Chatsworth 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Chatsworth 1

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts head to Chatsworth House in Derbyshire.


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When it comes to epic locations, it doesn't get much better than this.

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Tucked away deep in a rainy part of the Derbyshire Dales

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lies a treasure chest of a house,

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where for five centuries its owners have had the collecting bug

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written into their genes.

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What better place for the Antiques Roadshow to set up stall than here?

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At Chatsworth House.

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From the 1st Duke to the present 12th Duke of Devonshire,

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there's a strong history of updating

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and re-invigorating their vast collections.

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But they've courted controversy down the years

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by placing the modern stuff next to the old.

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The family obsession is sculpture,

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and they have the finest 18th century collection in the country.

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To the 6th Duke, this was bold and modern,

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so how has the 12th Duke added to it?

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With a bit of humour, that's how.

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When visitors arrive,

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they're greeted by a newcomer to this antique setting,

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the carefree man who's tipping his hat in cordial greeting.

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You might also say he's doffing his hat

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to the historical masterpieces around him.

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The tradition of portraiture runs through the house from room to room.

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Old masters meet new pretenders in wide-eyed wonder.

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Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire,

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famously painted by Thomas Gainsborough, eyes a successor.

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The ever-changing digital portrait

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of the present Duke's daughter-in-law, Laura.

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You can't help wondering what they think of each other.

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The Devonshire family put their traditional and modern collections

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together because the past often

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directly inspires the present,

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as with these modern ceramics by the artist Edmund Duval.

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He created them after seeing these incredible Delftware tulip vases

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which were high-end home decor 300 years ago.

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I think you'll agree, it's quite a collection inside,

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but I've a feeling we've more treasures to

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see outside as we meet our visitors

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in the gardens of Chatsworth House for today's Antiques Roadshow.

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Yesterday evening we were given a fantastic tour here of Chatsworth,

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of the house, but including through the wonderful sculpture galleries.

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Have you been through there?

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-No.

-Well, you really ought to.

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They're full of these huge classical white marble sculptures by Canova

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and others, from about the 1790's

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and your bust here,

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is from exactly the same tradition, the Neo-Classical tradition.

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Grand ideas of heroes and gods.

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Where did you find her?

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My husband bought her and she's been in the family for about 30...

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I should think over 30 years and unfortunately my husband's dead

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now so I can't have a conversation with him

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to ask him where he got her from. But I know that...

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She's just a wonderful person.

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She's real to me.

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I know they called her "Sadness"...

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Whether she is called Sadness or not, I don't know.

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Lots of people think she looks sad,

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but to me she's been like a healer to me, because when I've been really

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down in the dumps, and I look at her, she sort of says,

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"Yeah, I know but you'll get through".

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That's lovely, that's really lovely.

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Well, getting very down to the practicals,

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on the back it says "Wedgwood"

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-here and it does have her title "Sadness" as well here.

-Sadness, yes.

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Wedgwood of course was the father of English pottery

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but also the person who brought Classicism to ceramics.

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And she is, she's a very classical figure.

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Now whether she is supposed to be The Madonna, which is quite likely,

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bearing in mind she's wearing blue,

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but the classical traditions also have other...

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It's possible she's from antiquity.

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There are many figures of Andromache weeping over the ashes of her

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husband Hector who was killed in the Greek War by Achilles.

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So it was great tradition at the end of the 18th century.

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She's a fantastic thing.

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So you've got a really, you've got a really good treasure here you know.

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Most Wedgwood busts...

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You get small ones here, you get ones this size... She's enormous.

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Was that because of the plinth?

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She was supposed to be a very grand bust

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for very grand houses.

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It's a great thing, it's really nice.

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Um, and the fact that she's a healer, to you, I think that's terrific.

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-To me.

-I think, the blue, she probably is The Madonna.

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How very appropriate.

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-Thank you.

-It really is.

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And so at auction today she really would be in the region

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of £4,000 to £5,000.

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Thank you. I wouldn't sell her.

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I wouldn't sell her. She's my best friend.

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Standing in front of two absolutely stunning pieces of Stuart embroidery

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and I have to say, with two belonging to the same person,

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are you a collector?

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Yes.

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I've probably been collecting since I moved home.

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The house was built about 1660 and I thought, well,

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what would be nice to go with the house?

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And saw that one first, many many years ago,

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and then this one I bought probably about seven or eight years, as well.

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Very good, and they must look fantastic in a house of the right...

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In the setting with the beams and everything,

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yeah, it adds to the atmosphere.

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Let's look at this one first.

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It's stitched on thick white satin,

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it has a sort of glittery

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feel that the silk gives from the...

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It's almost like gold, isn't it?

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Absolutely, this reflected light

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really makes this rich and shiny, and reflective.

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And then, on this side, on your side,

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you can see what the colours originally would have been like.

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It seems to me that this has been

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displayed somewhere where half of it was in the shadow.

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And half of it was in full daylight, because this half is, you know,

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slightly sort of bleached out, but this side is really rich and vibrant

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and you can see the strength of the colours

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that would have been there when it was originally sewn.

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So this is a real sort of...

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A bit of real bling. This is footballer's wives' bling here.

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Where would that have been in the house, and who would have made it?

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Would it have been a child or...?

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Because it's very naively done in some respects.

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Two different questions there. The first is, who would have made it?

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Well, it would have been made by a young woman, not a child.

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And these were essentially to show her skills as an embroideress

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not her skills as an artist.

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And the pattern itself would have been copied from an engraving

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or a woodcut, or something else.

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Now if we shift down to this particular one below,

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you can actually see what I'm talking about.

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We've got the same motif here which is Rebecca and the well.

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-Oh, yes, yes, yes.

-The same motif as in the one above,

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but here you can see, this bit hasn't been stitched.

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-Right.

-This is the under drawing,

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this is the under drawing, there's the little under drawing

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of the butterfly, the under drawing of the...

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Oh, I've never spotted that, never spotted that at all.

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-How long have you had it for?

-About eight years.

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It's dark in my house.

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OK, all right, you've got every excuse,

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but you can see that the objects were drawn on by somebody

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else and then the artistry, as far as the embroideress was concerned,

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was in the stitching, and you can...

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On the stitches that you CAN see, you can see how skilled

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that particular job was.

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So it was a mark of a real lady, to be able to produce a work like this.

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So they'd be very much upper class

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kind of people that would do this then.

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Domestic embroidery in the Stuart time was a sign of

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leisure and having made it, made it good, rather than being

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-from the working class.

-So this was their entertainment then, basically?

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Exactly right, exactly right.

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OK, so you bought them relatively recently.

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I'm imagining that you paid a fair amount for them, but

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what I can say is although some areas of the antiques world

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have settled somewhat, the market, particularly in The States,

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for embroideries of that calibre in that condition, is very, very strong.

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-Right.

-Perhaps less so for this, because of the condition.

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Yes, the damaged one, yes.

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So let's start with this one. I would have said that this,

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in pound terms, would be around £8,000.

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Sorry? Right.

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OK, if you're pleased with that, I think we should get a chair for you

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-for this one.

-I can't believe that.

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Because I think that this would probably fetch

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around £15,000.

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-Phew!

-In a market which was

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perhaps attracted American buyers.

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That is an absolute cracker, £10,000 to £15,000 I see without any problem at all.

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I'm sorry.

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I must sit down, I'm absolutely amazed!

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Now you seem to have brought a little bit of Regency Rocky

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to Chatsworth today.

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-On the face of it, it's a picture of two boxers.

-Yeah.

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Do you know what the family history of the plaque is?

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We've had it for several years.

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Basically, my father was in the trade, he came by it, he restored it

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and we've had it ever since but

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it's always just been on the wall and never really looked at.

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Well, what's firstly amazing about it,

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it's pottery, what looks like a black frame

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which if it was an ordinary picture would be made of wood.

