Compilation Antiques Roadshow


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Compilation

Fiona Bruce and the experts take a look at some unscreened finds, brought along to Hutton-in-the-Forest, Chatsworth and the British Museum.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Compilation. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Questions, questions, questions.

0:00:020:00:04

Every Roadshow echoes with literally thousands of different people

0:00:040:00:08

asking our experts questions. "What is it?"

0:00:080:00:10

"How was it made?" "What's it worth?"

0:00:100:00:12

The question is, which is the most interesting answer?

0:00:120:00:16

Luckily, our cameras are there to catch them as they happen.

0:00:160:00:19

Welcome to another busy Antiques Roadshow.

0:00:190:00:22

People often ask me about the Roadshow.

0:00:590:01:01

"Do your experts ever turn up and find nothing interesting?"

0:01:010:01:05

Well, thankfully, in over 30 years of touring, the answer is no.

0:01:050:01:10

In fact, the reverse is true, that usually there are so many treasures on offer,

0:01:100:01:14

we can't fit them all into one programme.

0:01:140:01:17

So tonight we're going to bring you some of them, and three magnificent venues for the price of one.

0:01:170:01:22

Stand by for a whistle-stop tour of England.

0:01:220:01:26

The grand entrance to the British Museum in London recently welcomed

0:01:260:01:29

thousands of visitors keen to see our specialists.

0:01:290:01:33

And on a sunny day in the Derbyshire Dales,

0:01:330:01:36

we found our way to the magnificent Chatsworth House.

0:01:360:01:39

Both await us in this episode.

0:01:390:01:42

But we start in Cumbria, in equally glorious surroundings.

0:01:420:01:48

Six miles from Penrith is our most recent stopping off point, Hutton-in-the-Forest.

0:01:480:01:53

It was there that Eric Knowles started our day.

0:01:560:01:58

Forgive me, I think you should really be lying on a couch.

0:01:580:02:03

I'll tell you why, I'm thinking of myself at the moment

0:02:030:02:06

more as a sort of antiques psychiatrist,

0:02:060:02:09

in so far as I want you to tell me about your cabinet.

0:02:090:02:13

Well, I bought it in a local auction in Carlisle

0:02:130:02:17

because I do like art deco.

0:02:170:02:19

And I was particularly interested in the beautiful inlay,

0:02:190:02:23

and mother of pearl and the lovely floral decoration.

0:02:230:02:25

And also it's quite a practical cabinet as well.

0:02:250:02:29

I think when it comes to eyes, you've got a very good eye.

0:02:290:02:31

And you present me with a classic piece of French art deco.

0:02:310:02:36

-Oh, very good.

-And, I have to say, it's a bit of a jewel, isn't it?

0:02:360:02:40

And as for the legs, just the way that they start here

0:02:400:02:44

and they're beautifully reeded.

0:02:440:02:46

Then it forms a decorative feature all the way up to this cornice.

0:02:460:02:50

And on the top, inset with what appears to be like a marble slab,

0:02:500:02:56

-which is quite typical. Because it's practical.

-Yes.

0:02:560:02:59

But the woods that have been used,

0:02:590:03:01

you've got like a burr type yew wood, or walnut, on the top of it.

0:03:010:03:05

-Yeah.

-And the actual decoration, well, it's pure fantasy.

0:03:050:03:09

I love that roundel.

0:03:090:03:10

Yes. I love the mother of pearl, the way it shines. It's really nice.

0:03:100:03:14

I could imagine, in artificial light, at night,

0:03:140:03:17

it's got a magical quality.

0:03:170:03:18

-It's lovely.

-But it's a bit of theatre, is your cabinet.

-Yes.

0:03:180:03:21

There's more to this cabinet than meets the eye, isn't there?

0:03:210:03:24

-Well, there you are. Ooh, simplicity.

-Yes, yes.

-Isn't it?

0:03:240:03:29

Although it's nice wood as well.

0:03:290:03:30

Isn't it? I mean, more exotic woods.

0:03:300:03:33

-So, a secretaire.

-Yes, yes.

0:03:330:03:35

Date-wise, I suppose we're looking at around about 1925.

0:03:350:03:41

-Designer, who is it?

-I would love to know.

0:03:410:03:44

-It's very much in the manner of Louis Sue and Andre Mare.

-Right.

0:03:440:03:49

And Sue et Mare specialised in exotic inlays.

0:03:490:03:53

-Yes.

-And they went very heavy with mother of pearl.

0:03:530:03:57

-Right.

-I don't know for sure.

0:03:570:04:00

Dare I ask what you had to pay? And how long ago was it?

0:04:000:04:04

-It was two years ago.

-Oh, recently?

0:04:040:04:06

And I paid £900.

0:04:060:04:07

900? Well, let me just say that, you know,

0:04:070:04:11

if I went into certain galleries,

0:04:110:04:13

I know two or three that specialise in deco furniture.

0:04:130:04:17

And I know for a fact that I would not get away with paying

0:04:170:04:22

less than £9,000.

0:04:220:04:23

Oh, goodness, that's a big difference.

0:04:230:04:26

Lovely, that's excellent.

0:04:260:04:29

It'll be my pension, then.

0:04:290:04:32

If you can associate this piece with Louis Sue and Andre Mare,

0:04:320:04:38

then it becomes an important piece of furniture

0:04:380:04:41

and the starting price would be £30,000.

0:04:410:04:43

Goodness me!

0:04:430:04:45

If it does turn out to be Sue et Mare, I'm on 10%.

0:04:450:04:48

LAUGHING: I'll send you a cheque.

0:04:480:04:51

This is an incredible collection of amateur magazine work, isn't it?

0:04:570:05:01

-Yes.

-Tell me about it. Where did it come from?

0:05:010:05:03

It came from my husband's aunt and she was clearing out the house.

0:05:030:05:07

We went to help and she said would I take some rubbish out? And I did.

0:05:070:05:11

And I lifted the lid and there in the dustbin were these three books.

0:05:110:05:15

And so you pinched them?

0:05:150:05:16

I did. I asked permission first.

0:05:160:05:18

That sounds fair enough, doesn't it?

0:05:180:05:20

I asked if there were any more because there was only three.

0:05:200:05:23

Wonderful. "My aunt".

0:05:230:05:25

She looks absolutely dreadful, doesn't she?

0:05:250:05:27

I know. I know. Very Victorian.

0:05:270:05:29

Very Victorian. The whole thing is very Victorian.

0:05:290:05:32

This is a magazine, a private magazine.

0:05:320:05:34

And, of course, this is the sort of thing

0:05:340:05:36

they used to do in the evening.

0:05:360:05:38

They didn't watch television sets or anything like that,

0:05:380:05:41

they wrote magazines which they passed around the family.

0:05:410:05:45

But look, it's just full of all sorts of wonderful illustrations.

0:05:450:05:49

Some of them more amateur than others.

0:05:490:05:51

This one looks quite good to me, don't you think?

