Chatsworth 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Chatsworth 2

Fiona Bruce and the team pay a second visit to Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, where the experts are kept busy as more family treasures are brought from miles around.


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Our venue for today's Antiques Roadshow has a double boast.

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Not only is it one of the most spectacular

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country houses in the land, it's also in epic surroundings.

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Welcome to a second visit to Chatsworth House in Derbyshire.

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Sometimes in history partnerships occur

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that combine great ambition with great vision.

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And that's what happened when the 6th Duke of Devonshire

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employed a genius of garden design and engineering,

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Joseph Paxton, as head gardener of Chatsworth in 1826.

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On his first day at work,

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so the story goes,

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Paxton scaled the kitchen wall,

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jumped over the garden gate, clapped eyes on a girl,

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fell in love, and she with him, and all before nine o'clock.

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And that's how his remarkable 32-year career

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began here at Chatsworth.

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Paxton was organised and ambitious

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and after seeing the scale of his rockery, the Duke of Wellington

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told the 6th Duke that he'd like Paxton as one of his generals.

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Horticultural one-upmanship was rife

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when it came to stately home garden design,

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but never had such a gigantic

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theatrical stage-set of rocks been conceived.

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It was so monumental that Paxton invented special

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steam lifting equipment to put the giant boulders in place.

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Water features and fountains were a hobby of the rich and famous

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in the 18th and 19th century,

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so when the fountain-loving Tsar Nicholas was due to visit

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the 6th Duke, Paxton hatched a plan to build one.

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It was typically grand.

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At 300 feet, the Emperor Fountain was the highest in the world

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at the time, and it's staggering to think

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gravity alone pushes it that high.

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Sadly, the Tsar never saw it.

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Paxton's crowning glory was his great conservatory.

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In 1840 it was the world's largest,

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and the forerunner to Crystal Palace.

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To keep it tropically warm, men would drag 300 tons of coal

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along this tunnel, under the glasshouse, straight to the boiler.

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A maze sits on the spot now, but when Queen Victoria visited

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the conservatory in 1843, she was driven through it

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in a horse and carriage.

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She said of Paxton, "He was a very clever man, quite a genius."

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Paxton is buried in the grounds of the great house,

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with his sweetheart Sarah, the girl he fell in love with

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after leaping a Chatsworth gate on his first day at work.

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What a superb horticultural setting for today's Roadshow.

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So you like blue and white?

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Yeah, I've been collecting blue and white transfer ware

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for quite a while now.

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Yes. And this one, this one depicts Chatsworth itself.

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That's the newest one I've got, yeah,

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just because of the interest of it being Chatsworth

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and the date being erroneous.

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-It says 1792 on there.

-Down there, 1792.

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And that wing on here, wasn't actually built till the 1820s.

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-I see, so they fiddled things a bit.

-Yeah.

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So how do you know about Chatsworth, then?

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-Because I've worked here for 25 years.

-Have you really?

-I work in the gift shop.

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Oh, right, so that's where you acquired these plates, is it?

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Unfortunately not.

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Well, it's particularly interesting seeing this scene of Chatsworth,

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looking up at it, and there, but of course it's a fiddled date.

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-That's it and it's only a very modern plate.

-I mean...

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Oh, it is quite a modern plate, I think, what is the date here?

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It says "England" on it, so it's made after 1891.

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-Yeah.

-And anything with "England" on it, or the country of origin,

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isn't going to be before 1890, but these two are older.

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-This one, the Ladies of Llangollen.

-That's right.

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They were two bonny ladies, weren't they, who lived together and became, became rather famous didn't they?

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So you know all about the ladies there. It's a lovely plate isn't it?

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Yeah, I only knew about the ladies after I bought the plate.

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Oh, yes, and that one is...

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-This one is just...

-..a landscape scene.

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That's right and it was just because of the unusual transfer, I particularly liked this,

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because it shows a little bit of the animal falling off the bridge on it.

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The animal, poor old animal falling off the bridge.

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Rather like they do in the River Derwent here.

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-But it's great fun, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-And these are sort of middle 19th century.

-Yeah.

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1860s something like that.

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But this piece is much earlier than any of those.

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-Oh. I thought that was the newest.

-So how did you get one,

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-come by it?

-Um, I saw a lady who was clearing out at a car boot sale.

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She'd been collecting blue and white, I bought some things,

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and that was among it, and I think it was 50p.

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-Yes, but these were a bit more than 50p?

-That was £1.

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That was a pound, and this one?

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-I think that was a pound as well.

-That was a pound, a pound.

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-That might have gone as far as a couple of pounds.

-Couple of pounds!

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Well, these are going to be... that's going to be just your pound.

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Even though it's got Chatsworth.

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£10, £15, £15-£20.

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But this little chappie,

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who was 50p, is actually about 1760 in date,

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so it's the date this one's pretending to be.

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-Yes.

-It really is, it's made in Delft ware, that's English tin-glazed

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pottery there, on little peg legs, and it's intended as a...

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I suppose a bon-bon or sweet meat or something.

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With little dishes put into those.

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-Well, that's what we've been using it for.

-Well fine.

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For nuts and stuff.

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But made either in Bristol or Liverpool, must be one or other

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of those places, and instead of being just a couple of odd quid,

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your 50p is now worth £800.

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Oh, my goodness!

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Even in that condition?

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It's a little bit damaged, but, what the heck?!

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I mean, you're entitled to be damaged after 250 years.

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I'm a little damaged after less!

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Yes! Thank you.

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Look at this fascinating 18th century example of footballers' wives.

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These ladies sitting round this table

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with the wonderful feathers in their hair, taking tea.

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And of course tea was a tremendously important ceremony,

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really, at this period.

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Tea was coming in from China with all the porcelains.

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People wanted to show off their fabulous wealth.

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Look at their dresses, really dressed to kill, and of course,

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you know, in those days, to have a black servant was very much in vogue.

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It was one of the things, a lot of these people might have had estates,

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and they would have had the black servants.

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So this lady who's hosting this party is showing all along,

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-look at this wonderful turkey carpet.

-Oh, right.

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Which was made in Persia. Again there's so many details here that tell you how rich these people were.

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-Yes.

-It was all these things about,

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it depended what colour you painted your walls.

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If you had purple on your walls you were incredibly rich.

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Everything about this is quality.

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-The person that commissioned this to be done, was again showing their wealth.

-Yes.

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And what do you know about this embroidery?

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The only thing we do know is that it came down through the family.

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It was my great grandfather's,

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and it's just come down through the family from him.

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But we've no idea before then, where it's come from,

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or anything, haven't a clue.

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I think it's probably somewhere around 1740 when,

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as I say, this whole thing about tea...

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tea was incredibly expensive.

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These ships that came over,

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if you take the Nanking cargo, which sank in the 1750s,

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-70% of the value of the cargo was the tea.

-Yes.

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So it was very, very important to show off, and this is fabulous.

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Look at the detailing.

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I love these tassels, they're actually bigger than the...

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-Yeah.

-..this person was not that good at perspective!

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Because if you look at the table, then it's...

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-Flat.

-It's flat! They're going to...

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All the tea cups are going to fall onto the ground!

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And fabulous, fabulous little dog curled up here.

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-I know, he's so cute, isn't he?

-Cute.

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And would you ever have seen this on the back of a chair?

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Erm, I don't know.

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-Did you consider this shape?

-Yes, it is, isn't it?

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It's a very unusual shape.

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-Yes, it is.

-So I can...

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And can you imagine if you had a set of these? Wow!

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I know. You wouldn't want to sit on them though, would you?

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-Just look at them.

-Yeah, yeah.

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So I think this is... fabulous colours,

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really rare subject, these wonderful rich women sitting round taking tea.

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It's a very, very unusual subject.

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-So, the early ladies that lunched?

-The early ladies at lunch, exactly.

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As I said, definitely the footballers' wives of the day.

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And value?

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No idea.

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If this came up in a good specialist sale,

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I could easily, easily, see this sell for £8,000.

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Oh, really?!

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How fabulous.

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That's wonderful! It's staying in the family though.

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Your son can have this now.

