Layer Marney Tower 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Layer Marney Tower 1

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit Layer Marney Tower near Colchester in Essex to meet one of the biggest Roadshow crowds on record.


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If I told you this week the Antiques Roadshow is coming to one of the finest Tudor houses in the land,

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you'd probably think of Hampton Court. The chances are the words Layer Marney Tower

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won't be on the tip of your tongue. But just look at it! It's one of Britain's best kept secrets.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Essex.

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One of the great things about working on the Antiques Roadshow

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is I get to see some of Britain's finest buildings.

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And this week I've been brought to the tallest Tudor gatehouse in the land.

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Rising from the Essex landscape, it's a pretty impressive sight.

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But who on earth would build it?

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Step forward, Sir Henry Marney.

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He's not a household name, but he was, in fact, Henry VIII's first and most trusted advisor.

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From the start of his reign in 1509, Henry VIII showered Marney

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with honours, giving him the most important jobs in the land.

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And Marney was wise, grave, quiet, totally loyal. The perfect courtier.

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No scandal, which might be why you haven't heard of him.

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Of course, Henry Marney wasn't the only advisor to the king.

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Some are rather better known, like Cardinal Wolsey, who built the famous Hampton Court.

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Wolsey and Marney were bitter rivals, both vying for the king's favour.

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Sir Henry Marney might have been a modest man,

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but when it came to building this place, he couldn't resist

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a bit of one-upmanship, because his gatehouse is taller

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than the one at Hampton Court.

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In fact, it's even slightly higher than the tower of the church next door,

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making Henry just that little bit closer to God than local worshippers.

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Sadly, Henry Marney didn't see his vision completed.

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He died in 1523 and the house was never finished.

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Still, you can tell this was a man who wanted to be remembered,

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so I'm sure he'd be thrilled to see the turnout here at Layer Marney

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for the Antiques Roadshow.

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With this magnificent building behind us,

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we come down to something which is slightly less magnificent

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from the outside. It's a handmade dolls' house

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which has been rather sadly covered with gloss paint.

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But unlike, I think, a lot of dolls' houses,

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the interesting bit is not on the outside,

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but on the inside, because what it lacks in decor

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and originality on the facade, it makes up in spades in the inside.

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It's a wonderful thing. A family dolls' house?

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It's been in our family ever since it was made in the early 19th century.

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Fantastic. And looking at it, you can see, in fact,

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that it has been added to over the years. Yes, a lot of what we're looking at

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is early-mid-19th century, then there are some later bits,

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but it ends up with a lovely little Christmas stocking

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which has been coloured in by hand.

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Was that from your childhood, or somebody else's?

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No, it's not, it's my daughter

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-and she used to hang up stockings for the dolls every Christmas.

-Fantastic!

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There are a couple of pieces of furniture

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made by two companies - Schnegel and Kestner

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and they were quite expensive at the time,

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having been handmade and then imported.

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So the interior was something that money was spent on.

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So you've got a group of objects here that have

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been put together by somebody who wasn't constrained by money,

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because these things were expensive,

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but also wanted to make something very personal for the family.

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What other personal things do you think are in here

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that particularly excite you?

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Well, the grandfather of the twin girls who first had the dolls' house

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was an artist called James Gibbs who I don't know much about.

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I think he was quite prolific with watercolours

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and with drawings as well, and for his granddaughters

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he's done two small drawings especially for this dolls' house,

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-and then there are four lovely watercolours that he's done as well.

-May I take one out?

-Of course.

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Oh, that's absolutely fabulous!

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Well, it's a sort of lakeland scene, presumably in the Alps.

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Yes. Possibly, or Lake District, I don't know.

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-It could be Lake District. I'm not good enough on my lakes to be able to identify it.

-No.

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Ah, well that's very nice. On the back it says,

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"Painted by James Gibbs in 1835,

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"Ann's great-great-grandfather."

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There is a James Gibbs

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listed as being an artist working in that period.

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He certainly exhibited in the Royal Academy at about that time.

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-He does not appear to have been widely exhibited other than that.

-OK.

