Layer Marney Tower 2 Antiques Roadshow


Layer Marney Tower 2

Fiona Bruce returns to Layer Marney Tower in Essex. One great find is the first-aid box that accompanied Shackleton on his 1914 expedition to the Antarctic.


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Transcript


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At eight storeys,

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this is Tudor England's equivalent of a skyscraper.

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And it's worth the climb.

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I'm told this is one of the best views in Essex. Look at that!

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What a vista. Welcome back to the Roadshow from Layer Marney.

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At the very top of Layer Marney Tower, I can get right up close

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to these amazing terracotta battlements.

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They weren't for fending off invaders

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cos there weren't many of those in the 16th century,

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but these playful little dolphins here hint at a nautical theme.

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We're only a few miles from the coast and from here,

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you can see across the Blackwater Estuary and round to Mersea Island, and that, there, is oyster country.

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The area to the south of Colchester, with its salt flats and little muddy inlets,

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has been home to oyster fishermen for 2,000 years.

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Oyster farming was a thriving industry by the time

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Layer Marney was built and by the 17th century,

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they were so popular they'd become the pub snack of choice

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and you'd share them, like you might share a bag of crisps.

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So highly regarded were the oysters from this area that in 1667, Sir Samuel Tuke -

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whose family once owned this house -

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wrote the first ever scientific paper on oysters for the Royal Society in London.

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This is still a big oyster fishing area today. We think of them as being a luxury,

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but in the 19th century, so many oysters were being caught, they became the poor man's food -

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the sort of thing you cooked up to bulk out a meat pie.

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There's no way I'm going to be cooking these, far too delicious as they are.

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This is the native oyster,

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which used to be known as the Colchester green oyster

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and these days the little native is grown alongside

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the more familiar rock oyster, which was only introduced in the 20th century.

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I can't resist it, I'm going to try one.

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Mm! Well, there isn't one in that oyster,

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but let's hope our experts find a few pearls at the Roadshow today.

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We're looking at a lump of rock, really. What made you buy it?

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I never bought it. I found it.

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I was digging the pond out on my father's farm

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and I just managed to pull that out

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with the digger arm, and as I tipped it out onto the dirt,

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there it was, presented in front of me.

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-It just sort of went clunk?

-An odd shape... Just this odd-shaped figure of stone.

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-Right.

-And the more I scrubbed away at it, the more I was convinced it was worth a lot of money!

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-Which I am.

-Oh, the folly of youth!

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So, what do you think it is?

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A plaque...

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representing a family in the Essex area.

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It is carved stone,

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you've got a lion on this side, and in fact you would almost certainly

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have had another lion on this side. You can just see his paws, in fact,

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-sitting on top of the shield, so it would have been replicated.

-Right.

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What I don't know and what's impossible to find out on the day...

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-Right.

-..is exactly which family this relates to.

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Now, getting in touch with the College of Arms in London,

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-that would be identified, so that's the next step for you to do.

-OK.

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But I think that this is either 15th or maybe 16th century,

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but my feeling is that it's on the cusp there, so it's old.

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It's incomplete, it's very badly worn.

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The value is limited, I don't want you to get over-excited now -

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I can see you're hyperventilating!

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-But my feeling is it's going to be between £500 and £800.

-Right.

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-As it is.

-OK.

-I mean, if by any chance you are able to marry up the other piece...

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-Yes.

-..Then it would certainly double the value, if not a bit more.

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My suggestion is that you get back on your digger and go back

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-to the pond and see if you can find the other lion.

-Well, I did.

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I continued for the next five hours

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and extracted about another 100 tonnes,

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but then my parents said, "For God's sake, Ryan, you've got to come in for your dinner", so I...

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-And they didn't want a pond that big!

-No, no - they didn't, no.

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It was beginning to take over the whole farm, was it?

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Being a bit of an Indiana Jones, I weren't prepared to stop, either.

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Are you in the butchery trade?

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No, I'm not, but years ago my family were,

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-back to my great, great, great grandfather.

-Really?

-Yes.

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And his name wasn't Osborn, was it?

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-Funnily enough, yes.

-Good Lord, and there's the name,

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emblazoned on what is an absolutely delightful butcher's shop display.

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It dates to the middle of the 19th century, so hopefully that ties in.

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-Yes, yeah.

-And whereabouts was the family butcher's premises?

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It looks like this was in Walkers Court in Berwick Street in London.

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-Gosh, so it's a known property.

-Yes, the butcher lived there many years ago, yeah.

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Oh, that's absolutely marvellous and it looks like they lived upstairs, because upstairs we have obviously

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netted curtains and even the actual chandelier is bang-on 1850s,

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it was hand-made using a lamp.

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-Right.

-And this is why we can tie this piece to exactly the mid-19th century and it's totally original.

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-Yes.

-The butcher himself.

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Do you think it's based on a real man?

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Yeah. Can't you see the likeness?

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Yeah, look at those sideburns! He looks the job and you wouldn't mess with him, would you?

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-Butcher's block, knife at the ready and all these are hand-carved wood and hand-painted.

-Right.

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So of course when the shop was shut, this would be in the window,

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so people had an idea of what they could come back for the next day.

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-Yeah.

-I think that's probably part of the appeal of them.

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And how long have you personally owned it, as part of the family dynasty?

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-I've had it for about the last three or four years, but before that...

-Is that all?