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Yeah!

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Yeah, he's one of four, so maybe not.

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-They'll be arguing.

-There'll be arguments now.

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Well, I'd normally ask you what you know about this,

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but it actually says it all on the dial, doesn't it?

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-It does.

-A bit of a giveaway. Liberty & Co., Regent Street,

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it says it's eight days and it says it's a quarter repeater.

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Now do you know what the quarter repeating bit means?

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It means that when you press the button on the top, it tells you the time.

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That's absolutely right. It repeats to the preceding quarter.

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We'll come to that later, but meanwhile let's look at the watch.

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It's what we call a Goliath watch, it's Swiss

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-and it's nickel-plated.

-Oh.

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-So, have you ever looked inside it?

-Er, no.

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OK, there's a double back, so you've got that,

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then you've got the inner back, the cuvette,

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and there we have a three-quarter plate movement

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with a nice lever escapement.

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And you can see the coiled gongs on which the watch repeats.

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The date is roughly 1910, when we imported these.

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These were never worn on the person,

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always made to go with a stand like this.

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But this is a wonderfully ornate stand - and do you know why that is?

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No, I don't know anything about the case at all.

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-The case is made by Liberty.

-Oh, really.

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And it is absolutely typical of the Liberty Arts and Crafts movement of the early part of the 20th century.

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And being silver, it has a hallmark conveniently - L&C, Liberty & Co -

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and that's hallmarked Birmingham 1911.

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So it all ties in absolutely perfectly.

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It is an Irish Celtic design,

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typically Arts and Crafts, and it's on this lovely oak carcass.

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Most of these things aren't nearly as nice as that.

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So the watch - it's appearing to say about eight minutes to five,

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let's do the repetition...

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So it did the four and then the three individual quarters.

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And it would have been used probably on a bedside cabinet or

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a dressing table, so that somebody at night could have just stretched out,

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pressed that button and told the time without having to light a candle or to turn on a gas lamp.

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I love it. Do you like it?

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-We love it.

-And how did you get it?

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We inherited it in 1988, when my husband's godmother died.

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-Lovely thing to be given.

-Yes, yes.

-Lovely thing.

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When you inherited it, did you have any valuation or anything done?

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We did, yes, and we had it serviced at that time, cos it wasn't working.

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What sort of ideal did they come up with?

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Er, they said £1,000 for the watch and £300 to £500 for the case.

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-Right.

-That was in 1988.

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Well, you'll be delighted to hear

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that the market's moved on a bit since then,

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and certainly in a good shop or at a good high-quality antiques fair,

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somebody would be asking at least £3,000 for that today.

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Goodness me. Thank you very much!

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-Thank you.

-Thanks.

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It belonged to my father,

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who, since he was born in 1901, my guess would be that this was when

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he was a young lad, so shall we say, I would reckon he had it about 1910.

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Right, and do you remember it going?

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Just once.

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It was kept in my grandparents' house -

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my father had never taken it from there.

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and when we visited there, I think it must have been around about 1937,

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when I was about six or seven years old,

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it was got out and I was allowed to see it going.

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-But you couldn't touch?

-I wasn't allowed to do much, anything, with it.

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-And so that was a single experience.

-A single experience...

-And then it was back in the cupboard?

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It was probably put away finally around about 1950...

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-Right.

-..and hasn't seen the light of day until about a year or so ago.

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Well, it's great that it's come out, you know.

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It's an astonishing survivor of a train set, of about the period you're talking about.

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-Yes.

-This is made by Bing of Nuremberg,

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one of the great names of that period.

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Germany was the dominant force in both model railways and toy trains through the Victorian period.

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What we're looking at is therefore something made in Germany, but very much for the British market.

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Clearly marked MR - Midland Railway - we're right in the heart of the Midland Railway here.

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-It couldn't be in a better place.

-Quite.

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Indeed the German manufacturers made them for various British railway companies at that time.

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So if you were living in the west, you could have a Great Western set.

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Steam-powered and fired by methylated spirits.

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This was a common experience for wealthy children of that period.

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The thing though that excites me most of all, apart from the train, is actually this catalogue.

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I don't think you probably appreciate how rare this is.

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I gather it must be pretty rare.

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Here we have the catalogue for the railway of that day,

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with lots of layouts, how to lay out your track, but best of all,

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we've got a catalogue page of carriages,

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and we can identify those particular pieces.

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And if we turn over,

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we've got wonderful visions of equipment and cranes and

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sheds and stations and turntables. I imagine you've got all these at home.

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Oh, wish I had!

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HE LAUGHS

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This is a 1903 catalogue,

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so therefore it dates you precisely to what you were talking about.

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-It came into your family 1905-1910, thereabouts.

-Yes.

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I love it. What are you going to do with it now?

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Well, probably sell it to help finance university fees for grandchildren.

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I think that's a very noble effort. Have you asked them if they'd rather have the train?

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-I haven't!

-Well, I think, please do that - they might prefer a train to a university education.

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-They need the choice.

-They do.

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You don't want them saying, "I wish you'd never sold that train. OK, I've got a degree - but so what?"

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HE LAUGHS

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Anyway, it's a great set.

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In that case, what are you going to get for it?

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All the vehicles, the track, the train set,

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-should be £1,500-£2,000. So...

-It's more than I expected.

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-But it won't pay a year's tuition fees.

-It won't, no.

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However, the good news is that this actually is very rare indeed.

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A collector would probably pay £400 for that.

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That's much rarer than the train.

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-So we're getting there.

-We're getting there.

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£2,500. You've only got 500 to find.

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First year looked after!

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-Yes.

-It's easy.

-Quite.

-Thank you.

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Thank you!

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I've always been interested in walking, I've always been a walker and a rock climber and I always

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spent a lot of time walking in the Peaks.

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And where did you find your first Ramblers Handbook?

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The Clarion Ramblers Club was selling off some

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of their old books quite cheaply,

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so I opted to buy, I think I bought five for about a fiver.

0:17:210:17:26

-Great. And how many have you got now?

-41 now.

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OK - and what sort of range in date?

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I've got them from 1923 up to 1964,

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which is when the last one was produced.

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Right, and this is your earliest, you said, 1923-24?

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That's the oldest one, yes.

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And what's in them? I mean I gather it's just a description of a walk?

0:17:400:17:45

Well, the books are the complete guide for anyone that's interested in the Peak District.

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For instance it tells you that they'll meet at Leopold Street

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-in Sheffield at 8.50 in the morning, get the train...

-Not too early then!

0:17:520:17:56

No, and it gives a clearly defined route that they're going to follow.

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They're going to stop at Langsett for tea, and in a lot of them

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it'll tell you it'll cost you one and nine pence

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for a scone and a cup of tea.

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It'll tell you you're going to walk 17 miles.

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The fare will be two and three pence and the leader will be Mr W Marshall.

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-That's incredible.

-Yeah, and as I say, that's the information you get for every week of the year.

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It's absolutely fascinating.

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Now I did notice inside the front cover, there's an advert for an old hobnail boot - 39 and six.

0:18:210:18:28

-Yeah.

-My god, they look uncomfortable though.

0:18:280:18:30

I mean, the blisters people must have ended up with.

0:18:300:18:33

Yeah, a little bit different to today's stuff, yeah.

0:18:330:18:35

Yeah, and no doubt the advertisers helped with the printing costs at the time.

0:18:350:18:39

Well, I notice there's a portrait of George Ward, who I have heard of,

0:18:390:18:44

and he, to me, he's almost like the Wainwright of the Peak District.

0:18:440:18:49

Yes, I'm an admirer of Wainwright, but actually I prefer

0:18:490:18:53

this chap, Ward, because he was involved from 1900,

0:18:530:18:57

and he was involved very early in the mass trespass on Kinder Scout.

0:18:570:19:00

Yes, which was a crucial moment, when the sort of the common people, for want of a better word,

0:19:000:19:06

wanted access to paths that had been formerly off-limits.

0:19:060:19:09

-Absolutely.

-And it was the start of something that presumably led to the formation of The Ramblers.

0:19:090:19:14

Which Ward was instrumental in setting that up, along with a lot of other things.

