0:32:280:32:31

and three days later I found out I'd won it.

0:32:310:32:34

So I had to go and collect it in Barnsley.

0:32:340:32:36

-So how much did you pay for it?

-£20.

0:32:360:32:40

-Right, OK.

-It was starting bid.

0:32:400:32:42

And a lot of hard work carrying.

0:32:420:32:44

Well, I'm staggered that you can buy something like this for £20.

0:32:440:32:48

Did you know how big it was when you, when you bid for it?

0:32:480:32:51

They did give a description of the length and the size, but I thought it were an exaggeration.

0:32:510:32:56

-OK.

-They said it were over five foot.

0:32:560:32:58

Well, five foot and five ton I think because it's just taken eight burly fellas to bring this in today.

0:32:580:33:04

-Yeah, sure.

-So is this, is this something that he came home with

0:33:040:33:08

and you said, "What have you done?"

0:33:080:33:11

I said, "Will it fit in t' attic?".

0:33:110:33:13

-In t'attic?

-In t'attic, yeah, cos I didn't know how heavy it was.

0:33:130:33:17

And then he wanted to put it on t'dining room table

0:33:170:33:20

but, I mean, I said,

0:33:200:33:21

"What happens at Christmas, then? We won't be able to eat us dinner."

0:33:210:33:25

Can we have a look at it? Because, you know, from a distance

0:33:250:33:28

when I saw this, I thought, "Oh, what a great bronze,"

0:33:280:33:30

because it looks, to all intents and purposes like bronze,

0:33:300:33:35

and to be honest with you, I was thinking big names

0:33:350:33:38

and thinking maybe it's Bugatti, maybe it's Rembrandt Bugatti,

0:33:380:33:42

the great sculptor from, you know, the early 1900s,

0:33:420:33:46

but it's from a little bit further south, isn't it?

0:33:460:33:49

I think it's Africa.

0:33:490:33:51

Well, I think you know more about it than I do, in that department.

0:33:510:33:55

I have looked it a little bit and I've looked at this R Josamu

0:33:550:33:58

and I'm not sure if it's spelt like that, I think it's Josiramu.

0:33:580:34:02

I think it's Robert Josiramu.

0:34:020:34:04

-Whoever this man is, he's very, very clever.

-I think he's a genius.

0:34:040:34:08

I, well, I'll go with the flow on that one,

0:34:080:34:10

but I'm assuming that this has been carved in the last 20-30 years.

0:34:100:34:14

I don't think it's of any... not of any great age.

0:34:140:34:17

Yeah, I know it's not an antique, I do appreciate that.

0:34:170:34:20

No. Normally when you see African carvings, they're normally...

0:34:200:34:24

-first of all they're in like soapstone or steatite.

-Right.

0:34:240:34:27

And this one is in serpentine,

0:34:270:34:29

but let's have a look at the composition.

0:34:290:34:32

-Right.

-Because first of all it is, literally, a herd of elephants.

0:34:320:34:36

And, you see, when I look at this,

0:34:360:34:39

I can only marvel at this man's ingenuity,

0:34:390:34:42

because this chap's looked at a block of stone

0:34:420:34:45

and he's seen it for what it is,

0:34:450:34:47

because I love the way he's textured it.

0:34:470:34:50

-Exactly.

-You do get that lovely leathery...and those ears!

0:34:500:34:53

I know, it's stunning, isn't it?

0:34:530:34:55

They're just stunning and they've been polished.

0:34:550:34:58

What are you going to do with it?

0:34:580:34:59

You're keeping it where at the moment?

0:34:590:35:02

Well, it was actually intended to go at side of pond in t'garden

0:35:020:35:05

and now I've seen what it is, I got in touch with Leeds City Museum

0:35:050:35:08

-and they're doing an anthropology display or study and it's lasting five years.

-Yes.

0:35:080:35:13

So I've asked them if they want it.

0:35:130:35:15

-It should be touched.

-Yeah, I've been doing it ever since it arrived.

0:35:150:35:18

I don't want this locked up in my house.

0:35:180:35:20

I want 1,000, 10,000 people to come and touch it.