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Yeah, before that my father had it and he just kept it in a wardrobe

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and then before that my grandfather, so it's been eldest son, eldest son, all through the generations, yeah.

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Well, I mean I'm not going to mess about with value. It's such a good one.

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If I put this in an auction next week,

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-I'd put an estimate of £7,000 to £10,000 on it.

-Wow!

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-It's a classic bit of folk art, an incredible survivor.

-Really?

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Do you know, I think it's 28 years since I've seen...

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or at least TOUCHED one

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as big as this. I mean, a teddy bear, that is.

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Sorry, sorry, I'm going to start that again, I'm VERY sorry!

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-Tell me what his name is.

-He's just called Bear.

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-Oh, no.

-He's just... He's just known as Bear.

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He belongs to a very dear family friend

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-and Frank is now 82 years old.

-Yes.

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That bear was purchased as a present for his mother, by his father,

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so that he knows of, it's 85 years old.

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And I loved him as a child,

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-he was bigger than I was, when I first met him.

-Yes, I'm sure.

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I used to be taken upstairs and he'd be made to growl so that I could hear him, and I loved it.

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Oh. He is by the firm of Steiff, in Giengen, which is Southern Germany.

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If he had his little button in the ear,

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he would also tell me more - definitely his date.

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And I've found a little hole where it's been torn out by...

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probably the mother of your friend Frank, because they

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are so difficult to get out, so to pull it out you always make a hole.

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Yes.

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The reason he's sort of so stooped forward is that someone has loved him so much...

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-Probably holding him here, because he's very difficult to hold for a child.

-Yes.

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-And because he is filled with thin strips of lime wood.

-Oh, right.

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After a while it becomes sawdust, so he hasn't actually lost any stuffing, it's just become sawdust.

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-Yes, he does leave a bit of a trail of dust behind him.

-Oh, right, right.

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Well, I only date him definitely to 1907 because the growlers didn't come in until then.

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I mean, I'd love to try and make him growl... Maybe you can?

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Yes, I'll try, yes.

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Come on, Bear.

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BEAR GROWLS

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Ah, he is heaven.

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Well, I can tell you that if your friend Frank tried to sell him,

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he would probably get somewhere in the region of £10,000 to £15,000.

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Right. Oh.

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Um... Bear?

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You know what I think he should be called? Colossus.

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Well, I'm quite partial to a cheeky red now and again

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and I can't think of a better vessel to decant my bottle into.

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But tell me a little bit more about this wonderful claret jug of yours.

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Right, Well, it was bequeathed to my husband from his grandparents.

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-We've used it once.

-How was that?

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It was lovely, it was quite tentative.

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We used it at a Christmas, but I must admit because we usually

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have children round, we put it to one side up in the bedroom.

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Well, what an ornament

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for your bedroom!

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Because what we're looking at really

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is the marriage of two of the finest sort of exponents

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of this kind of item of the 19th century.

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First and foremost we've got to look at the silverware,

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by a chap called Alexander Crichton.

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-Right.

-And Alexander Crichton in 1881 launched an owl

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which was to be the first of a series of what we call zoomorphic claret jugs.

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He followed on with a duck, a drake, an otter, a penguin...

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they just kept rolling out.

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-Wow.

-And actually amongst them was the cockatoo.

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-So it's a cockatoo.

-It's a cockatoo.

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-Right, OK.

-Now the bodies were actually made up in Stourbridge,

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the heart of British glass.

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-Right.

-And they're down to two makers, actually.

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John Northwood is down as making them, but also Thomas Webb and Sons.

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-Really two great exponents of glass manufacture.

-Yeah.

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But the marriage of these beautiful materials, brings forward something

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that is not only humorous, it's practical and it just shouts quality.

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-And I bet when it's filled it must look...

-It does look lovely, yes.

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Sensational. They're always popular and when they are so popular and so

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sought after, they often tend to end up in very smart West End retailers.

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And if you wanted to go and replace your cockatoo claret jug

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in one of those smart West End retailers,

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you're going to have to open up your wallet

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with at least £6,000 to £7,000 in it.

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Wow, I was thinking perhaps six to seven hundred!

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Maybe it deserves a good bottle of claret in it, tonight, when you get home!

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-Tell you what...

-There's always an excuse for that!

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-I'll be round by ten, if that's any good!

-Thank you.

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He is a joy.

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'Is it...'

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the only one you have, or...?

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No, there's a set. There's a set of two carvers and six singles.

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Are they at home, do you use them?

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They're at my mother's, in her dining room.

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OK. And how did she come by them?

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My late father bought them in 1988.

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Right. Well, I imagine when your father bought them, he would have bought them very excitedly.

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Good quality mahogany, wonderful carving in a Chippendale style, and I have to say, when I first saw them

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at a distance and I saw the chair coming in,

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I thought, "there is a mid-18th-century wonderfully carved chair".

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-Right.

-And then you get a bit closer

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and the quality of the timber is as you'd expect, here and here.

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Then you start looking and the carving isn't...

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it's ALMOST of the style in the 18th century, but it's not quite.

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There are elements that start telling me that it's 19th century.

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So, I was looking at this piece here, the rosettes here,

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exactly what you'd expect to see on an 18th-century chair, but this isn't.

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This is very much a 19th-century type of quite shallow carving,

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and you just wouldn't see that on an 18th-century chair.

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What did you father... Do you know what he paid for them?

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I do. I found out recently.

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£11,000.

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-OK.

-It's not going to be one of them bad stories, is it?

