Hampton Court Castle 2 Antiques Roadshow


Hampton Court Castle 2

Fiona Bruce visits Hampton Court Castle in Herefordshire. Thousands of visitors arrive laden with objects, amongst which are a collection of SAS medals.


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This week, we've set up stall in a county that has as its mascot

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these gorgeous creatures... Hereford cattle -

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known for their gentle nature, I'm relieved to say -

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and once hundreds of them roamed this estate.

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Welcome to a return of the Antiques Roadshow

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from Hampton Court Castle in Herefordshire.

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Since it was built in the 15th century,

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Hampton Court Castle has been through good times and bad.

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During its heyday in the 19th century,

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this was a 10,500 acre estate,

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owned by one of the largest landowners in England.

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Johnny Arkwright was heir to the famous family who'd

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made their fortune in the cotton mills of Lancashire.

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He was considered the epitome of the English country squire.

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His pride and joy was his herd of Hereford cattle,

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which he called his "ruby moos"

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because of their claret coloured coats.

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Johnny had the heads of his prize-winning cattle cast in silver,

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and then placed upon the dinner table.

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At the end of the meal, guests would turn the heads upside down,

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fill the cups, and raise a toast.

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So here's to what we're hoping will be a special day

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at Hampton Court Castle.

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Well, how appropriate

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to be in Herefordshire

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and to see a wonderful portrait of Hereford cattle.

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It means a lot to me and my family here, because it was my

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grandfather's very great pride and joy to own that cow, the "Lovely".

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He owned "Lovely" and here

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-it's got even an inscription of her name here.

-That's right.

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-Well, this is a very British thing...

-Yes.

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-..to have portraits of one's cattle...

-Yes.

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-..or portraits of one's sheep, is a very, very British phenomenon.

-Yes.

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And do you know why?

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This was a particularly favourite cow of his,

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and she rather remarkably had two sets of twins.

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-Ah.

-The twin heifers which are there, Theodora and Dorothea.

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-Who are portrayed here.

-Yes.

-Yes.

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And then she had twin bull calves.

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Sir Julius, he named, and Sir Julian,

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and I think they both went, were exported to the Argentine.

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Oh, that brings me to the artist, because it's clearly signed here

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-by "A. M. Gauci 1885".

-Yes.

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-That doesn't sound a very British name, does it?

-I thought that.

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I always have thought it, I couldn't make out why.

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Well, there's very little information about Gauci, but

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from his name, he sounds like he may well be Argentinean or Spanish,

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or certainly have connections there.

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-Yes.

-And we only know him because he paints portraits of cattle.

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I often say, slightly jokingly, that an Englishman

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often would rather have his cattle or his horse

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-painted than perhaps his wife.

-That would probably be true!

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Now tell me, so this bloodline, does it still exist?

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-Are you in the business? Are you a cattle breeder?

-Yes.

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-We've got descendants of this bloodline still.

-How amazing.

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But they aren't registered as pedigree Herefords.

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Right, and am I right in saying that we have three generations of farmers

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-in front of me now?

-Yes.

-Wonderful.

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The picture lives at my house.

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Ah, so you've already passed it on, have you? So I mean this really is

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-part of family history.

-Very much so.

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-It always has been.

-And I guess you'll pass it on to your...?

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-I'm looking forward to it.

-He's got a smile on his face.

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Yes, yes, he's got a girlfriend.

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Well, now we know. But let's get back to the portrait.

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I mean, I think this is absolutely lovely.

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I mean, it's very personal to you, so value wise...

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-they're slightly out of fashion these portraits.

-Yes.

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And it has a sort of semi-naive sort of feel to it,

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and yet here is an artist that's probably got the character

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of each cow and heifer well, I'd say.

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-Very much so.

-So, have you ever had it valued?

-No.

-Perfect.

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Well, I would have thought that if it came onto the market,

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we would look at something between £3,000-£5,000.

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-Heavens.

-Not bad?

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We wouldn't sell it, but it's interesting to know that.

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But if "Lovely"

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appeared on the market today, what would she be worth?

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She would be worth, as a cow, I would guess £3,000 or £4,000.

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Right, so same as the picture.

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-Yes.

-Interesting. Well, I can't thank you enough, and look after it.

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-OK.

-Thank you very much.

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You've brought me a little piece of Wedgwood Fairyland Lustre.

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Oh, well,

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I knew it was Wedgwood, because I saw the title underneath,

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but I don't know much about it because it was given to me way back.

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-And who gave you this present?

-Well, there was this lovely, lovely lady

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who was our babysitter, gave it to us. We were rather poor,

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and she looked around where we were living

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and said "You've got no ornaments."

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So I said "Well, no, we've had to spend our money on other things."

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and she said to me, "I've got something I'm going to give you."

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And when I saw it, I just could see it was, I thought, exquisite,

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and I said, "Oh, no, it's too good, don't, it's too precious."

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And she said, "No, no, no, it was given to me by a wealthy lady

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"I used to clean for, and I don't really need it, you have it.

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"And when I come to babysit I can see it." So I took it.

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Somebody took pity on you...

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-Exactly.

-..and gave you this.

-Exactly.

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Well, it is Wedgwood, we know that, it's got the mark on the bottom.

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It was designed by somebody

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called Daisy Makeig-Jones, who worked for the Wedgwood factory,

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and she was actually related to the Wedgwood family by marriage.

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And she was working in the period just after the First World War

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in the 1920s and the 1930s. And in fact in the early '30s

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she was sacked by one of the Wedgwood family, and she was in such a temper,

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-she went to her studio and smashed everything...

-Oh, no.

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..because she felt as a member of the family, she shouldn't be sacked.

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But it is a lovely thing, and it's lustre and it's got fairies on it,

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and it was called Fairyland Lustre for obvious reasons.

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It's very collectable. Every time I have one of these in my auction,

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I get calls from American collectors. Do you know what they say?

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-No, do tell me.

-"Will you hold it to the telephone and ring it for me?"

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-So shall we try?

-Right.

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DULL RINGING

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-It's not ringing clear, is it?

-No.

-What do you think that might mean?

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If it's not ringing clear, it sounds like there might be a crack.

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Yes. That's why they do it,

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and obviously if you imagine you're in America, you want to hear

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a clear ring, and somewhere there will be a crack in this.

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So that means it's not going to be worth as much as if it was perfect.

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But it is still collectable.

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How much did you pay your babysitter in those days?

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Well, probably 50p an hour or something, you know.

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Well, this bowl, given by your 50p an hour babysitter,

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is worth about £500-£800.

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-Good heavens!

-So that's a lot of babies.

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It is.

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I would have paid her more if I'd known.

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Well, she paid you very well.

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-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

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So two magnificent volumes here

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of one of the most famous books on Egypt and Nubia.

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Can you hold that for me?

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That's lovely. I hope you're not parked too far away, are you?

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Did you have to carry them in?

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Well, yes. I did have a glamorous assistant to help me.

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You've got a glamorous assistant.

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Now, this is David Roberts'

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"Egypt and Nubia", printed in 1846, with the most magnificent plates.

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He spent about six months in Egypt and Nubia,

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and also in the Holy Land, as well, to produce these books.

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And there are two issues of these books.

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There's the coloured one which is the same plates, but hand coloured.

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And there's this one, which is the tinted lithograph copy.

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But the plates are still absolutely magnificent, even tinted like this.

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I mean, look at the depth of these.

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Nothing had been seen really like it before.

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Obviously people were very keen, as Napoleon was, on Egypt,

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and David Roberts went out there

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and you could say these are tourist books.

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But they're enormous, aren't they?

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-They're huge, very heavy.

-So, where did they come from?

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Well, they've been in my family for over 100 years,

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and we recently inherited them through the family.

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I don't know much about the background of them.

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And you've got the other volume here too, which... Let me...

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And there's the pyramids, and that is an absolutely fantastic view

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of the pyramids, and the Sphinx without its beard too, here.

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And it would have had a beard.

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The beard is in the British Museum at the moment.

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So what do you like about these things?

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I just love the depth in them, and they're just beyond words.

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-They're beautiful, I love them.

-I think they're absolutely tremendous.

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My worry is that you don't have volume three.

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It's very difficult to get hold of, as you can imagine.

