Retrospective Antiques Roadshow


Retrospective

Fiona Bruce reflects on another remarkable series of finds, and gives updates on many of the most-talked about items to have appeared on the show.


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Transcript


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For the last six months, our trusty truck has scoured the country,

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from the Highlands of Scotland to the south coast of Devon.

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And now we've reached journey's end for this series, and frankly,

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it's time for a well-earned rest.

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But not before we take stock of what's been another memorable year

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for the Antiques Roadshow.

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CHIRPING

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Our team of experts have been busy this season.

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Over the last six months, they've

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met over 30,000 visitors, all eager to share their treasures with us.

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When an object, a treasured antique, is valued on the programme,

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we're often asked, what happened next?

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When the cameras have stopped rolling, did the owner keep it,

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did they sell it? Where did it end up?

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Oh, my gosh. Oh!

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Are you joking?!

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Tonight is your chance to see the most talked-about finds screened

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across this series, and to discover

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what happened after their starring role.

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And here we have possibly the most exciting dolls

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which have ever come on to the Roadshow.

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And what about those rare and precious antiques that our experts most wanted to find?

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Well, a lady has come along today who thinks she might just have found one.

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We begin this special look back in Devon.

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Our visit to the Britannia Naval College started with a lucky find for ceramics specialist John Axford.

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It was an even luckier moment for David, who'd brought

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this delicate vase in, as he'd dropped it just before meeting John!

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It's a nice little glass vase - where did you get it?

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It belongs to a friend of mine.

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Ah. Why didn't he come?

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I'm down here on holiday.

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So, you go on holiday with your friends' vases?

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Yes, see whether I can get rid of them!

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He knows I like the show so he said, "Why don't you take something down?" I said, "I've got nothing."

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He said, "Take this down."

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Fabulous, it's very pretty.

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It's glass, overlaid glass - a white base and red glass on top of it.

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It's got all sorts of things on it - a little bat here,

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we've got a little twin fish symbol here,

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rockwork, pine trees, prunus, it's got it all going on.

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On the base, we've got a little mark on the bottom,

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a four-character mark, it's a Chinese mark, the mark of one of the Chinese emperors. Oh, is it?

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He thought it was Japanese. No, it's a Chinese vase.

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It says Qianlong, and he reigned for most of the 18th century,

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from 1736-1795. The problem is, you can have a perfectly good

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18th-century vase and an unscrupulous person will mark it.

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Right. It's lovely quality.

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The base is like jasper. And the mark is done really well.

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I have no reason to believe this is not a perfectly genuine

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18th-century Chinese glass vase, a really nice thing. Lovely.

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It's worth a fair bit.

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Is it? ?3,000 or ?4,000.

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Is it?!

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It's a damn good thing. Don't say it.

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It's a damn good thing it didn't break when you dropped it earlier!

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I know.

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GASPING

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That's why I gave up cricket.

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John, that was a great way to kick off our day at Dartmouth, and then it had an even happier ending.

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Yes, they took the vase, very pretty vase, up to auction

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and they put it under the hammer. And it went for...?

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It went for ?30,000, so I expect they were pleased.

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And you valued it at ?3,000 or ?4,000?! Yes. So, what happened?

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Well, the Chinese market for imperial goods has rocketed. It's sizzling hot.

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Things have gone up 50-fold in five years,

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and no-one can keep pace on where things are going to go.

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Two weeks ago in New York, a vase made 22,000 times its estimate.

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we'll tell you after this special look back at the year.

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It was in the small Yorkshire village of Saltaire

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After 33 years on the Roadshow, his patience finally paid off with this almost 1,000-year-old bronze.

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for all the hard work I'd done over the years.

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Brilliant. So he gave me this, the one thing I admired.

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He got it from an auction house in Bradford,

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and it was being used as a doorstop.

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At the end of the auction, he'd seen the vase,

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and I don't know what he gave for it,

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but he made a bid and came home with it.

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How fascinating, that's wonderful. Do you like it?

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I love it, it's my favourite piece.

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Where do you think it comes from?

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Myself, I would say Chinese, but I'm not 100%.

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My grandad did mention Chinese, he had tried to look it up.

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It is Chinese.

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What age do you think it might be?

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I don't know, 200 years old, would it?

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It is undoubtedly

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the oldest bronze we've ever had on the Roadshow. Seriously? Yes.

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The question is exactly when this dates from.

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I think with these cords on here,

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we're beginning to look as if it might be Yuan Dynasty,

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which followed the Song,

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and that ran from 1279 to 1368.

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I think that's when it dates from. Right, yeah.

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We've got here cast in these squiggles,

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which are actually based on chilong, which are sea dragons.

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Right. And then that's been infilled

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with key fret.

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And it's beautifully done.

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And then, on the side, you've got these

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dragon handles.

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It's got

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condition problems.

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It was at some time buried.

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Right, yeah. I think this verdigris on here, which some

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naughty person has had a go at cleaning, I notice.

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No more, thank you.

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No, no, I've never cleaned it. I don't know if my grandad ever did.

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Right. I think this fairly definitely indicates that

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this was a burial gourd.

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One of the handles looks as if it might come off at any minute.

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Yes, it's a bit...

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The foot has come off and been put back.

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But we're looking at something which is

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pushing 1,000 years old, you know.

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If this were in a smart dealer's catalogue in London...

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Yeah.

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..I could see it having a price tag of somewhere between

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?10,000 and ?15,000.

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Seriously? Seriously?