0:19:140:19:18

And even today, the Clarion Ramblers who still exist over 100 years later

0:19:180:19:22

still call him The Leader, and he's been dead since 1957.

0:19:220:19:27

Fantastic, and certainly a man of the hills.

0:19:270:19:29

-Yeah.

-Obviously I don't see too many of these on the market, but I know that if they arrive at a specialist

0:19:290:19:35

bookshop or seller, they're going to ask probably between,

0:19:350:19:38

-what, £25 and £100 each.

-Yeah.

0:19:380:19:40

-Which is no small amount, is it?

-No.

0:19:400:19:43

So you've got 41. We're looking at over a thousand pounds' worth.

0:19:430:19:47

Thank you.

0:19:470:19:49

I always think collections of cups and saucers look lovely displayed together.

0:19:520:19:56

-Are these ones you've collected?

-No, I inherited them from my parents.

0:19:560:20:00

Oh, right. And when did they buy them, or were they collected?

0:20:000:20:03

Well, I suspect they must have got them in the '20s, and they were living in Hampstead then.

0:20:030:20:08

And I know that they were sort of collecting things for their house at that time.

0:20:080:20:12

So these are for the china cabinets, presumably?

0:20:120:20:14

Yes, they lived in a display cabinet

0:20:140:20:17

and I've got the display cabinet and they still live in it.

0:20:170:20:20

Did they tell you much about them?

0:20:200:20:22

I know nothing about them whatsoever.

0:20:220:20:24

It's interesting seeing them here together,

0:20:240:20:27

they have the same basic border, a border associated with Meissen,

0:20:270:20:30

the great German factory.

0:20:300:20:32

But of course Meissen designs have always been copied for a long time,

0:20:320:20:36

and it's intriguing here to see

0:20:360:20:38

a copy of Meissen, which is what this is, with the border,

0:20:380:20:41

but done a long time ago.

0:20:410:20:42

But this armorial design is Chinese,

0:20:420:20:46

exported from China in around about 1740, the Meissen design gone out,

0:20:460:20:51

copied for the border and someone's coat of arms...

0:20:510:20:54

-You don't know whose arms?

-No, I have no idea at all.

0:20:540:20:56

There's a great coat of arms there, a lot of detail,

0:20:560:20:59

and the whole set would have had badges of the different families, made in China in the very thin,

0:20:590:21:04

delicate porcelain - as the Chinese invented the porcelain, and everybody wanted Chinese porcelain sets.

0:21:040:21:10

Here we've got a Meissen design of harbour scenes with Chinese figures

0:21:100:21:15

and a similar border,

0:21:150:21:16

but I mean not perhaps as well-painted as you would like.

0:21:160:21:20

-That's not bad but it's a bit sketchy, a little bit weak.

-Yeah.

0:21:200:21:24

This one, trying to be Meissen, but, oh, dear, the wrong mark.

0:21:240:21:28

A pretend crossed swords, a little bit awkward,

0:21:280:21:33

they're not the real Meissen - that one's a copy from 1880.

0:21:330:21:38

But this one, well, it screams out, doesn't it?

0:21:380:21:41

Just look how well-painted that is.

0:21:410:21:44

In the background, the trees are delicate, the faces are so real.

0:21:440:21:51

Little hand - isn't that beautifully painted?

0:21:510:21:53

And there's...

0:21:530:21:56

sprigs, flowers, filling up the design, and there's the Meissen

0:21:560:21:59

crossed swords as it should be, with impressed numbers and signs.

0:21:590:22:04

This is real Meissen, and that is 1740.

0:22:040:22:08

So, lovely condition, isn't it?

0:22:080:22:12

So, gorgeous things together, and nice comparison, because

0:22:120:22:15

in a way, two different copies of Meissen and the real thing.

0:22:150:22:20

And curiously, this one, although it's copying the design from Chinese,

0:22:200:22:25

a nice armorial one,

0:22:250:22:27

that's probably quite a valuable one, so I suppose that's going to be,

0:22:270:22:31

erm, £1,000, a nice cup and saucer.

0:22:310:22:34

Whereas that copy is the wrong one, out of period,

0:22:340:22:38

and so probably only £100 for that.

0:22:380:22:42

-Mm-hm.

-But the real thing, with that quality from 1740,

0:22:420:22:46

about 2,000 for that.

0:22:460:22:48

Wow. Well, that's very nice to know.

0:22:480:22:51

So, a lovely part of a display cabinet.

0:22:510:22:53

Well, they'll be going back in the display cabinet this evening.

0:22:530:22:56

Where they belong. Nice to see them.

0:22:560:22:58

OK.

0:22:580:22:59

Now, this photograph shows an RAF officer,

0:22:590:23:04

-possibly from the Second World War period?

-Yes.

0:23:040:23:06

Now, who was he?

0:23:060:23:08

He was my father, and he was based in the north-east of Scotland,

0:23:080:23:12

just north of Fochabers,

0:23:120:23:14

and he was part of the photo reconnaissance unit there.

0:23:140:23:17

His job was to review all the literature that came in,

0:23:170:23:21

film and such like, and interpret

0:23:210:23:23

what was going on, and then arrange to sort out for the next sortie,

0:23:230:23:28

the next day, or immediately.

0:23:280:23:30

Now I guess that's why you've brought along an album here with lots

0:23:300:23:33

of photographs of German shipping being attacked by Allied aircraft.

0:23:330:23:39

This photograph is extraordinary.

0:23:390:23:42

Look at the number of aircraft flying in this photograph.

0:23:420:23:45

Yes, and in this particular attack, the speeds at which they're going at

0:23:450:23:49

and also the fact that they're having to avoid fighters coming in, means that it's a general melee.

0:23:490:23:55

We don't know where that is, I guess?

0:23:550:23:57

Oh, it would be between what we call Fraserburgh and Scandinavia.

0:23:570:24:02

OK, and it looks like a home-made album - is this something that he would have made himself?

0:24:020:24:06

It doesn't look official to me...

0:24:060:24:08

No, it's something he put together, really because

0:24:080:24:12

he was told to destroy everything, so he decided to keep some of it for historical purposes.

0:24:120:24:17

What was this, after the war, when the war finished?

0:24:170:24:20

No, during. He felt that it would all be lost and for

0:24:200:24:24

the number of men who'd lost their lives, he felt - in the squadrons -

0:24:240:24:28

he felt this was a mark of respect.

0:24:280:24:30

It wasn't just the fighting force who were important,

0:24:300:24:33

but it was the men and the women in the intelligence

0:24:330:24:37

part of the squadrons that were just as important,

0:24:370:24:41

because it was their job to look at the photographs, to...

0:24:410:24:45

explore the different types of equipment

0:24:450:24:48

that the Germans were using, and if they realised that

0:24:480:24:52

the Germans were using something more modern, something different -

0:24:520:24:56

different ammunition, projectiles, flying styles, for example -

0:24:560:25:00

then they would bring in the boffins,

0:25:000:25:02

who would then interpret these photographs and come up with ways of countering the Germans.

0:25:020:25:07

Absolutely. He discovered several fancy antennae

0:25:070:25:11

on some of the submarines in this book,

0:25:110:25:14

and also on some of these ships,

0:25:140:25:16

which we weren't aware of, and that was the way, you know,

0:25:160:25:20

it was up to him to interpret it,

0:25:200:25:22

and send it off immediately for people to follow up.

0:25:220:25:25

And we have a photograph here which I find rather bizarre, rather peculiar.

0:25:250:25:31

Yes, this is a Mosquito,

0:25:310:25:33

and basically there were two ships in this fjord hugging the coast,

0:25:330:25:37

and what they're doing is coming in and strafing them

0:25:370:25:40

with rocket-propelled incendiaries.

0:25:400:25:42

Unfortunately, the German here has decided to fire up a grappling iron

0:25:420:25:47

on the end of a steel cable, obviously to put off the pilot,

0:25:470:25:50

and in this case the pilot will have been scared out of his wits and crashed,

0:25:500:25:54

which you can see down here.

0:25:540:25:56

There's no chance of pulling out of that.