0:35:200:35:23

I want them to touch it like my grandchildren do.

0:35:230:35:25

-I don't mind them sitting on it.

-Hang on, hang on.

0:35:250:35:28

At moment it's on t'floor behind the dining room table

0:35:280:35:32

so you can't see...

0:35:320:35:33

you've actually to walk in to look at it, so it's wasted.

0:35:330:35:37

I honestly believe that if I went, you know, into the right gallery,

0:35:370:35:42

I wouldn't be surprised to see a price tag, not of £800,

0:35:420:35:45

I wouldn't be surprised to see a price tag of nearer £5,000 on something like this.

0:35:450:35:50

So I don't know if that's colouring your vision and your...

0:35:500:35:53

because I think it's a very noble...

0:35:530:35:55

-I don't care what it's worth.

-You don't?

0:35:550:35:58

I'll do my best to get it over to that gallery.

0:35:580:36:00

I'm going over to see them this afternoon.

0:36:000:36:02

Do you know, I'm a really nosy person,

0:36:020:36:05

I'm also one of those unprincipled people

0:36:050:36:07

who read other people's diaries.

0:36:070:36:09

-And I guess you are as well.

-Yes, definitely.

0:36:090:36:12

So this is a diary, tell me about whose diary it was

0:36:120:36:15

and whose private business you have been nosing into.

0:36:150:36:18

Well, this is a Mr George Needle

0:36:180:36:21

and he was my father's great, great, great grandfather

0:36:210:36:26

and he was a stage coach driver for the Royal Mail.

0:36:260:36:31

Oh, right. So he's really sort of recording the end of an era.

0:36:310:36:35

He is, definitely, history in the making, what he's done.

0:36:350:36:38

Just at the time when these mail coaches were starting to really

0:36:380:36:42

go away from the scene and trains and things were starting to come in.

0:36:420:36:46

-Yes.

-So it's a real look at Queen Victoria's England, isn't it?

0:36:460:36:50

Now, we've got a couple of pistols here as well, what's the connection to the diary?

0:36:500:36:55

The pistols is what...obviously, he took passengers on the coach

0:36:550:37:00

and obviously the mail as well,

0:37:000:37:03

but for protection from the highwaymen and that,

0:37:030:37:07

he would give the little gun to the ladies, sitting in the back,

0:37:070:37:11

for protection, and obviously he would use it, or his guard.

0:37:110:37:15

I think that's very interesting, and there's a reference in the diary,

0:37:150:37:19

isn't there, to pistols being cleaned at Lancaster.

0:37:190:37:22

Yes, he's actually stated that he had to clean...

0:37:220:37:25

-Now I think that the pistols that were cleaned at Lancaster were not these two pistols.

-Don't you think?

0:37:250:37:30

Because the Mail would be issued with its own pistols

0:37:300:37:33

and they would be much bigger and much more effective than these two.

0:37:330:37:38

This one here is a cheap little Birmingham pocket pistol that,

0:37:380:37:42

when it was made, if you'd have paid five shillings for it,

0:37:420:37:45

it would have been probably about right, so really very cheap.

0:37:450:37:49

-Perfectly effective, one shot.

-Yes.

0:37:490:37:51

But not really the thing that you would want to guard a mail coach with.

0:37:510:37:56

-No.

-The other one's a bit more interesting because if you've

0:37:560:38:00

only got one go with that, then you've got six with this one

0:38:000:38:03

and it's an early type of revolver that we call a pepper box

0:38:030:38:08

and it differs from a true revolver because the barrels

0:38:080:38:12

are all put together in a group

0:38:120:38:15

rather than having a rotating cylinder

0:38:150:38:18

that shoots through a single barrel.

0:38:180:38:21

But this is known as a Cooper type pepperbox

0:38:210:38:24

and it will have been made in Birmingham

0:38:240:38:26

in about the sort of 1840s, 1850s.

0:38:260:38:29

Value, with these two nice associated pistols,

0:38:290:38:32

probably about £500 the lot,

0:38:320:38:35

but I think it's worth so much more than that

0:38:350:38:37

because you're listening to somebody who's saying,

0:38:370:38:40

who's telling you about his...