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But we are, we have been looking for it for...

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over 20 years, 15 years, and it's just very hard to come by.

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I don't think you'd find an odd volume of it, really, at all.

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Anyway, you've got two out of the three volumes.

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Had you had three, do you know how much they'd be worth?

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No.

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£15,000.

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-OK.

-I'm afraid only two, we're going to have to talk about

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£5,000, £6,000, £7,000 possibly, but no more than that.

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But they're fantastic, and so nice to have them come on the Roadshow.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Gemstones are my passion, and unusual gemstones even more so.

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So it intrigues me how you

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got this stone, and what do you think it is?

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It belonged to my granny, and I believe it to be something

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called a Ceylon trembler, but I don't know what that is.

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-Ceylon trembler?

-Yes.

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-Right, excellent.

-And that's all I know.

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And when did your granny get it?

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It was given to her by my grandfather,

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because he was a bit of a ladies' man.

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He travelled the world,

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in his position as chauffeur, with a companion.

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He travelled to the West Indies, India, China

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and on his return each year, he would give

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my granny a present for being away,

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and this was one of the presents that year.

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-She never wore it.

-Why didn't your granny wear it?

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Because she didn't like being left.

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He was having a wonderful time as this lady's companion, and, er,

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she was very offended, so each present that he bought her,

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she put in a cupboard.

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So it's never been worn, this ring?

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-I wear it.

-You wear it?

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-But she never did.

-Well, a Ceylon trembler you called it.

-Yes.

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I don't think that's in my gemological book somehow.

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No.

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It's in fact, what is really interesting

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is that it is an alexandrite.

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Now what is very interesting about alexandrites,

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which is part of the chrysoberyl family, is that it changes colour.

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-And it does, yes.

-Ah, have you seen that? You've noticed that?

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Yes, it does change colour, yes.

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Well, and it is the change of colour which gives it its price.

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Ideally you want it to change to red.

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-Ah.

-But it goes a bit muddy brown?

-And it's been purple as well.

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-It's been a bit purple.

-But not red.

-Well, it's interesting

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that you've mentioned purple, because I see a lot of synthetic corundum

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made to look like alexandrites, which are purple in colour.

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-Oh, right.

-But this one is lovely, to see the real McCoy,

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the real stone, so at least

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he was giving her real things and not the synthetics.

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Yes. That's good.

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I don't think she thought very much of it,

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I'm afraid, which is a shame, but there we are.

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-I hope you enjoy wearing it.

-Oh, I love it.

-Oh, jolly good.

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Oh, well, it's in very good condition

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and it is about probably about 1910, something like that.

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The value... Have you had it valued?

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I did have it valued a few years ago at a jewellers,

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and he said he would buy it from me there and then.

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-He offered me £200.

-£200.

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And I thought...

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I'm very sentimental, so I thought,

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-"No, I won't, I'll just hang on a bit longer."

-Well,

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I would say... I mean, it is an unusual stone. If it turned

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more of the red colour, rather than sort of the muddy purply colour,

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then it would be more expensive. But for this one, I would say,

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in its mount, I would say it's in the region

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-of about £1,500-£2,000.

-Ooh!

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Well, that is lovely. Thank you very much indeed.

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-Oh, well, it's lovely.

-Not that I... I won't ever sell it, but...

-No.

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Well, that is... Ooh! It's great.

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-Thank you very much.

-My pleasure. Thank you.

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So are you avid antique collectors?

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No, we're not antique collectors, no,

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but we're inheritors.

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-Oh, right. And this was obviously inherited.

-Inherited, yes.

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And what do you keep in this?

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Er, rubbish.

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-Rubbish?

-Yes, bits and pieces.

-Well, that's honesty for you.

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When I took the drawers out

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and poured it all out, it was a lot of rubbish.

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-Do you have any idea where it's from?

-I inherited it from my uncle,

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-who lived in Hove in Sussex, about ten years ago.

-Oh, right.

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-Right.

-It's been in the lounge, we've walked past it every day,

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and we've sort of, you know...

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-It's always been there.

-We know nothing about it.

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The big question is, is it Italian?

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That's an interesting question, because you look at it

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and, at first, you say... Well, when I see this decoration on the top

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and the sides, I thought Spanish. Then when I look at

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the mouldings around the drawer fronts, and on the base here,

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it looks Dutch.

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And then when you look at the panel in the centre here, it's Italian.

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So I think it's made by a migrant worker who ended up in Italy.

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Its original purpose, what do you think it was for originally?

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Putting collector's items into it?

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Yes, it was like a cabinet of curiosity for some wealthy merchant,

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because this is dating back from the late 17th, early 18th century.

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They would have kept things in here, curios, to show their friends.

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-Nothing of really high value, because there's no doors.

-There's no locks.

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Exactly, there's no locks - I noticed when I pulled one of the drawers out.

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But the whole thing, when you look at the facade, is really faux.

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-Do you know what I mean by that?

-False.

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Mmm. Because when you look at this, it's actually imitating gold.

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It's actually copper laid on glass.

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-It sort of sparkles, doesn't it?

-It sparkles.

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I mean, it's beautiful. When the sun's on it, it shines. And here,

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this is imitating blue lapis, and again

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it's all false, it's painted on the glass.

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And this is real here.

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In the centre we have blue lapis and we've got some agates.

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When we look at it, it didn't start life on this base.

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This base is later.

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-Really? Oh.

-The base was made in the Victorian times to hold the cabinet.

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This style of cabinet would have stood on

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little ball feet, or little spheres, and it would have been carried

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-from one room and just placed on a table.

-Yes.

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It's quite an interesting thing, even though I'm saying it's false.

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-It is very, very attractive...

-It is, it's lovely.

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..and quite desirable.

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Well, it's a nice sunny day, and the sun's shining upon you,

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and I would put a value on this between £4,000-£5,000.

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-Oh, really?

-Yeah. It's a very collectable item.

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-Now the sun's shining, look at that.

-Yes, look at that.

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-Isn't that wonderful? Absolutely fantastic.

-Marvellous.

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So what on earth do you think this is?

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Well, it was found in a shed.

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I think it's something agricultural. I'm not sure. A venomous substance?

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Funnily enough, it is a kind of venomous substance actually.

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What it is,

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despite everything that you might think it could be,

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is a fire extinguisher.

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No! I don't believe it.

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No, it really, really, really is.

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It's the Minimax,

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and we've got some writing on it here.

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We've got a design registration number

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and all sorts of information. There's a patent number here,

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a design registration number, which places it to 1924.

0:16:460:16:50

It's full of carbon tetrachloride, and carbon tetrachloride

0:16:500:16:55

is a substance which absorbs oxygen.

0:16:550:16:59

And so the fire breaks out, you grab the extinguisher,

0:16:590:17:03

-you lob it into the fire and Bob becomes your uncle.

-OK.

0:17:030:17:08

-I shall keep it in the kitchen.

-Keep it in the...?

0:17:080:17:10

I have to say that carbon tetrachloride is carcinogenic.

0:17:100:17:15

-We now know it's really ghastly.

-OK.

0:17:150:17:18

-So in a way, it's a bit of a toxic object.

-Mm.

0:17:180:17:20

And when it comes... It actually has a value, because there are people,

0:17:200:17:24

believe it or not, who collect these.

0:17:240:17:26

And I think it would probably sell,

0:17:260:17:28

with or without the mouse poo on it...

0:17:280:17:32

-..for about 100 quid.

-Wow, that's amazing!

0:17:330:17:36

-Isn't that good fun?

-Yes, yes. Incredible.

0:17:360:17:39

Every now and again

0:17:410:17:42

you get something turn up which needs further investigation.

0:17:420:17:46

This dish by Omar Ramsden

0:17:460:17:47

in silver, arguably the best Arts and Crafts designer

0:17:470:17:51

of the 20th century.

0:17:510:17:53

When you turn it over it shouts at you. There's more going on to it.

0:17:530:17:56

"Pax", the Latin for peace, "1938". Tell me about it.

0:17:560:18:01

Well, this belonged to my family, the Chamberlains.

0:18:010:18:05

I'm Neville Chamberlain's granddaughter, and my mother

0:18:050:18:09

had quite a lot of memorabilia, and we've shared it out.