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It's actually moulded

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integrally into the pottery, which is quite interesting.

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What's wonderful for me,

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as someone who's interested in pottery and porcelain,

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is the size of the plaque.

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It's really big, you don't often see English pottery plaques of this size.

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They often buckle in the kiln.

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-Yeah.

-And you know, are not flat enough to use.

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So that's the first great thing about it.

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You mentioned the two protagonists here,

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the two boxers, Spring and Langam.

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-The first thing you notice is the complete lack of boxing gloves.

-Yeah.

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-These are bare fist fighters.

-Yeah.

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And this plaque records a great moment in English sporting history

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when in January 1824 Tom Spring and Jack Langam met at Worcester.

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-Right.

-Tom Spring was the English heavyweight champion

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and Jack was the Irish equivalent.

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And they fought bare knuckle

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in front of a crowd reputedly of 50,000 people,

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which was a huge number for the time when the English population

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was probably a quarter of what it is today.

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They fought for 77 rounds,

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-for two hours and 29 minutes.

-Right.

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You can imagine what a gory spectacle that must have been.

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-Yeah.

-In front of this crowd, and Spring won.

-Right.

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And the plaque must have been made

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fairly soon thereafter to commemorate the event.

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The audience... I mean they make up a fascinating group of people.

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You've got a soldier there on the left,

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another

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just visible there

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in the middle.

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And you've got a black man standing here with his hands behind his back.

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-Yeah.

-Which in itself is unusual.

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It might possibly be,

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a lot of fighters at the time were freed slaves.

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He may himself have been a fighter

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-who is watching others fight.

-Yeah, right.

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But you know, only rarely does one find a piece of boxing memorabilia

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as important as this.

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I've always been told that there's something special

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-about the black man who's in the corner.

-I think that is,

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if it would be interesting if we could find the source for it,

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we might be able to find out who that is.

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-Who he is, right.

-It certainly adds great interest to it.

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-Yeah.

-I think,

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although there is some restoration to the plaque,

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this piece is going to appeal

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to a collector of boxing memorabilia,

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rather than to a pottery collector,

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and they probably won't mind so much about the restoration,

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especially in view of the rarity.

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So I think it's certainly worth £3,000.

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-Right.

-Maybe £4,000.

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-Yeah, thank you very much.

-It's a pleasure.

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So, this is a wonderful red Morocco album

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with the royal crest here of Queen Alexandra, I think it is.

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-Yes, it is, yes.

-Yes. And of course inside,

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so it is, "Presented to Her Most Gracious Majesty

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"Queen Alexandra, on the occasion of her birthday,

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"the 1st December 1916, as a token of loyalty and appreciation

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"of Her Majesty's kindness at all times to press photographers".

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So tell me about it. What do you want this photograph album for?

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Well, I'm very fond of Queen Alexandra.

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She's an extremely beautiful woman,

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and I know a little bit of her history.

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And of course it's all about all her activities and her press photographs.

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-Yes.

-So they gave them to her. How many photographs are there in here?

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I'm not actually sure,

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I've not really counted them, about a hundred I think.

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And how much did you pay for it?

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£1,000.

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-Why?

-I think it's...

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Well the gentleman I bought it from...

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I know very well, and he actually said, "I think you should have it

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"because you have such a large collection of memorabilia from her already".

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So he saw you coming?

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Probably.

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Oh, dear. Anyway, look, this is a wonderful bit here which I think...

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I mean yes, we could look at all these

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other lovely photographs of Queen Alexandra

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but here she is, with Shackleton, Ernest Shackleton,

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who was the chap who went south.

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First of all he went with Scott on The Discovery expedition.

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He then made two expeditions of his own, one of them successful

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and the other one not particularly successful.

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And here is the Queen herself

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and her sister Maria Feodorovna who was over from Russia.

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During the Russian Revolution,

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Queen Alexandra insisted that her sister was brought out

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but the others stayed and the others were killed, but her sister

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would undoubtedly have been killed, had not Queen Alexandra intervened.

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That she must be brought out on a gun boat or something else like that.

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Right, well you've paid £1,000.

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These few photographs here I think are probably the most interesting.

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I would value this...

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not at £1,000...

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I would value it at £5,000.

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-Good heavens!

-Do you feel better now?

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I do, I felt sick before.

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-Thanks for bringing it in.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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This has been one of the most admired pieces of the day.

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People have been fascinated by it.

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I can't make head or tail of it,

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so you tell me what you know about it.

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Well, if I could explain how I think it was done.

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I've got a son called Andrew who's got a shed and he has

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lots of bits of timber round it, and I say, "Shall I throw it away?"

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and he says "No, I'll use that, I'm going to make something"

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and I think about 400 years ago there was a chap in Germany

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that had a shed, very similar,

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he had planks of wood and a bag of nails

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and he wondered what to do with it, and I think this is the result.

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Right, OK.

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Well, it's a lovely story.

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I suppose I've got to try and unravel that now and decide whether

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it really is an old piece or not.

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So, did you buy it in Germany?

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Yes, we did, yes.

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Right, let's have a look at it anyway. What have we got?

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I mean, I think this piece is off the wall, literally.

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-Yes, yes.

-Do you know why I'm saying that?

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Not really, no.

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It's a modern expression, but it's an ancient cupboard.

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-Yes.

-Why I say "off the wall",

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I think this piece was actually inset into a wall.

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Ah. Mm.

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-Like an aumbry.

-Yes, yes.

-That's what we call them in England,

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I don't know what the German for it is.

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And it's been pulled out of the wall

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-and then made into a free standing piece of furniture.

-Yes, mm.

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So that's absolutely fascinating,

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-so in terms of date, it could well be 1600.

-Yes.

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Let's just have a look at one or two little points.

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The metal work looks pretty convincing to me, nice oak planks.

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Here, well it certainly looks old inside, doesn't it?

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Yes.

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Round here, now that's one of the most convincing things to me,

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these lovely old fashioned rose-headed nails,

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which are clearly very early hand made nails.

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But also the way it's finished at the side.

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-You can see on your side as well.

-Yes.

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It's absolutely crude as anything.

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Yes. That's where it's just been literally a hole in the wall,

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shoved into the wall,

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then pulled out, we don't know when. I mean, it's fascinating.

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The trouble is, we can't ask this,

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we can't get a DNA or a laser imprint of what life it's had.

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-I find even nationality very, very difficult to be sure about.

-Yes.

0:18:460:18:49

Because I think it's very similar

0:18:490:18:51

-to something made all over Northern Europe.

-Yes.

0:18:510:18:53

In the late 16th century, which I'm sure this is.

0:18:530:18:56

Somebody said to me, "Is it a rabbit hutch or something?"

0:18:560:19:00

-but it is made as a food cupboard.

-A food cupboard, yes.

0:19:000:19:03

I don't what you put down here, flower pots by the look of it.

0:19:030:19:06

Well, we've had videos in there actually.

0:19:060:19:08

-Oh, right, perfect.

-Just for storage.

0:19:080:19:10

Well, perhaps it was made by your son Andrew, then.

0:19:100:19:13

I don't know how commercial a piece like this would be.

0:19:130:19:17

I think it's such fun, and just simply by the admiration

0:19:170:19:20

it's had everywhere this morning.

0:19:200:19:21

I think I'm going to put a figure of £2,000 to £3,000 on it.

0:19:210:19:24

Right. Mm.

0:19:240:19:26

Yes, well we've got a stove at home

0:19:260:19:28

and if it gets really cold we can always use it.

0:19:280:19:32

It's sturdy enough to keep us warm for a few weeks I think.

0:19:320:19:35

This is supposed to be a serious programme!

0:19:350:19:38

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:19:380:19:41

This is a handy looking gentleman, I believe he's a relative of yours.

0:19:410:19:44

-Yes, he happens to me my grandfather.