0:05:510:05:54

Yes, it has pictures in it.

0:05:540:05:55

You have to find pictures, but I've never found them.

0:05:550:05:58

-Hidden pictures?

-Sort of, yes.

0:05:580:06:00

She looks like a smouldering beauty, doesn't she?

0:06:000:06:03

Yes, she does.

0:06:030:06:05

It's a wonderful reflection of Victorian society.

0:06:050:06:08

And I think, although amateur, I think it is absolutely charming.

0:06:080:06:11

And I suppose we have to give it a value.

0:06:110:06:14

You got them for nothing and I'm going to say that they're worth

0:06:140:06:18

-£1,000 for the three volumes.

-Never?

0:06:180:06:21

-Yes.

-I don't believe you.

0:06:210:06:24

All right, don't then.

0:06:240:06:26

I had them valued 40 years ago and they said £30 for three.

0:06:260:06:30

And I didn't get rid of them because I love them.

0:06:300:06:32

And now you've made my day.

0:06:320:06:33

This is absolutely tremendous and it's really good stuff.

0:06:330:06:36

-Thank you.

-As I say, it does reflect Victorian society.

-Indeed.

0:06:360:06:39

-You've brought in a couple of Wedgwood candlesticks.

-Yes.

0:06:390:06:43

They say Wedgwood on the bottom.

0:06:430:06:44

And they're Jasper, they're blue and white.

0:06:440:06:47

-Yes.

-Everything about them shouts Wedgwood.

0:06:470:06:49

But how much more do you know about them?

0:06:490:06:52

Only that they've been in our family for as long as I can remember.

0:06:520:06:56

And we've tried to do a bit of research on them,

0:06:560:06:58

but not got very far.

0:06:580:07:00

So have you an idea of the date and maybe their value?

0:07:000:07:03

No idea at all.

0:07:030:07:04

Let's start with the mark. They're Wedgwood.

0:07:040:07:07

There's the mark on the bottom in block capitals,

0:07:070:07:10

-Wedgwood, loud and proud.

-Yes.

0:07:100:07:11

Absolutely no doubt about it. So the mark

0:07:110:07:14

-and the way they're constructed will tell us what date they are.

-Right.

0:07:140:07:19

Because, like lots of potteries, they kept popular patterns going.

0:07:190:07:23

And Jasper, of course, you can still buy today.

0:07:230:07:25

So what we need to find out, for your sake, is are they new?

0:07:250:07:29

-You know they're not.

-Yes.

-Or are they very old?

0:07:290:07:32

They are actually 18th century.

0:07:320:07:33

-Right.

-About 1785-1795 in date.

0:07:330:07:37

-Really? Yes.

-The mark tells us a little bit,

0:07:370:07:40

but it's the way they're constructed.

0:07:400:07:42

The 18th century ones were all made in small separate moulds,

0:07:420:07:45

-assembled by hand and then lots of hand finishing.

-Oh, I see.

0:07:450:07:49

So if you look, particularly at her toes,

0:07:490:07:52

you can see there's actually a bit of extra hand cutting.

0:07:520:07:55

And the draperies, when the clay's still wet,

0:07:550:07:57

-they finished them off by hand. This has been a piece.

-Yes.

0:07:570:08:01

This has been a piece. She's been in several pieces.

0:08:010:08:04

The plinth's a piece, the base is a piece.

0:08:040:08:06

-I see.

-So, all put together, whilst wet, using liquid clay.

0:08:060:08:10

And, of course, as ceramic technology progressed,

0:08:100:08:12

they found ways of making this section together.

0:08:120:08:15

And then, eventually, the later ones would be made in almost one piece.

0:08:150:08:19

-Yes.

-So the mark and the technique shouts 18th century.

-Right.

0:08:190:08:22

-Would you like to know how much they're worth?

-Go on.

0:08:220:08:25

-£1,000 to £1,500.

-Right. Fine.

0:08:250:08:28

You need to find fancy candles to put in them.

0:08:280:08:31

I don't think they're ever going to see wax.

0:08:310:08:33

-I'm glad to hear it, thanks very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:08:330:08:37

Well, since we're in Cumbria and near the Lakes,

0:08:400:08:43

I was really hoping all day, really hoping,

0:08:430:08:46

to see a Wainwright. A Wainwright drawing.

0:08:460:08:48

And this one of Scafell, I couldn't ask for a better one.

0:08:480:08:52

It's completely wonderful.

0:08:520:08:53

Have you walked this?

0:08:530:08:55

I have, many years ago. Nothing recently. But yes, I have.

0:08:550:08:59

That looks quite precipitous, actually.

0:08:590:09:01

It is, it looks worse than it is.

0:09:010:09:03

But it is a very... It's a good path walk.

0:09:030:09:06

And did you use a Wainwright's Guide on that day?

0:09:060:09:09

I did, yes. I always walk in the Lake District with a Wainwright.

0:09:090:09:12

And do you use it? Do you use his drawings

0:09:120:09:15

in preference to an Ordnance Survey map?

0:09:150:09:17

No, I always have an Ordnance Survey map with me when I'm walking.

0:09:170:09:20

-I suppose that's safer, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:09:200:09:22

Do you know, what I love about these drawings most of all,

0:09:220:09:26

in a sense, is that you know exactly where you are at any point.

0:09:260:09:29

And he draws them with such clarity that he's understood 3D

0:09:290:09:34

and rendered it into 2D in a perfectly articulate way.

0:09:340:09:38

And it's his incredibly ordered mind that enabled him to do that,

0:09:380:09:42

I think, to put that down in pen and ink.

0:09:420:09:44

It's a piece of perfection.

0:09:440:09:46

What do you know about him?

0:09:460:09:48

He was a keen walker when he started his books,

0:09:480:09:52

the pictorial guides to the Lake District.

0:09:520:09:55

It was a labour of love for him. And he was a very solitary man as well,

0:09:550:09:59

it was quite difficult for him later on,

0:09:590:10:01

when the books became so popular.

0:10:010:10:02

And, in a way, he's responsible for making walking in the Lake District

0:10:020:10:06

as popular as it is today.

0:10:060:10:07

He went there for solitude

0:10:070:10:09

and he ended up finding it, you know, incredibly busy.

0:10:090:10:12

And of course it was partly his fault

0:10:120:10:14

that it was so very, very busy.

0:10:140:10:16

-Yeah, yeah.

-How on earth did you get it?

0:10:160:10:19

It was my grandfather's and it came to me after he died.

0:10:190:10:22

-He was a fell walker too, I suppose?

-He was a very keen fell walker, yes.

0:10:220:10:26

He used to walk in the Lake District a lot and there was a competition

0:10:260:10:30

with a very famous baked bean manufacturer,

0:10:300:10:34

that if you sent off an amount of labels, I can't remember how many,

0:10:340:10:39

you'd be put in a prize draw to possibly win a picture.