0:38:400:38:41

well, he probably thought it was a very ordinary life,

0:38:410:38:44

but I think that's what makes it an absolutely extraordinary piece.

0:38:440:38:48

-Thanks for bringing it.

-Thank you.

0:38:480:38:51

For about seven years I was out of work, due to medical reasons,

0:38:510:38:56

and in order to do something productive,

0:38:560:38:59

I volunteered in a charity shop

0:38:590:39:02

but eventually, you know, my long term aspirations are to work

0:39:020:39:07

and so I identified this as a potential way

0:39:070:39:10

of working my way off Benefit.

0:39:100:39:12

I've always been fascinated by glass and so these are the pieces which I've amassed, or some of them.

0:39:120:39:18

OK, so you're asking for my opinion as to whether you've got the eye, basically?

0:39:180:39:23

Absolutely, really, yes, yes.

0:39:230:39:25

So what sort of money are you paying for these things?

0:39:250:39:28

Ranges from some which are a bit more expensive, in the £10 range

0:39:280:39:34

and some which are a bit cheaper, in the £2 range.

0:39:340:39:38

OK. Well, I've arranged these very specifically into the league divisions.

0:39:380:39:46

The premiership is actually empty, there is nothing...

0:39:460:39:49

-if there were another rail, the premiership would be here.

-Right.

0:39:490:39:53

-But you have no premiership.

-Right.

0:39:530:39:54

You have first division, second division and third division.

0:39:540:40:00

-Right.

-So your stuff with limited commercial value is here and your best things are here.

0:40:000:40:06

-Right.

-So where are you finding this stuff?

0:40:060:40:09

Um, mostly in charity shops, boot sales occasionally

0:40:090:40:13

and then the odd piece I've been quite adventurous with

0:40:130:40:17

and got in an antique shop.

0:40:170:40:19

-How much was that?

-£20.

0:40:190:40:20

Well, that's a nice piece of Murano, Sommerso,

0:40:200:40:24

and that's a nice thing,

0:40:240:40:25

I mean, it's not up on this top shelf by accident.

0:40:250:40:28

My personal favourites here,

0:40:280:40:30

you've got a nice Perthshire paperweight here, that's 40 quidder,

0:40:300:40:34

so how much did you pay for that?

0:40:340:40:36

Um, £2.

0:40:360:40:38

You know, so you know that's where you've got to be concentrating.

0:40:380:40:41

My favourite things here are these little candlesticks

0:40:410:40:44

-by Erik Hoglund, he's a Swede.

-Hoglund.

0:40:440:40:47

Hoglund, it's a signed piece,

0:40:470:40:49

made by Boda, really attractive very zappy, they're £100 the pair.

0:40:490:40:53

-How much did you pay for them?

-£2 the pair.

-Learn!

0:40:530:40:57

You're getting there, you know, if you can concentrate, look at this,

0:40:570:41:01

this is a really nice quality piece of Murano glass,

0:41:010:41:05

very nicely made, quality is what...

0:41:050:41:07

that's look, this is quality.

0:41:070:41:09

Look at how all these concentric lines

0:41:090:41:11

are all fitted in there by trails.

0:41:110:41:13

-That's a nice piece, how much did you pay for it?

-£15 that.

0:41:130:41:17

Yeah you're getting a little, little toppy for something that's worth £40,

0:41:170:41:20

so you just get your prices down.

0:41:200:41:22

This is very nice antique glass, these are look pieces,

0:41:220:41:25

this is a nice antique, I mean you're getting there, you know,

0:41:250:41:28

but you've got to move up.

0:41:280:41:30

But I'm behind you, you know, so learn, that's what you've got to do,

0:41:300:41:34

but I think you've got, you concentrate uphill on this stuff

0:41:340:41:37

and I think you can do it.

0:41:370:41:38

-Thank you.

-Be courageous.

0:41:380:41:39

I'm hugely grateful for your input, thank you very much indeed.

0:41:390:41:42

You're most welcome. Good luck.

0:41:420:41:44

So, yours or a family piece or how did you get it?