0:18:090:18:13

And I was rather intrigued with this dish and wanted to bring it along.

0:18:130:18:18

I know that it represented the peace in 1938,

0:18:180:18:23

which was brought about by the Munich Treaty.

0:18:230:18:26

Sure. In a nutshell, Britain, Germany, France and Italy

0:18:260:18:30

were trying to allow Germany to sort of regain its border lands.

0:18:300:18:35

There were opponents, such as Anthony Eden and Churchill,

0:18:350:18:38

they were opposed to the agreement.

0:18:380:18:40

-Yes.

-But Prime Minister Chamberlain thought it was a good idea,

0:18:400:18:44

because he thought it would stop war with Germany, and that's

0:18:440:18:47

the famous saying, "Peace in our time."

0:18:470:18:49

Yes, but that's got a bit distorted over the years.

0:18:490:18:53

Everybody thinks it was that.

0:18:530:18:55

If you see the tape of it, he seems to be saying "Peace for our time,"

0:18:550:19:01

not, "Peace in our time," and, actually, what he was trying to say

0:19:010:19:06

was, "Peace for a time,"

0:19:060:19:07

because he wasn't sure it would last. He didn't trust Hitler.

0:19:070:19:11

This records the fact that lots of people were thrilled with him,

0:19:110:19:16

and they showered Downing Street with lots of presents -

0:19:160:19:20

countries and individual presents.

0:19:200:19:22

We don't actually know who it came from.

0:19:220:19:25

I mean, there's a lot of symbolism going on in the dish.

0:19:250:19:27

-You've got the four sides.

-Yes.

0:19:270:19:29

You've got the number four, the four nations involved in the treaty.

0:19:290:19:32

I mean, it's such a beautiful object, you know, the symbolism,

0:19:320:19:36

and to collectors these sort of things just don't turn up.

0:19:360:19:39

With that history, you being a descendant of Chamberlain

0:19:390:19:44

adds hugely to its value.

0:19:440:19:46

As an Omar Ramsden dish it's worth 700-900, somewhere in that order.

0:19:460:19:52

With that Chamberlain connection, it's worth sort of £3,000-£4,000.

0:19:520:19:56

Goodness me! Thank you very much.

0:19:560:19:58

I didn't realise it would be so valuable.

0:19:580:20:01

So your 18th century family

0:20:070:20:08

was immortalised by an artist who learnt in America.

0:20:080:20:11

Apparently so, yes.

0:20:110:20:13

Do you know about the painter?

0:20:130:20:15

We understand that he started in Bristol.

0:20:150:20:17

For some reason that we don't know,

0:20:170:20:20

he fled to America,

0:20:200:20:21

where he became quite well liked by the various burghers,

0:20:210:20:24

and then having made a reputation there, he came back to England,

0:20:240:20:28

and presumably Mr Taylor heard of him,

0:20:280:20:30

and asked him to come and paint him and his wife,

0:20:300:20:33

and, after that, the rest of the family.

0:20:330:20:35

And what a wonderful way of doing so.

0:20:350:20:37

Why it is such an interesting painting

0:20:370:20:39

is that the deportment of the features, that slightly odd way

0:20:390:20:42

that he's leaning on his finger, and the massive emphasis on the waistcoat

0:20:420:20:47

and the decoration are all of the things that you see in America.

0:20:470:20:51

And yet he's doing it in England.

0:20:510:20:53

Why? Because the artist, Joseph Blackburn,

0:20:530:20:56

has learned to paint

0:20:560:20:57

in a different country, and has imported that style to Britain.

0:20:570:21:02

And then next to Mr Taylor, you have Mr Taylor's children.

0:21:020:21:07

But what a wonderful concentration again on all the paraphernalia -

0:21:070:21:12

the extra details. Even the flowers are done

0:21:120:21:14

with a delicacy that you don't normally see in British portraiture.

0:21:140:21:18

They're rather more generalised.

0:21:180:21:20

This is, as it were, you know,

0:21:200:21:22

the Transatlantic take on the English face and the English body.

0:21:220:21:27

And I can also see that it's signed.

0:21:270:21:29

Yes.

0:21:290:21:31

So satisfying to get a clear signature like that.

0:21:310:21:34

I mean, what also you're beginning to see -

0:21:340:21:36

and we're about to move to their mother -

0:21:360:21:38

that these portraits have been slightly over-painted in the past.

0:21:380:21:42

There's some very crude areas, like her nose, that's been given

0:21:420:21:45

the appearance of a snout here, for a very simple reason.

0:21:450:21:47

This is really bad over-painting. Someone has taken a brush to this,

0:21:470:21:51

and made these pictures unnecessarily crude in order to conceal damage.

0:21:510:21:57

Take off the over-paint, and I think you'll find that those children

0:21:570:22:00

could hatch into rather beautiful innocent creatures.

0:22:000:22:03

They need restoration, in other words.

0:22:030:22:05

Then we move to her,

0:22:050:22:07

who I assume is the wife of the Mr Taylor,

0:22:070:22:10

-and the mother of the children.

-Yes.

0:22:100:22:13

I have to say, I am deeply struck by this.

0:22:130:22:17

Why? Because you have got the best of English

0:22:170:22:20

with the best of Colonial American.

0:22:200:22:22

You've got a wonderful flashy look that's reminiscent

0:22:220:22:26

of the works of George Romney, or Joshua Reynolds,

0:22:260:22:30

and yet you've that delicious concentration on detail, on lace.

0:22:300:22:35

Apparently he learned to paint the lace when he went to America.

0:22:350:22:39

I have actually a piece of material with some of the lace on here,

0:22:390:22:43

that came from her dress.

0:22:430:22:44

-How terrific.

-We don't know quite which bit, but there is the lace.

0:22:440:22:50

There it is! Oh, unquestionably it is.

0:22:500:22:52

I mean, it is such a brilliant sort of scratch

0:22:520:22:55

and sniff extension to a painting,

0:22:550:22:56

when you can actually hold the fabric that the artist has portrayed.

0:22:560:23:00

I have to say, it's a beautiful piece of fabric as well.

0:23:000:23:03

I think she was inclined to have the best at the time.

0:23:030:23:07

-She could afford it.

-And she looks the best, doesn't she?

0:23:070:23:11

I mean, she's a very striking woman.

0:23:110:23:13

Again the over-paint on the face, not very good.

0:23:130:23:16

Gosh, she could be so much nicer.

0:23:160:23:17

I mean, I feel like a makeup artist, wanting to re-do her.

0:23:170:23:20

You can see in the cracks of the paint,

0:23:200:23:22

just where the infilling has disfigured her brow.

0:23:220:23:27

But gosh, she would be beautiful if she could be restored and cleaned.

0:23:270:23:31

Let's talk about values. Let's start with Mr Taylor over here.

0:23:310:23:35

I would say that,

0:23:350:23:36

particularly if he could be restored well,

0:23:360:23:39

he's worth something like £7,000 to £10,000.

0:23:390:23:44

The three children I think have got great potential, and I would put

0:23:440:23:50

a valuation of about £15,000, possibly even a little bit more.

0:23:500:23:54

-Right.

-And we come to her,

0:23:540:23:57

who I think is a really beautiful example of this artist's work.

0:23:570:24:02

It's signed. She looks at you with that seductive dead look.

0:24:020:24:06

She's got that hugely decorative presence.

0:24:060:24:08

It would go with cushions and curtains in the wealthiest homes

0:24:080:24:12

anywhere in the world. This is worth £20,000-£30,000.

0:24:120:24:16

Well, I hope that the relations

0:24:170:24:19

that are scattered over the world don't come and claim them.

0:24:190:24:22

So thank you very much.

0:24:220:24:25

Thank you.

0:24:250:24:26

Now something unusual's going to happen. Alex, we haven't really met,

0:24:280:24:32

and I know you've got two books, and that is all I know about them.

0:24:320:24:35

So I shall be as surprised as you are when I find out more.

0:24:350:24:38

Now, tell me about these.

0:24:380:24:40

Well, these two books were given to my husband when he was

0:24:400:24:42

nine-years-old and he was at prep school in Farnham, in Surrey.

0:24:420:24:47

They were tied with string, with a little loop,

0:24:470:24:50

just like something out of a Dickens novel,

0:24:500:24:52

and he was told that they would be his summer time reading, age nine.