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Yay!

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That's really unbelievable, to be honest. Thank you, Grandpa!

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Thank you very much, yeah!

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Owner Matthew tells us he's still coming to terms

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with that valuation, but has recently decided

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to sell the bronze and have a big family holiday.

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It was another record-breaking day at Swindon's Steam Rail Museum.

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There, Fergus Gambon, a doll enthusiast from childhood days, made this remarkable find.

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I brought Aunt Mary Ann to visit you.

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You brought Aunt Mary Ann to visit me?

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Rather alarmingly, I see some loose limbs here. Yes.

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They're here, but they're separate. Let's get the whole thing out...

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Those are the legs.

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..and see what we've actually got.

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The more I look, actually, the more astounded I'm becoming.

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That's great, let's lie her down.

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Did you play with this as a child?

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No, no, no. No?

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She was handed on to me about eight years ago by my 98-year-old aunt,

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who's known her all her life.

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It was my granny's and my great-granny's before that.

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So she's lodged with the family for many generations.

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For a long time, yes. I've always had an interest in dolls of this type.

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She's very elegant. She's very elegant.

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She's carved from a single piece of wood.

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And her torso is shaped to show off the fashion that she's wearing.

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Do you know anything about 18th-century English fashion?

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This is a sack, isn't it?

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Oh, clever, yes, indeed, exactly.

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A sack-back dress. When we turn her round...

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You can actually see the colour, because she's been lying on that.

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Look at the brilliance of that colour.

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While we've got her his way, we can see how her hair was made -

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real hair woven onto little ribbons and tied around.

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These are all seriously early features...

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Oh, right. ..and get doll people very excited indeed.

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And for me, the incredibly exciting

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and wonderful thing about this doll...

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..is that using her dress, her costume, as an aid to dating,

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and looking at the way she's made... Right.

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..I think she dates from about 1740.

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1740?! 1740.

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Crumbs!

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She is a seriously early English doll. And as such,

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she's quite a major discovery.

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You can imagine on the Roadshow,

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dolls are coming in here in vast numbers.

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And here, we have possibly the most exciting doll that's ever come on

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to the Roadshow. A real, real significant find.

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I don't think the condition is an issue, as regards the value.

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Right. There have been a number of dolls of this importance on

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the markets in the last few years, both in London and

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one, in fact, in Las Vegas.

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And based on the price of those dolls, I have a fairly accurate idea

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of what I think she would make in a saleroom. Right...

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And that figure is...

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?20,000.

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Oh, no!

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I don't want that responsibility!

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Sue is definitely not selling her doll,

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and Aunt Mary Ann went straight to specialist

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conservationists after her trip to the Roadshow, and is looking

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resplendent today, complete with a new nose and restored clothing.

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Not bad for a toy first played with in the reign of George II!

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I reckoned she was special. I didn't know she was that special.

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She is a real Roadshow discovery.

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Oh, fantastic.

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Over the years, our experts have seen lots of buried treasures,

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objects literally dug up out of the ground.

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This year, we managed to unearth our oldest piece of treasure trove.

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It fell to veteran expert Henry Sandon at Chatsworth.

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It's incredible to come here to Chatsworth

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and find the earliest piece we've had on the programme

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here on this table before us -

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an Ancient Egyptian head.

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I suppose it's about Middle Kingdom, which is...

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Yes, 1700 to 1750 BC.

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Over 3,700 years old.

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3,700 years old!

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That's older than me!

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It's not looking in such bad condition, all things considered.

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How did you come by it?

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I dug it up out of a back garden in Derby.

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In your own back garden? Yes, doing some gardening,

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and I hit it with a spade.

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Hopefully I didn't do too much damage to it, but I hit it with a spade.

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So presumably, someone had used it as a garden ornament

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or rockery or something like that?

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Yes, something along those lines, in the past.

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But it's incredible to discover it!

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I suppose, I mean, you ought to have this investigated in

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perhaps the British Museum or something like that.

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I did take it down to them 12, 18 months back,

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for them to take a look at.

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Initially, when I sent them the e-mails and the pictures, they

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arranged for me to go down, but they said, in all honesty, we're expecting

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it to be a fake. Possibly an early fake, Roman, but a fake nonetheless.

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I opened it up there and I think the guy's jaw dropped,

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and before I knew it, I had the whole department arranged around the table

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having a look at it.

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They were like, "Yes, actually, it's genuine."

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Incredible. 4,000 years ancient and found in Derby!

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It goes back before the city of Derby started!

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It does. Isn't that incredible?

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I suppose one's got to think of a value.

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?10,000 upwards or something like that?

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I mean, it's a major thing, it really is a fantastic object.

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I think I'm speechless.

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For the first time ever!

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Now he's able to talk again,

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Andrew tells us he's definitely keeping his Egyptian head -

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as he told us, it's a one-off, so why sell it?

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More buried gems came our way

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when jewellery specialist Geoffrey Munn found not one but two

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medieval rings this past series. The first came

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as a complete revelation to its owner at Beverley Minster.

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Why on earth did you bring me this ring to the Antiques Roadshow?

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Curiosity, basically.

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And what sparked that curiosity? Was there anything about it?

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Well, the setting, for one thing.

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The size of the ring -

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because my mother had large fingers and it didn't fit.

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I've never seen the ring on her hands, ever.

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I've never found any marks on it, so I'm curious.

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It was in a pioneer matchbox, wrapped up with cotton wool, so,

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is it there for sentimental reasons?

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If so, why?