0:41:470:41:50

Well, it comes from my grandfather

0:41:500:41:52

and he had a big collection of clocks and watches

0:41:520:41:55

and when he died he left them to different members of the family.

0:41:550:42:00

So do you know anything about it at all?

0:42:000:42:02

I know it's got this chime on it that chimes three times, I think,

0:42:020:42:05

with the quarter of an hour, I used to play with that when I was a child.

0:42:050:42:08

-OK, it's very typically French looking.

-Right.

0:42:080:42:12

-Typical miniature carriage time piece.

-Uh-huh.

0:42:120:42:16

And look at this lovely dial, isn't that so pretty?

0:42:160:42:18

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

-Sort of mauve translucent enamel.

-Yeah.

0:42:180:42:22

-Lovely filigree hands and lovely bands of little gilt decoration there, absolutely charming.

-Yes.

0:42:220:42:27

But the give away, as you said,

0:42:270:42:29

that it's a repeater, is the knob on the top,

0:42:290:42:32

-and that's presumably what you played with as a youngster.

-Yes.

0:42:320:42:36

Well, the other give away, of course, is we can see the two gongs

0:42:360:42:41

and I'm going to press the button now

0:42:410:42:44

and you should see and hear it all.

0:42:440:42:46

BELL CHIMES

0:42:460:42:49

So, as you see, it did the hours and then the ding-dong for each quarter.

0:42:560:43:01

You have to imagine 100 and odd years ago when people travelled,

0:43:010:43:06

particularly to house parties,

0:43:060:43:08

there were very very few houses with gas or electric light,

0:43:080:43:12

so you could have had this on your bedside

0:43:120:43:15

and if you wanted to know the time in the dead of night,

0:43:150:43:18

-you could just have leaned out and pressed that, and it always repeats to the preceding quarter.

-Right.

0:43:180:43:25

So even at one minute to 11,

0:43:250:43:27

-it will still do what it did then, which is 10:45.

-Wow! Great.

0:43:270:43:32

I love it, if that came on the market now, at auction.

0:43:320:43:37

-Uh-huh.

-About £3,000.

0:43:370:43:40

Wow! I was expecting you'd say a couple of hundred.

0:43:400:43:43

Listen, if I saw it in a shop for a couple of hundred, I'd be a happy boy.

0:43:430:43:47

Seeing two little boxes like this is a really great pleasure. Where did you get them from?

0:43:500:43:54

Well, they've come down through the generations of my mother's family

0:43:540:43:58

and I can remember seeing them as a child at my grandparents' house.

0:43:580:44:01

We know nothing about the date they were purchased prior,

0:44:010:44:05

so there's no provenance, no letters or receipts.

0:44:050:44:08

They just suddenly appeared. They were there.

0:44:080:44:11

As a small child they were in my grandparents' sitting room, one each side of the sideboard.

0:44:110:44:16

And could you remember them ever using them?

0:44:160:44:19

No, they were just there for show.

0:44:190:44:20

-Oh, I see, so they're like trophies.

-That's right, yes.

0:44:200:44:25

-What I find very interesting is the tops of them.

-Yes.

0:44:250:44:28

-Um, these little prints.

-Yes.

0:44:280:44:30

They're after an Irish illustrator, Adam Buck,

0:44:300:44:34

-and there are people who collect Adam Buck prints.

-Yes.

0:44:340:44:39

And when you see these little prints,

0:44:390:44:41

they will, they're a real collector's dream.

0:44:410:44:43

Oh, are they? That's interesting.

0:44:430:44:45

-They're lovely. Do you know what wood they're made out of?

-No.

0:44:450:44:48

-Is it walnut?

-It's actually burr yew.

-Burr yew, oh.

-Oh, really?

0:44:480:44:52

I can see where you're coming from with walnut,

0:44:520:44:55

-because it's like that, burry.

-Yes.

-But it's yew wood.

0:44:550:44:59

These are Regency.

0:44:590:45:00

-Yes.

-They're made about 1810.

-Yes.

0:45:000:45:03

1810-1815.

0:45:030:45:05

-Right.

-Would you open that one for me, please, sir?