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Um, no, it's not a bad story.

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It's difficult. I would say in today's market, if your father

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was to go and buy another set to match up with these, I'd expect him to probably pay about £4,000.

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Christ! Well, lucky he's not here!

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LAUGHTER

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But if your mother enjoys them, they sit round the family dining table...

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We do have Christmas with them, but it won't be the same now!

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Hundreds of people have turned up to the Roadshow already and it can get

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a bit boring standing in the queue,

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but occasionally some people come along to provide entertainment.

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Not this, usually, though.

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-Wayne... It's Wayne, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Now, these are very sweet,

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what's the story with the lambs?

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These are all orphans from their parents

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where their mums have had triplets or quads and that,

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and we bottle-feed them to bring them on.

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-And they're here on the estate at Layer Marney?

-Yes.

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We do it every year, from Easter onwards until they're ready to feed out by theirselves.

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I've seen them wandering around. Can I feed one?

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-Course you can.

-Fantastic, oh, they've wandered off, hang on.

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-Come on.

-Come on, come on.

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Ooh! Ooh, my word. Come on, mate, come on.

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How long have you been collecting?

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Oh, 45 years.

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Well, I've just selected these three particular pieces

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and I'd like to know, how much do you like this?

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-How much did you pay for it?

-Er, not very much, not very much for that.

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And what do you think you bought?

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Something that had been designed

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from a very old piece of Chinese porcelain.

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-You're choosing your words carefully.

-I am, yes, yes.

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-Because I couldn't afford the real thing.

-Ah.

-You see.

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-This is actually modern.

-It is.

-It is modern. What about this?

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That, when I first bought it,

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it was told to me that it was a piece that had been presented to somebody

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high up in the court for the good deed that they'd been doing.

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Well, the subject matter on this is a dragon and the story you've told

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sort of fits with that, because a dragon is often used when someone has succeeded in an examination.

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They are compared to a dragon - the aspiring dragon pursuing knowledge.

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And the dragon itself - there he is - clutching the pearl of wisdom.

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Now, I'd love to say that this was an 18th-century example,

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but I'm going to have to say it's a 19th-century example.

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But tell me about this piece.

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Well, that piece, it was on the floor

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in a car boot sale, under a table,

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and I watched a lady pick it up,

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and as soon as I saw it, I thought, "I hope she puts it back down."

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She moved along and I picked it straight back up and she says, "Oh, I'm still looking at that."

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-I said, "No, it's in my hand."

-You're ruthless!

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Yes. So he said...

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I said to the lady, "How much do you want for it?"

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So she said, "£3." I said, "I'll have it" and that was it.

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Fine. Now, when it was put back carefully,

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how carefully was it put back? Because I see that we've got a...

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I did that yesterday afternoon.

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-Preparing to come here?

-Yeah. So I'm blaming you.

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Thank you!

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Three auspicious animals, two of them Chinese, one Japanese.

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I'm going to have a look at this, because there's something about this

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that isn't the case usually on Cloisonne.

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When you actually run your hand across it, you can actually feel the texture of the fish.

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-You can.

-You can feel their scales,

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and you can even feel the water eddies as they rise to the surface.

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-That's very, very difficult.

-It is.

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That is a particularly beautiful technique.

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Date, about 1900.

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You bought it for £3. OK, let's just think about it.

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There was a plant growing in it when I bought it.

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-Did you keep the plant?

-No, I threw it out.

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Well, your copy of the Schrander dish is worth not more than £20.

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No, Well, it was about 25, 30.

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OK. Your 19th-century dragon dish

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I would think is probably worth in the region of...

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-£50 to £80.

-Mm-hm.

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You paid £3 for this...

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We could say that this, today, is worth somewhere in the region of,

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let's say...

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Hmmm...

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Maybe £2,000.

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That's good!

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The bad news is that, before the chip...

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Oh, dear.

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..it would have been worth

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-twice as much.

-Oh!

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-That is probably the most expensive chip we have ever shown on the Antiques Roadshow.

-Oh, dear.

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Well, at least I've got something to be proud of!

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Now, about ten years ago on the Roadshow,

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I remember with great clarity, I filmed the sledge flag

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belonging to Sir James Wordie

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who was on the legendary Shackleton expedition of 1914-16

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to the Antarctic and it was a wonderful moment,

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and you've brought in some further pieces.

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Yes, that's right. Sir James Wordie

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was the father of the lady you met, who's my mother in law,

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who brought in those wonderful chattels including the sledging flag

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and I've brought in some more Shackleton treasures,

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which include his first aid box.

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Now, tell me about this. This went on the Endurance expedition.

0:19:160:19:19

This went on the Endurance expedition of 1914, the Trans-Antarctic Imperial Expedition.

0:19:190:19:25

Put together by what was then called Burroughs, Wellcome & Co and it was de rigueur for all those expeditions

0:19:250:19:34

of the heroic age, to have this particular first-aid kit,

0:19:340:19:38

although of course they put their own specific ingredients in, which included anything from heroin,

0:19:380:19:45

I suspect, to bandaging.

0:19:450:19:48

Let's just open the tin box and see what's inside. Take this out.

0:19:480:19:52

And there inside we can see, you have all the compartments for the various phials and things like that.

0:19:540:19:59

Yes, yes.