0:10:390:10:43

My grandfather was very keen on Wainwright,

0:10:430:10:45

not so keen on beans, didn't like them at all, but...

0:10:450:10:48

-He didn't even like them?

-No, he didn't like them at all, but being a Northern man,

0:10:480:10:52

he wasn't going to throw them away, so he ate them

0:10:520:10:55

and he entered several times and got nothing

0:10:550:11:00

and he was getting more and more frustrated

0:11:000:11:02

and in the end he wrote to them and said,

0:11:020:11:04

"I've been buying your beans for months and I don't even like them".

0:11:040:11:08

He didn't hear anything back,

0:11:080:11:10

then a few weeks later this turned up in the post.

0:11:100:11:12

What a fantastic story.

0:11:120:11:13

He must have been rather bloated with beans by then.

0:11:130:11:16

Yes, quite possibly,

0:11:160:11:18

although I think he was very happy the picture turned up,

0:11:180:11:21

but also very happy that he could stop eating beans.

0:11:210:11:24

Well, is it a work of art? Is it a topographical drawing?

0:11:260:11:29

I don't know, but they're very, very popular.

0:11:290:11:32

Everyone loves Wainwright.

0:11:320:11:34

And what that means, that such a good example as this, of Scafell,

0:11:340:11:38

-well, between £1,200 and £1,500.

-Blimey.

0:11:380:11:41

Didn't think it was worth that much.

0:11:410:11:44

You're never going to sell it, are you?

0:11:440:11:46

No, it'll be going to my son. Get a lot of enjoyment from it.

0:11:460:11:49

From the beauties of the Lake District,

0:11:530:11:55

we're heading to equally stunning landscapes -

0:11:550:11:58

to Derbyshire, where we recently set up camp at Chatsworth.

0:11:580:12:01

It was there many hundreds greeted us for another busy Roadshow.

0:12:040:12:08

Are you a general clock collector

0:12:120:12:13

or just clocks with a nautical flavour?

0:12:130:12:15

No, just general really. I like all sorts of clocks.

0:12:150:12:18

-Do you have lots at home?

-Quite a lot, yeah.

0:12:180:12:22

Time fascinates me.

0:12:220:12:24

-You picked these two because you thought they were fun?

-I did, yeah.

0:12:240:12:27

They're both slightly in the rough. Have you...?

0:12:270:12:30

-Well, this one was rebuilt by a friend of mine.

-Yeah.

0:12:300:12:33

He put all this one back together.

0:12:330:12:35

I bought that off a chap all in bits in a box,

0:12:350:12:38

and I put that one back together.

0:12:380:12:41

But I do realise that there are certain things that aren't right.

0:12:410:12:45

They're both French.

0:12:450:12:46

And this lovely automaton lighthouse is absolutely typical

0:12:460:12:52

of the sort of industrial themed clocks and nautical clocks

0:12:520:12:56

that the French were making in the latter part of the 19th century.

0:12:560:13:00

-Oh, right.

-So we've got this wonderful light.

0:13:000:13:03

It has a duplex escape wheel down there

0:13:030:13:06

and the balance wheel is basically this "lamp"

0:13:060:13:10

-in inverted commas, with the glass rods.

-Yeah.

0:13:100:13:13

-So it's a very visual item, isn't it?

-Yes, it is, actually.

0:13:130:13:16

It fascinated me when I first saw it.

0:13:160:13:19

It's good it's working, because if it doesn't,

0:13:190:13:22

they are absolutely fiendish to get back running.

0:13:220:13:24

It's a very tricky thing.

0:13:240:13:26

Well, I'm glad I didn't have to do it.

0:13:260:13:28

So let's go to this one.

0:13:280:13:30

Now, do you know what this is meant to represent?

0:13:300:13:33

I've always related it to like a diving bell, this sort of thing.

0:13:330:13:36

Well, you're much more likely that,

0:13:360:13:38

because I think actually it's an early buoy...

0:13:380:13:41

This is its counterweight.

0:13:410:13:43

It would have sat under the water, you would have seen this bit,

0:13:430:13:46

-and that would have been your light on it.

-Oh, right.

0:13:460:13:49

That would have kept it effectively from toppling over in a heavy sea.

0:13:490:13:54

We've got the time piece movement in there

0:13:540:13:58

and then going round, 120 degrees,

0:13:580:14:00

we've got a rather nice curved thermometer.

0:14:000:14:03

-Around again and we have an aneroid barometer.

-Yeah.

0:14:030:14:08

And then in the top...

0:14:080:14:10

..we have a little inset compass.

0:14:110:14:13

Now the great thing is this -

0:14:150:14:17

"The 1st Admiralty Prize",

0:14:170:14:19

and you can see the presentation.

0:14:190:14:22

And it's dated 1889.

0:14:220:14:24

"HMS Britannia",

0:14:250:14:27

-which is the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth.

-Yeah.

0:14:270:14:31

Two great pieces.

0:14:310:14:33

And we're here, obviously, to talk about their value.

0:14:330:14:37

This one, once it's had a little bit of re-plating done,

0:14:370:14:39

a bit of polishing and lacquering, make it look good, retail condition,

0:14:390:14:44

-you're going to see about £3,500.

-Oh, right, oh, right.

0:14:440:14:47

I didn't think it was worth that much.

0:14:470:14:49

And what about the lighthouse?

0:14:490:14:50

In a decent shop or, once again, at a top quality antiques fair,

0:14:500:14:54

people would be asking towards £5,000 for that.

0:14:540:14:57

Ah, right, right.

0:14:570:14:59

So from a bag of bones, literally, to a high value object.

0:14:590:15:02

Yes, yes.

0:15:020:15:03

So it's great to meet a fellow clock enthusiast

0:15:030:15:06

and I trust there's lots more at home

0:15:060:15:08

-and next time, bring a lot more in.

-Will do, yeah.

0:15:080:15:11

It's nice to know the value of them.

0:15:110:15:13

I get very excited when people bring along

0:15:180:15:20

wonderful pieces of jewellery, naturally.

0:15:200:15:22

But when there are super boxes like this, it gets even more interesting.

0:15:220:15:26

And then if we open them up, we have two gorgeous bracelets in there,

0:15:260:15:33

and each of the boxes has the Liberty logo in.

0:15:330:15:37

How did you get hold of these?

0:15:370:15:39

Well, these were my grandmother's.

0:15:390:15:41

They've been handed down two generations.

0:15:410:15:43

And do you remember

0:15:430:15:44

your grandmother wearing them?

0:15:440:15:46

I remember her wearing them, yes.

0:15:460:15:48

She wore them often, especially this one.

0:15:480:15:50

Well, they are absolutely gorgeous,

0:15:500:15:52

and of course Liberty, which is based in London, on Regent Street,

0:15:520:15:55

was opened in 1875 by Arthur Lasenby Liberty,

0:15:550:15:59

and his whole idea was to get amazing works of art,

0:15:590:16:03

be it furniture, paintings, rugs,

0:16:030:16:06

bring them into the building and display them in such a way,

0:16:060:16:09

which just showed off their best potential.