-Serviceman?

0:19:440:19:47

He was. He served in the Staffords.

0:19:470:19:49

And he actually fought in the First World War?

0:19:490:19:52

Er, yes, and also he was based in India.

0:19:520:19:55

Right, and I believe that's something he made.

0:19:550:19:59

That's right yes, tapestry, made with darning wool

0:19:590:20:02

that they used for socks, to repair the socks in the trenches.

0:20:020:20:07

It's a possibility.

0:20:070:20:10

I think more to the case you'd repair your socks

0:20:100:20:12

because without socks in a trench it's not much fun.

0:20:120:20:15

But I suspect he's fallen into the long tradition of the British

0:20:150:20:20

-soldiery of liberating something to make it with.

-I would think so.

0:20:200:20:25

Now, he's got the Staffordshire colours,

0:20:250:20:28

the rose, Egypt, their battle honour, the Staffordshire knot.

0:20:280:20:33

This is loosely described as trench art.

0:20:330:20:36

People would make things from shells, from bullets...

0:20:360:20:40

This is a bit more spectacular.

0:20:400:20:43

-I think that's a lovely example of First World War art.

-Oh, right, yes.

0:20:430:20:48

Values...

0:20:480:20:50

I'm afraid to say not a huge amount.

0:20:500:20:54

They crop up quite often.

0:20:540:20:56

I can't really see that more than perhaps £100, £150

0:20:560:21:03

but I think it's just a fantastic piece of First World War art,

0:21:030:21:07

and art from the Staffordshires.

0:21:070:21:09

Yeah. It's something that's going to be passed down through the family.

0:21:090:21:13

It's going to my eldest son.

0:21:130:21:14

Splendid, and that's what it should be.

0:21:140:21:16

-It should be hung on the wall and appreciated.

-Yes, yes, yes.

0:21:160:21:20

When I was a child, every year for Christmas,

0:21:250:21:29

my Godmother would give me one of the spoons.

0:21:290:21:32

-Really?

-Yes, over six years,

0:21:320:21:35

built up six spoons.

0:21:350:21:37

The good thing is, that they're all part of the same set.

0:21:370:21:42

So luckily she picked ones from the right set.

0:21:420:21:44

Cos they're actually made by a very good firm,

0:21:440:21:46

they're made by the firm of Peter and Ann Bateman,

0:21:460:21:48

who were the children of a famous Hester Bateman,

0:21:480:21:51

-and made in 1796.

-Oh.

0:21:510:21:54

-So they're pretty old.

-Yes.

0:21:540:21:56

And a very nice handsome set.

0:21:560:21:58

But probably much more interesting are these other two here.

0:21:580:22:04

They have the same crest on, with this lion at the top

0:22:040:22:08

-and that's not a family crest, or anything you know about?

-No, no.

0:22:080:22:11

These were my mother's and she has no idea of the history at all.

0:22:110:22:14

Yeah, well these are even older, because this one has a fabulous set

0:22:140:22:19

-of hallmarks down the back and this one's dated 1690.

-Oh, wow!

0:22:190:22:25

So that's... That's become quite a collector's spoon.

0:22:250:22:29

It's called a trefid spoon because of this funny shape at the end here.

0:22:290:22:32

Right.

0:22:320:22:34

It's got a maker's mark W. M.

0:22:340:22:36

and I don't think it's known who he is,

0:22:360:22:39

-but this is a really nice 17th century trefid spoon.

-Oh, wonderful.

0:22:390:22:44

Now the thing is that a trefid spoon is quite a desirable thing.

0:22:440:22:48

-Right.

-And I get the idea

0:22:480:22:50

that you don't really have an idea what this is worth.

0:22:500:22:52

Absolutely no idea whatsoever.

0:22:520:22:55

Well, I think if we start with the set of dessert spoons,

0:22:550:22:59

they are probably worth between

0:22:590:23:03

-£170 to £220 for the set.

-Fantastic.

0:23:030:23:08

This one...

0:23:080:23:10

about £600.

0:23:100:23:14

No! Six for one spoon?

0:23:140:23:15

-For one spoon.

-Oh, that's fantastic, thank you very much.

0:23:150:23:20

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:23:200:23:22

It was bought off the internet about six to eight weeks ago

0:23:220:23:27

-by my brother.

-Right.

0:23:270:23:29

Who unfortunately is on holiday at the moment

0:23:290:23:31

and I offered to bring it along for a valuation.

0:23:310:23:34

OK, and what did he pay?

0:23:340:23:36

Well, I think he paid £700 for the owl.

0:23:360:23:39

And what was this described as, when he went to bid for it?

0:23:390:23:42

It was described as a Martinware tobacco jar.

0:23:420:23:45

Right, well the Martin Brothers are really quite a serious name

0:23:450:23:50

in the decorative arts market, especially nowadays.

0:23:500:23:53

They're a trio of brothers that came to some great prominence

0:23:530:23:56

at the end of the 19th century, predominantly

0:23:560:23:58

through the manufacture of grotesque wares, grotesque birds.

0:23:580:24:03

And in fact their most popular range,

0:24:030:24:05

and the things that most people see them for,

0:24:050:24:07

and deemed to be most iconic for, are what we call the Wally Birds.

0:24:070:24:11

And they produced them in great quantities from sort of the 1880s

0:24:110:24:15

through to you know the end of the century,

0:24:150:24:18

and as a result, you know, they are incredibly sought after.

0:24:180:24:22

A bird of this size would probably realise

0:24:220:24:26

-somewhere in the region of £20,000 to £25,000.

-Really?

0:24:260:24:31

-If it were right.

-Right.

0:24:310:24:34

And that is unfortunately where I've got to be the bearer of bad tidings.

0:24:340:24:39

-OK.

-He is good, he is in fact incredibly good,

0:24:390:24:43

and that is the problem at the moment.

0:24:430:24:46

The market has become so strong

0:24:460:24:48

and so boisterous that there are some very, very clever people out there

0:24:480:24:53

doing some very, very clever work

0:24:530:24:56

and I have to say that unfortunately he is,

0:24:560:25:00

-we've got to use the right word, he's a fake.

-He's a fake, right.

0:25:000:25:02

There's lots of reasons why,

0:25:020:25:04

you know, the modelling is almost a little bit too...

0:25:040:25:08

It's almost too focused, it's too tight, it doesn't have the fluid

0:25:080:25:11

freedom of Robert Wallace, who was the main modeller.

0:25:110:25:15

The glazes, again, are not quite right,

0:25:150:25:17

because of course glazes have moved on, there's different processes

0:25:170:25:20

that we now use, and generally the whole sort of feel about him,

0:25:200:25:25

the whole, you know, the gut instinct

0:25:250:25:27

tells me it's just not there, he's not got that magic element.

0:25:270:25:32

I know £700 was paid for it but in terms of the value of it

0:25:320:25:36

I actually can't value it,

0:25:360:25:38

because there's a general thing in our business

0:25:380:25:41

where we say that you can't value a fake.

0:25:410:25:43

How can you value something that is incorrect?

0:25:430:25:46

He's potentially going to be an expensive lesson, I would say.

0:25:460:25:51

Maybe there is recourse, that's something for you to look into.

0:25:510:25:55

-Sure.

-But I would say when we're looking at things like this,

0:25:550:25:58

it comes back to the old adage,

0:25:580:25:59

if it looks too good to be true...

0:25:590:26:02

-It probably is, right.

-You've said it.

0:26:020:26:04

Now I am always fascinated by military documents, particularly

0:26:060:26:11

service records and certificates of discharge,

0:26:110:26:14

but one of the things I've noticed from this particular

0:26:140:26:18

discharge certificate is that he's been discharged

0:26:180:26:23

for being under 17 years of age.

0:26:230:26:25

-That's right, yes.

-Now, who was he?