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I'm baffled.

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Well, I'm a bit baffled too,

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I'm terribly grateful in a way that she didn't wear it, because,

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would it surprise you to know that this ring

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was exactly the same age as Beverley Minster?

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It is at least 600 years old.

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Good grief.

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And what we can tell about it is that some stage or another,

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I've looked at it enormously carefully with my lens,

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and there are tiny, tiny traces of earth

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under the setting and beyond it.

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So it is an excavated object, without any doubt at all.

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I'm farming stock, my grandparents were farming stock,

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so, one of them has maybe picked it up. Found it in a field. Yep.

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It is the most marvellous object.

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It hums with all the magic of medieval England.

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It's a 15th-century ring, at very least, and it's very charming too,

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because it's an illusion that it's made of two bands.

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One is matt and the other faintly polished.

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Those are undoubtedly emblematic of two lives drawn together,

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if you like, by the stone in the middle.

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And this is a love ring, and it's rather touching, really.

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We can say with every confidence that it was lost at some stage or another.

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What we know about it is that it was a reasonably high-status owner,

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because it's made of pure gold.

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Most people didn't have access to pure gold.

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And fewer people would have access to a sapphire,

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which is rather crudely cut, in a way. It's not quite a cabochon,

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but it's simply lapped in a simple way.

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This is not only an enormously interesting object,

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but an intensely valuable one.

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There was a ring sold at an auction room in London which was almost

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identical in design, set with a tiny diamond,

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and it fetched ?20,000.

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Are you joking?!

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What the heck do I do with it now?

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No idea. I'd keep it if it were mine.

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Owner Paul is doing just that,

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this time not in a matchbox, but in a safe.

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But the second ring Geoffrey saw had a different destiny.

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This time it came to light at Swindon after our next guest had unearthed it on nearby farmland.

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Well, I was out detecting with three friends in a field one evening.

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It was just getting to dusk, and we said, "Come on, time to go home,"

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so they switched off their metal detectors,

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popped them on their shoulders.

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I just carried on walking to the car, got a bleep

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with the metal detector, dug it up, and it was quite dark by that time,

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and one of them said, "It looks like a bit of gold paper."

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I pulled it out and said, "Blimey."

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We didn't quite realise how old it was until we got it under the light.

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And then the pulse was quickening - how long was it before you realised

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that it was something really ancient?

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I looked through a few books and realised that it's probably medieval.

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The next stage then is to hand it in under the Treasure Act.

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Under the Treasure Act, when something's made of precious metal and it's over 300 years old,

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you have to submit it to your finds officer at the museum, don't you?

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Yes. And I should think the finds officer was pretty overwhelmed, wasn't he or she?

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Oh, yeah, absolutely, she'd never seen a ring like that.

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Neither have I, and my pulse has quickened,

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and I wasn't even there on that dark, dusky night.

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It's set with a natural diamond crystal, isn't it?

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It is, yes. It's a cubic diamond, cubic crystal of diamond,

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it's not actually been cut.

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In a way, that's a pointer to its age,

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because diamond cutting

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is a later sophistication than you would expect in a ring like this,

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which is mid to late 15th century, isn't it? Yep.

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It's a love ring. Around the shank is an inscription

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once inlaid with black enamel.

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You've almost memorised that, haven't you?

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Amour mi tien.

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It means "love hold me".

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Love keep me.

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And at the back is a true lovers' knot.

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The more it's pulled, the tighter it becomes.

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So this is a fantastic emblem of a medieval love affair

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that we can only guess at.

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I'm sick with envy, I wish a moment like that had happened to me.

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Without a shadow of doubt, if this was sold

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under the right circumstances,

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that it could come near to, well,

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?40,000.

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Oh! Blimey!

0:19:190:19:20

Can't believe that. 40,000?!

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And true to Geoffrey's word, that ring went on to sell recently

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for ?42,000, and the proceeds were split with the owner of the land.

0:19:290:19:34

Jonathan, who brought it into the Roadshow, tells us he's using

0:19:340:19:37

his share to pay for a new bathroom and much-needed car repairs.

0:19:370:19:40

But how does that saying go?

0:19:410:19:44

All that glisters is not gold?

0:19:440:19:46

So, what have you brought me? My pot of gold. Your pot of gold. Yes.

0:19:470:19:51

Wow! Tell me,

0:19:510:19:52

what is this pot of gold, where did you get it from?

0:19:520:19:54

It was my grandfather's,

0:19:540:19:56

and he died in 1924,

0:19:560:19:58

and he had a carousel all his life, you know...

0:19:580:20:03

The funfair? The funfair one, yes.

0:20:030:20:05

And this is what he used to paint the horses with and

0:20:050:20:10

things like that. Fantastic.

0:20:100:20:13

It's pure gold, 24-carat gold.

0:20:130:20:15

Is it? Yes.

0:20:150:20:16

Can I open the top and have a little look inside?

0:20:160:20:19

Yes, certainly. I've never had a pot of gold before.

0:20:190:20:23

No rainbow today. No, we need a rainbow, we do!

0:20:230:20:26

Wow, look at that, that's unbelievable. And it's powder.

0:20:260:20:30

It's like gold dust, yes.

0:20:300:20:32

Exactly.

0:20:320:20:34

That is incredible.

0:20:340:20:36

I don't think I've ever seen anything like it.

0:20:360:20:39

It has a smell about it, doesn't it?

0:20:390:20:41

Money does, doesn't it?! Always!