0:25:560:25:59

Terrifying, isn't it, actually?

0:25:590:26:01

And all young men.

0:26:010:26:03

-Very.

-In the prime of their lives.

0:26:030:26:05

Yes, yes, indeed, yes, usually just 20 or just over.

0:26:050:26:10

-I think this book is a tribute to their bravery.

-Indeed.

0:26:100:26:14

Well, you know, these do have a value.

0:26:140:26:18

There are many, many collectors around the world

0:26:180:26:22

who are fascinated by photographs like this,

0:26:220:26:24

and the photographic evidence of this type,

0:26:240:26:27

and they do pay quite substantial sums.

0:26:270:26:30

Just this album alone, and the history that surrounds it,

0:26:300:26:34

if you like, would probably be worth £700, £800, maybe even £1,000.

0:26:340:26:41

Interesting. I don't know whether I would part with it personally.

0:26:410:26:45

I would be interested to

0:26:450:26:47

pass it on to a museum eventually, if there was one specifically for this, for these squadrons.

0:26:470:26:53

Now it's not often we see Constable at a Roadshow, but I know it's a name our experts dream of seeing.

0:26:560:27:02

Do you know if it is a genuine Constable or not?

0:27:020:27:04

No - I need someone to verify who the artist is.

0:27:040:27:09

I know it has Constable written on the frame, but...

0:27:090:27:13

in the past I've been told different things about the painting.

0:27:130:27:17

I just enjoy the painting, so it would be nice to know

0:27:170:27:21

who the artist is.

0:27:210:27:23

People have looked at it before - some people have told you it is a Constable,

0:27:230:27:27

and others have told you it isn't?

0:27:270:27:28

My husband and I were told that it wasn't, even though he'd bought it as a Constable.

0:27:280:27:32

And then later on, after my husband's died, I was told it isn't a Constable,

0:27:320:27:39

but because it has Constable written on the frame, when people visit me, they think

0:27:390:27:43

I've got a Constable and I keep saying it's not a Constable.

0:27:430:27:46

So I'd like to know who the artist is.

0:27:460:27:48

You're in the right place, and I know you've brought a number of paintings.

0:27:480:27:52

You're very gallantly holding them for us - and you want to find out more.

0:27:520:27:56

If it is a Constable, that's... It would be worth quite a lot of money.

0:27:560:28:00

Probably, I hope not.

0:28:000:28:02

-You hope not?

-I hope it's not a Constable in a way.

0:28:020:28:04

-Why is that?

-Erm...

0:28:040:28:07

Because I would have liked him to have enjoyed

0:28:070:28:10

knowing that it is a Constable, and to enjoy finding out what we're going to find out today.

0:28:100:28:16

-And good luck.

-Thanks, Fiona.

0:28:160:28:18

Well, here we have this wonderful shimmering gold work that just takes

0:28:190:28:24

us back right to the 1920s and the Charleston and the Flapper style.

0:28:240:28:29

It's all full of movement and great fun. How did you come to have it?

0:28:290:28:33

Well, I actually inherited it from my German aunt,

0:28:330:28:36

and sadly we don't know anything about the history,

0:28:360:28:40

but there is this date inside - 10th May 1928.

0:28:400:28:46

We always thought as well that it must be from this Charleston era,

0:28:460:28:49

and I thought how beautiful it would go with these lovely dresses

0:28:490:28:52

which are sort of flapping about, and that's all I know, really.

0:28:520:28:56

Oh, wonderful.

0:28:560:28:58

Well, it really is from that 1920s period,

0:28:580:29:01

and the date works perfectly with the bag and also the purse.

0:29:010:29:05

-It's a period which is always called the Art Deco period.

-Yes.

0:29:050:29:10

It's about the wonderful cinemas, about dancing,

0:29:100:29:13

about girls going out and having really wild and extravagant dresses and just having fun.

0:29:130:29:17

And there was one particular lady, Josephine Baker, who was a real sort

0:29:170:29:21

of dancer and singer and entertainer, and she's well-known for dancing the Charleston at the Folies-Bergeres,

0:29:210:29:27

so it really is just fitting to see a bag like this,

0:29:270:29:30

and tie it into that Deco period.

0:29:300:29:32

It is absolutely beautiful. I think what fascinates me about this is that

0:29:320:29:37

it is of course gold, it's 18-carat gold,

0:29:370:29:41

it's marked in the inside 750, which is a mark to represent gold.

0:29:410:29:47

-Right.

-And it's also got this lovely platinum work, bringing out that

0:29:470:29:50

lovely geometric look that you associate also with the Deco period.

0:29:500:29:54

-Yes, yes, right.

-And then also at the top here you've

0:29:540:29:56

got two beautiful cabochon-cut sapphires in the top, which are also seen in the little bag.

0:29:560:30:02

-In the little bag, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:30:020:30:04

So, absolutely amazing.

0:30:040:30:05

And maybe in the '20s, you'd just have your dance card in there and

0:30:050:30:08

just continue to dance the night away which just sounds a wonderful way to live, doesn't it?

0:30:080:30:14

-It's a collector who's going to go for this.

-Yes.

0:30:140:30:16

And as far as something like this coming up at auction, I think we'd

0:30:160:30:20

-probably expect it to be between £3,000 and £4,000.

-Ooh!

0:30:200:30:24

Well, I think that's a lot of money for a little bag!

0:30:240:30:28

Wow, that's brilliant, really.

0:30:280:30:30

It's just been fabulous to see it,

0:30:300:30:32

it's been wonderful for you to bring it along, and I can just sort of hear the Charleston in the background of

0:30:320:30:38

-the evening, and I'm sure you'll just be dancing your way home.

-Absolutely!

0:30:380:30:42

One has to assume that she's called Eve, or something like that,

0:31:010:31:05

from the style of it.

0:31:050:31:06

Do you know what the official title is?

0:31:060:31:08

The official title is called The Temptation,

0:31:080:31:10

but we've always known her as Eve in the family.

0:31:100:31:13

She's got the apple and this wonderful serpent all the way through,

0:31:130:31:18

-and it's signed on the back NA Trent - now, that's Newbury Trent.

-Yes, it is.

0:31:180:31:23

-What does the A stand for?

-Abbot.

0:31:230:31:24

-Abbot.

-Newbury Abbot, Trent.

0:31:240:31:26

And the books say that he dies either in 1953 or '63 - which is right?

0:31:260:31:31

-'53.

-And how can you be so sure?

0:31:310:31:33

-He's my great uncle.

-Right, OK!

0:31:330:31:35

And you obviously knew him, did you?

0:31:350:31:37

I met him, but I don't remember him, I remember his wife, who was a very imposing woman

0:31:370:31:42

and I was terrified of her, so I remember her and not him.

0:31:420:31:45

Oh, what a shame, because we've got this lovely photo of him, and he looks really a very charming man.

0:31:450:31:51

Well, he seems to have had quite an interesting range of friends and contacts as well.

0:31:510:31:56

He exhibits quite often at the Royal Academy and clearly gets to know Royal Academicians and so on,

0:31:560:32:02

and he lives in a smart part of Chelsea - well, smart today - near

0:32:020:32:05

Sir Alfred Munnings, who was the President of the Royal Academy.

0:32:050:32:10

And there is a bust of Munnings by Trent, which is rather nice,

0:32:100:32:14

but it's sort of slightly different to his normal work.

0:32:140:32:16

He was working in the 1920s, largely doing war memorials,

0:32:160:32:20

and it's so beautifully sinuously carved, it's...

0:32:200:32:26

-It's lovely, isn't it?

-It is terrific, and it's dated 1926.

0:32:260:32:30

So you know, probably absolutely at his peak.

0:32:300:32:33

You inherited it, so you didn't ever have to buy it, so you've no idea...

0:32:350:32:39

-No.

-Well, this whole period of sculpture is now very much in demand,

0:32:390:32:44

and I can see she would make somewhere between

0:32:440:32:47

at least £2,000 to £3,000

0:32:470:32:49

possibly maybe as much as £4,000 at auction today.

0:32:490:32:52

So establishing a good price, I think.