0:45:050:45:08

Aren't they delightful? They are absolutely exquisite,

0:45:080:45:12

-this is fantastic, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:45:120:45:14

Whether this is the original... do we know?

0:45:140:45:17

I think it is because I know that they did tapestries as well

0:45:170:45:20

so it probably is original, yes.

0:45:200:45:22

-Right, because there would have been lots of little spoils of silks in here.

-Yes.

0:45:220:45:26

-And no doubt over the years they've...

-They've used.

0:45:260:45:29

-They've been used or they've just rotted away.

-That's right, yes.

0:45:290:45:34

-Very, very pretty, so nice to see the tray full.

-Yes.

0:45:340:45:37

And, yeah, on both of them, both of them, very, very pretty.

0:45:370:45:41

That's superb, thank you, thank you.

0:45:410:45:44

Wonderful little gilt mounts,

0:45:440:45:46

little lion paw feet, as I say, Regency.

0:45:460:45:50

Now the 64,000 question... what are they worth?

0:45:500:45:54

In today's market, which is rather volatile,

0:45:540:45:58

I would say these are worth between £3,000 and £5,000.

0:45:580:46:03

In all the years I've been in the business,

0:46:030:46:06

I haven't seen a pair like this before.

0:46:060:46:08

I would call them a matched pair, because they're not mirror image,

0:46:080:46:12

but they must be extremely rare and I think they're,

0:46:120:46:14

I think they're wonderful, they're wonderful things.

0:46:140:46:17

Thank you. We're very proud to own them, yes, thank you.

0:46:170:46:20

I don't think I've ever seen a sadder looking ivory

0:46:220:46:25

but there's something quite sort of charming about it.

0:46:250:46:28

That's right, I've always been very fond of it.

0:46:280:46:30

It was from my grandparents.

0:46:300:46:32

My grandfather was a painter/decorator in Bradford

0:46:320:46:35

and he was, from what we understand he was paid with the ivory,

0:46:350:46:39

probably in the 1920s or 1930s

0:46:390:46:41

but we don't know any more of the story than that.

0:46:410:46:44

That's the story that's been handed down in the family.

0:46:440:46:47

-And do you like him?

-I love him, I think he's lovely

0:46:470:46:50

and it's also a connection to the fact

0:46:500:46:52

he was always there in my grandparents house.

0:46:520:46:55

-And you remember it as a child?

-Yes, that's right.

0:46:550:46:58

It's Dieppe ivory which is French Normandy coast

0:46:580:47:00

and that is really the centre for carved ivory figures like this.

0:47:000:47:05

But it's such an unusual carved figure,

0:47:050:47:08

being a tramp or a sort of vagabond,

0:47:080:47:10

but the detail on it is really quite stunning.

0:47:100:47:13

I mean, with Dieppe ivories,

0:47:130:47:15

they imported the ivory from West Africa

0:47:150:47:17

and it was the centre of carved ivory making

0:47:170:47:20

since the sort of 16th century,

0:47:200:47:21

but in the late 19th century there was a huge demand

0:47:210:47:24

for these sorts of things, but this is such an unusual piece.

0:47:240:47:28

The quality... I mean, even to have the back carved like that,

0:47:280:47:32

the way his jacket is torn,

0:47:320:47:33

the quality is really mind-blowing actually.

0:47:330:47:37

And the detail on the carving,

0:47:370:47:38

I mean, you can see there the sad expression on his face

0:47:380:47:41

and the way he's got his hands tucked underneath his shirt

0:47:410:47:44

and it's just so beautifully carved.

0:47:440:47:46

I mean, the skill, and all of this was carved with drills and then polished off and chiselled by hand.

0:47:460:47:51

So the amount of hours in this piece is staggering really.

0:47:510:47:55

So the value I'd have thought

0:47:550:47:56

would be comfortably sort of £600 to £800,

0:47:560:47:59

-which is what it would fetch today at auction.

-Right, gosh, yes.

0:47:590:48:02

He's just such a charming little thing.

0:48:020:48:04

Is that sort of what you had in mind with the bill?