0:20:410:20:43

Well, we would have to test it to make sure,

0:20:460:20:50

but yes, you are talking about 22-carat, up to 24-carat gold.

0:20:500:20:56

I would say this is going to be roughly around about

0:20:560:20:59

?7,000 to ?9,000.

0:20:590:21:01

That is a fantastic find at the end of your rainbow.

0:21:040:21:08

My goodness. I shall go on holiday!

0:21:080:21:11

Sadly, when they came to test the pot,

0:21:140:21:16

it turned out to be flaked paint.

0:21:160:21:18

Sorry, Agnes.

0:21:190:21:20

Looks like your holiday is on hold.

0:21:200:21:22

And another visitor to the Roadshow didn't get the happiest of outcomes either.

0:21:240:21:28

It was bought off the internet about six to eight weeks ago

0:21:280:21:32

by my brother, who is on holiday at the moment,

0:21:320:21:35

and I offered to bring it along for a valuation.

0:21:350:21:39

And what did he pay?

0:21:390:21:40

I think he paid ?700 for the owl.

0:21:400:21:43

And what was it described as when he went to bid for it?

0:21:430:21:46

It was described as a Martinware tobacco jar.

0:21:460:21:50

Well, the Martin brothers are really quite a serious name in

0:21:500:21:54

the decorative arts market, especially nowadays.

0:21:540:21:57

They're a trio of brothers that came to some great prominence at the end

0:21:570:22:01

of the 19th century, predominantly through the manufacture

0:22:010:22:05

of grotesque wares, grotesque birds.

0:22:050:22:07

In fact, their most popular range, the things most people see them for,

0:22:070:22:12

and deemed to be most iconic for,

0:22:120:22:14

are what we call the Wally Birds. They produced them in great

0:22:140:22:17

quantities from the 1880s through to the end of the century.

0:22:170:22:23

As a result, they are incredibly sought-after.

0:22:230:22:26

A bird of this size would probably realise somewhere in the region

0:22:260:22:31

of ?20,000 to ?25,000. Really?

0:22:310:22:36

If it were right.

0:22:360:22:37

Right...

0:22:370:22:39

And that is unfortunately where I've got to be the bearer of bad tidings.

0:22:390:22:43

OK. He is good.

0:22:430:22:46

He is in fact incredibly good, and that is the problem at the moment.

0:22:460:22:50

The market has become so strong, and so boisterous, that there are some

0:22:500:22:56

very, very clever people out there doing some very, very clever work.

0:22:560:23:00

And I have to say that unfortunately, he is -

0:23:000:23:04

we've got to use the right word - he's a fake. He's a fake.

0:23:040:23:07

But all's well that ends well,

0:23:080:23:10

as David revealed when he came back recently.

0:23:100:23:13

So, once you'd found out from Will Farmer

0:23:150:23:18

that it was a fake, what did you do?

0:23:180:23:20

I was advised by Will

0:23:200:23:23

that he would verify it for me, that I should look to try

0:23:230:23:26

and get my money back. Because the Roadshow said they would

0:23:260:23:29

verify it for me, I sent them a nice little e-mail,

0:23:290:23:32

mentioning the fact that it had been on the Roadshow,

0:23:320:23:35

and they, without hesitation, really, gave me a full refund.

0:23:350:23:40

And how much did you buy it for?

0:23:400:23:42

Initially, ?700.

0:23:420:23:44

So it was worth getting the refund!

0:23:440:23:46

Certainly was, definitely.

0:23:460:23:48

I'm very pleased with the outcome, and it was thanks to the Roadshow

0:23:480:23:51

and Will Farmer as well, his intervention,

0:23:510:23:54

that I was able to get the refund quite quickly.

0:23:540:23:57

I was disappointed on the day, because I was hoping

0:23:570:24:00

that it was the real thing. Just unfortunate that I bought a fake.

0:24:000:24:03

I'm glad you got your money back. Yeah, so am I.

0:24:030:24:05

Our look back on this year's most talked-about finds takes us

0:24:130:24:16

back to the splendid backdrop of Beverley Minster.

0:24:160:24:18

This memorable encounter for expert Graham Lay

0:24:180:24:21

didn't begin too promisingly.

0:24:210:24:25

This looks like two members of the Women's Land Army. Is that true? No.

0:24:250:24:31

No. Oh, have I offended you somehow?

0:24:310:24:34

Yes. Why is that? They look like Women's Land Army.

0:24:340:24:37

We aren't Women's Land Army.

0:24:380:24:40

Well, what were you, then? The Women's Timber Corps.

0:24:400:24:44

Women's Timber Corps? Yes. So this is you, is it?

0:24:440:24:47

Yes, it is. That's me.

0:24:470:24:50

Now, I know a little bit about that, but many people

0:24:500:24:54

will never have heard of the Women's Timber Corps.

0:24:540:24:56

So, you were a member of the Women's Timber Corps when?

0:24:560:24:59

1942.

0:24:590:25:01

At 17 and a half.

0:25:010:25:04

We finished in 1945.

0:25:050:25:08

And what did you have to do?

0:25:080:25:10

What was the purpose of the Women's Timber Corps?

0:25:100:25:12

The purpose of the Women's Timber Corps was first of all to get the men

0:25:120:25:18

from felling the trees into the forces.

0:25:180:25:21

So, we had to learn how to fell a tree.

0:25:210:25:23

Then, we were taught how to measure

0:25:230:25:27

for pit props and telegraph poles.