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-But there's no question that the work itself is absolutely exquisite.

-They're very sweet, aren't they?

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So we have a lovely dolls' house

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with family connections which have been added to over the years,

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and as a result, I would say that the house and the contents together,

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-I would put at between £2,500 and £3,000.

-Oh, right. OK.

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But what I would encourage the next generation to do,

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as your daughter did, with the little addition of the Christmas stocking,

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-is just put perhaps one thing from the 21st century in there.

-Right.

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-Just to surprise the next generation.

-Very good, thank you very much.

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That's great, thank you.

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-Isn't it fascinating how you've got the shell as a detail at the top of the building?

-Yes.

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And shells were just so popular in decoration.

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Where have you brought this from?

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We've brought it from Australia, Ian. We were coming to the UK

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and one of the reasons was to bring this tray to the Antiques Roadshow

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which we watch regularly at home.

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Because we don't know anything about its history.

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We know which family it came from, but we don't know anything else,

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except the date, which we had identified earlier.

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-OK, so the date you've identified as...

-1773.

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That is the date letter for 1773.

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-Right, and we think it was made by Philip Norman.

-Absolutely spot-on.

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That's all we know.

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The only problem now is that, unfortunately,

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Philip Norman would not recognise this.

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Really?

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It's a naughty piece of silver!

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Ooh, should we be showing it on TV?

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Well, the object has actually been made

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-out of a 1773 piece of silver.

-Right.

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They've done a beautiful job on it, but Philip Norman probably made

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a salver or something like that, and it's one of those interesting things.

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Always when you look at a piece of silver, you should date it

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-in your mind's eye first, and THEN look at the hallmarks.

-Right.

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Now, to me, when I looked at this, to me, 1900.

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Now you're saying you know the family from which it came.

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-Yes, yes.

-What's the story there?

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The story there is that our son, who owns it, is adopted,

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and his paternal grandparents passed it to him,

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and their forebears go back to Lord Shaftesbury

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and to King Edward Ironsides and to Charlemagne.

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-Wow.

-So they do go back a long way, so we just wanted to find out

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something about the tray.

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Certainly, whoever has made it in its present form

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has done a wonderful job. This is the most beautiful chasing,

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and all the insects appearing in it, the bee over there,

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butterflies, the plants.

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Very high standard of workmanship.

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-Right.

-So it's somebody good that's done it,

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-but also somebody naughty who's done it.

-Right, right.

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-Because technically, it should go to the assay office.

-Right.

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-And be brought within the law.

-So we should scarper, should we?

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THEY LAUGH

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Well, when's your return flight?

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We could go tomorrow.

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I don't think you need to be quite that quick.

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But bring it within the law

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and then it's going to actually have a commercial value.

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-Right.

-Which, with the quality of this, I would have thought

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we'd be looking easily £600, £700, £800.

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Right, that's interesting, very interesting.

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As it is, it would be a criminal offence in England to sell it.

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We don't intend to sell it.

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Well, I persuaded my mother to buy it from a church jumble sale

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when I was about six, and it was just black.

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The lady on the stall said it was a Chinese whistle.

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A Chinese whistle?!

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Yeah, and she said a part had broken off the back, so...

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-Oh, I see, this hole here.

-That part, yeah.

-OK.

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I've been trying to play it for years, but I can't get

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-a sound out of it. Other than that, I haven't got a clue what it is.

-Where do you blow it?

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Where do you think it was made?

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I presume China or Japan, there's writing on the back.

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Yeah, we've got some writing here.

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There we are, that is actually a signature.

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I'll put you out of your misery.

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That is actually a Japanese signature and, in fact, the whole decoration

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of this piece is typical Japanese metalwork of the late 19th century.

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You've got a lovely praying mantis in there.

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Look at him with his beady eyes.

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He's ready to pounce on something.

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I mean, this is exquisite metalwork,

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but the fact is, it's not a club, it's not a whistle.

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I'm not going to be a musician, then, after all these years?

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But what you could be is a flower arranger.

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This is a vase for hanging on the wall...

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Ah!