0:48:040:48:07

No, I had no idea at all. It's just always been there and just today

0:48:070:48:11

I was coming along and I thought I'd pop it in my back and see what,

0:48:110:48:14

if I could find anything more out about it.

0:48:140:48:17

Well, it's small but it's beautifully printed

0:48:170:48:21

-and it has its driver and I love it.

-Yes.

-What made you bring it in?

0:48:210:48:27

It was a last minute spur of the moment thing, brought something else

0:48:270:48:31

-and I thought maybe I'll take the car as well.

-Very good so...

0:48:310:48:34

Because it has the provenance so that makes it more interesting.

0:48:340:48:38

She has, "It has the provenance", she says, indicating a scrap of paper. What is that scrap of paper?

0:48:380:48:43

-This was a gift to my late husband's uncle.

-Right.

0:48:430:48:49

His sister gave it to him on his 21st birthday

0:48:490:48:52

and that sister was my late husband's mother, my mother-in-law.

0:48:520:48:57

I'm still with you, but only just.

0:48:570:48:59

What date was the birthday?

0:48:590:49:01

-July 10th 1925, his 21st.

-And what does this say?

-This says,

0:49:010:49:05

"Many Happy Returns for your 21st. For I've the key of the door, lads,

0:49:050:49:10

I've the key of the door, I've never been 21 before, tra, la, la, la, la."

0:49:100:49:15

-Excellent.

-"I am paying the chauffeur 12 months wages in advance,

0:49:150:49:23

"I have also filled her up with petrol and oil so that she won't cough.

0:49:230:49:29

"I enclose a half pence,"

0:49:290:49:31

-I would have thought she would have put "a halfpenny" in those days.

-Yes.

0:49:310:49:35

But, however, "So that you can get a drink on your travels,

0:49:350:49:39

"your loving sister, Kathleen. Good bye." In inverted commas.

0:49:390:49:43

-That's so great.

-Isn't that lovely?

0:49:430:49:45

So the car and the chauffeur with twelve month exploring,

0:49:450:49:49

exploring the highways and byways of Britain in this.

0:49:490:49:52

-Well, the car itself is a little German car but I think you knew that.

-Yes, yes.

0:49:520:49:57

-Because it actually does say.

-It does actually say, yes.

0:49:570:50:00

-"Made in Germany" on it. And it's what's known as a "penny toy".

-Uh-huh.

0:50:000:50:03

Originally these little toys may have been sold for a penny

0:50:030:50:06

but actually I think this is a bit too sophisticated to be a proper penny toy.

0:50:060:50:11

It could have been made by one of several manufacturers.

0:50:110:50:13

The best known is a company called Mayer,

0:50:130:50:15

and even though it's a tiny toy,

0:50:150:50:17

these penny toys are very desirable these days

0:50:170:50:20

and I wouldn't see any question that that would get in excess of £200

0:50:200:50:24

-if it ever came to auction.

-Goodness me.

0:50:240:50:26

It's an absolute cracker.

0:50:260:50:28

Thank you very much, that's really lovely and very interesting.

0:50:280:50:32

I'm looking at your leaf dish to try and work out sort of what the design shows.

0:50:320:50:35

It's sort of a bit smudged, isn't it?

0:50:350:50:38

There's a Chinese fence with rock work and this is bamboo

0:50:380:50:43

and then here we've got a rather curious sort of Buddhist emblem.

0:50:430:50:49

A Buddhist emblem tied in ribbons.

0:50:490:50:51

Have you thought about the design?

0:50:510:50:53

Not really, I just like blue and white.

0:50:530:50:56

Right, so are you a collector?

0:50:560:50:57

More of a magpie. I just see things and if I like them and I can afford them, I buy them.

0:50:570:51:02

-So where did you get this one from?

-At the local second hand market.

0:51:020:51:05

-Oh, right, recently?

-Around six months to a year ago.

0:51:050:51:08

-OK, what did it cost you, can I ask?

-£35.

-Right.

0:51:080:51:13

Where do you think it was made?

0:51:130:51:15

The design's Oriental but I think it's English.

0:51:150:51:20

That's right because there you've got a Chinese scroll

0:51:200:51:23

-rolled out there.