0:25:270:25:29

That's what you were cutting the trees down for? Yes.

0:25:290:25:32

That's a very valuable service, making pit props in particular for the mining of coal during the war.

0:25:320:25:39

So, you were a lumberjack, were you? No.

0:25:390:25:42

Lumber Jill. Lumber Jill!

0:25:420:25:45

Is that what you were called?!

0:25:450:25:46

Yes. How bizarre, that's quite strange, isn't it?

0:25:460:25:49

Wonderful time. Wonderful time, really, wonderful friends.

0:25:560:26:01

And then we lost...

0:26:020:26:04

We lost our families, you know, brothers...

0:26:080:26:11

..in the war.

0:26:120:26:14

Dreadful, really.

0:26:140:26:16

But we were, we were all good friends and we worked very hard.

0:26:160:26:21

I wouldn't have missed it for the world, but I didn't know what I was going to do.

0:26:220:26:26

You did your bit.

0:26:260:26:28

Oh, most definitely. You did your bit, and I'm very proud of you.

0:26:280:26:32

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:26:320:26:34

Perhaps the most moving story this series was told to

0:26:390:26:42

jewellery specialist Joe Hardy at Tatton Park in Cheshire.

0:26:420:26:46

This is my aunt, my late father's sister and her eldest daughter.

0:26:480:26:53

And this is where? This is in Venice,

0:26:530:26:55

taken in about 1935, I think. And this is

0:26:550:27:00

one of the daughters again with her sister,

0:27:000:27:03

taken in Brussels, where they lived, where they were being educated.

0:27:030:27:06

And this is their son Freddie.

0:27:060:27:08

Oh, lovely, lovely photo.

0:27:080:27:15

And in 1939,

0:27:150:27:18

my father was afraid for their safety,

0:27:180:27:20

and they came back to Manchester.

0:27:200:27:22

But when Chamberlain said "peace for our time", they went back,

0:27:220:27:26

because of the elder daughter's exams, and

0:27:260:27:29

sadly, it was a terrible decision, because they ended up in Auschwitz.

0:27:290:27:32

Oh, my goodness me.

0:27:320:27:34

They were taken to the camps, yes.

0:27:340:27:36

These cards here that you have, what are these?

0:27:360:27:39

These are letters that my aunt wrote to my father and his brother

0:27:390:27:44

during the time they were in France.

0:27:440:27:52

and the Germans crossed the Channel,

0:27:520:27:54

that then they would come directly to our house

0:27:540:27:56

and take our family, because we were Jewish.

0:27:560:27:58

Then he didn't hear anything from her at all for the next few years.

0:27:580:28:02

For the next few years? He waited?

0:28:020:28:04

He waited, only until the end of the war,

0:28:040:28:06

when the Red Cross got in touch, 1945, and they found out

0:28:060:28:09

what had happened, that they had been taken to Auschwitz and gassed,

0:28:090:28:14

burnt in the crematorium.

0:28:140:28:16

With the children? With the three children as well.

0:28:160:28:22

Oh, my goodness. They were all taken. So, erm,

0:28:220:28:34

My aunt must have left her phone number.

0:28:340:28:37

And she brought all the jewels that had belonged to my aunt.

0:28:370:28:40

Sadly, my father was so distraught at the time,

0:28:400:28:43

he never kept a record of who she was.

0:28:430:28:45

And actually now, my brother and I are going to La Baule

0:28:450:28:53

or her descendants, because somebody will know the story.

0:28:530:29:00

And this watch here was one of the collection

0:29:000:29:03

which was then given back to your father by this neighbour, this lady?

0:29:030:29:07

That's my very precious remnant of the story.

0:29:070:29:10

It is such an elegant watch, which goes with the elegance

0:29:100:29:13

of your aunt in the photograph that you showed us.

0:29:130:29:16

She was a Manchester girl - you don't expect a Manchester girl

0:29:160:29:20

to have died in the Holocaust, particularly.

0:29:200:29:22

No, of course not. So, that's a very sad story, and my

0:29:220:29:24

father could never talk about it, he was just heartbroken.

0:29:240:29:28

And so it's left to our generation to keep the memory of it alive.

0:29:280:29:32

And since then, Jackie has been to France for an emotional meeting

0:29:320:29:36

with the family who helped her aunt.

0:29:360:29:38

They presented her with pieces they kept for her aunt,

0:29:380:29:40

which they've held on to for 60 years.

0:29:400:29:43

that they most want to find,

0:29:590:30:01

that they dream of turning up to a Roadshow.

0:30:010:30:04

It remains to seen quite how many we unearth,

0:30:040:30:06

as we welcome a whole new set of visitors

0:30:060:30:09

to our new series later this year. But Jill here...

0:30:090:30:11

Jill, you're the first one to come out of the woodwork.

0:30:110:30:15

And you think you might have found one of these valuable antiques.

0:30:150:30:18

You screamed when you saw it on the television. I did, I was absolutely amazed.

0:30:180:30:24

Let's just remind ourselves. Shall we have a quick look? Yes.

0:30:240:30:27

Well, what we see the least of are almost

0:30:270:30:34

is the jewellery designed by the neo-gothic architect William Burges,

0:30:340:30:38

who is really the greatest genius

0:30:380:30:40

of 19th-century design and architecture. But he also dabbled

0:30:400:30:45

in jewellery specifically,

0:30:450:30:46

and he made designs for his intimate circle.

0:30:460:30:50

We know about them because the designs remain at the Victoria Albert Museum.