0:19:590:20:00

Well, I think a lot of people will know about the expedition, how the ship got crushed in the ice

0:20:000:20:06

and how the men were stranded on Elephant Island, and eventually Shackleton left with I think six men,

0:20:060:20:11

to try and make South Georgia to get rescue and he tried twice, I think, to come back,

0:20:110:20:17

and failed and the third time, they eventually came back

0:20:170:20:20

-to Elephant Island after four and a half months, I think.

-Yes.

0:20:200:20:23

-And Shackleton said, "not a life would be lost" and that was the case.

-And that was the case, yes.

0:20:230:20:28

Gosh. Now, is it a coincidence,

0:20:280:20:30

or more than a coincidence, that you yourself are a polar explorer?

0:20:300:20:35

I don't think my husband married me because I was a polar explorer!

0:20:350:20:39

In fact I actually became a polar adventurer after I married,

0:20:390:20:43

and I remember being very moved when I went to the Royal Geographical Society

0:20:430:20:48

and listened to a reading of Shackleton's diaries and since which I've been -

0:20:480:20:55

yes - to Antarctica and the Arctic and on my own.

0:20:550:20:59

And I am very aware of how heavy some of these pieces of equipment are, that they actually took.

0:20:590:21:06

And these would have contained things like chloroform, presumably.

0:21:060:21:10

Yes, indeed it would. Something I wish I'd had myself on my last expedition!

0:21:100:21:14

-You've used chloroform, have you?

-No, I didn't.

0:21:140:21:17

The chloroform was used in this medical kit for Blackborow when

0:21:170:21:22

he was on Elephant Island, because he had to have his toes amputated.

0:21:220:21:25

-Right.

-And I too got frostbite and gangrene in several of my toes and I had to amputate them myself,

0:21:250:21:32

because I was on my own and I didn't have any chloroform, not even a tot of rum!

0:21:320:21:35

So you cut your own toes off?

0:21:350:21:37

-Yes, yes. Needs must.

-I stand in awe.

-I still stand.

0:21:370:21:41

Tell me what this is. This must be related to a sledge.

0:21:430:21:47

This was part of the sledging harness that Sir James Wordie wore

0:21:470:21:52

on this expedition.

0:21:520:21:54

It's actually not that dissimilar to my own sledging harness.

0:21:540:21:57

This is made of a sort of hardened leather

0:21:570:22:01

and I think that the sledging trace which would be attached

0:22:010:22:04

to the sledge would be attached from here.

0:22:040:22:07

On the face of it, if you look at these items,

0:22:070:22:10

you've got a tin box, which is an empty medicine chest and a typed list of food.

0:22:100:22:15

In themselves not very interesting, but when you tie them in

0:22:150:22:18

to one of the greatest polar explorations in history,

0:22:180:22:23

they become very important and I think if these pieces came up, as a group, they would probably fetch

0:22:230:22:29

maybe £5,000 to £7,000, because just because of what they are, and what they represent.

0:22:290:22:35

I think Ernest Shackleton would have been very appreciative of that to put towards his sponsorship funds!

0:22:350:22:40

Now tell me about your great trip planned for next year.

0:22:400:22:42

Well, it's Arctic, North Pole,

0:22:420:22:46

-on my own. So no other woman has achieved that yet.

-So,

0:22:460:22:50

-if you succeed, you'll be the first woman to go solo to the North Pole.

-In the world.

0:22:500:22:54

In the world, that's remarkable.

0:22:540:22:56

And I shall take a very clever medicine cabinet with me.

0:22:560:23:00

Very sensible, and I'm sure everybody here, and everybody watching,

0:23:000:23:04

wishes you every success and good luck.

0:23:040:23:06

Yes. For Great Britain.

0:23:060:23:08

Thank you very much.

0:23:080:23:11

-Well, it's always intriguing to find a piece of jewellery with a monogram on it.

-Right.

0:23:220:23:27

And it's got a lovely, interlocking...

0:23:270:23:30

-I think it's an "A"... Two "A"s going across each other.

-Oh.

0:23:300:23:34

-And it's mimicked on the case as well.

-Right.

0:23:340:23:37

And I wonder what the "A" stands for.

0:23:370:23:40

You've got a royal crown on the top of the box there, embossed in gold,

0:23:400:23:45

and on the top of the brooch you've got another crown on the top there. So what does that tell us?

0:23:450:23:49

It's something to do with royalty?

0:23:490:23:52

-I think you're right.

-Is it?

0:23:520:23:54

-I think it is, yes, I think it is something to do with royalty.

-Yes.

0:23:540:23:58

Beginning with "A", I think it might be Princess Alexandra,

0:23:580:24:01

Princess consort to who later became Edward VII.

0:24:010:24:05

OK. The "A" on the piece of jewellery here is in enamel,

0:24:050:24:11

in white enamel and then amethyst which is inset in there.

0:24:110:24:16

I'd never have known that.

0:24:160:24:19

This piece is probably early 20th century, around 1905, something like that.

0:24:190:24:24

Right, OK.

0:24:240:24:25

You've told me a lot I didn't know about it.

0:24:250:24:28

-Oh.

-For one thing, amethyst is my birth stone.

0:24:280:24:30

Is it? Oh, that's even more lovely.

0:24:300:24:32

But then my father had it for my mother about, I think about 40-odd years ago.

0:24:320:24:38

Well, it's a lovely jewel. I mean the royal connection really helps.

0:24:380:24:42

-Mm.

-An awful lot. I've looked at it carefully and there are a few

0:24:420:24:46

little bits of damage on the enamel,

0:24:460:24:48

-the white enamel on the interlocked "A"s.