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..into which you put a lovely flower.

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It's very rare. I've never seen one in metal before like this.

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Beautiful thing. But polished, I'm afraid, rather over-vigorously.

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Well, when I got it, it was completely black

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and I was six or seven, so I...

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That's what it should have stayed.

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If it had stayed black, I would have given you some good news,

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but I'm going to have to disappoint you on the valuation front,

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because this late 19th-century little hanging flower vase

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is probably worth £300 to £500.

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-Really?

-Yeah, but I suggest, rather than making war,

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we make peace and I offer you my little rose.

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Thank you very much.

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Well, I never had a clue.

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So you've brought me a rather battered cookery book.

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-Here we are, "Cookery."

-That's all it says.

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And it looks as though the upper and lower cover are pretty well off,

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-like all the best cookery books.

-It's been well used, I think.

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It's an 18th-century cookery book. It's quite old.

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-So I gather from inside.

-So how did this come to you, then?

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-It descended to me through the family.

-An unbroken family line.

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Oh, yes. Yes.

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Quite simply, it's called The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy.

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And I like the subtitle,

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"Which far exceeds anything of the kind ever yet published."

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-Optimistic.

-Now, there's no author's name on it.

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The title page simply says, "By a Lady."

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A lady! That's all it says.

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-That's all I know.

-Yes, she really doesn't give very many clues.

-No.

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Well, I should tell you

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it's actually a very interesting and very important cookery book.

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-Is it?

-It's not just important.

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I think you could actually say it's a revolutionary cookery book.

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It's written by a lady by the name of Hannah Glasse.

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-I don't know if that rings any bells.

-None at all.

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She lived in the 18th century.

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Wasn't terribly rich, she wasn't terribly poor,

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but she was terribly important in retrospect,

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because she changed the way we cook, the way we think about food.

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Up until Hannah Glasse, I think we always deferred to the French.

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We assumed that the French were the people who could cook,

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and I think we still do, to some degree.

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But Hannah said, "No, this is absolutely wrong.

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"English cookery can be just as good and I'm going to show you how it's done."

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Just look at the title here.

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You get a sense of her character from the title page.

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Chapter III. "Read this chapter and you will know how expensive a French cook's sauce is."

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Already in Chapter III she's having a go at the French

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and saying, you know, all very well, but it's expensive.

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This is kind of thrifty English cookery.

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She says, "Take your hare when it's cased and make a pudding.

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"Take a quarter pound of suet and as much crumbs of bread,

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"a little parsley shred fine and about as much thyme

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-"as will lie on a sixpence when shred," and so on.

-Lovely.

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So these are quite simple ingredients for good wholesome cookery

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and that's why she's so important.

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Very rarely do we see a book

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which has really changed the course of a kind of history,

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and Hannah Glasse's book is certainly one of those,

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so it has got a commercial value.

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A copy of this would sell quite happily at auction

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for £8,000, £9,000.

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-GASPING

-I've got to carry that home.

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Yes. What a responsibility!

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Every week, our specialists are setting us a challenge.

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They're bringing along three antiques which,

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to my eyes, all look incredibly similar.

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But one is a basic model, one is rather better

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and one is a wonderful example of its type, the best.

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This week it's Will Farmer's turn, our ceramics specialist, of course,

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with these Art Deco figures.

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Now, one of them, the basic one, is worth about £200,

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the better one, up to £2,000,

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and the best one up to £8,000.

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I'm going to try and work it out later,

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but to begin with, I'm going to ask our visitors,

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and then Will will put us out of our misery and tell us all.

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When we come to the Roadshow,

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most of us expect to see rather good furniture.

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-I'm looking here at a frankly pretty basic table.

-Yes.

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It was my mother's campaign table.

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-Hang on. Your mother's. Let's say, who was your mother?

-Mary Whitehouse.

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-OK, so you are Mary Whitehouse's son.

-Richard, the middle one of three.

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-Right. So this is the table upon which she prepared her campaign.

-Yes.

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The table would be covered in papers.

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I didn't understand what any of them were.