0:26:250:26:27

Um he was my grandfather who was born in 1899 and he ran off to join

0:26:270:26:34

the army, fought in the trenches when he was 15.

0:26:340:26:37

His mother tracked him down and then asked to have him brought home,

0:26:370:26:41

so he was discharged when he was 16 years old.

0:26:410:26:44

So after he'd been discharged from the army,

0:26:440:26:47

he then went on to join the navy, when he was 17.

0:26:470:26:50

-You're kidding!

-No.

0:26:500:26:52

And so this certificate here, the certificate of service,

0:26:520:26:55

relates to his naval service then.

0:26:550:26:58

-Yes.

-Oh, I see it says "Portsmouth" here.

0:26:580:27:00

And one of the things I love about these certificates of service

0:27:000:27:04

-is it's a potted history of what they were doing.

-Yes.

0:27:040:27:07

A very unusual service record,

0:27:070:27:10

running off from home at the age of 15, joining the army,

0:27:100:27:14

being discharged because he was found to be under 17,

0:27:140:27:18

then deciding that wasn't enough, he joined the navy, and then,

0:27:180:27:23

by the look of it, he went through many years,

0:27:230:27:26

several decades actually, in the navy, and ended up in

0:27:260:27:30

Portsmouth and was discharged in 1933 by the look of this.

0:27:310:27:38

Yes, he did try to go back for the Second World War

0:27:380:27:41

but they said he was too old.

0:27:410:27:42

My goodness, he was a glutton for punishment. But I notice also

0:27:420:27:46

you've brought three medals with you.

0:27:460:27:48

Now this is the 1914-15 star, and on the back

0:27:480:27:53

-it has "Private CF Burdett".

-Yes.

0:27:530:27:58

So this is a medal to...

0:27:580:28:00

That was issued for his army service during the First World War,

0:28:000:28:04

and this victory medal also says "Private CF Burdett"

0:28:040:28:09

so this is the victory medal for his army service.

0:28:090:28:13

But this victory medal is also to C F Burdett.

0:28:130:28:17

He's got two victory medals and this one says "AB",

0:28:170:28:20

Able bodied seaman

0:28:200:28:21

and "RN", Royal Navy.

0:28:210:28:23

So this is for his naval service during the First World War.

0:28:230:28:27

But I think the incredible story

0:28:270:28:30

is the fact that he went to war at the age of 15.

0:28:300:28:33

I mean really that's just still a boy, isn't it?

0:28:330:28:36

Yes, you can imagine in the trenches.

0:28:360:28:39

And he was awarded two lots of medals,

0:28:390:28:41

which again is almost unheard of,

0:28:410:28:44

I mean that's incredibly unusual, it's very, very rare.

0:28:440:28:47

I can't think of another time when I've actually seen this occur.

0:28:470:28:50

What about value?

0:28:500:28:52

There are a lot of people out there, a lot of medal collectors,

0:28:520:28:57

who would be very keen on this little group of medals

0:28:570:29:00

and the documents that surround it.

0:29:000:29:03

I reckon a collector would pay

0:29:030:29:07

at least £800 for it.

0:29:070:29:11

OK. Well, they won't be being sold for a while.

0:29:110:29:13

I know everyone says that but...

0:29:130:29:15

Thank you.

0:29:150:29:17

The grounds here at Chatsworth are just wonderful,

0:29:190:29:22

and your father was a gamekeeper here, wasn't he?

0:29:220:29:25

He was working woods and looking after the pheasants.

0:29:250:29:29

One winter he had been out with them

0:29:290:29:31

and spent so long in the snow that he got frostbite in his feet.

0:29:310:29:34

As well as being a gamekeeper here, as a very young man,

0:29:340:29:37

he was also a wonderful artist.

0:29:370:29:39

This is a beautiful little watercolour

0:29:390:29:41

of one of the other gamekeepers.

0:29:410:29:42

He even had a studio here at Chatsworth, didn't he?

0:29:420:29:45

The Duke allowed him to rent a studio for a while

0:29:450:29:47

and then he moved to Bakewell to paint and built his own studio

0:29:470:29:50

and painted in Bakewell all his life.

0:29:500:29:52

And this is him, here in a self portrait...

0:29:520:29:54

look at that splendid beard... and what was his name?

0:29:540:29:56

-Bert Broomhead.

-And of course being a local lad, you know,

0:29:560:29:59

not only gamekeeper here, he was able to record Derbyshire at the time.

0:29:590:30:04

As it was. This one's from 1950, a beautiful view of Parwich. I'm sure Parwich doesn't look like that now.

0:30:040:30:10

-Because of course the road would be tarmacked now.

-That's right.

-Wouldn't it?

0:30:100:30:14

Very much England as it was.

0:30:140:30:16

Did you watch him paint?

0:30:160:30:17

I mean did he... have you followed in his footsteps?

0:30:170:30:19

I wasn't often allowed in the workshop but there

0:30:190:30:21

is a photograph of me watching him as a little one, painting.

0:30:210:30:25

It was all very hush-hush and secret and I was usually shuffled out of the way.

0:30:250:30:29

I have not inherited his talent, but I do think

0:30:290:30:31

people deserve a chance to see the work of an unknown artist.

0:30:310:30:34

And the fact he was given a studio at Chatsworth...

0:30:340:30:37

-he was obviously recognised as such.

-He had the approval of the Duke.

0:30:370:30:41

The Duke must have known he was an artist of some talent.

0:30:410:30:44

It must be the first time a gamekeeper was given his own studio.

0:30:440:30:48

It's lovely to see the paintings. Thank you very much for bringing them along.

0:30:480:30:53

Well, I normally wouldn't want to see two snakes near me,

0:31:160:31:20

but I'm so pleased to be seeing these two lovely gem-set necklaces.

0:31:200:31:23

How did they slither into your life?

0:31:230:31:26

They belonged to my grandmother who then passed them on to my mother

0:31:260:31:29

and she passed them down to me, so that's all I know about them.

0:31:290:31:33

-Is it?

-Yes.

-You don't remember your grandmother wearing them or anything?

0:31:330:31:36

-No, I can remember me mum wearing them, but not my grandmother.

-That's wonderful, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:360:31:41

-A lot of people wouldn't want to wear snakes, which is...

-Oh, no.

-..great that she did wear them.

0:31:410:31:47

-Yes.

-Do you wear them?

-Yes, occasionally, yes.

0:31:470:31:49

Excellent, brilliant. Well, they date from about 1850-1860 and the Victorians loved anything

0:31:490:31:56

-to do with animals and nature, love, sentiment, and of course all that is within these two necklaces.

-Yes.

0:31:560:32:04

We've got turquoise set to both of the heads of the snakes and the real

0:32:040:32:09

attention to detail was always with the snakes' heads which is fantastic.

0:32:090:32:13

And then we've got old cut diamonds, also highlights in the head, and little red ruby eyes.

0:32:130:32:20

Now this one's got a lovely plain gold necklace chain, but this one

0:32:200:32:24

-has also been set with turquoise as well, which is really quite special, isn't it?

-Yes, mm, mm.

0:32:240:32:29

Which one do you prefer?

0:32:290:32:31

-Um, that one I think.

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, yeah, well that's interesting

0:32:310:32:34

because it's got so much more to it, hasn't it, with having the turquoise in the chain as well.

0:32:340:32:39

-Yes.

-Turquoise has always been associated with forget-me-not flowers.

0:32:410:32:45

The true colour of blue forget-me-nots is very similar to the turquoise blue.

0:32:450:32:50

-Yes.

-So you've got an instant hidden message there of "forget me not" and again, true love.

-Yes.

0:32:500:32:56

But the other sentimental thing about them is that they are necklaces and

0:32:560:32:59

during the Victorian period, anything that was a circle...