-Right.

0:24:480:24:51

But despite that, if it were to come up at auction,

0:24:510:24:54

simply because of its royal provenance,

0:24:540:24:57

I think it would fetch around £1,500 to £2,000.

0:24:570:25:01

-Oh, right.

-So it's quite...

0:25:010:25:03

-Quite a lot, isn't it? Yes, for a little thing like that.

-Yes.

0:25:030:25:08

Goodmor'n, as they say in Danish.

0:25:080:25:11

-I'm sorry, I'm not Danish.

-What?

-It's my husband who's Danish.

0:25:110:25:15

Your husband's Danish and hence he has this wonderful Danish picture.

0:25:150:25:18

-Yes.

-By, I think, a wonderful artist called Peder Monsted.

0:25:180:25:22

-Yes.

-1918. Did he inherit it, or did he buy it?

0:25:220:25:26

No, he inherited it. His grandfather was an art collector.

0:25:260:25:33

Oh, yes, and would it surprise you

0:25:330:25:36

that such a great artist is not represented in any Danish museum?

0:25:360:25:41

-Yes.

-And the reason why I think that Monsted is considered to be

0:25:410:25:46

a little bit too commercial for his own good,

0:25:460:25:50

-is that apparently in his studio, he used to have ten canvases going at the same time.

-Oh, yes.

0:25:500:25:55

-So he'd do a little figure here and then he'd go on to the next one, do a figure there.

-Right.

0:25:550:25:58

-So he was very prolific.

-Yes.

0:25:580:26:01

-And it is said he painted over 60,000 pictures.

-Oh, wow!

0:26:010:26:04

-But, nonetheless, look at the skill, look how brilliant he is.

-Yes.

0:26:040:26:09

-The snow is superb, the light coming through.

-The light in it, yes.

0:26:090:26:13

And the scale would look fantastic in anybody's house,

0:26:130:26:17

as long as, of course, it was big enough!

0:26:170:26:20

-Right, well we had to build the room where it's in now.

-No.

-Yes.

0:26:200:26:24

Scandinavian pictures are very much in demand.

0:26:240:26:29

People love the stillness and the quietness, and would it surprise you that I think that if it came up

0:26:290:26:36

for auction, it would be worth between £30,000 and £50,000?

0:26:360:26:39

Yeah, that is more than I thought, yes.

0:26:390:26:43

Well, good on Monsted

0:26:430:26:45

and shame on the museums for not having any works by him, because he's a wonderful artist.

0:26:450:26:49

Thank you very much.

0:26:490:26:51

We're taking a moment in this series to look back at some of

0:26:580:27:00

the most memorable finds of the Antiques Roadshow over the last 33 years.

0:27:000:27:04

And I reckon if you asked most people, one thing they would remember is a collection of silver

0:27:040:27:09

that came into the Roadshow in 1993

0:27:090:27:12

at Crawley and left our expert Ian Pickford just reeling.

0:27:120:27:18

-My father collected them extensively through most of his life.

-Right.

0:27:180:27:23

He passed them on to Mum, now that he's gone and we are still

0:27:230:27:28

-learning about what they are and where they're from, really.

-Right.

0:27:280:27:31

Have you any ideas as to values?

0:27:310:27:33

-I wouldn't even be able to hazard a guess.

-Right.

0:27:330:27:35

Somewhere around...

0:27:350:27:37

£2,000 to £3,000.

0:27:370:27:40

-For a little thing like that?

-For a little thing like that.

0:27:400:27:43

£10,000.

0:27:430:27:45

What else have you got in there?!

0:27:450:27:47

Another little box, yeah.

0:27:470:27:48

Gosh, that is a very rare box.

0:27:480:27:52

£3,000.

0:27:520:27:54

£5,000.

0:27:540:27:56

At least £12,000 to £15,000.

0:27:560:28:00

£15,000 to £20,000.

0:28:000:28:04

Ooh, somewhere around...

0:28:040:28:07

£30,000 to £40,000.

0:28:070:28:11

Oooh! Now, THAT is exceptionally rare,

0:28:120:28:16

there are about one or two

0:28:160:28:18

known to exist.

0:28:180:28:20

There's three, now.

0:28:200:28:22

Right!

0:28:220:28:24

I remember sitting at home with my parents watching that, and our jaws hit the floor.

0:28:240:28:28

Certainly Ian Pickford's did, as well. What did the owners think?

0:28:280:28:32

Well, Richard, you were there, you've brought along your sister Carolyn.

0:28:320:28:35

-What was going through your mind?

-Where did he find it all?

0:28:350:28:39

Yeah, well, Dad - you've done it now!

0:28:390:28:41

-And you had no idea.

-No, no, not at all, until literally,

0:28:410:28:45

until we found it under the bed, we had no idea.

0:28:450:28:48

-I mean this is the stuff of dreams, really.

-Yeah.

0:28:480:28:51

And what happened to it all afterwards?

0:28:510:28:53

The majority of it got spread in the family

0:28:530:28:58

and some other pieces got sold to look after Mum in her old age.

0:28:580:29:02

Now you've brought along a couple of pieces today, so did Ian see these back then?

0:29:020:29:07

Ian saw this piece back then,

0:29:070:29:09

but this piece was undiscovered, we've found this since.

0:29:090:29:13

-So where, where was it hiding?

-In a piece of newspaper, in a bag.