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They were strewn all over the table, she'd always be on the telephone,

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and she was brilliant at manipulating the press

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and getting stuff into the press that she wanted to talk about.

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-She was great at her own PR, wasn't she?

-Yes, absolutely.

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So she fought very hard to achieve

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standards of decency in broadcasting,

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-very simply, and in publishing.

-Yes, yes.

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She was offended by the open sexuality of the 1960s

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and she launched this campaign, Clean Up TV Campaign,

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-in 1964 in Birmingham.

-Yes.

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-The response was huge and it built and built from there.

-Yes.

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And that led into the National Viewers' and Listeners' Association,

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-which had something like 150,000 members.

-Something like that, yes.

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-I just want to read her manifesto, which I think sets her in her context.

-Yes.

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"We men and women of Britain believe in a Christian way of life.

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"We want it for our children and our country.

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"We deplore present-day attempts to belittle or destroy it

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"and particularly we object to the propaganda of disbelief, doubt and dirt

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"that the BBC pours into millions of homes through the television screens."

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So the BBC was her target.

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-Her enemy.

-Her enemy, and I think she particularly attacked

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the Director General at the time, Sir Hugh Carleton Greene.

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He didn't like her. Actually, she wasn't to be mentioned

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by any member of the BBC staff under any circumstance,

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and he had a painting in his office,

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a large multi-breasted portrait of my mother

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which he used to use for dart practice.

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-Where is that painting now?

-I've no idea.

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-Now, you're the next generation.

-I am.

-What do you think about her?

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I don't particularly believe in what she stood for.

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I don't really agree with the campaign, particularly.

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I just think she's a remarkable woman because she stood up for

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what she believed in, really, which is quite amazing.

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What was she like as a mother? What was she like to live with?

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-We certainly felt sidelined and secondary to the campaign.

-Yes.

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It was rather unfortunate that she started the campaign when we were young teens.

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-It was a crucial time for you.

-Yes, no sex and violence

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when that's the only thing we were interested in.

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-Yeah, you wanted to go and see The Clockwork Orange.

-Right, yes.

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And she actually watched a lot of porn and violence.

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-Really?

-And I began to wonder.

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This painting interests me,

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because this is clearly a John Bratby of her.

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I would have thought he was the last painter

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-she would ever have chosen.

-I know, I know. I think it's brilliant.

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It encapsulates her as a person perfectly.

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-Yes, so you're happy with that?

-Oh, yes.

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-I think it's a really striking image.

-It is, yes.

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You know, those burning eyes, that passion, is all there, isn't it?

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Yes. This was a dress that she used to use for speaking.

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I remember that. Yeah, I can remember the film of her speaking.

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I'm very glad you've brought it in, because you, the family,

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have the responsibility to keep that memory going.

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Maybe this has to go to a public collection.

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The values are very difficult. A Bratby painting is straightforward.

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It's £2,000 to £5,000, depending on the subject.

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She'd probably be more because she's quite an important subject.

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What's an old kitchen table worth?

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Ten quid? You know.

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What's all the paperwork worth?

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Nothing until you see the story,

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and then it becomes a very important social archive.

0:18:440:18:47

-Enjoy the painting in her memory.

-We usually keep her behind the door.

0:18:470:18:51

Behind! No, no, bring her out. She deserves to be seen.

0:18:510:18:54

It's such a great image.

0:18:540:18:56

Do you mind if I say that this a very grown-up-looking lady indeed

0:18:580:19:02

in this photograph?

0:19:020:19:04

She was. She was my grandmother

0:19:040:19:06

and she was a very grown-up-looking lady.

0:19:060:19:08

And she's dressed really very formally indeed,

0:19:080:19:12

with jewellery that I can only describe as utterly stupendous.

0:19:120:19:17

Did she wear it with a certain kind of...?

0:19:170:19:19

Because she looks quite relaxed.

0:19:190:19:21

She wore it with great style, and in fact, as a child,

0:19:210:19:25

my very favourite dressing-up dress was that dress,

0:19:250:19:29

-once she'd finished with it, yes.