0:32:520:32:54

Indeed, yes. I'm sure that my great uncle would be very pleased if he knew that today,

0:32:540:32:59

because I don't think he was desperately well-off in his lifetime.

0:32:590:33:03

I had an uncle who was a sculptor and I'm afraid that sort of thing happens.

0:33:030:33:06

-'Twas ever thus.

-Yes, I think so.

0:33:060:33:09

I understand you've been talking to Fiona and that you're interested

0:33:090:33:12

to know more about these pictures and indeed who painted them.

0:33:120:33:15

-Yes.

-Right, well, I hope I can help you.

0:33:150:33:18

This is potentially by

0:33:180:33:22

one of the great British artists, John Constable,

0:33:220:33:26

who painted at the end of the 18th century, early 19th century.

0:33:260:33:31

But I'm going to let you down very quickly - it is not by John Constable.

0:33:310:33:35

If I got a pound for every time someone said to me,

0:33:350:33:37

"I've got a John Constable," I'd be an extremely rich man.

0:33:370:33:40

That's fine, it's because it said "Constable" there, and people think it's a Constable.

0:33:400:33:45

I don't want people to say, "Oh, you've got a Constable,"

0:33:450:33:48

-because I don't know whether it is or it isn't and...

-Exactly, exactly.

0:33:480:33:51

It's not by Constable, and there's a number of things that we need to look it.

0:33:510:33:55

First of all, JC here, do you see that?

0:33:550:33:58

-Yes.

-He hardly ever signed, so that was my first sort of worry.

0:33:580:34:03

The second thing,

0:34:030:34:04

if you're talking about the greatest artist of this period,

0:34:040:34:07

it's just not quite good enough.

0:34:070:34:09

-Yep.

-If you look at the figures here,

0:34:090:34:11

the gentleman fishing and so forth,

0:34:110:34:13

the quality isn't quite strong enough,

0:34:130:34:16

and the background of the house, just a bit weak.

0:34:160:34:19

The colouring is right,

0:34:190:34:21

typical, this sort of splurge of red that he often used, but...

0:34:210:34:25

-It's not.

-Thumbs down, I'm afraid.

-That's fine, that's great.

-It's still got a value.

0:34:250:34:30

-Yes.

-Because you know, he influenced so many people - so who is it by?

0:34:300:34:33

We'll just say "follower of John Constable".

0:34:330:34:36

I think that's the closest you're going to get.

0:34:360:34:38

If you and I went out to paint something, you know, 200 years ago,

0:34:380:34:41

and we didn't put our name, we would just go, how do they know who we are?

0:34:410:34:45

If you see what I mean. So we're never going to find out who it is.

0:34:450:34:48

-Right.

-So, "follower of."

0:34:480:34:50

And it's probably worth £1,000-£1,500.

0:34:510:34:53

-That's fine.

-As a nice, decorative, typical English landscape.

0:34:530:34:57

-That's fine, thank you very much.

-Enjoy that.

0:34:570:35:00

But, I know you're going to see Rupert with two more pictures,

0:35:000:35:03

so let's hope that the news is better than the news I've given you - so, fingers crossed.

0:35:030:35:07

Thank you, thank you.

0:35:070:35:08

It was always a family joke that I would inherit it eventually.

0:35:100:35:15

It's never been my favourite piece of furniture

0:35:150:35:17

so I said to my mother, "Don't leave it to me, cos if you do, I'll to sell it."

0:35:170:35:21

Well, she died four years ago and actually wrote it into her will

0:35:210:35:26

that I had to keep it as a family heirloom.

0:35:260:35:29

Basically I was stitched up by my mother which was very nice of her.

0:35:290:35:34

I have grown to appreciate it slightly more over the years but

0:35:340:35:39

I have a very modern house so it stands out a bit like a sore thumb.

0:35:390:35:43

So did she know that when you stitched you up?

0:35:430:35:45

-No, I've moved since.

-She thought you were a modernist?

-She knew I liked modern furniture.

0:35:450:35:49

Well, we haven't had a Davenport on the Antiques Roadshow

0:35:490:35:53

as long as I can remember, because they all look the same.

0:35:530:35:56

But this is just so different and so exotic that I think we just had to show it to everybody.

0:35:560:36:00

Now we've got the standard type of opening here and down here

0:36:000:36:03

for the writing compartments, a bit stiff,

0:36:030:36:05

-you clearly haven't been using it a lot, have you?

-No.

0:36:050:36:10

What do you know about it? Where do you think it's from?

0:36:100:36:12

Well, my mum's family originally came from Lincolnshire.

0:36:120:36:15

I don't know whether it's come from there.

0:36:150:36:19

I don't know enough about it and, really, that's why I brought it

0:36:190:36:22

-because I'd love to know more.

-It's not from Lincolnshire.

0:36:220:36:26

-Right. OK.

-It's from Italy.

0:36:260:36:28

Oh! Wow!

0:36:280:36:30

OK. It's travelled a fair way, then.

0:36:300:36:33

In fact the design, the basic design we can see of this inlay,

0:36:330:36:37

is all Moorish.

0:36:370:36:38

-Oh, right.

-So it's the Islamic culture that came into Europe

0:36:380:36:43

and when the Moors were conquering

0:36:430:36:45

southern Spain and southern Sicily and southern Italy,

0:36:450:36:48

they brought this culture into southern Europe.

0:36:480:36:51

But that was 1,000 years ago. This is not 1,000 years old.

0:36:510:36:55

It's about 1880.

0:36:550:36:57

-Right, OK.

-And so there is no representation on this geometric

0:36:570:37:02

design of anything made by God and that is part of the Islamic culture.

0:37:020:37:06

You can't reproduce animal or plants.

0:37:060:37:09

However, the Italians, being Catholics, liked the style of this alla Certosina, this very exotic

0:37:090:37:17

Moorish influence and just said,

0:37:170:37:19

"We don't care about that, we're going to put in our

0:37:190:37:22

"typical Italian figures here with these little Cupids flying around."

0:37:220:37:25

Heaven knows what they're doing really, they're sort of

0:37:250:37:28

flying around in mid air on this heavenly background,

0:37:280:37:31

but this is copper here, this lovely coppery colour, it's real copper,

0:37:310:37:35

mother of pearl and ivory.

0:37:350:37:36

These little babies' bottoms are made of ivory.

0:37:360:37:40

They've been etched there to give them shadow and shade whereas this decoration here, I think is bone.

0:37:400:37:47

-Oh.

-So Italy,

0:37:470:37:50

1880ish, possibly Sorrento, not quite sure where it came from.

0:37:500:37:53

I don't think we'll ever find out who made it.

0:37:530:37:56

-No.

-It's the sort of thing that they've seen the English style of

0:37:560:37:59

Davenport and thought "Mm, yeah, we can do this in the Italian style."

0:37:590:38:04

Have you got woodworm at home?

0:38:040:38:07

Not that I know, but I know this piece appears to have, yes.

0:38:070:38:11

-Well, it's certainly had woodworm, hasn't it?

-Right, it has, yes.

0:38:110:38:14

Because at this point here you've got these very obvious holes here.

0:38:140:38:17

We'll have to be a bit careful. I think come next May, I want you to put a piece of paper

0:38:170:38:22

underneath it, tap it a few times and if there's dust, then perhaps you'd better get the woodworm killer.

0:38:220:38:27

That's when they start hatching and they start saying, "It's a bit warm in here"

0:38:270:38:31

-and find another piece of furniture.

-OK.

0:38:310:38:34

It's great fun, it's lovely to see it.

0:38:340:38:36

Thank you for bringing it in, it's a lovely story

0:38:360:38:38

but can I persuade you to keep it or are you going to break the will?

0:38:380:38:42

Oh, gosh no, because knowing my mother, she'd come back and haunt me for ever.

0:38:420:38:46

The condition is slightly against it but I want to put a value on it.

0:38:480:38:51

-I'd like you to insure it, cos you're going to keep it, you're not going to sell it.

-No.

0:38:510:38:55

For £2,500.

0:38:550:38:56

Right, excellent, thank you very much, that's great.