0:24:520:24:56

Looked at them, thought, "These are a bit stuffy."

0:24:560:24:59

-"Mart of Nations".

-And "The Island Secret".

0:24:590:25:02

That could be interesting, but "Mart of Nations"

0:25:020:25:04

doesn't sound like a great read.

0:25:040:25:06

Well, anyway, they were chucked into the back of his cupboard

0:25:060:25:09

and totally forgotten about,

0:25:090:25:11

and 25 years go by, and I get married to this nine-year-old.

0:25:110:25:14

Considerably older by then, clearly.

0:25:140:25:16

Yes, absolutely. And I find the books,

0:25:160:25:18

and I'm putting them into our bookshelf at home.

0:25:180:25:21

I notice that they're stuck together, and I can't understand

0:25:210:25:24

what's the matter with them, and look what I found inside.

0:25:240:25:27

Look at that!

0:25:290:25:31

Take them out and see what's in there.

0:25:310:25:33

-Brilliant!

-8d. Everything's 8d and in perfect condition.

-Mars Bars.

0:25:330:25:38

So it wasn't a detention, Fiona, it was a treat!

0:25:380:25:42

Oh, and he never opened them!

0:25:420:25:43

-No.

-So he never realised?

-No.

0:25:430:25:47

Isn't that amazing?

0:25:470:25:49

I love it. That was definitely worth a surprise. I'd never have guessed.

0:25:490:25:53

I think we'll have those now!

0:25:530:25:56

Well, on the Antiques Roadshow, when we look at medals,

0:26:110:26:14

we're normally looking at medals from past campaigns,

0:26:140:26:19

from major wars - the First World War,

0:26:190:26:22

the Boer War.

0:26:220:26:23

But now we're going to look at medals from much more recent campaigns.

0:26:230:26:29

Relatively modern by those standards, and I think by the end of this piece,

0:26:290:26:34

I think viewers will be absolutely stunned at the value

0:26:340:26:39

we might be putting on some of the medal groups.

0:26:390:26:43

We're here, not far from Hereford, a stone's throw from Hereford,

0:26:430:26:48

which to many people mean the headquarters of the SAS,

0:26:480:26:51

the Special Air Service,

0:26:510:26:54

an organisation that of course is surrounded in mystery.

0:26:540:26:58

But why do you collect modern medals?

0:26:580:27:01

Well, I've been collecting medals from the age of 12, and the trouble

0:27:010:27:04

with collecting old Victorian medals is there's very little research.

0:27:040:27:08

After all, the recipients have died many, many years ago.

0:27:080:27:11

So I've sold all my old Victorian medals and I concentrate on

0:27:110:27:15

modern medals. The recipients generally are still alive,

0:27:150:27:19

and I can interview them, buy them a few drinks,

0:27:190:27:22

get their stories, write them down. I find them

0:27:220:27:24

far more interesting to research than the old Victorian medals.

0:27:240:27:28

What puzzles me, and I guess would puzzle a lot of people, is why,

0:27:280:27:32

if the recipients are still alive,

0:27:320:27:35

that they're willing to sell their medals.

0:27:350:27:38

I think because they've no-one

0:27:380:27:40

to pass them down to in the first place, and because they know

0:27:400:27:44

they're worth a lot of money. These guys don't wear their medals,

0:27:440:27:47

they don't have occasions to wear them, so why not sell them

0:27:470:27:50

for large amounts of money, and someone like me can do the research

0:27:500:27:54

and preserve their memories?

0:27:540:27:56

Only one of these gentlemen has died,

0:27:560:27:58

that's the owner of the Military Medal.

0:27:580:28:00

-He died last year.

-This group here?

-That group.

0:28:000:28:02

But before he died, I got to interview him.

0:28:020:28:05

Of the others, I've interviewed everyone else as well,

0:28:050:28:07

so I've got their life story and their military history as well.

0:28:070:28:11

And you've brought some photographs here. Tell me what these are.

0:28:110:28:15

Right, that's the regiment, it was D Squadron.

0:28:150:28:18

They're about to take South Georgia,

0:28:180:28:20

and that's the only remaining helicopter that's left out of three,

0:28:200:28:24

and the gentleman on the far left, he's the winner

0:28:240:28:27

-of the Military Medal group down there.

-So this group...

-Is his.

0:28:270:28:30

-..belongs to him, on the far left.

-Yes. It's very nice to have

0:28:300:28:33

a photograph of someone about to go into action.

0:28:330:28:36

This is, of course, the Falklands War we're talking about.

0:28:360:28:38

-Yes.

-And I can remember...

0:28:380:28:41

sitting in front of the television in 1980...?

0:28:410:28:44

-Two.

-1982,

0:28:440:28:46

and hearing on the news that the Argentineans

0:28:460:28:50

had invaded OUR territory, British territory of South Georgia.

0:28:500:28:54

And of course we went to war to protect the Falkland Islands.

0:28:540:28:58

So you've also brought along another group. Tell me about this group here.

0:28:580:29:02

Yes. Well, that gentleman, I've interviewed him about a dozen times,

0:29:020:29:06

and I've written over 25,000 words on his life history.

0:29:060:29:10

It's a fascinating history, but in South Georgia, there was only about

0:29:100:29:14

15 of them actually took South Georgia,

0:29:140:29:15

and they posed for that historic photograph.

0:29:150:29:18

-This is a photograph that I've seen in many books.

-Yes.

0:29:180:29:22

And was famously used in the newspapers

0:29:220:29:23

-and the news at the time.

-Yes.

0:29:230:29:26

-And which one is he?

-He's kneeling on the bottom right.

0:29:260:29:29

So this chap here, with the moustache?

0:29:290:29:31

-Yes.

-Well, it's incredible.

0:29:310:29:33

I mean, do you know, these groups,

0:29:330:29:36

to Special Air Service, very rarely come on the market.

0:29:360:29:41

And they are worth considerable sums of money.

0:29:410:29:44

Now I guess I don't need to tell you this,

0:29:440:29:46

because you must have acquired these yourself.

0:29:460:29:49

-Yes, indeed.

-And how... what did you pay? Give me an example

0:29:490:29:52

of some of the amounts of money you've paid for these medals.

0:29:520:29:55

I paid 25,000 for the Military Medal.

0:29:550:29:57

-How much?

-25,000.

0:29:570:29:59

-So for this group of three medals, you paid £25,000.

-Yes.

-How long ago?

0:29:590:30:03

That was about three years ago.

0:30:030:30:05

OK.

0:30:050:30:07

-I paid £6,000 for that group there.

-For this group, yes.

0:30:070:30:10

Yeah. These belonged to my friends, so I didn't buy those,

0:30:100:30:14

-and I paid £4,500 for this one. Right.

-Well, OK,

0:30:140:30:19

we know what you paid for some of these groups, but you know,

0:30:190:30:22

you've made, I think, an incredibly good investment,

0:30:220:30:25

because I think today, if they came up on the open market,

0:30:250:30:29

I think this group of three, with the history that surrounds it,

0:30:290:30:35

could easily make £30,000,

0:30:350:30:38

and I think if you took a total of the medals, the flag,

0:30:380:30:44

the pennants that you've got together here,

0:30:440:30:47

I think we would be looking at something in the region of...

0:30:470:30:52

-£80,000 to £90,000.

-Very good.

0:30:520:30:55

It's a serious, serious collection. Are you carrying on?

0:30:550:30:59

-Still collecting?

-Oh, absolutely. I'm running out of money,

0:30:590:31:02

-but I'm still collecting. Yes.

-I feel very, very proud

0:31:020:31:05

for the fact that you've shown these to me today.

0:31:050:31:08

Thank you.

0:31:080:31:09

This is a most remarkable album of postcards.

0:31:120:31:15

I'm flicking through it,

0:31:150:31:17

and page after page of nothing but dollies, teddies, toys.

0:31:170:31:22

Who collected them?

0:31:220:31:25

It was a very dear old friend of mine who was a doll restorer

0:31:250:31:27

and teddy bear restorer,

0:31:270:31:30

and it was her collection of a lifetime, 40 years plus.

0:31:300:31:34

So she collected to that theme because she was in the business?

0:31:340:31:37

-Yes.