-What, 1950s? '52, '53,

0:19:290:19:32

-that sort of period?

-Shh! Yes, that sort of thing.

0:19:320:19:35

Well, when you were very young indeed, of course.

0:19:350:19:37

-She's wearing a wonderful tiara.

-Yes.

0:19:370:19:41

A diamond necklace there with stones the size of marbles,

0:19:410:19:46

a pair of diamond drop earrings there,

0:19:460:19:50

which are almost beyond belief

0:19:500:19:53

and then she's wearing, here, a bracelet.

0:19:530:19:57

Do you want the good news or the bad news?

0:19:570:20:00

Whatever you should wish to give me.

0:20:000:20:02

Well, the tiara was one of seven owned by her mother.

0:20:020:20:07

-Seven?

-Seven, one for every day of the week, as you do.

0:20:070:20:10

The necklace, apparently, was Marie Antoinette's

0:20:100:20:14

and went to an aunt of mine. The earrings I've never seen.

0:20:140:20:19

But the bracelet is here.

0:20:190:20:22

A wonderful Deco diamond plaque bracelet.

0:20:220:20:27

-So this is the piece that has filtered down to you?

-It's all that's left.

0:20:270:20:31

It's set with plaques, very Deco with those geometric plaques,

0:20:310:20:37

mounted up in, I would assume, probably platinum.

0:20:370:20:41

And the central core is a line of large diamonds

0:20:410:20:47

in three-by-three formation.

0:20:470:20:49

So each of these plaques,

0:20:490:20:52

which might be called a cartouche-shaped plaque,

0:20:520:20:54

has got a central large diamond and two smaller diamonds.

0:20:540:20:59

The total weight of diamonds is probably in the region of 20 carats.

0:20:590:21:04

-Wow!

-So it is, really, a stupendous bracelet.

0:21:040:21:09

As far as the value is concerned,

0:21:090:21:12

the value of it is largely driven by the quality of the diamonds

0:21:120:21:16

and actually, when you look at the stones through a lens,

0:21:160:21:19

you find they're slightly mixed in quality.

0:21:190:21:21

They're not all absolutely perfect well-matched stones.

0:21:210:21:25

The impact it makes is extraordinary,

0:21:250:21:30

but as always, you know, the jewellers who look at these things

0:21:300:21:33

look at it in a rather cold, dispassionate light,

0:21:330:21:36

where they get their lenses and they examine each stone, stone by stone.

0:21:360:21:40

Now, having said that, on the basis that we've got something

0:21:400:21:43

in the region of around about 20 carats,

0:21:430:21:45

such a large piece... What shall we say?

0:21:450:21:49

Something around about £15,000.

0:21:490:21:52

She was a good shopper! Wow!

0:21:550:21:59

-Do you know anything about Art Deco?

-No, I like it, but I don't know anything about it.

0:22:050:22:10

-Perhaps the basic.

-We've got three Art Deco figures here.

0:22:100:22:13

Basic, better, best.

0:22:130:22:16

One is worth up to £200,

0:22:160:22:18

one up to £2,000,

0:22:180:22:21

and one is a beautiful example worth up to £8,000.

0:22:210:22:25

I've probably got it totally wrong!

0:22:250:22:28

It looks very, very aged,

0:22:320:22:34

and you couldn't reproduce something to make it look that aged.

0:22:340:22:37

-You sound like a man who knows what he's talking about.

-A bit.

0:22:370:22:40

I could be wrong, though. You're going to prove me wrong now.

0:22:400:22:43

I just wonder if she's the best one,

0:22:480:22:51

and she, although gorgeous, is the better one.

0:22:510:22:55

Best, better, basic.

0:22:550:22:58

We'll find out.

0:22:580:23:01

I couldn't believe it when I first saw this.

0:23:080:23:11

It takes me back to evenings in the summer,

0:23:110:23:13

when I was sort of sent to bed rather earlier than I wanted to.

0:23:130:23:16

And I'd bring out my Orlando books.