0:16:090:16:11

Eventually he started to bring in jewellery as well,

0:16:110:16:14

and here we've got a beautiful bracelet

0:16:140:16:17

with turquoise and delicate silver work,

0:16:170:16:20

which you can see in each of the panels,

0:16:200:16:23

and these very of the period, where they enclose the turquoise.

0:16:230:16:27

And if we look on the clasp,

0:16:270:16:29

we actually have Liberty Sterling stamped to the clasp.

0:16:290:16:32

It is just such a delicate piece of jewellery. Do you wear it?

0:16:340:16:37

Yes, but it's been handed down to my daughter,

0:16:370:16:40

so she's very interested in all about it, knowing about it.

0:16:400:16:44

But it's a gorgeous piece. It is very pretty.

0:16:440:16:46

It's absolutely wonderful.

0:16:460:16:48

And the turquoise has all stayed in extremely good condition.

0:16:480:16:51

It's all nicely coloured and the intricate detail on the silver

0:16:510:16:56

is also very, very beautiful.

0:16:560:16:58

Now, slightly later in date, we've got the bracelet over here.

0:16:580:17:02

This has got various gemstones set all along it,

0:17:020:17:05

including lovely carnelian, sapphire,

0:17:050:17:09

lapis lazuli, amongst other gemstones

0:17:090:17:12

and I'm sure you can see they're all lovely little scarab beetles.

0:17:120:17:15

-Yes, yes.

-And the scarab, of course, is associated with Egypt,

0:17:150:17:19

and in the '20s, Egypt was just total excitement,

0:17:190:17:23

-because Tutankhamen's tombs had been re-excavated.

-Yes.

0:17:230:17:27

And there were these major images coming back of these tombs.

0:17:270:17:32

The Mail actually called the period "Tutankhamen Mania"

0:17:320:17:35

because everybody went mad

0:17:350:17:37

and there's always been an excitement about Egypt,

0:17:370:17:39

and it showed that you were ahead of your times

0:17:390:17:42

and you were in the height of fashion. With regard to value,

0:17:420:17:45

if these came up at auction,

0:17:450:17:46

it's just fabulous that you've got the boxes with them as well.

0:17:460:17:50

Each of these on their own, the boxes,

0:17:500:17:52

they're each worth about £100-£150.

0:17:520:17:56

-Oh, amazing.

-Yeah, it is.

0:17:560:18:00

But the jewellery, what about that?

0:18:000:18:02

Each of these, I think you could expect to get

0:18:020:18:05

-about £1,000-£1,500 at auction.

-How much?!

0:18:050:18:09

-A thousand and...

-£1,000-£1,500.

0:18:110:18:13

Oh, my goodness, fantastic.

0:18:130:18:15

Now, as the Duke of Devonshire,

0:18:190:18:21

we should firstly say thanks for allowing us into your splendid home.

0:18:210:18:25

It's wonderful you're back, it's great.

0:18:250:18:28

-Now, this is your favourite item in the house.

-I love it, yes.

0:18:280:18:31

I remember it from a long, long time ago,

0:18:310:18:33

when I was little and living here, when we moved in in the late' 50s.

0:18:330:18:37

-It's always being admired.

-Who first had this made?

0:18:370:18:42

This was made for a man called Baron Von Knyphausen

0:18:420:18:46

in about 1697 in Germany.

0:18:460:18:53

It was bought in 1817

0:18:530:18:55

through an agent in Brussels by the sixth Duke.

0:18:550:18:57

Now, it's not just an extraordinary eagle or hawk in its own right.

0:18:570:19:02

-It's also a drinking vessel.

-Yes. If I just take this out...

0:19:020:19:06

-Yikes!

-So that's the head, that is safe.

0:19:060:19:10

And then inside is this drinking vessel.

0:19:100:19:12

There's the baron's coat of arms,

0:19:120:19:15

and I think it was made as a statement of importance.

0:19:150:19:18

It's certainly an incredible sort of power symbol, isn't it?

0:19:180:19:23

Yes, it's covered in all these semi-precious stones.

0:19:230:19:26

There's garnets and cornelians and amethysts.

0:19:260:19:28

-Sapphires here.

-Sapphire there.

0:19:280:19:30

And emeralds... It is beautiful. Let's put it all together.

0:19:300:19:34

What is it about it that you love so much?

0:19:340:19:37

I love it because it's flashy and blingy,

0:19:370:19:40

and it's really a statement of somebody saying,

0:19:400:19:43

"This is a beautiful thing

0:19:430:19:45

"which I've made for the best of my abilities."

0:19:450:19:48

And considering how old it is, it's rather fascinating.

0:19:480:19:53

-Have you ever drunk out of it?

-No, I haven't, actually.

0:19:530:19:56

You can't put the silver beaker down, actually.

0:19:570:20:00

So you'd have to drink it all in one go.

0:20:000:20:02

-Sounds like a marvellous excuse. Maybe later.

-Maybe later.

0:20:020:20:07

Well, when I first saw this, I thought,

0:20:220:20:24

"Oh, my goodness, some tatty book",

0:20:240:20:26

but it proved absolutely fascinating going through it.

0:20:260:20:30

I mean, these are, what are they? They're police records.

0:20:300:20:34

Yeah, police mug shots.

0:20:340:20:35

Where does it come from?

0:20:350:20:36

It was rescued from a skip some 30 years ago,

0:20:360:20:39

from a Derby police station that were clearing out.

0:20:390:20:41

And in those days I suppose records didn't matter,

0:20:410:20:45

and my dad rescued it because he thought...

0:20:450:20:47

He was interested in old things.

0:20:470:20:49

And your father was...?

0:20:490:20:51

He was a policeman.

0:20:510:20:52

I'm not sure he's allowed to do that!

0:20:520:20:54

But anyway, I'm very glad he did,

0:20:540:20:57

because this is rather important, isn't it?

0:20:570:21:00

James Brady, here, and Alfred Mason...

0:21:000:21:04

-These people were involved in a plot.

-They were, yes.

0:21:040:21:06

Against Lloyd George. And the date here is, what, 19...

0:21:060:21:11

-1917.

-1917.

0:21:110:21:13

Were they Bolsheviks or German sympathisers or what?

0:21:130:21:17

It's alleged that they were Communist sympathisers.

0:21:170:21:20

Well, here they are and here are their mug shots,

0:21:200:21:22

James Brady, alias The Duke.

0:21:220:21:25

It says where he went and all the things that he did.

0:21:250:21:28

And here's this other chap, Alfred George Mason.

0:21:280:21:32

And then the others, who are rather strange, which are two women.

0:21:320:21:37

Yes, they were, I believe, conscientious objectors,

0:21:370:21:40

didn't agree with the war.

0:21:400:21:41

It was in the middle of the First World War.

0:21:410:21:44

And Lloyd George was in charge, as it were, at that stage.