0:32:590:33:02

so a necklace, a bracelet, or a ring, was again seen as a true indication of true love, because you could

0:33:020:33:07

-actually end the circle and that you were joined together eternally.

-Yes.

0:33:070:33:11

So with regard to value, anybody who collects Victorian jewellery would love to have these two pieces

0:33:110:33:17

-together and it's great that you wear them as well, so you just know that people would want to buy them.

-Yes.

0:33:170:33:23

I think this one here, because it's slightly plainer,

0:33:230:33:26

might fetch somewhere between £1,500 and £2,000 at auction.

0:33:260:33:30

Wow. Really?

0:33:300:33:32

And then of course this one here, we've got a little bit more detail.

0:33:320:33:37

Obviously the turquoise has changed colour, and some people don't like that, they like to see it the really

0:33:370:33:42

beautiful forget-me-not blue, but even so, I think again we're looking at somewhere between

0:33:420:33:47

£1,800 and £2,000 for this necklace because of the extra detail in it.

0:33:470:33:52

Fantastic, thank you. Wow.

0:33:530:33:55

My pleasure. So you'll continue to wear them?

0:33:550:33:57

-Definitely.

-Brilliant.

0:33:570:33:59

-Thank you.

-My pleasure.

-Thanks.

0:33:590:34:02

Well, what a stunning portrait of a beautiful lady. Can I...

0:34:020:34:05

can I see a resemblance here?

0:34:050:34:08

I think I can, which is lovely.

0:34:080:34:10

-Yes, it is a picture of me.

-And how old were you when this...?

-I was 22.

0:34:100:34:13

22, and of course it's by the great, great painter, Stanley Spencer.

0:34:130:34:18

-That's right.

-That is fantastic.

0:34:180:34:20

How did your family... or how did you know Stanley Spencer?

0:34:200:34:23

-We lived in Cookham, which is where Stanley Spencer lived.

-Ah, of course.

-And my father was his doctor.

0:34:230:34:29

Gosh. And he got to know him very well, he was keen on art and things, and so we used to go up there and

0:34:290:34:35

have a look at his paintings when they were being done.

0:34:350:34:38

What an amazing... so what sort of man was Stanley Spencer?

0:34:380:34:42

He was a chatterbox, never stopped talking, and if he'd come to a cocktail party or something,

0:34:420:34:48

the only way to get him to go home was to take him home.

0:34:480:34:52

Really?

0:34:520:34:54

-Gosh! But was he good company?

-Oh, yes, yes.

0:34:540:34:57

Fascinating. And I note... I mean it's nicely signed, your portrait, "Stanley Spencer October 1959"

0:34:570:35:03

and of course he died in 1959, so...

0:35:030:35:05

Well, he was dying of cancer and my father said to my mother "He's not eating, let's get him,"

0:35:050:35:12

so he came to our house.

0:35:120:35:14

-Up to the house.

-And to keep him occupied he drew me and we gave him

0:35:140:35:18

some food and then soon after that he went into hospital where he died.

0:35:180:35:21

-Oh, so sad, because he was sort of 68, I think, when he died.

-Yes.

0:35:210:35:25

-So a young man.

-Yes, really, yes.

0:35:250:35:27

-He really lived in Cookham all his life, didn't he?

-He did.

0:35:270:35:31

I mean it was a sort of paradise for him.

0:35:310:35:32

-Yes.

-And he did a lot of Biblical subjects but set in Cookham.

0:35:320:35:37

-That's right.

-That's right. But he's an absolute genius and I think you

0:35:370:35:41

can see by this portrait, at the end of his life, how wonderful it is...

0:35:410:35:45

the attention to detail is phenomenal... he has that almost Pre-Raphaelite exactness.

0:35:450:35:52

I think he's majestic.

0:35:520:35:54

Now have you ever had this valued?

0:35:540:35:56

-No.

-Oh, dear, now, I mean they are just so...

0:35:560:36:01

I mean people just love Stanley Spencer, they love his work.

0:36:010:36:06

I mean this drawing's big, it's beautiful, lovely sitter, £10,000 to £15,000.

0:36:060:36:13

Oh, goodness me! Wow.

0:36:130:36:15

I think we'll take it to the gallery in Cookham to look after.

0:36:150:36:19

-Not bad for two days' work.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:36:190:36:21

Where did you get this marvellous tea set from?

0:36:210:36:24

My father bought it in the late 1950s from an antique shop in Sheffield.

0:36:240:36:30

Do you know what he paid for it?

0:36:300:36:34

He paid £45 at the time.

0:36:340:36:36

Right. It's very interesting because when I looked at it at first, it rather made me think of Liberty's,

0:36:360:36:42

the London store, which opened in the 1870s and which sold very fine artistic wares, and became famous

0:36:420:36:52

the world over for doing so, and sure enough, when I turned it over,

0:36:520:36:55

you can see the marks of Liberty, "L & Company"

0:36:550:37:00

-so it is Liberty's.

-Oh.

0:37:000:37:02

You also have a hallmark for Birmingham and then finally you've got the date mark for 1902.

0:37:020:37:08

So you've got a great piece of early 20th century silver,

0:37:080:37:14

made for the best retailer in, arguably, the world, in terms of the quality of its goods.

0:37:140:37:20

The Cymric range...

0:37:200:37:22

which this is from...

0:37:220:37:24

was introduced in the late 1890s so this fits perfectly, and here it is.

0:37:240:37:29

-Do you ever use it?

-No, it's never been used.

0:37:290:37:33

-Why not?

-Not by my father, or our family.

-No, is it just for...?

0:37:330:37:37

I think it's too special really. It's sort of more of an ornament.

0:37:370:37:39

Yeah, well it's absolutely marvellous and I would have thought that...

0:37:390:37:43

you said how much?

0:37:430:37:45

-£45.

-Forty-five pounds.

0:37:450:37:48

Well, I think I would be taking a liberty if I didn't value it at something more like £3,000.

0:37:480:37:58

Oh, gosh! Very nice, yeah, yeah, very nice.

0:37:580:38:02

So I think you will be having that cup of tea after all.

0:38:020:38:05

Yes, yes, yes, that's lovely.

0:38:050:38:07

A warm day at Chatsworth and we're looking at a pair of fire, or pole screens.

0:38:070:38:13

-Totally inappropriate, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:38:130:38:14

Well, it seems so, doesn't it?

0:38:140:38:16

-But we've got a view of Chatsworth on this one.

-Indeed we have.

0:38:160:38:19

This is the front of the house.

0:38:190:38:21

Down at the bottom of the picture is the River Derwent flowing and.. .

0:38:210:38:26

So I love the three stags in the foreground.

0:38:260:38:29

-It gives it a very relaxed look.

-Yes, exactly, it does, doesn't it?

0:38:290:38:32

-Yes.

-And these are hand-painted on to papier mache.

0:38:320:38:34

-I thought they were papier mache.

-That's a very favoured material which

0:38:340:38:37

came into prominence at the end of the 18th century but by the early 19th century was a great art form.

0:38:370:38:43

-Yes, yes.

-And of course papier mache with its surface is very heat resistant.

0:38:430:38:48

-Of course.

-So the Victorians used it for all sorts of things because of its strength.

0:38:480:38:52

-Yes, yes.

-So you see trays, boxes, and in this case, lovely adjustable sort of shield-shape panels.

-Yes.

0:38:520:38:59

To obviously keep the heat of any open fire off... off faces during conversations.

0:38:590:39:05

-Yes, complexions.

-Absolutely.

0:39:050:39:06

And have they been giving you active service for long?

0:39:060:39:09

Well, ornamental service, obviously, and they belonged to my grandparents

0:39:090:39:13

who had a farm on this estate, just outside Bakewell.

0:39:130:39:17

-Fantastic.

-I suppose they've been in the family about 120 years.

0:39:170:39:21

Yes, your Chatsworth heirlooms.