0:23:160:23:20

And this is the maquette, the sort of study with the original sketches,

0:23:200:23:25

by the authoress and illustrator Kathleen Hale,

0:23:250:23:29

for Orlando Buys A Farm, a book I remember well.

0:23:290:23:32

One of a series done between, late '30s right through, I think,

0:23:320:23:37

until about 1970 she was producing these books.

0:23:370:23:40

But this is amongst the earliest of them and I would say this looks to me like sort of '40s

0:23:400:23:45

and I feel I've got a real artefact, certainly a real artefact of my childhood.

0:23:450:23:50

And how did you come by it?

0:23:500:23:52

My husband bought it, because he was the same, he'd been brought up on Orlando...

0:23:520:23:57

Saw that it was for sale when Kathleen Hale went into a home

0:23:590:24:03

and they needed to sell her things so that...to keep her in this home.

0:24:030:24:08

How long ago was that?

0:24:080:24:10

I should think about 15 years. I can't really remember, but over 15 years ago.

0:24:100:24:15

Because I believe she died relatively recently, yes.

0:24:150:24:19

-Yes, I mean she straddled the century, didn't she?

-Yes, yes.

0:24:190:24:24

But I love the idea of anything that shows the creative process,

0:24:240:24:29

and you can feel the author sort of bearing down upon the publishers saying,

0:24:290:24:33

"This is my idea for the top right-hand corner, this is for the left-hand corner",

0:24:330:24:38

and I love the views, you know, we're looking at these cows from above.

0:24:380:24:42

I mean, what a hilarious look at a cow,

0:24:420:24:44

but also what a rather sort of captivating way of looking at a cow as well.

0:24:440:24:48

-Yes, yes.

-And the pigs as well.

0:24:480:24:52

Pigs, which are lovely.

0:24:520:24:54

I mean, they don't need any explanation, do they, really?

0:24:540:24:58

This is a sort of, you know, lyrical poetry in a drawing, isn't it?

0:24:580:25:02

Oh, gosh, it's just, it's just really wonderful.

0:25:020:25:06

But it's not exactly the same as the first book, because quite a lot has been left out.

0:25:060:25:12

-That just makes it all the more exciting, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:25:120:25:16

-You get closer to the soul of the author.

-Yes.

0:25:160:25:19

If this were to come up for sale, I can easily see it making £10,000 to £15,000.

0:25:190:25:26

Oh, that's rather nice, it's gone up, then.

0:25:260:25:30

We've had a heck of a turnout here at Layer Marney.

0:25:330:25:35

As you can see, people are queuing there, and there was at one stage a three-mile tailback of cars,

0:25:350:25:40

and then just look up here, because people are all the way up to the gatehouse, as you can see.

0:25:400:25:46

Now, what we like to do at the Roadshow is we've got a little clicker,

0:25:460:25:49

and here's our clicker lady. Hello.

0:25:490:25:51

We work out how many people have come in and so we can tell how big the crowds are.

0:25:510:25:55

-So how many have we got?

-We've got 2,458.

0:25:550:25:58

Gosh, that's a lot and we're only just halfway through the day.

0:25:580:26:03

-What?!

-Gird your loins - there's a lot more to come.

0:26:030:26:09

Well, for all intents and purposes it just looks like a fairly ordinary skeleton timepiece, doesn't it?

0:26:090:26:16

-I would think so.

-Do you find it attractive?

-I love it.

0:26:160:26:20

I inherited it when I was about 14 from an old aunt, who was probably at that time

0:26:200:26:26

probably about 75, 80, and nobody in the family seems to know anything about it.

0:26:260:26:32

OK. Obviously the first thing to talk about is the maker, Charles Frodsham,

0:26:320:26:38

Strand, but the interesting thing is

0:26:380:26:40

-straightaway, we've got two seconds dials.

-Yes. That's...

0:26:400:26:47

-And then it's got two pendulum suspensions on the back.

-Yes.

0:26:470:26:53

Why on earth would you want to do that?

0:26:530:26:56

I don't know. Somebody once said it was going to be a demonstration clock, but I don't know.

0:26:560:27:01

They're absolutely right and looking at the number,

0:27:010:27:05

883, we can date this pretty much to 1850-1851.