0:29:130:29:17

-So these things are still coming to light?

-Yes.

0:29:170:29:19

Goodness me, and do you know anything about the value of this?

0:29:190:29:22

-No, we know nothing about it.

-Well, you know you've come to the right place, don't you?

-Yes!

0:29:220:29:25

How exciting.

0:29:250:29:28

Well, I'm excited, Ian's going to be beside himself.

0:29:280:29:30

Well, I don't know about you, but I grew up with Noddy

0:29:360:29:39

and sort of part of my psyche I think

0:29:390:29:42

was involved with the stories of Noddy and Big Ears

0:29:420:29:47

and all their friends in Toyland,

0:29:470:29:49

and here they are, the original drawings from some of the books.

0:29:490:29:54

Now, what's your relationship with these? Did you go out and buy them?

0:29:540:29:57

No, I've always loved Noddy as a little girl, and my three daughters also love Noddy.

0:29:570:30:03

So where did they come from? Did you buy them?

0:30:030:30:06

Well, my husband bought them for me for a present from an auction in about 1997.

0:30:060:30:12

Right. I mean let's talk a bit about Noddy, because he was first drawn

0:30:120:30:15

in 1949 and he's still going strong at the age of what...63?

0:30:150:30:22

Enid Blyton, who is one of those children's authors

0:30:220:30:26

who some people love, and some people revile,

0:30:260:30:30

her publisher got her together with an artist which really saw her vision,

0:30:300:30:38

and created the characters,

0:30:380:30:40

and that was somebody called Harmsen Van der Beek.

0:30:400:30:43

Now Van der Beek is the best known of the artists.

0:30:430:30:48

He couldn't keep up with the demand of Enid Blyton writing

0:30:480:30:52

all these Noddy books, so he had his little helpers, just as Noddy did.

0:30:520:30:57

And so although Van der Beek died in 1953, even by then, there were

0:30:570:31:02

a lot of other artists involved in producing the Noddy illustrations.

0:31:020:31:08

And two names that I know of -

0:31:080:31:11

Robert Tyndall, Mary Brooks and there were lots of others -

0:31:110:31:15

really copied slavishly the style that Van der Beek had created

0:31:150:31:22

and I would love to say that what we're looking at is a group of Van der Beek drawings.

0:31:220:31:29

I don't think we are.

0:31:310:31:32

I think that we're looking at very good drawings produced by

0:31:320:31:37

-other people within the Noddy stable, if you like.

-Right.

0:31:370:31:40

They are beautifully drawn.

0:31:400:31:43

They are watercolours heightened with body colour.

0:31:430:31:46

-I would have thought that what we're looking at here is in the sort of £300 to £500 category.

-Right.

0:31:460:31:53

-But in a way, it's not about the money.

-No. It isn't. Not at all.

0:31:530:31:57

It's about walking past these pictures in your house and being

0:31:570:32:00

-taken back to when you were five or six and first discovered them.

-Exactly.

0:32:000:32:04

So how many years is it, since the great event?

0:32:040:32:08

It's got to be 20 plus years.

0:32:080:32:10

-Yeah? But what have you done to your hair? It was dreadlocks then.

-Well, times change.

-Things move on.

0:32:100:32:16

So, tell me about this one.

0:32:160:32:18

-Where has that come from?

-We found it wrapped in a bag in some newspaper.

0:32:180:32:22

Gosh, what a beaker, though!

0:32:220:32:25

Because what we've got here...

0:32:250:32:27

These are all the battles fought by Wellington in the Peninsula War.

0:32:270:32:33

-Right.

-And then...

0:32:330:32:35

Now THAT - that is fascinating.

0:32:350:32:38

Dover Castle.

0:32:380:32:40

Wellington of course was made Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

0:32:400:32:44

-Right.

-And in 1839, about ten years after he'd been appointed,

0:32:440:32:51

they had a huge banquet for him, to celebrate his appointment.

0:32:510:32:55

It was about ten years too late, but it was...

0:32:550:32:58

And they put up this massive marquee

0:32:580:33:01

and they had about 2,000 guests

0:33:010:33:03

-and there of course is Wellington.

-Is himself.

0:33:030:33:06

So what a piece to find.

0:33:060:33:09

I've never seen that before. I've heard about it.

0:33:090:33:12

Does that mean it's the only one?

0:33:120:33:15

The medal would have been specially struck and it is, I think, quite a rare medal.

0:33:150:33:19

-How many were actually issued, I don't know.

-OK.

0:33:190:33:25

Bit of research should reveal that. Actually the medallist,

0:33:250:33:29

I've just noticed there, his name, is just under his head, Wyon.

0:33:290:33:33

-Right.

-And boy, he was the great medallist of the 19th century.

0:33:330:33:38

So whether every guest got one, or whether it was literally just

0:33:380:33:41

a question of whoever wanted to pay for one, but mounted in the beaker,

0:33:410:33:45

what on earth is that worth?

0:33:450:33:47

And would that be ivory or bone?

0:33:470:33:51

That should be horn.

0:33:510:33:53

-Horn, OK.

-I'll go for that being horn, the shape and the colour.

0:33:530:33:56

So we've got to add to the total, haven't we?

0:33:560:33:59

-Mm.

-Unfortunately!

-Yes.

0:33:590:34:02

Oh... At auction,

0:34:020:34:04

I reckon we're looking at between £2,000 and £3,000.

0:34:040:34:10

-Right, gosh.