0:21:440:21:48

Their plan was to poison him.

0:21:480:21:50

-How were they going to do that?

-They tried to poison him with a dart

0:21:500:21:54

and they tried the poison on dogs to see if it would work,

0:21:540:21:57

but I don't think they actually got that far and they got caught before.

0:21:570:22:01

How extraordinary, for killing dogs.

0:22:010:22:03

It is the most fascinating book,

0:22:030:22:05

and it is remarkable for it to have survived.

0:22:050:22:08

It's a social document. There's lots of people in here,

0:22:080:22:12

but I would say in excess of £1,000.

0:22:120:22:15

-Right.

-Why not?

-Thank you.

0:22:150:22:17

And I suppose we should thank your father

0:22:170:22:19

for taking it out of a skip.

0:22:190:22:20

You know, I just love Japanese pots and Japanese works of art.

0:22:250:22:28

Is this a family treasure or what?

0:22:280:22:31

It is a family treasure.

0:22:310:22:33

The only thing I know about its origins is that it was given

0:22:330:22:37

either to my grandmother or my great grandmother

0:22:370:22:40

by "a seafaring man" who wasn't her husband.

0:22:400:22:43

-Right.

-And it has always been called the Japanese vase,

0:22:430:22:47

although we didn't know whether it was or not,

0:22:470:22:50

and nobody is ever allowed to touch it.

0:22:500:22:53

-Oh, really?

-Yes.

-I should feel as though I'm wearing

0:22:530:22:55

-sort of white gloves, then, today.

-Yes.

0:22:550:22:58

-So do I have your permission to...?

-Yes.

0:22:580:23:00

Thank you very much.

0:23:000:23:01

Well, let's have a look at it, because you're absolutely right,

0:23:010:23:05

-it is Japanese.

-Well, we've got something right.

0:23:050:23:07

Oh, you got it right there.

0:23:070:23:09

-But it is a little gem, it is a treasure.

-Is it?

0:23:090:23:12

Well, you've only got to look at it, the detail on there.

0:23:120:23:16

Because this type of pottery is referred to as Satsuma.

0:23:160:23:19

But more importantly, this type of quality

0:23:190:23:24

you would normally associate with the city of Kyoto.

0:23:240:23:27

There were lots of big names who specialised in this particular ware.

0:23:270:23:32

One big name is Ryozan, another one is Yabu Meizan,

0:23:320:23:36

but my favourite is Kinkozan.

0:23:360:23:39

Oh, lovely.

0:23:390:23:41

A pot like this I would say is probably about 1910.

0:23:410:23:44

Having said that, if anybody says, "How old is it?"

0:23:440:23:47

you say, "It's late Meiji period."

0:23:470:23:49

Sounds better, doesn't it?

0:23:490:23:50

Right, yeah. Oh, it sounds very nice.

0:23:500:23:52

It's the detail these people worked to.

0:23:520:23:55

I mean, that is just a mass of tiny, tiny butterflies.

0:23:550:23:59

Is it really?

0:23:590:24:00

-Hang on, how long have you lived with this?

-All my life.

0:24:000:24:04

-And you've never...?

-I was never allowed close to it.

0:24:040:24:06

I didn't touch it till I was well into my 20s.

0:24:060:24:09

Oh, my goodness me, that's repression!

0:24:090:24:12

Goodness me.

0:24:120:24:14

No, trust me, they're all there.

0:24:140:24:17

-And you've got this wonderful figural decoration as well.

-Yes.

0:24:170:24:20

And that's where I home in on,

0:24:200:24:21

because that tells you whether it's absolutely top, top notch.

0:24:210:24:25

And this is very close to perfection.

0:24:250:24:30

It is a little miniature masterpiece in every sense of the word

0:24:300:24:33

but you want to know who it's by, and there is no mark as such.

0:24:330:24:38

There is a very indistinct impressed mark there

0:24:380:24:40

which I just simply cannot, cannot, cannot read,

0:24:400:24:45

which is a bit of a shame.

0:24:450:24:46

Also, what is important from a collector's point of view

0:24:460:24:49

is condition, and if we look at this black band here,

0:24:490:24:52

-you'll notice it's slightly worn...

-Yeah.

-..which is a bit of a minus.

0:24:520:24:56

So, what price do we put on a pot that has led such a sheltered life?

0:24:570:25:03

-No idea.

-None whatsoever?

-None at all, no.

0:25:030:25:06

I'll tell you what it's worth because that'll make me feel wanted.

0:25:060:25:09

All right.

0:25:090:25:10

Because I think if I wanted to go out and buy another,

0:25:100:25:14

I'm not going to get any change whatsoever

0:25:140:25:16

out of £1,500.

0:25:160:25:18

Wow!

0:25:180:25:20

In a round about fashion, you can actually thank your parents

0:25:200:25:25

for having that sort of control.

0:25:250:25:29

-I still have the same control.

-Oh, you do? OK.

0:25:290:25:32

My daughter touched it for the first time last night and she's 23.

0:25:320:25:37

Poor things.

0:25:380:25:39

Thank you very much indeed.

0:25:390:25:42

It was given to me by a neighbour who was leaving their home

0:25:420:25:48

and taking up another one and they found it under the roof.

0:25:480:25:52

Yes.

0:25:520:25:53

Rather dirty and filthy and as I was an art student at the time,

0:25:530:25:58

they said, "Oh, give it to Dave."

0:25:580:25:59

I like the whole composition of the thing,

0:25:590:26:02

although I feel that that arm is a little bit...

0:26:020:26:04

Yeah, there are little things...

0:26:040:26:06

Odd bits about it which don't quite gel.

0:26:060:26:09

Well, let's look and see exactly what we're looking at.

0:26:090:26:12

We've got Mary, the mother of Christ, who's standing here.

0:26:120:26:15

He's a little bit older than the infant Christ

0:26:150:26:18

we're used to seeing in traditional representations.

0:26:180:26:21

And down here, we've got John the Baptist,

0:26:210:26:23

and he's wearing his camel hair shirt, and that's his staff there.

0:26:230:26:26

Tied around the staff is a ribbon on which is written

0:26:260:26:30

"Ecce" and "Agnus Dei." I am the Lamb of God.

0:26:300:26:34

And the Christ child is reaching out to hold it,

0:26:340:26:37

as if grasping his destiny,

0:26:370:26:39

because this picture looks back as well as forwards.

0:26:390:26:42

It looks to Christ's death.

0:26:420:26:44

In fact, in the distance you can see one big rock

0:26:440:26:47

and they are a hint at Calgary, where he ends up on the cross.

0:26:470:26:51

I think it's 17th century

0:26:510:26:52

and I also think we're quite east in Europe,

0:26:520:26:55

we might be as far as Germany

0:26:550:26:56

and perhaps even as far as Czechoslovakia, Bohemia.

0:26:560:26:59

-Really?