-I've cheated, because I've gone through them

0:31:370:31:40

and I've pulled a few out here, which...

0:31:400:31:43

I mean, they're by no means the best, but they're the ones

0:31:430:31:46

that tickled my fancy.

0:31:460:31:47

And you know, when you look at them, there's so much detail here.

0:31:470:31:52

Here we've got a little group of dolls, lots of different ones,

0:31:520:31:56

and another group here with some boy dolls in there.

0:31:560:31:58

This one's a little bit foxed.

0:31:580:32:01

-And these I love, because there are the dolls with their owners.

-Yes.

0:32:010:32:08

And that's just great to see them, you know, the looks on their faces -

0:32:080:32:12

some of them serious, some of them smiling.

0:32:120:32:15

This is great, with the child with her doll and the little teddy.

0:32:150:32:20

Absolutely. I think it's the mere fact that the children

0:32:200:32:24

-with their toys, and also the expression on their faces.

-Exactly.

0:32:240:32:27

And some are beautiful children.

0:32:270:32:29

And then steering away a little bit from the dolls, we've got

0:32:290:32:33

something perhaps more for the boys here.

0:32:330:32:35

We've got a Christmas tree

0:32:350:32:36

decorated with the Allied flags from the First World War.

0:32:360:32:39

Oh, and this, this is great. A letter to Father Christmas.

0:32:390:32:43

"My Christmas wish. Dear "blank".

0:32:430:32:46

"I do wish Santa Claus

0:32:460:32:47

"would bring me a "blank" this year from Harrods Toy Fair. Your loving

0:32:470:32:53

""blank"." And the address. How lovely. And here we've got

0:32:530:32:56

Father Christmas holding a zeppelin,

0:32:560:32:58

which would have been the toy of the moment, you know.

0:32:580:33:00

-Exactly.

-Absolutely of its period.

0:33:000:33:03

Oh, well, now I know why I picked this one out,

0:33:040:33:07

-because this is a Steiff card.

-Mm.

0:33:070:33:11

There's a Steiff teddy bear in a cart,

0:33:110:33:14

and what's more important for me, is that all these figures

0:33:140:33:17

are actually Steiff figures as well.

0:33:170:33:21

And those I've only ever seen in line drawings

0:33:210:33:24

so, you know, to me, it's a great discovery to see

0:33:240:33:26

-that they actually did make them.

-Make them.

-Or at least

0:33:260:33:29

-they made one for the postcard.

-Yes.

0:33:290:33:31

I could go on, but I think really what I'm going to talk about

0:33:310:33:34

just briefly now is about postcard collecting in general,

0:33:340:33:38

because lots of people have collections of postcards,

0:33:380:33:41

usually in albums that are falling to pieces.

0:33:410:33:43

And the question I'm always asked is, "Are they valuable?"

0:33:430:33:48

And the answer is generally

0:33:480:33:49

a lot of postcards aren't valuable, because people collect by theme.

0:33:490:33:54

When they go to a postcard fair, they're not aimlessly buying,

0:33:540:33:57

they're flicking through and saying,

0:33:570:33:59

-"I need railway cards and I haven't got this one."

-Yeah exactly.

0:33:590:34:02

So that's obviously what your friend did, she collected in sets,

0:34:020:34:05

she filled all the gaps, and what she has got here as a result

0:34:050:34:09

is something really quite remarkable.

0:34:090:34:12

-Yes, I agree.

-These cards are valuable.

0:34:120:34:17

They would work out at around £10 a piece.

0:34:170:34:20

-Right.

-And you've got, how many?

-There's 300.

0:34:200:34:24

You do the math.

0:34:240:34:25

Well, to be honest, I inherited them, I suppose,

0:34:270:34:30

because she wanted them... somebody to look after them.

0:34:300:34:34

She didn't want them to be broken up, sold on, and so really,

0:34:340:34:37

they've been in the cupboard for a long time,

0:34:370:34:39

and that's where they'll stay, I think.

0:34:390:34:41

-They're in safe hands.

-They are.

-Thank you for bringing them.

-Thanks.

0:34:410:34:45

Now then, I wonder how much action

0:34:460:34:48

this has seen? It certainly looks as if it's seen some. There's a notch.

0:34:480:34:52

I wonder whether that's been taken out on the back of somebody's head!

0:34:520:34:55

This is a Great Western Railway, or as Brunel would prefer us

0:34:570:35:02

probably to say, "God's Wonderful Railway,"

0:35:020:35:04

constable's truncheon, which dates from probably the 1850s.

0:35:040:35:09

But certainly, before the telegraph,

0:35:090:35:13

when they needed these people to stop saboteurs

0:35:130:35:16

and other people pinching railway property.

0:35:160:35:19

This is quite an unusual thing to see.

0:35:190:35:21

Are you a collector of truncheons or...?

0:35:210:35:24

-No, no, just I'm a railway enthusiast.

-Yes.

0:35:240:35:27

And I was given it over 40 years ago

0:35:270:35:30

by a gentleman whose family owned it originally,

0:35:300:35:35

and it comes from Lansdown Junction, Cheltenham,

0:35:350:35:39

and he thought that I would treasure it more than his family

0:35:390:35:43

when he passed away, as they would only sell it.

0:35:430:35:46

-So he gave it, through my father, to me.

-Good.

0:35:460:35:49

It's in lovely condition for its age. Most of them are quite damaged.

0:35:490:35:52

The Great Western Railway constables' truncheons

0:35:520:35:55

were really nicely decorated.

0:35:550:35:58

I understand that it was only the Great Western who decorated

0:35:580:36:01

in such an elaborate fashion. And you can see, although it's transferred,

0:36:010:36:05

the quality of the transfer is high,

0:36:050:36:07

and there's a wonderful imperial crown at the top,

0:36:070:36:10

which makes it look very important and official indeed.

0:36:100:36:13

Well, because these are so scarce, it is difficult

0:36:130:36:17

to actually arrive at a price on them, but I could well imagine

0:36:170:36:22

that if you actually wanted to replace these,

0:36:220:36:25

which you'd have considerable difficulty,

0:36:250:36:28

you could easily be talking as much as £1,000 to replace one of these.

0:36:280:36:31

Very good.

0:36:310:36:33

Very good. Thank you very much.

0:36:330:36:35

These shells have a distinctly Pacific feel in Herefordshire.

0:36:390:36:43

How did you come by them?

0:36:430:36:44

Well, they came into our family through my great aunt,

0:36:440:36:47

who was the daughter-in-law

0:36:470:36:49

of a well-known ornithologist, Edgar Leopold Layard.

0:36:490:36:52

He was Honorary British Consul in New Caledonia,

0:36:520:36:55

-in the sort of Indonesian area, I think.

-Yes.

0:36:550:36:57

-The Pacific anyway.

-The Pacific anyway.

0:36:570:37:00

They have wonderful details here.

0:37:000:37:02

There's sort of native scenes carved here and, then,

0:37:020:37:05

quite a European scene here, although this is marked

0:37:050:37:08

-"New Caledonia".

-Yes, yes, yes, yes.

-I think something like this

0:37:080:37:12

would be done obviously because they were trying to please

0:37:120:37:16

their European visitors or masters at the time, and so, you know,

0:37:160:37:20

the carvers would take an engraving,

0:37:200:37:22

-an etching from a European piece, and put it onto this shell.

-Yes.

0:37:220:37:27

This one in particular fascinates me.

0:37:270:37:29

Well, we have a note which my father left, that apparently

0:37:290:37:33

that was engraved, we believe, by a French forger called Tournere,

0:37:330:37:37

who was sent to New Caledonia as a prisoner for the rest of his life,

0:37:370:37:41

because they were so concerned that if he was left in France,

0:37:410:37:45

he'd forge more bank notes, and make fortunes I suppose. He certainly,

0:37:450:37:49

-obviously, was a very capable...

-He's an exceptionally fine engraver.

0:37:490:37:53

Exquisite this, and so difficult to engrave on a shell.

0:37:530:37:57

The chances of breaking it...

0:37:570:37:59

It's a very difficult thing. Many of the ones

0:37:590:38:01

I've seen that are engraved, just have one small scene on it.

0:38:010:38:04

This one has all these different little vignettes.