-Blimey. Goodness me.

0:34:100:34:13

-Now you're sure you've actually found everything?

-Yes, yes.

0:34:130:34:16

He was quite a fellow, your father.

0:34:160:34:17

-He certainly was.

-What a collector.

-Certainly was.

0:34:170:34:20

So you, I believe, have a connection to Layer Marney,

0:34:220:34:26

this wonderful corner of England that we're visiting today.

0:34:260:34:29

Our family owned Layer Marney for a mere 160 years.

0:34:290:34:34

So it's more than just a connection!

0:34:340:34:36

-Yes.

-So your family... You're Mr Corsellis.

-Correct.

0:34:360:34:40

But what you've brought me today is certainly not from that period,

0:34:400:34:43

this is something much more recent. This is from the 20th century.

0:34:430:34:47

Still has the name Corsellis on it.

0:34:470:34:50

My elder brother - he was two years older than me.

0:34:500:34:53

-So this case is your brother's, not yours.

-Yes.

0:34:530:34:57

Well, inside it is what looks to be an RAF scarf

0:34:570:35:01

as well as a collection of notebooks.

0:35:010:35:05

He left behind about 230 poems which he'd written during his life,

0:35:050:35:12

but only 15 had been published in his lifetime,

0:35:120:35:16

but this is his full collection.

0:35:160:35:19

And he was writing when?

0:35:190:35:21

Couple of years before the war and the first two years of the war.

0:35:210:35:25

-And he wrote about the war.

-Yes, very much so, because he was training to become a pilot in the RAF.

0:35:250:35:33

I assume he was a young man when he was writing.

0:35:330:35:35

-Yes, he certainly was, he was 20 when he died.

-He died in the war?

0:35:350:35:38

That's it, yes. Flying fairly low and the plane stalled

0:35:380:35:44

and he was not able to regain control over the plane, so it crashed.

0:35:440:35:50

And so he died at a very young age.

0:35:500:35:52

Yes, but many of the war poets died young.

0:35:520:35:56

So, some of these poems talk about his flying experience.

0:35:560:36:00

-They do, yes.

-But a couple of these I stumbled across

0:36:000:36:03

-are talking about his experiences in London.

-Yes.

0:36:030:36:06

-Where he was obviously helping out on the ground rather than as a flyer.

-Well, yes,

0:36:060:36:11

he was working for Wandsworth Borough Council as a very young air raid warden.

0:36:110:36:18

And it looks as though every few days, or at least every week,

0:36:180:36:21

-he was writing down his experiences in his book.

-Correct.

0:36:210:36:23

This one caught my eye - "Dawn after the Raid".

0:36:230:36:26

Yes.

0:36:260:36:28

"Under this pile of fallen masonry Under those spillikins of beams

0:36:280:36:33

"Where number thirty-two lies shattered, there may be a body.

0:36:330:36:37

"Dig For there may be a body. "

0:36:370:36:41

I think it's incredibly powerful and really takes us to the heart of the Blitz

0:36:410:36:47

-in the early 1940s.

-I do agree.

0:36:470:36:50

Wonderful image of spillikins of beams - of a house being smashed apart like a children's game.

0:36:500:36:55

It's tremendous.

0:36:550:36:57

Now the value of a collection of artefacts like this, clearly doesn't rest in money.

0:36:570:37:03

It's far more important that this kind of material is published and known about,

0:37:030:37:07

but of course people will be interested to know what it's worth.

0:37:070:37:10

I suppose if this were sold at auction, today or tomorrow, it might make

0:37:100:37:17

£8,000, possibly as much as £10,000,

0:37:170:37:20

but I suppose it will be very much more valuable in the future.

0:37:200:37:23

I'm not surprised.

0:37:230:37:25

I couldn't help but see you struggling along with this thing.

0:37:300:37:34

What on earth is it?

0:37:340:37:36

OK, it's a Victorian vacuum cleaner.

0:37:360:37:39

-Is it?

-Yes, there's a badge round here which tells you all about it.

0:37:390:37:42

The Wizard, Standard Number Two.

0:37:420:37:47

And so just talk me through how this works, then.

0:37:470:37:50

Probably needs about two maids to work it,

0:37:500:37:53

one holding this

0:37:530:37:55

-and the other one turning the handle.

-Oh, I see the bellows here.

0:37:550:37:59

You can turn it, the bellows work.

0:37:590:38:02

There is one of these in the Science Museum, by the way, but I don't know that there are any others.

0:38:020:38:07

Right. Can we give you a hand? Where are you going with it now?

0:38:070:38:10

Well, I'm attempting to get down the steps to the bottom field.

0:38:100:38:13

-Right. I'll give it a go.

-Wow.

0:38:140:38:16

Thank you.

0:38:180:38:19

There is a word that the Antiques Roadshow valuers

0:38:330:38:36

keenly long to hear.

0:38:360:38:38

It's a word that causes the very hairs on our necks

0:38:380:38:41

to rise up, and that word is "Titanic"

0:38:410:38:45

and you are the lucky owner of a piece of Titanic memorabilia.

0:38:450:38:50

Yes, I certainly am. My grandfather

0:38:500:38:54

was a master joiner and worked on The Titanic.

0:38:540:38:57

Worked in Harland and Wolff in Belfast.

0:38:570:39:00

-Master craftsman.

-This presumably is his portrait.

0:39:000:39:03

-This is my grandfather here.