-Yes, it's possible,

0:26:590:27:01

because look at the drapery here. That's actually quite Gothic

0:27:010:27:04

in the way it's so deeply cut

0:27:040:27:06

and so carefully and sharply layered.

0:27:060:27:09

Yet the face of Mary is very human

0:27:090:27:11

and she's what I might call a "bus stop Madonna".

0:27:110:27:14

You'd meet her at a bus stop, she's a real person,

0:27:140:27:16

and you get a strong sense of the affection between mother and child.

0:27:160:27:20

It's very human, the whole grouping, the cascade of figures,

0:27:200:27:23

is done in such a way that the two are extremely intimate.

0:27:230:27:27

So we're looking at a devotional object. It's quite small,

0:27:270:27:30

so it might have been for domestic use.

0:27:300:27:32

A privileged person would own this beautiful painting

0:27:320:27:35

and keep it almost as a personal chapel,

0:27:350:27:37

wouldn't have to go to church with everyone else

0:27:370:27:40

because she's got her own little shrine in her house.

0:27:400:27:44

We don't know who it's by, but the Old Master market,

0:27:440:27:48

that's the category it falls into in the art market,

0:27:480:27:50

it doesn't often care about the certainty of a name,

0:27:500:27:54

it's more about the quality of the picture.

0:27:540:27:56

We can see some very good qualities in this picture.

0:27:560:27:59

What it all adds up to is a value of between...

0:27:590:28:03

£3,000 and £5,000.

0:28:030:28:04

That's a very comfortable figure.

0:28:040:28:06

I must remember that expression, "a bus stop Madonna."

0:28:100:28:13

It's rather poetic, really.

0:28:130:28:15

Our recent visit to the British Museum

0:28:200:28:22

found the team hard at work beneath the colonnades

0:28:220:28:25

that form the grand entrance.

0:28:250:28:27

As museum visitors hurried to see the collection inside,

0:28:270:28:30

our experts were busy finding their own selection of treasures.

0:28:300:28:33

It's great to welcome you to the Antiques Roadshow

0:28:360:28:38

on this sunny day, but I understand today

0:28:380:28:41

is an important day for more reason than just you being here.

0:28:410:28:45

That's true. My 66th birthday

0:28:450:28:48

and retirement from active work.

0:28:480:28:52

-Your retirement as well?

-Yes.

-You've a lot to celebrate.

0:28:520:28:55

And I understand this is just a small part of your collection?

0:28:550:28:58

Yes.

0:28:580:28:59

I have been collecting ever since I got married to my wife about 33 years ago.

0:28:590:29:04

So I am a general collector, so I collect everything.

0:29:040:29:08

And what's it like to live with him?

0:29:080:29:10

Oh, that's a good question.

0:29:100:29:13

It's really a hell

0:29:130:29:15

because I don't know anything about antiques before I knew him.

0:29:150:29:19

When he started collecting... We do worry almost every day

0:29:190:29:22

because even a halfpenny... If he had a halfpenny,

0:29:220:29:26

he wouldn't mind investing it in the antique,

0:29:260:29:31

then later on when you ask for money,

0:29:310:29:33

he says, "I have no money." "What happened to your money?"

0:29:330:29:36

"I invested it in antiques."

0:29:360:29:39

And he's ploughing it into this seeming scrap metal.

0:29:390:29:42

Where do you go to find them?

0:29:420:29:44

I go to auctions, I go to car boots, I go to junk shops...

0:29:440:29:48

-You name it.

-That's what objects are for,

0:29:480:29:50

to give you a thrill, the thrill of the chase,

0:29:500:29:53

and the thrill of possessing.

0:29:530:29:55

That's a good one, Keighley. Quite a contemporary artist.

0:29:550:29:59

How long have you had that one?

0:29:590:30:01

About...17 years now.

0:30:010:30:05

Did you pay a lot for it?

0:30:050:30:06

Well, I paid...

0:30:060:30:07

£500, because that was what he was selling it... I met him in person.

0:30:070:30:13

This is from the Amsterdam series in the mid 1980s

0:30:130:30:17

and 500 then, would be probably £800 to £1,200 now.

0:30:170:30:22

But look at the colour of it,

0:30:220:30:23

it's a little upturned Dutch girl's bonnet,

0:30:230:30:26

resting on a pair of clogs.

0:30:260:30:28

This one is Indian.

0:30:280:30:30

Yes.

0:30:300:30:31

I think it's maybe cast in the last sort of 50 years

0:30:310:30:35

and I'd say in a sale room, that would fetch

0:30:350:30:38

between £100 and £150.

0:30:380:30:40

You've got this figure here, too. Where did that come from?

0:30:400:30:44

Well, this one, I bought it from a junk shop.

0:30:440:30:47

Well, your junk shop find is actually quite old.

0:30:470:30:51

Made in Italy about, sort of, 1880.

0:30:510:30:55

Do you know who it is, in all his glory?

0:30:550:30:57

-No.

-Narcissus.

0:30:570:31:00

He was an ancient Greek hunter who was a very good looking lad,

0:31:000:31:04

so good looking that he used to despise other people

0:31:040:31:07

and was rather haughty and arrogant.

0:31:070:31:09

For a punishment,

0:31:090:31:10

the gods made him fall in love with his own reflection,

0:31:100:31:13

and he couldn't draw himself away from his own reflection

0:31:130:31:16

and he perished and just turned to dust.

0:31:160:31:19

So it's quite a nice thing.

0:31:190:31:21

It's modelled after an ancient one which was excavated in Pompeii

0:31:210:31:25

in, I think, about the 1860s.

0:31:250:31:28

It's a very, very popular subject.

0:31:280:31:30

He's lost his base and, of course, he's lost his foot.

0:31:300:31:34

But what I do love about it is, all this verdigris.

0:31:340:31:37

It's been outside, it's probably been in somebody's garden.

0:31:370:31:41

Did you give an awful lot for this?

0:31:410:31:43

Well, I think £350, something like that.

0:31:430:31:46

I think that's probably about enough really. It's probably worth...

0:31:460:31:50

I mean, a perfect one with the base,

0:31:500:31:52

about £1,000 to £1,500.

0:31:520:31:55

So you've not done too badly at that.

0:31:550:31:57

So how do you display these?

0:31:570:31:59

Are these pride of place in the living room or are they...?

0:31:590:32:02

No, I hide them away from my wife.

0:32:020:32:06

So you do put your foot down then?

0:32:060:32:08

Yes. Hard fast.

0:32:080:32:11

I think you get away with a lot.

0:32:110:32:13

Look, you're ploughing your money into things

0:32:130:32:16

that you enjoy discovering, it gets you out at the weekend,

0:32:160:32:19

it gets you out and about into the auctions and there's a thrill,

0:32:190:32:23

of going to a sale room, going into a dealer's.

0:32:230:32:27

I think you're doing really well.

0:32:270:32:28

We've got eight objects, metal objects, from your vast collection.