0:30:500:30:54

Is that what these are here, then? Yes, most definitely they are.

0:30:540:30:57

And very tantalisingly, it says on the top of here,

0:30:570:31:00

six of these in silver and three of these in gold.

0:31:000:31:05

So we've nine chances of the Antiques Roadshow flushing

0:31:050:31:07

these out of the United Kingdom somewhere.

0:31:070:31:09

So these are designs for brooches, are they?

0:31:090:31:11

Yes, and they're almost certainly bridesmaids' brooches.

0:31:110:31:14

So, Jill, what did you think when you saw Geoffrey there?

0:31:140:31:17

I was speechless for a second or two.

0:31:170:31:20

I just thought, it can't possibly be my brooch.

0:31:200:31:24

He was looking at the first two brooches, but my brooch was underneath.

0:31:240:31:28

And I thought, no, it can't possibly be my brooch.

0:31:280:31:31

So I rushed upstairs and rushed back down again and I thought, "It is!"

0:31:310:31:35

Were you there holding it up against the television trying to check?

0:31:350:31:39

Two days before the programme came on the television, I'd actually been going to sell it

0:31:390:31:44

and I'd put it out on top to sell, to take to the local market

0:31:440:31:48

because I thought it might be worth a few pounds. Oh, gosh!

0:31:480:31:52

So it was really incredible because it's been stuck at the bottom of my jewellery case for 20-odd years.

0:31:520:31:59

And which one of these do you think it is? I think it's that one.

0:31:590:32:02

I think it's that one.

0:32:020:32:03

Well, get it out. Let's have a quick look. I think it is that one.

0:32:030:32:07

It's broken, I'm afraid.

0:32:070:32:09

It's that one.

0:32:090:32:10

Right.

0:32:100:32:12

You're the very first person who's come forward, so it's very exciting.

0:32:120:32:17

I've no idea. You don't know either, do you?

0:32:170:32:20

I can't wait. Well, Geoffrey Munn, he's going to be very excited,

0:32:200:32:23

is going to have a look, and then we'll find out.

0:32:230:32:26

Wonderful!

0:32:260:32:27

Our best bargain buy screened this series

0:32:310:32:34

has to be a pretty cup and saucer found by John Sandon in Brighton.

0:32:340:32:40

A tea bowl and saucer for drinking tea

0:32:400:32:43

in the Chinese style.

0:32:430:32:44

But on the bottom, the famous crossed swords mark of Meissen.

0:32:440:32:49

Meissen, one of the great European factories, the oldest porcelain factory,

0:32:490:32:53

and perhaps the most famous, and therefore, the most imitated of all

0:32:530:32:56

and the most commonly faked mark is the crossed swords.

0:32:560:32:59

So what's important is the provenance and the history.

0:32:590:33:02

Yes, well, I've only had it for about six months.

0:33:020:33:06

I was moving into a new house

0:33:060:33:08

and I didn't have any crockery cos I'd been in a shared house,

0:33:080:33:11

so I was going to lots of car-boot sales and just buying loads and loads of plates and saucers,

0:33:110:33:16

things like that and I just liked mismatched different coloured things

0:33:160:33:20

and I saw this and I bought that as well.

0:33:200:33:23

So what do you think you bought? Well, I thought it was old.

0:33:230:33:27

I got it home and I looked and I kind of recognised

0:33:270:33:31

the little signature thing on the bottom, but I didn't know what it was.

0:33:310:33:34

Yes, they're the swords of Saxony where the Meissen factory was established

0:33:340:33:39

and of course, the mark was introduced as a form of protection in the 1720s.

0:33:390:33:44

Everyone was imitating Meissen back then,

0:33:440:33:47

so they put the mark on in order to protect the real thing.

0:33:470:33:50

But of course, as soon as they put a mark on, they gave a sign for everyone else to copy.

0:33:500:33:54

From that time onwards, everybody put the crossed swords on.

0:33:540:33:57

But what they didn't do was really match the quality

0:33:570:34:00

so it's really the detail we look at to see if it's really Meissen or not.

0:34:000:34:04

In this case, I think, really...

0:34:040:34:05

How close do you have to look to see this is quality?

0:34:050:34:08

Yeah, the little flowers, absolutely miniature.

0:34:080:34:11

It's pretending to be Chinese,

0:34:110:34:13

because that's what the great porcelain was at the time.

0:34:130:34:15

A very distinctive style.

0:34:150:34:17

And this style of Chinoiserie painting was developed at Meissen around the 1720s.

0:34:170:34:24

We're looking at a design that was in fashion in the early 1730s.

0:34:240:34:27

1730s? That old?

0:34:270:34:29

Well, it is. It really is that age.

0:34:290:34:32

It looks new.

0:34:320:34:33

Yeah. I didn't think it was that old, cos it was in such good condition.

0:34:330:34:37

And at the car-boot sale, they probably thought it was new. Yeah, probably.

0:34:370:34:41

My, oh my.

0:34:410:34:42

It was a set made for a king, made for a prince,

0:34:420:34:45

it was the most expensive porcelain of its day... Wow.

0:34:450:34:47

..and it's pretty expensive now.

0:34:470:34:50

So, go on, tell me, how much was it at the car-boot sale?

0:34:500:34:54

Well, I think it was about ?2.50.

0:34:540:34:56

I never spent any more than ?3.50 for anything.

0:34:560:34:58

Well, you haven't half done well. This is something else.