-Ah.

0:51:230:51:25

But the shape isn't Chinese at all.

0:51:250:51:28

Curiously, the Chinese were not very good at moulding,

0:51:280:51:31

and this is beautifully moulded.

0:51:310:51:32

There you've got... it's a leaf, isn't it?

0:51:320:51:35

You've got an entire vine leaf has been rolled out into the clay and the mould's made from that,

0:51:350:51:40

that's a real leaf, so all the little veins there are...

0:51:400:51:44

-there's a lot of detail.

-Yes.

0:51:440:51:46

Um, it's terribly hard to paint on,

0:51:460:51:48

so no wonder it's blurred a little bit.

0:51:480:51:51

But it's a copy of the Chinese, any clues? Let's have a look.

0:51:510:51:56

Oh, there's a little mark there,

0:51:560:51:58

is that a Chinese symbol?

0:51:580:52:01

Oh, it's trying to be but that's a workman's mark, a little "tf",

0:52:010:52:05

and that mark is the type of thing used early at Worcester.

0:52:050:52:09

-Ah.

-I'm getting quite excited seeing that, because looking at this glaze,

0:52:090:52:14

it's not the hard whiteness of Chinese,

0:52:140:52:16

it's a slightly creamy-bluey feel of Worcester

0:52:160:52:19

and slightly misshapen, slightly primitive,

0:52:190:52:22

and this is really quite early, right at the beginning

0:52:220:52:25

of the factory when they were copying two things.

0:52:250:52:28

They were copying the Chinese,

0:52:280:52:29

which is the design straight out of a Chinese dish,

0:52:290:52:33

and they were copying Meissen

0:52:330:52:34

the great German porcelain from Dresden, from Meissen,

0:52:340:52:38

and they specialised in leaf and plant shapes

0:52:380:52:41

and the idea of a leaf dish is something straight out of Meissen.

0:52:410:52:45

-And Worcester have copied that here in about 1754-55.

-So early?

0:52:450:52:51

That's very early.

0:52:510:52:54

-So you've done quite well, haven't you?

-Have I?

0:52:540:52:57

-Have you any idea what you think it might be worth?

-I've no idea.

0:52:570:53:01

It's in such wonderful condition, it's so rare,

0:53:010:53:06

-I mean, it's going to be, ooh, £3,500.

-No!

0:53:060:53:10

Really?

0:53:100:53:12

Really?

0:53:120:53:14

-Ooh, thank you very much.

-It's fantastic.

0:53:150:53:19

SHE LAUGHS

0:53:190:53:21

Do you know there's something slightly unsettling about this doll asleep in this case.

0:53:220:53:29

Tell me her story.

0:53:290:53:31

It was passed to my mother

0:53:310:53:34

and it was a relative, a child,

0:53:340:53:37

and I don't know whether it was a cousin, or some other relative,

0:53:370:53:43

but the little girl who owned it had been ill

0:53:430:53:47

and the doll just laid on the bed for a few days

0:53:470:53:51

and she died, did the little girl.

0:53:510:53:54

Shortly after she died,

0:53:540:53:56

the doll and all these little bits were put in this case and it was sealed,

0:53:560:54:03

and then my mother got the doll

0:54:030:54:06

and, of course, it was... I've known it all my life

0:54:060:54:10

there and I've never really taken much notice of it.

0:54:100:54:14

But today

0:54:140:54:16

as it's been opened for the first time.

0:54:160:54:19

So this is the very first time.

0:54:190:54:21

-Yes.

-In 100 years.

0:54:210:54:24

That that doll has been opened.

0:54:240:54:26

And it's the first time I've touched it.

0:54:260:54:29

To see her laid there asleep,

0:54:290:54:32

it's very emotional for me, very emotional.

0:54:320:54:36

And you've known this doll all your life?

0:54:360:54:39

Yes, she's...well, yes, as long as I can remember

0:54:390:54:42

but she's been in my possession for more than 30 years now

0:54:420:54:45

because she's been passed down to me from my mum.

0:54:450:54:48

So when I got married, I took her to my new home.