0:32:280:32:33

What's in front of me is worth certainly upwards of £1,500.

0:32:330:32:37

Yes, but I thought I would have got more from this.

0:32:370:32:41

It means I have to look for a job.

0:32:410:32:43

LAUGHTER

0:32:430:32:45

To carry on your collecting habit?

0:32:450:32:48

We'll find him a job, won't we? We'll find him a job!

0:32:480:32:50

Can you tell me, is it family or purchase?

0:32:560:32:58

-Family.

-And the history?

0:32:580:33:00

It was a gift to my father in law

0:33:000:33:04

from his senior partner.

0:33:040:33:06

When he died, his widow gave it to my father in law.

0:33:060:33:09

That's a tremendous gift from the senior partner...

0:33:090:33:12

It was very nice, and now my eldest son is the owner of it.

0:33:120:33:15

The first thing that caught my eye is its size.

0:33:150:33:18

It's somewhat smaller than bracket clocks of this period.

0:33:180:33:22

Yeah, shorter.

0:33:220:33:23

Yes, indeed. Now, it's signed on the back

0:33:230:33:27

by a maker called Daniel Parker in Fleet Street.

0:33:270:33:32

Do you know anything about him at all?

0:33:320:33:35

No, but Fleet Street is newspapers, not clocks.

0:33:350:33:37

That's true. Not even newspapers any more!

0:33:370:33:40

It's not that far from the area of Clerkenwell,

0:33:400:33:42

where the clock making industry flourished.

0:33:420:33:44

-Right.

-He started in Derby, he moved to London

0:33:440:33:49

and he was mostly working towards the very end of the 17th century,

0:33:490:33:53

so we're talking about 1680-1690.

0:33:530:33:57

You've got, as you'd expect,

0:33:570:33:58

a rather pleasant engraved back plate.

0:33:580:34:00

-It's beautiful.

-Fortunately, it's got a pendulum lock.

0:34:000:34:05

These are very often missing. This is the piece

0:34:050:34:07

that locks the pendulum when the clock's transported,

0:34:070:34:11

which in those days would have been from room to room

0:34:110:34:14

or possibly from house to house.

0:34:140:34:16

When a family went from London to a country house,

0:34:160:34:18

-they would have taken the clock with them in a box.

-Right.

0:34:180:34:22

You've got striking, which you can see from the back,

0:34:220:34:25

-we have what is known as the locking plate.

-Yes.

0:34:250:34:28

That's the wheel, the interrupted wheel,

0:34:280:34:30

and as it strikes, the detent here will count its way round,

0:34:300:34:34

jumping into the hole commensurate with the number.

0:34:340:34:37

It's one of the reasons why we have to be slightly careful

0:34:370:34:40

-with these clocks, they can get confused.

-Oh.

0:34:400:34:43

If you whizz the hands round, they can get confused.

0:34:430:34:47

It has what is known as a basket top,

0:34:470:34:49

which is this repousse engraved piece.

0:34:490:34:53

Good size.

0:34:530:34:55

Um, minimum, I would say,

0:34:550:34:58

£5,000 to £7,000.

0:34:580:35:00

But, and it's a big but, with a little bit of tidying up,

0:35:000:35:05

I wouldn't expect to walk into a shop and buy it

0:35:050:35:08

for, say, less than 15.

0:35:080:35:09

-It's a lot of money for a tick tock.

-I know. Isn't it?

0:35:090:35:12

It's not often I see a piece of silver

0:35:140:35:17

that makes my heart skip a beat,

0:35:170:35:18

but this is one of the most beautiful pieces

0:35:180:35:21

of art nouveau silver I've seen for many a long year.

0:35:210:35:25

And if we pick it up and look underneath,

0:35:250:35:27

it gets even better

0:35:270:35:28

because we see it's got the mark of Liberty & Company.

0:35:280:35:31

The date letter "d", which is a little bit worn here, but for 1903,

0:35:310:35:36

and then a little patent number, 2028.

0:35:360:35:40

It's got a Shakespearian inscription from Romeo and Juliet -

0:35:400:35:45

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet",

0:35:450:35:48

but it's got these wonderful enamel,

0:35:480:35:52

rather Arthurian plaques set in the side.

0:35:520:35:55

I think these might be from The Lady of Shalott.

0:35:550:35:59

We've got particularly the lady here, Lady Shalott.

0:35:590:36:03

She wasn't meant to look directly at the knight,

0:36:030:36:05

she had to look at him through the mirror,

0:36:050:36:08

and the story goes in Lady of Shalott

0:36:080:36:10

that it cracked from side to side, because she looked at him straight on.

0:36:100:36:14

And if we move round, we've got a knight in armour right round here,

0:36:140:36:18

so I think that's where it may be taken from.

0:36:180:36:20

Now, names like Archibald Knox are always associated with Liberty,

0:36:200:36:26

but I don't think this is an Archibald Knox design.

0:36:260:36:29

Do you know anything about it, or its history?

0:36:290:36:32

I know a little about it

0:36:320:36:34

and I'm a collector of things like Archibald Knox

0:36:340:36:36

and in searching for that kind of art nouveau silver, I came across

0:36:360:36:40

this piece, which is a little less modern than my taste normally,

0:36:400:36:44

but I fell in love with it because it is so unique, so beautifully made

0:36:440:36:49

and very much appealed to me.

0:36:490:36:51

And you've brought along this photograph,

0:36:510:36:53

which looks to be the original design of this bowl,

0:36:530:36:56

because it's got the same number, 2028,

0:36:560:36:58

which is stamped on the bottom. Where is this from?

0:36:580:37:02

This is from the Westminster Archive Library.

0:37:020:37:05

They have a sketch book of all the Liberty silver from about 1900-1912

0:37:050:37:09

and I was delighted when I found that picture in it of the bowl.

0:37:090:37:14

It's a really glorious piece. Can I ask what you paid for it?

0:37:140:37:17

Around £5,000. Not cheap.

0:37:170:37:20

I'm not surprised,

0:37:200:37:21

but I actually think it's worth a bit more than that

0:37:210:37:24

because I think it's such a pretty piece.

0:37:240:37:27

I think it was probably designed by Oliver Baker.

0:37:270:37:30

It's got very much his mark of influence over it.

0:37:300:37:35

Liberty - great name, it's stylish, it's pretty, it's a rose bowl,

0:37:350:37:39

hence the Shakespearian inscription. It's got everything going for it,

0:37:390:37:43

so I would say maybe...

0:37:430:37:46

-£6,000, £7,000, even £8,000.

-Thank you.

0:37:460:37:49

I think you've bought a great object.

0:37:490:37:53

Well, I have never seen so many Russian Easter eggs

0:37:550:37:59

blazing away in the autumn sunshine here.

0:37:590:38:01

Why did you bring them? What was the story?

0:38:010:38:04

Well, I was watching the Antiques Roadshow a few months ago

0:38:040:38:07

and somebody produced a Faberge cigarette case.