0:34:580:35:02

Because it's in wonderful condition, it's top quality

0:35:020:35:06

and in mint condition.

0:35:060:35:08

So what's it worth? Um, single cup and saucer...

0:35:080:35:12

how about ?5,000?

0:35:120:35:13

GASPING AND LAUGHTER

0:35:130:35:16

Seriously?

0:35:170:35:18

Oh, my...

0:35:200:35:21

Owner Poppy still loves her boot sale buy

0:35:250:35:28

and says she's holding on to them for a future investment. Wow.

0:35:280:35:32

Perhaps the best reaction to a Roadshow revelation

0:35:370:35:40

happened at the end of our day in Saltaire,

0:35:400:35:43

and it was another antique from China that prompted the interest.

0:35:430:35:47

I don't think it's ever been dusted in a long time.

0:35:490:35:53

It's my mum's and it just sits on a shelf in the dining room.

0:35:530:35:56

And how did your mum get it?

0:35:570:35:59

She said it was from her mum and dad

0:35:590:36:01

when she was a little girl, they all went to Torquay on holiday

0:36:010:36:05

and they went into a sort of junky antique-y type shop

0:36:050:36:09

and her dad spotted it and at the time she said

0:36:090:36:13

it was all black and grimy

0:36:130:36:14

and he spent the holiday with a little toothbrush

0:36:140:36:17

shining it up.

0:36:170:36:18

Cleaning it up?

0:36:180:36:19

We have what is a hollow vessel in the middle

0:36:190:36:22

and it seems to be surrounded by branches,

0:36:220:36:26

pine tree, growing round its own trunk.

0:36:260:36:30

And there's a lovely detail here, when we get into this side,

0:36:300:36:33

how the outer branches

0:36:330:36:35

undercut themselves, and you get

0:36:350:36:38

a really quite complicated in-and-out of the branches.

0:36:380:36:43

Do you know where it's from?

0:36:430:36:44

Um, China?

0:36:440:36:46

It's from China.

0:36:460:36:48

Pine trees are very important in China.

0:36:480:36:51

They are symbols of longevity and permanence.

0:36:510:36:54

If you go into a scholar's studio and you look at the table

0:36:540:36:58

and you look at the things that he's laid out, his writing equipment,

0:36:580:37:01

you'll find an ink stone and you'll find

0:37:010:37:03

a little pot of water into which he will dip his brush

0:37:030:37:07

to get the ink and then write on the paper.

0:37:070:37:10

And I believe that this is likely to be a brush washer,

0:37:110:37:16

so you put water in it,

0:37:160:37:17

but although it's actually of a pine tree,

0:37:170:37:20

it's not carved in pine. This is actually carved

0:37:200:37:23

in bamboo. OK. How old do you reckon it might have been?

0:37:230:37:27

I've no idea.

0:37:270:37:28

Do you want to have a guess? Go on. Um...

0:37:280:37:31

120-ish?

0:37:310:37:32

120 years.

0:37:320:37:34

Well let us go back another...

0:37:340:37:37

300.

0:37:370:37:39

Really?

0:37:390:37:41

Yes. Maybe 400.

0:37:410:37:43

This was being carved

0:37:430:37:47

around 500 years ago.

0:37:470:37:48

Oh, my gosh.

0:37:480:37:50

So it's a rare survivor.

0:37:500:37:52

Oh, my gosh.

0:37:520:37:53

It's survived your cleaning techniques.

0:37:530:37:56

I'm just going to say one more thing about the shape.

0:37:560:37:58

It alludes to rhinoceros horn.

0:37:580:38:02

Rhino horn was another very favoured material for the Chinese scholar,

0:38:020:38:07

but I'm glad to say this is not rhino horn, from one point of view,

0:38:070:38:10

from the point of view of the rhino.

0:38:100:38:12

But from the point of view of value, a rhino horn of the 1500s

0:38:120:38:17

would have been a very, very expensive object.

0:38:170:38:21

Being bamboo, I'm afraid, it's not in the same league. Yeah.

0:38:220:38:26

So, this little scholar's object is probably only worth

0:38:290:38:33

somewhere in the region of, let's say, between ?6,000 and ?9,000.

0:38:330:38:36

Oh, my gosh!

0:38:360:38:37

Are you joking?!

0:38:390:38:41

My mum's in Florence, I'll have to ring her up!

0:38:420:38:44

It's a wonderful, wonderful object.

0:38:460:38:50

I can't believe it!

0:38:510:38:53

We've seen some fantastic responses to this series'

0:38:530:38:56

treasure trove on the Antiques Roadshow.

0:38:560:38:58

Our thanks to all who waited so patiently

0:38:580:39:01

to see our team of experts.

0:39:010:39:03

Let's hope there may be a surprise in store for you

0:39:030:39:05

if you visit us this year.

0:39:050:39:06

But before we go, one last mystery to unravel.

0:39:080:39:12

I've been looking forward to this -

0:39:120:39:14

the moment has come to put Jill out of her misery.

0:39:140:39:18

Very nice to see you! I sense a plot! Yes!

0:39:180:39:21

And you're central to it!

0:39:210:39:23

Jill thinks she may have found one of the brooches by William Burges,

0:39:230:39:36

You appealed for it on a programme, Jill was watching it

0:39:360:39:39

and thinks she may have found it.

0:39:390:39:42

Before you look, what would it mean

0:39:420:39:44

if it is indeed one of William Burges' brooches?

0:39:440:39:45

It would mean the absolute world to me.