0:39:210:39:23

My Chatsworth heirlooms, exactly.

0:39:230:39:26

Now the borders are very much high Victorian with sort of scrolls of acanthus and sort of strap work.

0:39:260:39:34

-Yes.

-But do you know something?

0:39:340:39:36

I think that the stands that they're on, which are incredibly elegant and made of mahogany...

0:39:360:39:41

-Yes.

-I think the stands were made 20 years earlier.

0:39:410:39:44

-Really?

-These, I think are 1840s...

0:39:440:39:46

-These I think are 1820s.

-Really? Gosh, I didn't know they were so old.

0:39:460:39:49

-Because these are very much a Regency shape.

-Yes.

0:39:490:39:52

-But very elegant. I mean they're totally impractical today.

-Of course.

0:39:520:39:55

Have you got open fires still?

0:39:550:39:57

No, no, but they're in bedrooms and well away from the light.

0:39:570:40:00

-Yes, yes, well they're pretty.

-They're so pretty.

0:40:000:40:02

On that sort of basis, you'd need probably around £1,500 to replace them.

0:40:020:40:07

-Really?

-Particularly elegant and beautifully painted.

-Thank you very much.

0:40:070:40:11

I really feel that we're in the scene of a costume drama.

0:40:140:40:16

We're right in the heart of where a costume drama would be filmed.

0:40:160:40:19

It's such a beautiful Edwardian wedding dress.

0:40:190:40:22

I mean, who was it worn by?

0:40:220:40:25

My mother wore it last in 1942/43 and my grandmother in 1902.

0:40:250:40:33

Well, 1902 is an absolutely precise date for it, isn't it?

0:40:330:40:36

-I mean, it is a classic Edwardian dress.

-Yes.

0:40:360:40:40

It was presumably your grandmother's moment to look like Queen Alexandra.

0:40:400:40:44

Yes, yes, it must have been, yes, for that date.

0:40:440:40:47

But this is the most wonderful silk dress finished in lace, nipped in

0:40:470:40:54

just below this lovely high bodice line, which is classic for the era.

0:40:540:40:58

Very kindly modelled by a lady who's just come for

0:40:580:41:03

-the Roadshow today, so, and fits it like a glove.

-Yes. Perfect.

0:41:030:41:07

But where did she get it from?

0:41:070:41:09

Where did she buy it from? Do you know that?

0:41:090:41:11

It was from a shop in Liverpool. Lime Street, Liverpool.

0:41:110:41:15

I mean, the joy of it, I think is seeing it worn, and...

0:41:150:41:21

-Yes.

-It's interesting because you've brought these photographs along,

0:41:210:41:25

but there's not one of your grandmother wearing it, so in 1902

0:41:250:41:28

she wore it, but there's just a photograph of her...

0:41:280:41:31

My grandmother, unfortunately, had a birthmark on the side of her face, so she never really...

0:41:310:41:39

would never have a photograph taken.

0:41:390:41:42

Obviously that's my mother and father, with my mother wearing it.

0:41:420:41:46

When it was re-worn by your mother then, in the early 1940s, of course Britain was at war.

0:41:460:41:53

-Yes.

-And we had utility restrictions in place.

0:41:530:41:55

And we were restricted on the number of buttons, the number of pockets

0:41:550:41:58

and the amount of fabric we could use in clothing, so to wear vintage was actually quite a good call then.

0:41:580:42:05

-Yes. Yes, it would be.

-Did you wear it? So you're the third...

0:42:050:42:08

Unfortunately, no, I didn't know it was there.

0:42:080:42:13

I only found it about 15 years ago.

0:42:130:42:17

My father died and I had to clear the house out and it had been in the garage outside

0:42:170:42:23

in a chest of drawers, in the original box, and it had been there since... all those years.

0:42:230:42:29

I think the interesting thing about this is that ten years ago...

0:42:290:42:32

and that's not that long ago... a dress like this would have been

0:42:320:42:36

very much a museum piece, not considered anything that a bride today would...

0:42:360:42:40

you know... would want to wear.

0:42:400:42:41

But the market has gone through such a sea change recently, and suddenly today's brides are looking for

0:42:410:42:47

something really, really individual that doesn't look like anybody else and so vintage is really back.

0:42:470:42:53

And in that context, as something to wear today for a modern bride,

0:42:530:42:57

I would put a value of between £800 and £900 on it, maybe even, maybe even slipping into £1,000.

0:42:570:43:07

It's on the day, isn't it?

0:43:070:43:08

I'd pay that to wear it.

0:43:080:43:10

I don't think I'd fit into it.

0:43:120:43:14

In the glorious surroundings of Chatsworth, I can't think of

0:43:250:43:28

a better place to talk about treasures.

0:43:280:43:29

And in this series we're asking our experts...

0:43:290:43:32

what treasure would they most like to see?

0:43:320:43:34

What would they fantasize about turning up to a Roadshow?

0:43:340:43:37

Then on the flip side... what items do they see the most of?

0:43:370:43:39

Well, Hilary, it's your turn today, so let's start off with what you see the most of.

0:43:390:43:43

What do our visitors tend to bring along in great numbers to a Roadshow?

0:43:430:43:46

I see suitcases full of battered Dinky toys.

0:43:460:43:51

Now, there's nothing wrong with a Dinky toy, don't get me wrong and there

0:43:510:43:55

are plenty of people out there who love Dinky toys, but what everybody has is something a bit like this...

0:43:550:44:02

play worn, battered, bits fallen off.

0:44:020:44:04

Occasionally you might get one in a box but it's those

0:44:040:44:08

sorts of Dinky toys that really people aren't interested in, sadly.

0:44:080:44:12

And do they have a value?

0:44:120:44:15

Well, I mean a tiny value.

0:44:150:44:16

I mean we're talking about 50p, £1 here and there, so not much really.

0:44:160:44:21

I can hear the sound of sobbing off camera, from all the people that own these.

0:44:210:44:26

Yes, but I mean the fact is that you're very lucky...

0:44:260:44:29

you get one lot of pleasure from a toy...

0:44:290:44:31

either you get the pleasure when you get it and you play with it,

0:44:310:44:34

or you get the pleasure later and you can't have both.

0:44:340:44:36

And of course then, it's the ones that weren't played with, which are the rarities,

0:44:360:44:41

even though they were perhaps one of many hundreds of thousands produced.

0:44:410:44:44

And so if it's a rarity, if it is in its box, then the prices can be really quite startling.

0:44:440:44:50

So what would you be talking about?

0:44:500:44:53

Well, I mean the one record price so far is for this one here, which is a little pre-war Dinky about this size,

0:44:530:45:01

but decorated with the name of a particular maker, W.E. Boyce, which was a shop in London.

0:45:010:45:07

Incredibly rare.

0:45:070:45:09

-£20,000.

-No!

0:45:090:45:12

Why?

0:45:120:45:14

It's the simple laws of supply and demand.

0:45:140:45:16

Very, very rare object, thousands of people,

0:45:160:45:19

tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of people worldwide collect Dinky toys.

0:45:190:45:23

Something has to give, and the price shoots up.

0:45:230:45:26

Now, if Dinky toys are what you see the most of,

0:45:260:45:28

what would you most like to see?

0:45:280:45:31

Well, I was incredibly lucky, when we came to Chatsworth

0:45:310:45:34

with the Roadshow back in 1996, it was in fact the Dowager Duchess who allowed us to film last time

0:45:340:45:41

and it's this object here, which is a toy by a manufacturer called Marklin.

0:45:410:45:47

Until I came to Chatsworth, there was only one of these known, and when I walked through

0:45:470:45:53

the corridors of Chatsworth House, there on a shelf, in a room, was the second one ever known

0:45:530:46:00

and there was just a little rope across the doorway.

0:46:000:46:05

A wonderful moment and an incredibly rare toy and worth about £100,000.