0:38:070:38:10

Well, it was found by my grandfather

0:38:120:38:15

in the hunting fields in the early '20s.

0:38:150:38:17

He advertised it in Fox and Hound, Tatler, Country Life,

0:38:170:38:20

and nobody claimed it.

0:38:200:38:22

This is a Russian cigarette case. Did you know that?

0:38:220:38:25

I knew it was Russian, I've done a bit of history

0:38:250:38:27

on the hallmarks, but beyond that, I don't know.

0:38:270:38:30

And the little ruby thumb push to open it with, a cabochon ruby,

0:38:300:38:33

that's quite a hint of what lies within.

0:38:330:38:35

And here are endless signatures written in Cyrillic.

0:38:350:38:39

But possibly the most interesting thing is the maker's mark here.

0:38:390:38:42

It comes from the Moscow branch of Faberge

0:38:420:38:45

-that made the Imperial Easter eggs for Nicholas and Alexandra.

-Amazing.

0:38:450:38:49

And when the case was opened by the expert...

0:38:490:38:53

-That was me!

-..I saw my grandfather's... Yes!

0:38:530:38:56

It was my grandfather's signature that jumped out at me,

0:38:560:38:59

one George Bray,

0:38:590:39:01

and he had given his wife such a necklace.

0:39:010:39:06

These were presents at Easter time.

0:39:060:39:08

-Didn't they get certain eggs?

-They did.

0:39:080:39:10

He was very devoted to his wife.

0:39:100:39:12

-They were in Russia, but British people living in Russia.

-Yes.

0:39:120:39:15

And you're right to say these are Easter eggs

0:39:150:39:18

and they've been collected,

0:39:180:39:19

and in a way these are British people following a very Russian tradition,

0:39:190:39:23

which is an Orthodox tradition where Easter is the major religious festival.

0:39:230:39:27

And on Easter morning, you get up and give a single Easter egg

0:39:270:39:31

to your beloved with the blessing, "Christ is risen"

0:39:310:39:34

"Khristos voskrese."

0:39:340:39:36

And she or he would answer, "God bless you"

0:39:360:39:39

and that would be that part of the ceremony over.

0:39:390:39:42

It was the highest religious festival in Russia

0:39:420:39:44

and took precedence over Christmas

0:39:440:39:47

and it was a pattern also to be given jewelled Easter eggs

0:39:470:39:51

of this quality to make necklaces, just as you see them here.

0:39:510:39:54

In a way, I couldn't ask for them to be more typical.

0:39:540:39:57

As soon as I'm shown something like this,

0:39:570:39:59

I think, well, I'm going to look for a Faberge one.

0:39:590:40:02

The problem with these is when they were put onto the necklace,

0:40:020:40:05

the gold loop was taken away to solder them on more often than not,

0:40:050:40:09

and with it goes the Faberge signature,

0:40:090:40:11

so it's a pattern more often than not in the necklace.

0:40:110:40:15

We can't read Faberge's signature.

0:40:150:40:16

But this one, subliminally, I believe, is by Faberge.

0:40:160:40:20

It has the red cross on it in enamelled gold.

0:40:200:40:23

The Tzarina was patroness of the Red Cross

0:40:230:40:25

and the Russians were losing millions of people on the front

0:40:250:40:28

in the 1914-18 War

0:40:280:40:30

and the Red Cross was enormously important to them

0:40:300:40:33

and it's not a surprise to see it here.

0:40:330:40:35

We have to think a little bit about value

0:40:350:40:38

and it's quite easy really

0:40:380:40:39

because there is precedent for these things to be sold.

0:40:390:40:42

But this is an unusually full one

0:40:420:40:44

and by the time you've added it all up,

0:40:440:40:47

it's nudging £10,000 for this necklace here.

0:40:470:40:50

And then this necklace here, just a little fewer eggs,

0:40:500:40:54

but doesn't really matter,

0:40:540:40:55

maybe £7,000 would do it.

0:40:550:40:58

But very strangely, this one here,

0:40:580:41:00

which is in perfect condition, is the one that I'm most interested in.

0:41:000:41:04

It has a curious red stone at the bottom

0:41:040:41:07

and it is also in the colours of Holy Russia,

0:41:070:41:10

and Holy Russia and Easter, and so it's a patriotic object.

0:41:100:41:14

More than that, the stone underneath is called purpurine.

0:41:140:41:17

In nature, hard stones arrange themselves

0:41:170:41:19

in all kinds of different colours

0:41:190:41:21

and what it lacks really in nature is a brilliant coloured red,

0:41:210:41:25

which was invented by the Romans to fill that gap

0:41:250:41:29

and Faberge revived it and I can tell you with absolute certainty

0:41:290:41:33

that that is a Faberge Easter egg.

0:41:330:41:35

Who does that belong to?

0:41:350:41:37

Anna.

0:41:370:41:39

It's probably about three times the size

0:41:390:41:41

of any Faberge pendant Easter egg I've ever seen.

0:41:410:41:44

It's also in pristine condition.

0:41:440:41:47

-Have you worn it?

-No.

-Not once?

0:41:470:41:50

Very tempting, isn't it? It's in pristine condition,

0:41:500:41:54

you can't ask for it to be anything more exciting from Faberge

0:41:540:41:57

because Easter eggs have an echo of the Imperial Easter eggs

0:41:570:42:01

made by Faberge for the Imperial Court

0:42:010:42:03

and this object here in front of us

0:42:030:42:06

-should be insured for close to £30,000.

-My gosh!

0:42:060:42:11

My goodness! Right.

0:42:130:42:16

Does it change your perception of it at all?

0:42:160:42:20

Yes!

0:42:200:42:21

A little bit. Brilliant. Well kept.

0:42:210:42:24

Absolutely. Marvellous. Well, how brilliant. What a lovely story.

0:42:240:42:28

and wrought by the Antiques Roadshow because without the Antiques Roadshow,

0:42:280:42:31

no you, no necklaces and no egg.

0:42:310:42:34

We only brought that one as an afterthought because we weren't sure about that one!

0:42:340:42:38

Do you know, I couldn't be more thrilled for those three.

0:42:380:42:42

How amazing was that? They come along thinking they're going to talk about their grandfather

0:42:420:42:47

and it turns out that they own some incredibly precious Faberge.

0:42:470:42:51

Dreams really do come true on the Antiques Roadshow.

0:42:510:42:54

We've thoroughly enjoyed it. I hope you have as well.

0:42:540:42:57

Until next time, bye-bye.

0:42:570:42:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:060:43:09

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:090:43:12

Fiona Bruce and the experts take a look at some unscreened finds, intriguing objects brought along to Hutton-in-the-Forest, Chatsworth and the British Museum.

Pieces under scrutiny include a valuable painting once given away in a competition which involved buying tins of baked beans, a book of police records found in a skip which expose a plot to try to poison Prime Minister Lloyd George, and the largest Faberge egg to appear on the programme.