0:39:450:39:48

I found these designs in the Victoria Albert Museum,

0:39:480:39:51

and I published them in a book I wrote with Charlotte Gere,

0:39:510:39:54

my co-author, and we were terribly excited by them,

0:39:540:40:01

pivotal architect in the 19th century.

0:40:010:40:03

And it raised our subject up into an entirely new category,

0:40:030:40:07

in a way,

0:40:070:40:10

and they are artistic in every sense of the word.

0:40:100:40:13

But I can hardly talk, I'm so excited! Come on, then!

0:40:130:40:17

It's too much! Jill, let's get it out and have a look.

0:40:170:40:20

Oh, my goodness me. I think it might be that one.

0:40:200:40:24

I don't think there's any shadow of doubt,

0:40:240:40:26

and I think that is absolutely...

0:40:260:40:30

I honestly can hardly articulate it. I think it's absolutely marvellous.

0:40:300:40:35

And it's completely different manufacture

0:40:350:40:38

to what one might have expected.

0:40:380:40:41

It's slightly heavier and massier than I thought the design would be.

0:40:410:40:44

But in every sense of the word, it is it... Is it?!

0:40:440:40:48

It's pulse-making!

0:40:480:40:50

Honestly, it is a Tutankhamen experience on the Antiques Roadshow!

0:40:500:40:54

I have to say that only television can do this -

0:40:540:40:57

there is no other medium that could have flushed this out,

0:40:570:41:01

from not only the United Kingdom,

0:41:010:41:03

but potentially from the entire world.

0:41:030:41:05

Can I tell you something? Yes.

0:41:050:41:08

Jill was going to sell it down the local market

0:41:080:41:11

and thought she might get a few quid for it!

0:41:110:41:13

Two days before. Two days before?

0:41:130:41:15

Gosh, I'm going to stalk you for the rest of my life,

0:41:150:41:18

I think it's absolutely marvellous, isn't it?

0:41:180:41:20

Geoffrey, how rare is this?

0:41:200:41:23

It's beyond rare. I never hoped to see it.

0:41:230:41:26

Jewellery designed by artists

0:41:260:41:28

and architects of this calibre are hardly measurable.

0:41:280:41:32

The Cecil Higgins Art Museum has just bought

0:41:320:41:35

a settle by William Burges, a piece of furniture,

0:41:350:41:38

and without putting too fine a point on it,

0:41:380:41:40

they've just paid just shy of ?1 million for that piece of furniture.

0:41:400:41:47

?850,000, they paid for it, very recently.

0:41:470:41:51

Money isn't the greatest fascination

0:41:510:41:54

What we're sharing together is IT.

0:41:540:41:56

I'm interested to know about you, the moment of recognition.

0:41:560:41:59

What happened when you saw that?

0:41:590:42:00

I did a little scream and ran upstairs to find it!

0:42:000:42:08

What do you think now that Geoffrey's told you that it is...?

0:42:080:42:16

Well, I think, measured against the settle,

0:42:160:42:18

it is an extraordinarily valuable object.

0:42:180:42:22

Somebody lucky enough to buy that from you at said boot sale

0:42:220:42:25

would have walked away with something close to ?10,000.

0:42:250:42:29

Oh, my God!

0:42:290:42:33

So, that was quite a... You like it a bit more now!

0:42:330:42:38

With two days from selling it. I just forgot to take it down to the market.

0:42:380:42:42

Jill also confessed to me that she didn't like it very much!

0:42:420:42:46

I didn't like it! I'm assuming you're liking it a little more now?!

0:42:460:42:48

I love it! Oh, my goodness! I always loved it,

0:42:480:42:53

and I never, ever dreamt

0:42:530:42:56

that I would ever lay hands on it or see it.

0:42:560:42:59

Isn't that wonderful? It's very, very moving stuff for me.

0:42:590:43:02

The tables of the Antiques Roadshow are turned, because usually

0:43:020:43:05

it's the owner of the object that is given this jolt of surprise -

0:43:050:43:09

this time round, it's the specialist who's got it big time,

0:43:090:43:12

and I'm frankly trembling with it!

0:43:120:43:13

Thank you very much! I think we're going to have to take Geoffrey away

0:43:130:43:17

and wipe him down with a damp flannel! He's in such a lather!

0:43:170:43:20

What an amazing find.

0:43:200:43:22

We appeal for all sorts of wonderful antiques in this series,

0:43:220:43:26

so if you think, like Jill here, that you might have one,

0:43:260:43:30

please bring it along to our next series of programmes.

0:43:300:43:33

All the details of when our recordings are going to be

0:43:330:43:36

are on our website -

0:43:360:43:39

And also, there are clips on our website which show the items

0:43:390:43:42

we've appealed about throughout the series.

0:43:420:43:45

Who knows, it could be you, and we would be thrilled to see it.

0:43:450:43:50

MUSIC: Boombastic by Shaggy

0:44:210:44:22

# Mr Lover Lover, mmm

0:44:220:44:24

# Mr Lover Lover, girl

0:44:240:44:28

# Mr Lover Lover, mmm... #

0:44:280:44:30

In this special edition, Fiona Bruce reflects on another remarkable series of finds over the last six months, and gives updates on many of the most-talked about items to have appeared on the show.

There is also an exciting development on the experts' quest to find some of the most wanted missing antiques. Following an appeal on the show, one viewer thinks she may have found one of the rarest pieces of missing jewellery in the UK. Has she? All is revealed as the mystery is solved once and for all.


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