0:38:560:38:59

-With woodworm.

-With woodworm, thank you very much.

0:38:590:39:02

Thank you.

0:39:020:39:03

So, I understand you've been through the wringer a bit today, haven't you?

0:39:080:39:11

-You've seen Fiona.

-Yes.

0:39:110:39:13

-And you've seen Mark.

-Yeah.

0:39:130:39:15

-And they've given you some rather bad news about your things, unexpected bad news.

-Yes.

0:39:150:39:19

It's been fine, it's been everything that I thought it would be.

0:39:190:39:23

Oh, well that's OK then.

0:39:230:39:24

Yes, and what about these? What do you think these are?

0:39:240:39:27

I actually know what this one is.

0:39:270:39:29

-Oh, you do, go on.

-Yes, it's a Marcus Stone.

-Ah-ha.

0:39:290:39:32

Different people were saying different things.

0:39:320:39:34

-Some people were saying it wasn't, some people said that it was.

-I see.

0:39:340:39:39

But I was told by a reputable auction house that it was a Marcus Stone.

0:39:390:39:44

Ah-ha, yes, that could very well be so.

0:39:440:39:47

I suppose you could understand it,

0:39:470:39:49

if somebody said it wasn't a Marcus Stone,

0:39:490:39:51

because he's a 19th century painter and he's not really known

0:39:510:39:54

for this sort of, I suppose it's an Arthurian subject, isn't it?

0:39:540:39:58

It's the resting knight.

0:39:580:39:59

Well they did say to me, the first auction house, that he only painted romance and that it wasn't.

0:39:590:40:05

-That's what he became known for.

-Yeah, that it wasn't.

0:40:050:40:08

-So then I ended up getting confused.

-Well, let's see if we can put that one to rest.

0:40:080:40:13

I can see why the first auction house said it wasn't as well,

0:40:130:40:16

because it's got what appears to be a fake signature on it.

0:40:160:40:18

-Do you see that there?

-Oh, right.

0:40:180:40:21

-That's a very "added later" look to it.

-Right.

0:40:210:40:23

You know, and I don't trust it at all,

0:40:230:40:25

and if I'd only seen that, I would have thought, "Oh, I'm not at all sure."

0:40:250:40:29

But we'll come back to that and let's look at this because this has a proper signature on it.

0:40:290:40:36

-Have you seen it?

-Er, Peter Monamy.

0:40:360:40:40

But I took it to be cleaned, restored.

0:40:400:40:42

-Yeah and had it cleaned and then it came up like this.

-And I love it.

0:40:420:40:46

I know that people don't like the frame, but I like the frame as well.

0:40:460:40:51

I think it all goes together.

0:40:510:40:53

Peter Monamy was obviously a marine painter and he loved this sort of

0:40:530:40:56

letterbox format and it really suits

0:40:560:40:58

marine subjects who of course, you know,

0:40:580:41:01

when you're looking out across a big sky and the sea,

0:41:010:41:04

it suits to have a very, very long horizon,

0:41:040:41:06

quite low in the picture as well,

0:41:060:41:08

so that you've got room for tall masts and big ships.

0:41:080:41:11

And he was particularly influenced in the 18th Century by Dutch painters, particularly Wilhelm van der Velde,

0:41:110:41:18

who was famous for what he called his "calms"

0:41:180:41:21

and as you can see, it is very calm, it's almost flat.

0:41:210:41:25

All the sails are slack and there's no wind at all, just enough to move

0:41:250:41:28

that pennant at the top but it's still looped over a yard arm.

0:41:280:41:31

The atmosphere's rather good.

0:41:310:41:33

But I suppose the problem with it is, that you can't see any of the rigging

0:41:330:41:39

any more and there are various bits of it that don't quite make sense.

0:41:390:41:43

I'm not really sure about that cloud of smoke there

0:41:430:41:46

which is presumably from a broadside.

0:41:460:41:48

What's he firing at?

0:41:480:41:49

It looks as though it might have been added later.

0:41:490:41:52

The cleaning of it has removed what rigging might have been visible

0:41:520:41:57

-so it's been through the mill.

-Yes.

-It's lost a lot.

0:41:570:42:00

But it's still quite an attractive picture and you do get a sense

0:42:000:42:03

of the calm and the still and very much a sense

0:42:030:42:06

of the age of all the shipping sitting in the roads here.

0:42:060:42:09

It might be Plymouth, I'm not sure.

0:42:090:42:11

But it's got a good sky and a good feel to it.

0:42:110:42:14

-I think it's the real thing, that's what we're saying here.

-Right.

0:42:140:42:18

It is definitely the real thing, it's a Peter Monamy.

0:42:180:42:22

But almost a ghost of a Peter Monamy.

0:42:220:42:24

I know, but I still like it.

0:42:240:42:26

I still like it too. Right, coming back to the Marcus Stone again

0:42:260:42:30

and the great thing about this picture

0:42:300:42:33

is it's actually got a real signature on it as well, a rather jokey place

0:42:330:42:36

because his name was Marcus Stone and what he's done is

0:42:360:42:39

put his initials on a stone, just down there. Can you see it?

0:42:390:42:42

-Oh, I can see it, yeah.

-And the date of 1858. MS.

0:42:420:42:45

-Very small as befits a young artist showing his first Royal Academy piece.

-His first?

0:42:450:42:51

His very first exhibited work in the Royal Academy, it's called "Rest."

0:42:510:42:57

So it is a Marcus Stone then?

0:42:570:42:58

-Yes, it is.

-Well, because when you said that this is not right, so that one down there makes it right?

-Yes.

0:42:580:43:05

-Oh, right.

-What it also means is that somebody's been messing about with it.

-Oh, right.

0:43:050:43:10

With the cleaning, it's the same with the Monamy, they've both been cleaned

0:43:100:43:13

and they've both had things added and taken away,

0:43:130:43:15

by the cleaning and the cosmetics, and the thing is that we're looking

0:43:150:43:19

at two honest pictures by the people they're supposed to be by.

0:43:190:43:22

-Right.

-They're real.

0:43:220:43:24

-Does that cheer you up at all?

-It does, because I love them.

0:43:240:43:28

I do like them and I've always felt that they were real and when

0:43:280:43:31

people have said that they're not, it's not bothered me because I like the contents of the pictures.

0:43:310:43:36

Well, good because that's really why you should you be getting them in the first place of course.

0:43:360:43:41

Now values...

0:43:410:43:43

That's quite good news, but not fantastic, because although they're real, you've got condition problems

0:43:430:43:49

in each and this one is atypical, it's not what people expect from Marcus Stone and that's why the first

0:43:490:43:54

people were thrown by it and with the dodgy signature at the top as well, it doesn't help.

0:43:540:43:59

But with a little bit of work, you clean that signature off again and perhaps getting it looking a

0:43:590:44:03

-bit more real. We're probably looking at about £3,000 or £4,000, perhaps a little more.

-Right.

0:44:030:44:09

-That's fine, thank you.

-That's good, and then on the Monamy, well

0:44:090:44:12

this kind of marine picture has sunk a little if you'll forgive the pun.

0:44:120:44:17

Nonetheless I think we're still looking at £2,000 to £3,000.

0:44:170:44:21

-Right, thank you.

-That adds up, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:44:210:44:24

Taken all in all, we're probably looking at about

0:44:240:44:27

five, six, seven, £8,000 on a really good day perhaps.

0:44:270:44:31

-Right, thank you very much.

-No, not at all.

0:44:310:44:33

Where are you going to take me, babe?

0:44:350:44:39

-They're going back on the wall.

-They're going back on your wall?

0:44:390:44:43

At the moment. I just like them, thank you.

0:44:430:44:46

People were evacuated to some pretty unusual places during the war, but being evacuated to Chatsworth

0:44:480:44:53

as a schoolgirl must rank as one of the most extraordinary.

0:44:530:44:57

What did you think when you first arrived?

0:44:570:44:59

Well, I was rather over-awed.

0:44:590:45:01

I should think so. And what was it like?

0:45:010:45:03

You spent how many years here as a schoolgirl?

0:45:030:45:05

I was here for four-and-a-half years.