0:38:040:38:08

Beautifully detailed,

0:38:080:38:10

and there's a native inhabitant with a quite a European idea on the head.

0:38:100:38:16

Terribly difficult thing to do, wonderful example.

0:38:160:38:20

This engraving here

0:38:200:38:22

is very reminiscent of something nearer to sort of 1850-1860,

0:38:220:38:27

I would say on this one, whereas these, I'd say, are slightly later.

0:38:270:38:30

-OK.

-How many of these examples do you have?

-We have six.

0:38:300:38:35

I think there were more once. My sister looks after them,

0:38:350:38:38

and one was stolen when their house was burgled,

0:38:380:38:40

and another one actually was given to some friends

0:38:400:38:43

who were very close to the family. So six or eight or so, altogether.

0:38:430:38:47

They're extremely decorative.

0:38:470:38:51

-These two I would put at £250-£300 each.

-Yes.

-This one,

0:38:510:39:00

because of the European subject, rather slightly rarer, and obviously

0:39:000:39:03

with the New Caledonian, I'd put a little bit more, maybe £300-£350.

0:39:030:39:10

This one...

0:39:100:39:12

has so much detail.

0:39:120:39:14

I've never seen one as good as this. I have seen a few of these shells,

0:39:140:39:17

but I've never seen one as good as this.

0:39:170:39:19

Really?

0:39:190:39:22

He obviously was a great engraver,

0:39:220:39:24

which the French government obviously knew.

0:39:240:39:26

And valuation, I would say...

0:39:260:39:30

-£1,000-£1,200.

-Really?

0:39:300:39:34

Thank you.

0:39:340:39:35

We see lots of tea caddies on the Antiques Roadshow,

0:39:380:39:41

but this one just breaks the rules.

0:39:410:39:43

-What can you tell me about it?

-It belonged to my granny,

0:39:430:39:47

who was given it by an old lady, Miss Ravenshaw, when she died,

0:39:470:39:50

and I know that they had it in their family

0:39:500:39:53

about 1850-1860, because she's mentioned it in her diary,

0:39:530:39:56

and that's really all I know about it.

0:39:560:39:59

It's been in our family since about 1830... sorry, 1930s.

0:39:590:40:04

I just want to open it up,

0:40:040:40:06

because this is what got my heart racing when I saw the interior.

0:40:060:40:10

Got these three canisters for holding your tea - the green tea

0:40:100:40:14

and black tea.

0:40:140:40:16

But what makes this really, really special is this. It's another caddy.

0:40:160:40:21

-So it's a caddy within a caddy.

-Right.

0:40:210:40:24

And I just want to take these out,

0:40:240:40:27

because the cut glass is absolutely exquisite.

0:40:270:40:30

This is to me what's special, because tea was very, very expensive.

0:40:300:40:36

Now we have a cup of tea, it's in a mug.

0:40:360:40:39

When they were drinking tea at this period, in the 18th century -

0:40:390:40:43

this is an 18th century tea caddy - tea was a real ritual.

0:40:430:40:47

So they would have mixed it in that one?

0:40:470:40:50

No. I think, because this was locked, this was another caddy as well,

0:40:500:40:54

-because there's no locks on these.

-No.

-When did it get damaged?

0:40:540:40:58

I don't know. It was like that when I remember it from a little girl.

0:40:580:41:01

Right. OK.

0:41:010:41:03

-The box itself is made out satinwood, hence its weight.

-Right.

0:41:030:41:09

Inside the lid you can see, this is sycamore,

0:41:090:41:12

and it's got this lovely chequered decoration.

0:41:120:41:15

It's all in the detail, it's fabulous.

0:41:150:41:18

Even the lock is actually numbered here, you see?

0:41:180:41:21

It's like a little safe, holding this treasure of tea.

0:41:210:41:26

Any idea what you think it may be worth today?

0:41:260:41:28

I've always thought about £200-£300, because it was just a pretty...

0:41:280:41:33

-the decoration on the outside is very pretty.

-Yes.

-But I've no idea.

0:41:330:41:37

Well, the box is worth a couple of hundred pounds,

0:41:370:41:42

just as an interesting item.

0:41:420:41:44

When I look at these other items,

0:41:440:41:47

-to me, that's worth £1,000.

-Oh!

0:41:470:41:50

What, in that condition? Cracked and...

0:41:500:41:53

-In that condition.

-Right.

-So, overall,

0:41:530:41:56

we'd say in this condition,

0:41:560:41:59

I'm quite happy to say it is worth £2,000.

0:41:590:42:02

-Three?

-Two.

-Two.

0:42:020:42:04

It'd be nice to be three.

0:42:040:42:07

I'm getting my hopes up now!

0:42:070:42:09

If it was perfect, it would be a different story altogether.

0:42:090:42:12

It could be even £5,000.

0:42:120:42:15

-Right.

-This is a lovely little piece of furniture.

0:42:150:42:19

Lovely little piece.

0:42:190:42:22

So, two little thimbles. Have you had these a long time?

0:42:230:42:27

Yes.

0:42:270:42:28

They were given to me by my Godmother

0:42:280:42:31

when I was christened in January 1941.

0:42:310:42:33

Oh, lovely, and you like them?

0:42:330:42:35

-I think they're beautiful.

-They're sweet little things.

0:42:350:42:38

-Thimbles now are getting quite collectable.

-Yes.

0:42:380:42:41

There are thimble collectors clubs,

0:42:410:42:43

so they go mad on these things.

0:42:430:42:44

Especially on this little one.

0:42:440:42:46

This is Worcester, Royal Worcester, painted by Willy Powell.

0:42:460:42:51

-His signature is just...

-Can you see it?

0:42:510:42:53

-Willy - W Powell.

-Oh, I never saw that.

0:42:530:42:56

-Right.

-He was a little hunchback.

-Oh, was he?

0:42:560:43:00

About four foot tall.

0:43:000:43:02

He used to have to sit on a special stool to paint the paintings,

0:43:020:43:06

-but he was a beautiful painter of birds. Isn't that lovely?

-It is.

0:43:060:43:10

1935 is the date coding, so a nice early one,

0:43:100:43:14

and that's very, very beautiful.

0:43:140:43:16

This one is much earlier. This one is the end of the 19th century,

0:43:160:43:20

decorated with little tiny jewels, and all hand gilding.

0:43:200:43:25

All these little jewels are put on by brush, little tiny...

0:43:250:43:29

imitating turquoises or gold spots or something or other,

0:43:290:43:32

and while the little bird thimble is very collectable now, a little bird

0:43:320:43:38

thimble like that by Willy Powell, the great painter of birds,

0:43:380:43:44

is going to be something like about £200.

0:43:440:43:46

-Right, right.

-The little thimble

0:43:460:43:48

with jewels is almost unfindable by thimble collectors.

0:43:480:43:53

-They'd go absolutely bonkers over that one.

-Do they?

0:43:530:43:57

So we're looking at something like about £500-£600 for a little thimble.

0:43:570:44:00

Gosh, right.

0:44:000:44:02

-That's lovely.

-So now you must go on sewing, mustn't you?

0:44:020:44:06

-I keep them in my cabinet, safe.

-Oh, use them.

0:44:060:44:11

I mean, Willy Powell would love to know

0:44:110:44:13

someone was using his little thimble.

0:44:130:44:15

He was a beautiful little man,

0:44:150:44:17

and I know he'd love you to have it and use it.

0:44:170:44:20

Oh, that's nice. Thank you.

0:44:200:44:21

Well, here we have two letters from Winston Churchill.

0:44:260:44:30

One from Christmas 1949,

0:44:300:44:32

and the other on his birthday, 30th November 1946.

0:44:320:44:37

So where did you get these?

0:44:370:44:39

I got those from an antique market.

0:44:390:44:40

-Right.

-I thought they were very interesting

0:44:400:44:43

-and Winston Churchill is a...

-A hero of yours?

0:44:430:44:47

-Yes, very much a hero.

-And what did you pay for them?

0:44:470:44:49

For those, £150.

0:44:490:44:51

Yes. Well, let me tell you that had they been right,

0:44:510:44:56

they would have been worth a lot of money.

0:44:560:44:58

-Yes, I thought they might be wrong.