-In photograph album.

0:39:030:39:05

Alexander, and he actually sailed on her, on the sea trials

0:39:050:39:10

and then sailed to Southampton on the ship.

0:39:100:39:14

Right, as a master craftsman no doubt for sort of four or five years,

0:39:140:39:18

that enormous task of producing those fabulous first-class passenger cabins

0:39:180:39:23

with all the wonderful woodwork...

0:39:230:39:25

Exactly.

0:39:250:39:26

And of course the other very exciting thing is that 2012

0:39:260:39:30

is the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the ship.

0:39:300:39:34

It is.

0:39:340:39:36

So what exactly have you got?

0:39:360:39:37

Cos I'm looking at an envelope with a black edge to it.

0:39:370:39:42

When my grandfather was in Southampton,

0:39:420:39:45

before he left the ship -

0:39:450:39:47

-because he left the ship to go back to Belfast...

-Right.

0:39:470:39:50

..one of the crew actually gave him a memento,

0:39:500:39:54

-which I have here today.

-I'm just beside myself with excitement,

0:39:540:39:58

come on, open it! Open it, what is it?

0:39:580:40:01

Let's have a look.

0:40:010:40:03

It's actually a hat band from a member of the crew of The Titanic.

0:40:050:40:10

Good gracious.

0:40:110:40:13

That's obviously made of black silk.

0:40:130:40:17

-Which obviously went round a hat...

-Yeah.

0:40:170:40:20

..of a member of the crew.

0:40:200:40:23

I shall immediately contradict you

0:40:230:40:26

-and tell you that this is actually a souvenir gala night ribbon.

-Really?

0:40:260:40:31

And these were actually available on the ship and at the quayside

0:40:310:40:35

-as a souvenir to anyone who wanted to actually buy one.

-OK.

0:40:350:40:38

Your granddad was probably given one.

0:40:380:40:40

-Right.

-I mean if you look, they're actually far too long to go round a hat.

-To go round.

0:40:400:40:44

And these are actually used for display on board the ship, for example, when you were

0:40:440:40:50

fine dining, you may have a silver centre-piece in the middle of

0:40:500:40:54

the table and you could obviously take the ribbon

0:40:540:40:58

and wrap it right round.

0:40:580:41:00

And quite frankly, White Star Line ribbons are fairly common.

0:41:000:41:06

-Right.

-From sister ships to the Titanic, and in fact those can be bought for a few hundred pounds.

0:41:060:41:11

-Right.

-But this, look... Let's face it,

0:41:110:41:14

this is RMS Titanic,

0:41:140:41:16

-and there's actually only 20 of these actually known to exist.

-20?

-Yeah.

0:41:160:41:23

Now when it comes to value,

0:41:230:41:25

it is such a difficult market to predict, it's a very volatile market

0:41:250:41:30

and values can run away with emotions, but we would put this

0:41:300:41:35

in a sale with an estimate around £8,000 to £12,000.

0:41:350:41:39

That's just for a little fine ribbon.

0:41:390:41:42

Well, there's so few known.

0:41:420:41:44

-Right, it's always been said it's been a hat band.

-Yeah.

0:41:440:41:48

So it's lovely to share it with you today.

0:41:480:41:51

100 years after it sank, it seems even the smallest item of

0:41:510:41:54

Titanic memorabilia can cause a stir among the specialists.

0:41:540:41:58

This is a marvellous contraption.

0:42:000:42:03

Now, Neil - this is yours. What is it?

0:42:030:42:06

Well, it is a pedal roller and it was made for rolling

0:42:060:42:09

a cricket crease or a gentleman's lawn, or something like that.

0:42:090:42:12

You do it with your feet, obviously.

0:42:120:42:14

Yes, but it's such hard work, that it didn't really go into production,

0:42:140:42:18

and this model is actually unique.

0:42:180:42:20

And how have you come by it?

0:42:200:42:22

My grandfather had it and...

0:42:220:42:24

-Did he use it?

-No, no!

0:42:240:42:27

And it was stuck behind the farmhouse in some nettles

0:42:270:42:30

and I was always interested in it, and they gave it to me.

0:42:300:42:33

Look at this photograph, isn't this amazing? Is this your mother?

0:42:330:42:36

-Yes, it is indeed.

-In the 1950s.

-Look at that.

0:42:360:42:39

Riding this, this garden roller.

0:42:390:42:41

Fiona, how do you fancy kind of re-enacting this photograph?

0:42:410:42:45

You can be my Mum.

0:42:450:42:47

-I'll give it a go.

-All right, go on then, go on, let's see.

0:42:470:42:50

-Shall I?

-Yeah, go on, go.

0:42:500:42:52

Oh, my word! Is it going to just sort of career off?

0:42:530:42:57

-Has it got brakes?

-Yeah, there is a brake on the back here.

-OK.

0:42:570:43:01

If you go too fast, I'll sort it.

0:43:010:43:02

-Right, OK, right here we go - are you ready?

-Yeah.

0:43:020:43:05

Ooh! From Layer Marney...

0:43:050:43:07

CHEERING

0:43:070:43:09

..and the team at the Antiques Roadshow, until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:090:43:14

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts return to Layer Marney Tower in Essex. Among the objects under scrutiny are the first-aid box that accompanied Shackleton on his endurance expedition to the Antarctic in 1914, a suitcase of poems evoking life as a fighter pilot in World War II and a small but valuable relic from the Titanic.


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