0:46:050:46:13

Wow!

0:46:130:46:16

And did the Dowager, or the Dowager's children...

0:46:160:46:21

did they play with it... or did she have it rather... because she knew it

0:46:210:46:24

was something that was so valuable?

0:46:240:46:25

-No, it was a childhood toy, from a previous generation.

-Gosh.

0:46:250:46:29

It's made by the best toy maker at the time,

0:46:290:46:32

a company called Gebruder Marklin.

0:46:320:46:35

They made exceptional quality toys

0:46:350:46:38

and this is just an extraordinary rarity.

0:46:380:46:42

Only two ever known, so it is that combination.

0:46:420:46:47

This... you've seen two of these now...

0:46:470:46:49

been rather spoilt actually... so what would you most like to see?

0:46:490:46:52

What would really set your pulse racing if it just arrived in a plastic bag -

0:46:520:46:57

who knows - at the Roadshow?

0:46:570:46:59

Well... now don't laugh...

0:46:590:47:01

because it does look slightly like a brick on wheels...

0:47:010:47:04

but it's this, which is another toy by Marklin.

0:47:040:47:07

I've only got a picture of it.

0:47:070:47:09

It's from their 1904 catalogue

0:47:090:47:12

and it's a picture of a toy steam tram called a Serpollet Wagen,

0:47:120:47:19

designed by somebody called Leon Serpollet, and

0:47:190:47:22

it's never turned up.

0:47:220:47:24

The image is there in the catalogue, so presumably one must exist.

0:47:240:47:29

And if one did turn up, could you put a value on something like that?

0:47:290:47:32

-Ooh yes.

-Well, go on then.

0:47:320:47:35

Well, I think putting it into context. If this one...

0:47:350:47:38

which is pretty rare...

0:47:380:47:40

is worth about £100,000...

0:47:400:47:42

that, which has never turned up...

0:47:420:47:44

would have to start at around £150,000 and go up from there, one hopes.

0:47:440:47:49

Gosh.

0:47:490:47:50

Right. Well, you heard it here... go search your attics.

0:47:500:47:54

Hilary says so.

0:47:540:47:56

If you think you might have one of these,

0:47:560:47:58

this is the Holy Grail for Hilary, so either just

0:47:580:48:01

come along to a Roadshow or contact us at our website, which is

0:48:010:48:05

bbc.co.uk/antiquesroadshow

0:48:050:48:08

Well, when I first saw this box, it reminded me of several others

0:48:140:48:18

that I've seen in the past

0:48:180:48:20

and I was absolutely sure that it contained a gold watch

0:48:200:48:24

emblazoned with the Imperial arms, the double-headed eagle.

0:48:240:48:27

And what does it mean to you when you open the box...

0:48:270:48:29

are you excited about it?

0:48:290:48:30

Well, I recall it from being a young child and my dad would get it out

0:48:300:48:34

of his secret hidden place in the wardrobe

0:48:340:48:36

-and allow us to look at it, but not touch.

-Not touch.

0:48:360:48:39

And it belonged to his grandfather, so my great-grandfather who was

0:48:390:48:45

Chief Superintendant of the Metropolitan Police

0:48:450:48:48

and was part of the king's bodyguard.

0:48:480:48:50

And he accompanied the king on a visit to Russia to see the Tsar,

0:48:500:48:54

who I think was his cousin, and he was given this watch

0:48:540:48:58

as a thank-you gift.

0:48:580:48:59

-Pretty good, isn't it?

-From the Tsar of Russia.

0:48:590:49:01

Well, I think it certainly was a thank you gift and in that regard

0:49:010:49:04

it's absolutely typical,

0:49:040:49:06

because the Tsar of Russia was the Supreme Autocrat

0:49:060:49:09

of All the Russias, he was Grand Duke of Finland, Ataman of Siberia,

0:49:090:49:12

and his dominions were so vast that

0:49:120:49:14

when the sun was coming up on one side, it was going down on the other, and what this is adding up to, is

0:49:140:49:18

-that it put him in a perfect position to give incredibly lavish gifts.

-Yes.

0:49:180:49:23

And this is not just a gold watch,

0:49:230:49:24

but it's decorated with black champleve enamel and blue enamelled

0:49:240:49:28

ribbons, with his cipher and he gave them persistently.

0:49:280:49:33

Curiously enough they're incredibly rare in everyday life,

0:49:330:49:36

but they're not rare in my life, because

0:49:360:49:38

I deal with Russian works of art and I must have seen tens of them,

0:49:380:49:41

if not hundreds of them, in my lifetime.

0:49:410:49:44

But at the same time, they're astonishingly rare in everyday life,

0:49:440:49:48

and I'm thrilled to see it.

0:49:480:49:50

I can also tell you from the lid satin here, that it's made by a firm

0:49:500:49:54

called Pavel Bure, and it means Paul Bure, and

0:49:540:49:59

his address and his name surmounted here with the

0:49:590:50:02

Imperial eagle, as is the watch,

0:50:020:50:04

which is a sign that he's under the direct patronage of the Tsar.

0:50:040:50:07

I think we can assume this is Nicholas II.

0:50:070:50:11

-Right.

-And that it's probably very early 20th century.

0:50:110:50:15

-Does that fit in with your...? Absolutely.

-Yes, yes, it does.

0:50:150:50:17

My great-grandfather retired from the king's service in 1920

0:50:170:50:21

so it would have been before that.

0:50:210:50:23

Absolutely and of course 1917 no Tsar at all, with the Russian Revolution,

0:50:230:50:26

so we've got a jolly good framework

0:50:260:50:28

for it, so it's very touching,

0:50:280:50:29

and a great memento of a fallen dynasty, I mean a fallen eagle,

0:50:290:50:33

quite literally, and after 1917 Russia fell into chaos,

0:50:330:50:36

and it's only really coming back again.

0:50:360:50:38

So we have what is a royal, an imperial souvenir and a great one.

0:50:380:50:43

Perhaps a valuation, I think rather cool for a Russian

0:50:430:50:45

work of art, of somewhere between £800 and £1,200 would be right.

0:50:450:50:50

Well, I don't think we'll ever get rid of it.

0:50:500:50:52

We want to keep it in the family because it's got such a history

0:50:520:50:55

-attached to it, and we really love it.

-Brilliant.

0:50:550:50:58

-Thank you very much.

-No, wonderful, that's great, lovely, thank you.

0:50:580:51:02

We were very short of money during the Second World War.

0:51:020:51:06

The impact of the Battle of Britain being considerable, and a lot of

0:51:060:51:10

aeroplanes were actually bought privately,

0:51:100:51:13

either by rich people, or by collections in towns.

0:51:130:51:17

I think a Spitfire cost about £5,000

0:51:170:51:20

and they raised that sum and that Spitfire, aeroplane,

0:51:200:51:23

whatever it was, would then fly with the name of the town on the side.

0:51:230:51:27

There's one in the museum in Stoke on Trent.

0:51:270:51:30

Tell me what you know about this.

0:51:300:51:33

Well, what I know about it is that one night me father came home and

0:51:330:51:38

brought that through the door and he says "I've brought you this"

0:51:380:51:41

and he threw it onto the settee.

0:51:410:51:44

What, just like that?

0:51:440:51:45

He just threw it onto the settee.

0:51:450:51:46

Luckily it went towards the pillow and landed.

0:51:460:51:49

If it had gone the other way it would have been onto the floor

0:51:490:51:51

-and probably broke.

-How old were you?

0:51:510:51:54

-I'd be probably eight, nine or, something

-Where did he find it?

0:51:540:51:59

It was found in a tractor bucket that was on a demolition site,

0:51:590:52:04

and how it survived, we don't know.

0:52:040:52:08

It just got unearthed out this tractor bucket, it was there,

0:52:080:52:11

and well, as you can see, it's not marked...