0:45:050:45:07

What, living here in the dormitories?

0:45:070:45:09

-Living here, yes.

-And what was it like?

-Very, very cold.

0:45:090:45:13

And this is, this is the snow, look at that.

0:45:130:45:16

Yes, this is settling off for church.

0:45:160:45:19

Gosh, and how many of you were there?

0:45:190:45:21

-250 girls.

-250 girls, and where were you evacuated from then?

0:45:210:45:24

-Colwyn Bay.

-Colwyn Bay.

-Yes.

0:45:240:45:26

-And so in the winter it was freezing.

-Yes.

0:45:260:45:29

Those are your bad memories, what were the good memories?

0:45:290:45:32

Oh, the good memories, the summer was lovely.

0:45:320:45:35

In this garden, we would have the whole run of the garden.

0:45:350:45:38

-Swimming in the lake, that kind of thing?

-Swimming in the lake.

0:45:380:45:41

We took our test in the round pond.

0:45:410:45:43

Are you in this picture, Nancy?

0:45:430:45:45

Yes, I'm there in the white cap.

0:45:450:45:48

I was all ready to go.

0:45:480:45:50

-Oh, look, which one is you here, Nancy, let's see?

-Oh, that one.

0:45:500:45:53

And how old were you?

0:45:530:45:55

I think I was probably about 13 there.

0:45:550:45:58

And did you ever get any raids overhead, anything like that?

0:45:580:46:01

-Yes, we were machine gunned.

-You were machine gunned?

0:46:010:46:04

Yes, two enemy planes, they didn't know what we were

0:46:040:46:08

and they were just going back and they thought it was

0:46:080:46:12

some sort of military place so they just emptied their bullets

0:46:120:46:17

onto the north side.

0:46:170:46:19

-You can still see the bullets in the wall.

-And where were you?

0:46:190:46:22

We were just in the painted hall, on a summer evening, finishing prayers, it was five to eight.

0:46:220:46:28

-Must have been terrifying.

-So it was, we all went to the cellars, to the beer cellars,

0:46:280:46:34

our air-raid shelter and

0:46:340:46:35

stayed there, till we heard that they'd been shot down.

0:46:350:46:40

-A trip down memory lane for you. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:46:400:46:42

Well, you've brought a pair of pink glass vases

0:46:440:46:47

-which commonly get called "cranberry."

-Oh, right.

0:46:470:46:51

But I'm going to use the proper name,

0:46:510:46:54

which is "ruby gold glass."

0:46:540:46:56

OK.

0:46:560:46:58

Ruby gold because real gold is used to create this wonderful ruby colour.

0:46:580:47:03

What do you know about them?

0:47:030:47:05

-They were given to my mother by her late mother-in-law.

-Right.

0:47:050:47:09

And apart from her taking them to an auctioneers about 30 years ago,

0:47:090:47:17

they said they were Venetian and that the paintings were

0:47:170:47:22

painted on a lot later and that's about it, that's all we know.

0:47:220:47:27

The paintings they're referring to are these wonderful,

0:47:270:47:30

I suppose they're Viennese in style actually, these Neo-Classical panels

0:47:300:47:34

and when you look closely, you can see that they're bolted on

0:47:340:47:38

with little metal bolts, top and bottom.

0:47:380:47:41

So my guess is that someone looked at these, and thought,

0:47:410:47:44

"Well, why are they bolted on?"

0:47:440:47:46

because normally glass of this type is cased.

0:47:460:47:49

You have a white outer layer

0:47:490:47:51

which is attached naturally to the ruby inner layer.

0:47:510:47:55

-Right.

-It's quite unusual to have them bolted like this.

-Yes.

0:47:550:47:58

But not so unusual that we haven't seen it before

0:47:580:48:01

and I am sure that these are all of a piece,

0:48:010:48:03

they were made at the same time.

0:48:030:48:05

-Right.

-And the handles are also bolted on, when you look inside.

0:48:050:48:09

Oh, right, I didn't realise that.

0:48:090:48:11

So the other thing, Venetian, these scream to me Bohemian.

0:48:110:48:15

A great centre for this kind of glass in the 19th Century.

0:48:150:48:19

They're not Venetian, they are definitely Bohemian.

0:48:190:48:23

The other issue is date.

0:48:230:48:24

But these vases are a gift because their shape

0:48:240:48:29

tells us so much about when they were made.

0:48:290:48:31

They've got

0:48:310:48:33

some oriental feet made to look rather like hardwood stands.

0:48:330:48:37

Despite the European Neo-Classical decoration,

0:48:370:48:40

they're quite Japanese in shape

0:48:400:48:42

and that was a fashion very much in vogue in the 1870s and 1880s.

0:48:420:48:49

So these are beautiful

0:48:490:48:51

and very unusual Bohemian vases.

0:48:510:48:54

Have you ever thought what they might be worth?

0:48:540:48:56

-Many times.

-Many times, many times.

0:48:560:48:59

Every time I looked at them on my mother's mantelpiece.

0:48:590:49:02

Well they do look extremely glamorous.

0:49:020:49:05

In fact we're standing here in front of Chatsworth, one of the great

0:49:050:49:08

stately homes of England and similar Bohemian vases stand on a mantelpiece in a bedroom in that house.

0:49:080:49:16

That's how good these things are, that's how grand they are.

0:49:160:49:21

-So I think...

-They don't want them back, do they?

0:49:210:49:23

No, oh, no, no, no. HE LAUGHS

0:49:230:49:26

Unless you know something I don't,

0:49:260:49:28

no, no. It's a measure of the quality of the things you have here.

0:49:280:49:32

That's fantastic.

0:49:320:49:34

So what are they worth?

0:49:340:49:35

I think an auction estimate for these vases

0:49:370:49:42

would be between £3,000 and £5,000.

0:49:420:49:46

Lovely. That's very nice to know.

0:49:460:49:50

If I dare go back in time and to the days when me granddad

0:49:500:49:53

was alive giving me advice and he always said to me,

0:49:530:49:56

"There are three things you should watch for on a man that will tell you an awful lot.

0:49:560:50:01

"One will be his shoes, if they're polished.

0:50:010:50:04

"The other will be his watch and the third would be the pen that he uses."

0:50:040:50:07

And I have to say that you're using a rather stylish pen.

0:50:070:50:12

-Is this because penmanship is big in your family or what?

-Not really, no.

0:50:120:50:18

I bought it in a box of playing cards and it was in the bottom.

0:50:180:50:21

Well, let's have a look at the pen.

0:50:210:50:23

First of all, this is a dip pen of sorts.

0:50:230:50:26

I mean you've got a lever there to act as a fountain pen,

0:50:260:50:30

but this originally would have actually sat

0:50:300:50:33

in probably a circular stand, so it never had a cover, OK.

0:50:330:50:37

And then, then there's a signature down here as well, all in Japanese.

0:50:370:50:42

Because this is a very stylish pen

0:50:420:50:44

which probably dates to around about 1930 and the name here, there are

0:50:440:50:51

two names, one is probably well known to most folk and that is Dunhill,

0:50:510:50:57

and a Japanese name which is Namiki.

0:50:570:51:01

In 1928 they combined forces to produce this type of pen.

0:51:010:51:07

So it's beautifully lacquered,

0:51:070:51:09

it's very scant in the decoration but with the Japanese, less is more.

0:51:090:51:14

And if you look very carefully it's dusted with tiny, tiny particles of gold.

0:51:140:51:20

So, I mean this really is a pen that any pen collector would be very keen

0:51:200:51:25

to have and Namiki pens can vary dramatically in price,

0:51:250:51:31

depending on whether it is a large fountain pen with very elaborate

0:51:310:51:36

dragons or whether it's something

0:51:360:51:39

of relatively modest decoration like yours, and consequently,

0:51:390:51:43

this particular one, I can tell you now,

0:51:430:51:46

if I saw it at auction, I'd expect it to be worth

0:51:460:51:50

in the region of maybe £500 to £700.

0:51:500:51:52

Really?

0:51:520:51:54

I'm amazed, amazed.