-Well, they're facsimiles

0:44:580:45:01

and they're not worth £150, I have to tell you.

0:45:010:45:04

There was an auction house in London who used to have these pinned up

0:45:040:45:09

on their wall at the reception desk, because people who used to come in

0:45:090:45:13

with these and say that they're real,

0:45:130:45:15

and they would say, "No they're not, look up there on the wall."

0:45:150:45:19

But there we are, anyway.

0:45:190:45:21

More exciting I suppose

0:45:210:45:23

is this, which is Edward Elgar's

0:45:230:45:26

"The Dream of Gerontius" by Cardinal Newman.

0:45:260:45:30

The interesting thing about it, it is signed by Edward Elgar,

0:45:300:45:34

and it's also signed by Jaeger,

0:45:340:45:37

who happens to be...

0:45:370:45:39

-Nimrod.

-Nimrod. Yes, who was

0:45:390:45:42

Elgar's great friend, of course, and he writes a lot of these things.

0:45:420:45:47

But this is not the score, this is just the words to it.

0:45:470:45:51

But it is the first edition,

0:45:510:45:53

the "Book of Words, with analytical and descriptive notes

0:45:530:45:57

"by AJ Jaeger". Now what did you pay for this?

0:45:570:46:00

Well, it was in a box of items in a local auction,

0:46:000:46:04

-and I paid £6 for the box of items.

-I think you've done slightly better.

0:46:040:46:09

It's very rare to see Elgar autographically with his friend,

0:46:090:46:14

Jaeger, and I think that that makes this rather exciting.

0:46:140:46:18

My valuation of it is, what?

0:46:180:46:23

-Somewhere in the region of £800.

-Oh, super. Very good.

-Nice one.

-Yes.

0:46:230:46:29

THUNDER RUMBLES

0:46:330:46:36

So where did you find these, down the offy?

0:46:360:46:40

No, I did a barn conversion some years ago

0:46:420:46:45

and there was a crack in the wall, so I had to put concrete underneath,

0:46:450:46:49

and when I dug under the barn, so these popped out.

0:46:490:46:52

OK. I think that's pretty good fortune, isn't it?

0:46:520:46:55

-Yes.

-Tell us about the date of the building.

0:46:550:46:57

Well, that building was about 1860, I think.

0:46:570:47:01

No, no, earlier than that. Come on, there's got to be something earlier.

0:47:010:47:05

Well, there was a farm next door to it,

0:47:050:47:07

and that was probably dated back to about 1700, I think.

0:47:070:47:11

-It was certainly on maps of 1740.

-Oh, you see, now,

0:47:110:47:14

-now we're getting there.

-Right.

0:47:140:47:16

-Because 1720 is this one.

-Yes.

-And 1740

0:47:160:47:22

is the date of this one, so actually we've got good dates.

0:47:220:47:27

I mean, what's amazing, is bearing in mind

0:47:270:47:29

that they're hidden in a wall,

0:47:290:47:30

and you're smashing around with concrete and pick axes

0:47:300:47:33

and barrows and all the rest of it, they're in really good nick.

0:47:330:47:36

Um, this one is...strangely is Northern European.

0:47:360:47:40

-It might be German.

-Right.

0:47:400:47:43

Has a nice crisp pontil under here, with a nice iridescence actually.

0:47:430:47:47

-It was covered in iridescence when...

-Yes.

0:47:470:47:50

..I picked it up and it came off in my hands.

0:47:500:47:52

If we can look down the neck, there's some really nice iridescence in that.

0:47:520:47:56

So this is for Rhenish, German wine.

0:47:560:47:59

-It would have been probably imported with the wine in it.

-Oh.

0:47:590:48:02

-1720.

-Right.

0:48:020:48:04

And this one is more unusual. This is an English mallet shape,

0:48:040:48:07

and it's distinguished by a very large, sharp

0:48:070:48:11

pontil mark under the base here.

0:48:110:48:13

And isn't that a rustic piece?

0:48:130:48:15

Look at that. Wonky donkey!

0:48:150:48:17

You know, you can see...

0:48:170:48:19

Really, you can imagine some old glass maker in 1735,

0:48:190:48:22

puffing his lungs into that,

0:48:220:48:24

and, having done so, still while the glass is still hot,

0:48:240:48:28

is picking up a seal for AB, whoever AB was...

0:48:280:48:32

You should check the deeds.

0:48:320:48:34

-We tried. We can't find anyone.

-No? ..dropping a dob of glass

0:48:340:48:37

onto here, and pressing that,

0:48:370:48:39

in the manner of the seal, of sealing a letter,

0:48:390:48:43

his initials onto the bottle. And what's strange

0:48:430:48:47

is that, it's a bit like me, it's got a really big mouth!

0:48:470:48:51

Well, I wasn't going to make any...

0:48:510:48:52

-I may have to deal with you later.

-OK!

0:48:540:48:57

So what is basically the rubbish in a wall

0:48:580:49:03

is not bad money.

0:49:030:49:05

So we've got, I don't know, £200, £300 on this one.

0:49:050:49:11

-500, 600, 700 on here.

-Right.

0:49:110:49:15

So what we have is over £1,000 for two green bottles...

0:49:150:49:20

hiding on a wall.

0:49:200:49:21

THUNDER RUMBLES

0:49:270:49:31

It's that moment on the Antiques Roadshow

0:49:320:49:34

when it's time for a rendition of Singing in the Rain.

0:49:340:49:38

It was glorious earlier! What's happened? The heavens have opened.

0:49:380:49:41

But we're going to enjoy ourselves, aren't we?

0:49:410:49:43

-ALL:

-Yes.

-In your blue macs.

0:49:430:49:46

Takes more than a spot of rain to put us off!

0:49:460:49:48

This is such a pretty little box, a little

0:50:070:50:09

rosewood box with pewter inlay and mother of pearl, little steel handle.

0:50:090:50:14

Could be 1840s.

0:50:140:50:16

-Ah, but it's got a treasure.

-Yes.

0:50:190:50:21

And it's got a dear little wax doll. Tell me what you know about it.

0:50:210:50:26

She was given to my daughter.

0:50:260:50:28

She was left by an old family friend,

0:50:280:50:31

and it came with some information about it in German,

0:50:310:50:36

that it belonged to the Brothers Grimm and was given to a little girl

0:50:360:50:42

-all those years ago.

-Fantastic. Well, let me just... Hang on.

0:50:420:50:45

Oh, this is all in German. "Im Jahr achtzehn

0:50:450:50:48

"achtundvierzig". My German isn't what it was!

0:50:480:50:53

I do have a translation for you.

0:50:530:50:56

Thank goodness! OK. "In the year 1848..."

0:50:560:50:58

la, la, la...

0:50:580:51:00

Oh, this is interesting.

0:51:000:51:02

"The father of little Dorothy was friendly with the Grimm Brothers

0:51:020:51:05

"and they brought with them one day, to the apartment, the doll." Amazing.

0:51:050:51:09

Well, I mean, the Grimm Brothers, I suppose, whether we know it or not,

0:51:090:51:14

they are part of all our childhoods.

0:51:140:51:17

In 1812 they wrote the great fairy story book

0:51:170:51:19

"Tales of Children and the Home", in which were Snow White, Cinderella,

0:51:190:51:24

Sleeping Beauty. And basically any other fairy stories

0:51:240:51:28

that we've ever heard about, first appeared in that book.

0:51:280:51:31

So what a wonderful thing to have been given by them.

0:51:310:51:34

Let's just have a look at this little doll.

0:51:340:51:37

Well, she's a poured wax doll.

0:51:370:51:39

She's got her head very realistically turning to one side.

0:51:390:51:44

I love the little printed cotton dress that she's wearing,

0:51:440:51:48

with these tiny buttons.

0:51:480:51:49

They look as if they've been sewn on by a mouse.

0:51:490:51:52

-Interestingly, I think that she's an English doll.

-Really?

0:51:520:51:56

But having said that, the English were very well known for wax dolls

0:51:560:52:00

in the early part of the 19th century.

0:52:000:52:04

As a little doll,

0:52:040:52:06

she's all right, but not stupendous.