0:54:480:54:51

And that's just an amazing thing.

0:54:510:54:53

Here is this doll with this tragic story of the little girl

0:54:530:54:57

and she's been in this case and now today we're going to take her out

0:54:570:55:02

to look at her and find out a little bit more about her.

0:55:020:55:06

-It's really exciting.

-Yes, I mean, she's a very, very beautiful doll.

0:55:060:55:10

May I take her out of the case?

0:55:100:55:12

She's in all the original clothes and everything as the doll was bought.

0:55:150:55:21

She is absolutely beautiful and, of course,

0:55:210:55:24

there she is with her eyes open.

0:55:240:55:27

Yes, that's as I've always known her.

0:55:270:55:29

I mean, beautiful real hair, fantastic,

0:55:290:55:33

all original clothes. I mean, that's just spectacular and, of course,

0:55:330:55:38

you never ever really get to see 100 year old doll

0:55:380:55:42

in this sort of condition,

0:55:420:55:44

because, of course, she's been preserved in this case

0:55:440:55:47

for all that time.

0:55:470:55:49

She's a German doll

0:55:490:55:52

from the very end of the 19th century,

0:55:520:55:54

-beginning of the 20th century.

-Yes, she came from Germany?

0:55:540:55:57

Yes, she's an Armand Marseille doll.

0:55:570:56:01

-Oh, right.

-And very, very pretty doll, very good number, 3,200.

0:56:010:56:07

So, just looking in the case...

0:56:070:56:08

obviously they wanted to keep special things from the little girl,

0:56:080:56:13

so there's dolls house furniture,

0:56:130:56:15

I suppose some money that she had when she died

0:56:150:56:18

and, most tragically I suppose, also some of her hair.

0:56:180:56:23

I mean, it was a very common thing in the Victorian period

0:56:230:56:27

to actually preserve some hair of a loved one who'd died.

0:56:270:56:30

Today opening it, and seeing it,

0:56:300:56:34

um, as I say, I've never felt emotional before, but I do now.

0:56:340:56:38

In fact, I've a big lump

0:56:380:56:40

and it's the German side of my mother's family

0:56:400:56:44

that we don't know anything about.

0:56:440:56:46

That is there in the doll.

0:56:460:56:49

-In the doll.

-Yes.

0:56:490:56:50

It seems rather the wrong time now to talk about value.

0:56:500:56:56

This doll has far more value to you as a family,

0:56:560:57:00

being handed down to the girls in the family.

0:57:000:57:03

Doll collectors do love to know about the owners of the dolls,

0:57:030:57:07

they do love to know a story and this particularly story, tragic and poignant as it is,

0:57:070:57:13

would add considerably to the value of the doll.

0:57:130:57:17

So the history would mean the doll would probably sell for £600, £700,

0:57:170:57:23

-but that's not the point...

-No, she's not for sale.

0:57:230:57:27

..Of the story, I mean, it's just not the point of the story.

0:57:270:57:30

This is a wonderful part of your family history.

0:57:300:57:34

Yes, my mother always said, "You never open that"

0:57:340:57:37

but today we've opened it and I felt quite guilty when we opened it,

0:57:370:57:43

I really did.

0:57:430:57:44

I'm glad we've done it now, I'm really glad we've done it

0:57:440:57:48

and I do feel much more connected with her.

0:57:480:57:51

Remember these elephants

0:57:540:57:56

that Eric was looking at earlier in the programme,

0:57:560:57:58

and the owner wasn't quite sure what to do with them,

0:57:580:58:01

all 25 stone of them.

0:58:010:58:02

Well, we spoke to Leeds Museum and they thought about it for about 30 seconds

0:58:020:58:06

and said yes, they'd be delighted to have them.

0:58:060:58:09

So these elephants are hot footing it, straight from the Roadshow

0:58:090:58:12

just down the road to Leeds Museum.

0:58:120:58:14

And do you think you'll be happy there?

0:58:140:58:16

Yes, they say they will. What a marvellous ending to our show.

0:58:160:58:20

From Leeds Town Hall, bye bye.

0:58:200:58:22

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:290:58:32

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:320:58:35

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