0:51:540:51:57

It's just sat in the cupboard for years.

0:51:570:52:00

-Well, you bought it with playing cards.

-Yes.

0:52:000:52:03

I think it's fair to say that you played your cards right, didn't you?

0:52:030:52:07

I think it is, but that's the good news, OK.

0:52:070:52:10

The bad news is had it been a large size with barrel and cover,

0:52:100:52:17

decorated with dragons, I actually saw one sold

0:52:170:52:21

in the saleroom that I worked in, about 15 years ago, wait for this,

0:52:210:52:24

for £187,000.

0:52:240:52:29

-Really?

-And how much did you pay, for that pack of cards?

0:52:290:52:32

Well, if it was £5 that would be it, yeah.

0:52:320:52:35

I think you're quids in, quids in.

0:52:350:52:37

-Yes.

-Thank you.

-Lovely, thank you very much.

0:52:370:52:41

So this is part of a really large archive of jewellery designs. Tell me about them with you.

0:52:410:52:47

Well, basically,

0:52:470:52:49

my granddad worked for Cartier designing and when he died, well,

0:52:490:52:56

when my grandmother died, we found all these in the loft in a big pile

0:52:560:53:01

and have slowly gone through them over the years

0:53:010:53:04

and just amazed by them.

0:53:040:53:06

Well, they are totally amazing

0:53:060:53:08

and in a way they're rarer than the jewellery itself because

0:53:080:53:11

the jewellery is made and then very often the design is thrown away

0:53:110:53:16

or it becomes dirty and in the course of it

0:53:160:53:18

being taken to the workshop, to the bench for the craftsman to make it.

0:53:180:53:22

Now, of course, Cartier is the greatest name of 20th Century jewellery design, and we can see,

0:53:220:53:27

left, right and centre, huge precious stones mounted in platinum and gold.

0:53:270:53:31

But that's a slight distraction from the fact that

0:53:310:53:34

this is a very important part of the decorative arts of the 20th Century

0:53:340:53:39

and it's very close to genius,

0:53:390:53:40

but it seems that the real genius comes from your family. What was his name?

0:53:400:53:45

My grandfather's name was Charles Alexander Kennedy Ambrose

0:53:450:53:49

which is a bit of a mouthful.

0:53:490:53:51

And I think he died in the 1960s but he worked for Cartier during

0:53:510:53:56

like the '30s to the '60s and that's about it really.

0:53:560:53:59

And that is actually what we can see here.

0:53:590:54:02

This is a little archaeological trip in a way.

0:54:020:54:04

If you were able to go into Cartier in the early 20th century it meant

0:54:040:54:09

-that you were able to afford what they were offering for sale.

-Yes.

0:54:090:54:12

A necklace like this, with the most dramatically beautiful emeralds and

0:54:120:54:15

diamonds, would have been literally a king's ransom at Cartier, because

0:54:150:54:20

kings and maharajahs and sultans were going in and out

0:54:200:54:23

like fiddlers' elbows, asking for these things.

0:54:230:54:26

And we can just examine some of them a little here.

0:54:260:54:29

This is made of Siberian amethysts, sort of stylised fall of grapes,

0:54:290:54:33

perhaps in deep purple cabochon stones surrounded by turquoise.

0:54:330:54:37

-This was a style invented by the Duchess of Windsor.

-Oh, right.

0:54:370:54:41

The wife of King Edward VIII,

0:54:410:54:43

and the combination of turquoise and amethyst

0:54:430:54:46

is extraordinarily contemporary

0:54:460:54:49

and I think it's safe to say that that design probably

0:54:490:54:52

derives from a commission from

0:54:520:54:54

Edward VIII for a vast necklace of turquoise and amethysts

0:54:540:54:57

that she wore with stunning effect.

0:54:570:54:59

She said that it was impossible to be too thin, or too rich.

0:54:590:55:04

And I think there's no doubt at all about the too rich bit.

0:55:040:55:07

I'm not sure about the too thin. But anyway, she wore these things

0:55:070:55:11

as an extension of her dress and she was a stunning woman to look at and Cartier was their favourite choice.

0:55:110:55:17

So, and even more interestingly, you've also brought wax maquettes

0:55:170:55:20

for jewellery and if somebody came to Cartier and wanted something made,

0:55:200:55:24

it was very important they were completely and utterly satisfied

0:55:240:55:28

with what they had, because to break it down and start again

0:55:280:55:31

would have been a disaster.

0:55:310:55:32

The only way to make that happen, was to model them in wax in three dimensions and put

0:55:320:55:37

the stones onto the wax so that the person who, very imaginatively here, has asked for three brooches in the

0:55:370:55:44

form of the three polar bears, which is beyond belief, frankly,

0:55:440:55:48

it really is. I mean it's a stunning, stunning concept and remains so and that was

0:55:480:55:54

shown to her and she would agree it with the absolute confidence that the back would be sensationally made too.

0:55:540:55:59

Here a lizard, a salamander, a legendary beast that renews

0:55:590:56:03

itself from fire and here yet another polar bear.

0:56:030:56:06

So, are you breathless?

0:56:060:56:08

I'm nearly worn out. I can hardly cope with the excitement.

0:56:080:56:11

I need to go on a Valium drip or something,

0:56:110:56:14

but anyway there must be some future for this.

0:56:140:56:18

I mean there has to be, it needs to be very carefully conserved.

0:56:180:56:21

You must look after it, you must find out more about him, you must be in touch with Cartier,

0:56:210:56:25

see what they say, what were his greatest commissions and to value them in every sense of the word

0:56:250:56:30

because they are utterly invaluable

0:56:300:56:32

-and this is very, very hard indeed because they're not jewels.

-No.

0:56:320:56:36

They're only on paper, little lumps of wax,

0:56:360:56:39

this, that and the other, but none the less they are very sought after.

0:56:390:56:43

There's a small band of connoisseurs and collectors who want these things very badly.

0:56:430:56:48

I suppose I'm one of them, actually.

0:56:480:56:50

But I could never afford them

0:56:500:56:52

because to be perfectly honest I think you'd probably have to fork out

0:56:520:56:56

somewhere between £15,000 and £20,000 to buy this from you.

0:56:560:57:00

Oh, my god!

0:57:000:57:01

GASPING

0:57:010:57:04

You are joking!

0:57:040:57:05

Oh, I thought they'd be like £20 each.

0:57:050:57:10

Oh, my good lord.

0:57:100:57:12

That's amazing, that is just amazing.

0:57:120:57:16

Thank you so much, thank you.

0:57:160:57:18

Brilliant.

0:57:180:57:19

Chatsworth House is renowned for having the finest

0:57:220:57:25

private collection of Neo-Classical statues in the land.

0:57:250:57:29

Now this may not be Neo-Classical, but it's a classic.

0:57:290:57:33

I think you'll agree. Henry, I think I recognise this figure.

0:57:330:57:36

It's made for me and it's of me.

0:57:360:57:37

I think it's wonderful, made by a great potter in Northern Ireland

0:57:370:57:41

called Peter Meanley and it's in salt- glazed stoneware, which is very much

0:57:410:57:45

a material to my heart and its wonderful colours and glaze and oh,

0:57:450:57:49

-it's super, I love it very much.

-Where do you keep it?

0:57:490:57:53

Well, it's in the drawing room on a very strong table

0:57:530:57:56

because it's such a hefty weight.

0:57:560:57:57

I daren't, I can't even move it myself.

0:57:570:58:00

Oh, no, I mean it certainly is a conversation piece.

0:58:000:58:02

Oh, yes, it's great.

0:58:020:58:03

As Toby jugs go, I've never seen anything like it. Have you seen any Toby jugs here?

0:58:030:58:07

Yes, we've seen a lot of Toby jugs.

0:58:070:58:09

We've had a great crowd and a marvellous time.

0:58:090:58:11

Well, but nothing on this scale I have to say.

0:58:110:58:14

Well, from Henry and me at Chatsworth

0:58:140:58:16

-and Henry Number Two here, until next time, bye-bye.

-Goodbye.

0:58:160:58:20

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0:58:200:58:24

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0:58:240:58:27