0:52:060:52:11

But she's been sprinkled almost with fairy dust,

0:52:110:52:14

because of her connection with the Grimm Brothers, and I think

0:52:140:52:19

that that then puts her into a different league,

0:52:190:52:21

and I would put her value

0:52:210:52:23

at perhaps £400-£600.

0:52:230:52:26

-So a real...a real treasure.

-Yes.

0:52:260:52:29

And something that has her own fairy story to tell.

0:52:290:52:34

It does, yes.

0:52:340:52:35

-Wonderful. Thank you for bringing her along.

-Thank you.

0:52:350:52:38

It's a really unusual thing to bring to a Roadshow. Lovely thing to see.

0:52:430:52:46

Where did you get it?

0:52:460:52:48

I had a dear friend, an elderly friend, who died last year,

0:52:480:52:52

and she requested that I could choose several things

0:52:520:52:57

from her home, and this was one of the items that I chose.

0:52:570:53:01

So what do you know about it?

0:53:010:53:03

Very little. I don't know how to pronounce it,

0:53:030:53:06

-but we believe it's called a cloisonne.

-Cloisonne, that's right.

0:53:060:53:10

It was called Oriental,

0:53:100:53:12

and we understand that it might have had pot pourri in it.

0:53:120:53:18

But again, we really don't know.

0:53:180:53:20

Well, that's a good start. It is Oriental, it's Chinese

0:53:200:53:23

and it is cloisonne, and cloisonne is a type of enamel,

0:53:230:53:26

where you have these little cloisonnes or wires,

0:53:260:53:29

which are soldered onto the surface, and the colour here

0:53:290:53:31

is coloured glass, which is floated into the gaps

0:53:310:53:34

and then ground off. So that's what cloisonne is.

0:53:340:53:37

It's not really a pot pourri.

0:53:370:53:39

It should be filled up with sand to a level,

0:53:390:53:41

and then have incense put into it and then it rises out.

0:53:410:53:45

Oh, we've got dragons all round these reticulated panels here,

0:53:450:53:48

so smoke would be rising out of it. It's an incense burner.

0:53:480:53:51

-Right.

-It's a pretty impressive one too.

0:53:510:53:54

This one dates from somewhere in the 19th century,

0:53:540:53:57

probably the first half of the 19th century.

0:53:570:54:00

Chinese cloisonne can be valuable. If you put that in auction, it would be

0:54:000:54:03

8,000 to 10,000.

0:54:030:54:05

Goodness me! Wow! Whoo!

0:54:080:54:12

Oh, thank you very much.

0:54:120:54:14

That's quite amazing.

0:54:150:54:17

We saw this earlier in the programme, but do you actually know what it is?

0:54:190:54:23

Well, I think it's a stirrup cup.

0:54:230:54:25

Absolutely.

0:54:250:54:27

Stirrup cups first appeared in the mid-18th century

0:54:270:54:29

and were always foxes. But the Victorians

0:54:290:54:33

decided that was a bit boring, so they decided

0:54:330:54:36

to make other things, like dogs' heads as stirrup cups.

0:54:360:54:39

And stirrup cups were handed up

0:54:390:54:42

to the Master of the Hunt, just before they went off hunting.

0:54:420:54:45

And what I've got in my hand,

0:54:450:54:48

I've got to say, is one of the best ones I've ever actually seen.

0:54:480:54:52

It's got a nice set of marks down the bottom here.

0:54:520:54:54

Made by the firm of Hunt and Roskell, who were one of the best

0:54:540:54:58

makers of the 19th century, and it's got a date letter here for 1869.

0:54:580:55:04

But what has made this possibly one of the best days

0:55:040:55:07

I've ever had on any Antiques Roadshow,

0:55:070:55:09

is the fact that in front of us we've got 11 more.

0:55:090:55:14

So how on earth did 11 come to be made?

0:55:140:55:19

Well, they are all models of real Hereford cattle

0:55:190:55:22

that were shown and won prizes at shows up and down the country,

0:55:220:55:27

and so every time that the owner won

0:55:270:55:29

with one of his real Hereford bulls,

0:55:290:55:31

-he had a cup modelled on the cow or the bull to celebrate.

-I see.

0:55:310:55:35

So that's why each one has a name on, and this one has "Sir Hungerford".

0:55:350:55:39

Yes. That was Johnny Arkwright's grandfather,

0:55:390:55:42

actually, Sir Hungerford Hoskins.

0:55:420:55:43

The bull was named after his grandfather.

0:55:430:55:45

Sir Hungerford didn't look like this?!

0:55:450:55:48

-No.

-No, no. Good. OK.

0:55:480:55:49

So Johnny Arkwright was resident here at Hampton Court

0:55:490:55:53

in 1869 when they were made.

0:55:530:55:56

That's right. He was the owner of the house and the estate.

0:55:560:55:59

-And are there any records of him ever using these?

-Oh, yes, very much so.

0:55:590:56:03

They were used on, I think, the dinner table

0:56:030:56:06

as a sort of place setting perhaps. I don't know.

0:56:060:56:09

Well, the good thing about this particular model is, if we put him

0:56:090:56:13

-upside down he sits absolutely like a goblet.

-Yes.

0:56:130:56:17

So it must have looked pretty impressive to have

0:56:170:56:20

12 of these all around a dining table.

0:56:200:56:22

I've never, ever heard of 12 - "herd" -

0:56:220:56:26

and there's no joke there, never heard of a set of 12,

0:56:260:56:31

even though there are some smaller ones

0:56:310:56:32

and larger ones, and they've all got different names on, as you say.

0:56:320:56:36

But I have to tell you that stirrup cups are enormously collectable.

0:56:360:56:40

-Oh, right.

-There's been a surge in interest

0:56:400:56:42

in them over the last seven or eight years.

0:56:420:56:45

There are lots of collectors, and bulls

0:56:450:56:48

happen to be one of the rarest forms of stirrup cup you can get.

0:56:480:56:52

Right.

0:56:520:56:53

-So, now, how long have you had these, or...?

-They're not mine,

0:56:530:56:57

-I'm sorry to say.

-They're not yours?

-I wish they were.

0:56:570:57:01

Because I knew a little of the history of the herd,

0:57:010:57:04

-I was asked to bring them today.

-I see.

0:57:040:57:06

And I know that they are kept very safe

0:57:060:57:09

under lock and key most of the time.

0:57:090:57:11

Very occasionally, used,

0:57:110:57:12

but mostly kept safe and sound.

0:57:120:57:14

Well, so you probably haven't got a great idea

0:57:140:57:17

about what this little lot is worth.

0:57:170:57:19

No. I know more about the value of the creatures themselves.

0:57:190:57:23

Well, I wouldn't know which was more valuable, yet.

0:57:250:57:28

But maybe you'll tell me. But if I tell you that...

0:57:280:57:31

this one, which is a wonderful bull, with a great big chubby neck.

0:57:310:57:37

It's a beautiful model, fabulously textured here,

0:57:370:57:41

really super, super example.

0:57:410:57:43

Something like this is probably worth at least £10,0000-£15,000.

0:57:430:57:49

-So times twelve.

-Right.

0:57:520:57:54

And for a set, there's not going to be much change left out of £150,000.

0:57:540:58:01

I'd better take them home carefully!

0:58:010:58:03

Well, they are an extraordinary lot.

0:58:040:58:08

If I ever see anything like this again, I will be truly lucky,

0:58:080:58:11

but I've been more than truly lucky just to handle these and see these,

0:58:110:58:15

so thank you so much for bringing them along.

0:58:150:58:18

It's been lovely to bring them back to Hampton Court today.

0:58:180:58:21

-Couldn't be a better home.

-Thanks.

-Thanks.

0:58:210:58:23

So we're ending the programme as we began,

0:58:230:58:26

with those amazing cow stirrup cups. Aren't they fabulous?

0:58:260:58:31

From Hampton Court Castle, until next time, bye-bye.

0:58:310:58:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd.

0:58:540:58:57

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:570:59:00

Fiona Bruce and the team return for a second visit to Hampton Court Castle in rural Herefordshire. Thousands of visitors arrive laden with precious objects, amongst which are a silver dish given to Chamberlain after his famous 'peace in our time' speech, a collection of silver drinking urns shaped as Herefordshire bulls made by the greatest silversmith of the day, and a modern-day collection of SAS medals which carry an astonishing valuation.


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