0:52:110:52:13

-survived.

-It's meant to be.

0:52:130:52:16

You know, it's survived that, it's survived the bounce,

0:52:160:52:18

it's survived all the way through.

0:52:180:52:20

Now as I understand it, you know,

0:52:200:52:23

this was developed as a way of raising money.

0:52:230:52:27

There was going to be a dog race and the prize was a silver cup

0:52:270:52:33

and the idea was that money being raised through the race

0:52:330:52:35

would go into the Spitfire fund.

0:52:350:52:36

I think when it came to the crunch, they couldn't quite do a silver cup,

0:52:360:52:41

and so you got a pot cup instead,

0:52:410:52:43

but it's relevant because it was made at Pearson's, the local company,

0:52:430:52:46

you know Pearson's of Chesterfield,

0:52:460:52:49

the great maker of stoneware, salt glaze,

0:52:490:52:51

oven wares and decorative pottery over a very long period.

0:52:510:52:55

I like Pearson's, I like their history and I think

0:52:550:52:57

it was a very stylish factory, a very practical factory.

0:52:570:53:00

Anyway, they must have been commissioned to make this

0:53:000:53:03

and I think probably the chap who won it was pretty disappointed.

0:53:030:53:06

He thought "where's the silver cup?

0:53:060:53:08

"I've got this blue pot"

0:53:080:53:10

and I think the problem was also that Chesterfield,

0:53:100:53:13

unlike some towns in this area, had a problem in getting the money.

0:53:130:53:17

Bolsover had a Spitfire, Buxton had a Spitfire

0:53:170:53:20

and Chesterfield never quite managed it and in 1943 they gave up.

0:53:200:53:24

They only got half way to a Spitfire and they gave the money away to some other fund.

0:53:240:53:28

-The owner of the dog track did actually buy a Spitfire.

-Privately.

0:53:280:53:33

-Privately, yes.

-Oh, well that's all right, so it all ends up happily.

0:53:330:53:36

It's very difficult to value, you know,

0:53:360:53:38

it may be the only one of its kind that survived,

0:53:380:53:40

maybe there are other ones in other towns that I don't know about,

0:53:400:53:43

but I think it's a wonderful

0:53:430:53:45

evocation of the hard times in 1940, efforts to keep us going in the war.

0:53:450:53:51

I'd love it, and I think I'd pay about £400 if I saw it for sale.

0:53:510:53:55

Impressed with that, because I've never looked on it as being worth

0:53:550:53:59

-anything at all, you know, it's been in the house and it's the history of it.

-But how do you value history?

0:53:590:54:05

You know, it's on our way now towards a Spitfire...

0:54:050:54:08

although they're rather more expensive these days.

0:54:080:54:10

It will go home tonight and sit in my kitchen.

0:54:100:54:13

You know it's incredible to come here to Chatsworth and find the earliest

0:54:210:54:25

piece we've had on the programme, here on this table before us, an ancient Egyptian head.

0:54:250:54:33

I suppose it's about Middle Kingdom which is....

0:54:330:54:37

Yes, 1,700 to 1,750 B.C.

0:54:370:54:39

Over 3,700 years old.

0:54:390:54:42

3,700 years old, that's older than me!

0:54:420:54:46

It's not looking in such bad condition, is it,

0:54:460:54:48

all things considered?

0:54:480:54:49

How do you come by it?

0:54:490:54:50

I dug it up out of a back garden in Derby.

0:54:500:54:54

-Dug it up?

-Yeah, doing some gardening

0:54:540:54:58

and I hit it with a spade, hopefully I didn't do too much damage to it,

0:54:580:55:02

but I hit it with a spade.

0:55:020:55:03

So presumably someone had used it as a garden ornament

0:55:030:55:07

or rockery or something like that.

0:55:070:55:09

Yes, something along those lines in the past.

0:55:090:55:11

I mean you don't throw away an ancient Egyptian head, do you,

0:55:110:55:14

in the garden without a reason.

0:55:140:55:16

Well, I wouldn't. You wouldn't think.

0:55:160:55:18

Of course the fascinating thing about being here at Chatsworth is...

0:55:180:55:22

we had a tour of the house last night,

0:55:220:55:23

and there are masses of these Roman and Egyptian things inside the house,

0:55:230:55:30

this would have fitted in in Chatsworth.

0:55:300:55:33

In my garden in Worcester I used to find Romans

0:55:330:55:37

and their pots buried down below,

0:55:370:55:39

it's what got me interested in antiquities and things and here is...

0:55:390:55:45

did it get you interested in ancient things?

0:55:450:55:48

My mum's always been interested in Egyptology

0:55:480:55:51

but I'm more into geology, so along similar lines.

0:55:510:55:54

Do you know the stone angle on it?

0:55:540:55:56

-What is it, schist or...?

-It's quartzite.

0:55:560:55:58

Oh, it's quartzite, quartzite, so absolutely beautifully made

0:55:580:56:02

and I mean it's had some damage...

0:56:020:56:04

well, what do you expect, poor old chap.

0:56:040:56:06

I don't know whether this had a beard,

0:56:060:56:09

-it possibly did have a beard, they did.

-Possibly yes.

0:56:090:56:12

..have a beard, and he's had his nose damaged a bit,

0:56:120:56:15

but what the heck, 4,000 years old,

0:56:150:56:18

-you expect it to be a little bit knocked about.

-Worn away, yeah.

0:56:180:56:22

But it's incredible to discover it.

0:56:220:56:26

I suppose... I mean you ought to have this

0:56:260:56:29

investigated in perhaps the British Museum or something like that.

0:56:290:56:33

I did take it down to them, 12, 18 months back

0:56:330:56:37

for them to take a look at.

0:56:370:56:39

Initially when I sent them the emails with the pictures,

0:56:390:56:42

they arranged for me to go down

0:56:420:56:43

but they said "in all honesty we're expecting it to be a fake,

0:56:430:56:46

"possibly an early fake, Roman, but a fake none the less."

0:56:460:56:50

I opened it up there and I think the guy's jaw dropped and before I

0:56:500:56:55

knew it, I had the whole department arrayed around the table

0:56:550:56:58

having a look at it because they were like...

0:56:580:57:00

"Yeah, actually it is, it's genuine."

0:57:000:57:03

4,000 years ancient and found in Derby.

0:57:030:57:07

It goes back before the city of Derby started.

0:57:070:57:10

Isn't that incredible?

0:57:100:57:13

I suppose one's got to think of a value.

0:57:130:57:16

It's extremely difficult, but I suppose one must be thinking in terms

0:57:160:57:23

of £10,000 upwards or something like that.

0:57:230:57:27

I mean, it's a major thing, it really is a fantastic object.

0:57:270:57:32

I'm longing to stroke the chap and to think that it is that,

0:57:320:57:38

and there it stands, having been found in Derby.

0:57:380:57:42

I think I'm speechless.

0:57:460:57:48

For the first time ever.

0:57:480:57:50

A little-known fact about Chatsworth for you.

0:57:550:57:57

In 1829, a banana plant was brought to

0:57:570:58:00

the 6th Duke of Devonshire and his famous head gardener, Joseph Paxton,

0:58:000:58:04

to grow in the greenhouse here.

0:58:040:58:05

It was named the "Cavendish banana"

0:58:050:58:07

which is the Devonshire family name.

0:58:070:58:09

A few years later, a missionary took back

0:58:090:58:11

some young banana plants from here to Samoa.

0:58:110:58:14

They flourished in Samoa and in fact the world over, and now,

0:58:140:58:17

the Cavendish banana is one of the most commercially available bananas

0:58:170:58:22

in the world, so there you are...

0:58:220:58:24

from Chatsworth and the Antiques Roadshow and the Cavendish bananas,

0:58:240:58:29

bye-bye.

0:58:290:58:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:430:58:46

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:460:58:48