0:27:050:27:12

-Goodness, yes.

-So I think there's a very, very good chance it was made

0:27:120:27:16

-as a demonstration piece for the Great Exhibition in London of 1851.

-Oh! Oh, goodness.

0:27:160:27:21

Let's just start the pendulum off,

0:27:210:27:25

which is currently working on the...

0:27:250:27:30

side with the recoil,

0:27:300:27:32

the anchor escapement and you can see that working there

0:27:320:27:36

on that little seconds.

0:27:360:27:38

-Yes.

-And then just stopping briefly -

0:27:380:27:42

you probably have never noticed this,

0:27:420:27:45

but there's a knob here, which, by pushing in this knob here,

0:27:450:27:50

we are disconnecting the drive to the anchor escapement

0:27:500:27:53

and transferring it to the other escapement here.

0:27:530:27:58

Oh, I see, yes, yes.

0:27:580:28:00

And it is purely to demonstrate the different escapements.

0:28:000:28:04

The hands are absolutely superb, have you noticed these lovely... cut-out spade hands.

0:28:040:28:09

-Yes, they're beautiful.

-It's the finest quality, the whole thing is magnificent.

0:28:090:28:14

-It's got maintaining power, it's got four levelling screws here.

-Yes.

0:28:140:28:19

With the spirit level in the middle.

0:28:190:28:23

-This is an exceptionally rare thing. I believe it to be unique.

-What, this clock?

-Yeah.

-Really?

0:28:230:28:28

-So made for the Great Exhibition of 1851.

-Amazing.

0:28:280:28:34

I'm quite confident to say that anybody, of which there are many skeleton clock enthusiasts,

0:28:340:28:42

would pay a minimum of £15,000 and I think it would probably go for

0:28:420:28:47

actually at least £20,000 and maybe a little bit more. It is a unique item.

0:28:470:28:54

Most clock people would kill to own it.

0:28:540:28:56

There's always a tale behind autograph books.

0:29:010:29:03

So what's the tale behind this one?

0:29:030:29:06

Well, I used to go to Charlton, when I was a youngster, with my parents.

0:29:060:29:10

I went from the age of eight, and get the autographs of the players as they came in,

0:29:100:29:17

including the Manchester United players - before Munich, this was, in 1955.

0:29:170:29:23

You used to go up and say, "Autograph, please,"

0:29:230:29:26

when you recognised them, you did, in those days.

0:29:260:29:29

A few years later, disaster strikes and we had the terrible,

0:29:290:29:33

terrible Munich air disaster where the majority of the team is killed.

0:29:330:29:39

-Players you'd met...

-Oh, terrible, it was a Thursday, I can remember.

0:29:390:29:43

And when I was coming home from school and my mother's waiting at the door

0:29:430:29:47

to tell me about it.

0:29:470:29:48

Oh, yes, I can remember it as if it was yesterday.

0:29:500:29:53

Oh, yes, there's Duncan Edwards, who was in the air crash, David Pegg, Roger Byrne, Berry,

0:29:530:30:01

he was in the air crash as well, and it was very dramatic,

0:30:010:30:05

that match, the first match afterwards.

0:30:050:30:09

They played Sheffield Wednesday in the FA Cup and they didn't know who the team was going to be,

0:30:090:30:14

and they had to sign players from here, there, and everywhere they could.

0:30:140:30:17

And they won 3-0 and by a wave of emotion, they got through to the cup final that year.

0:30:170:30:23

It was obviously a very, very poignant time for you because you, you kept the newspaper reports.

0:30:230:30:30

Oh, yes, because it's a memory from that time.

0:30:300:30:34

Well, it's also, interestingly, a reasonably valuable memory

0:30:340:30:38

because it's an autograph book that's stuffed with all sorts of signatures, there are footballers and cricketers.

0:30:380:30:45

-Cricketers.

-So I think in terms of value, around about £600.

0:30:450:30:49

No! 600! Just being a youngster and getting autographs.

0:30:490:30:56

Will, you set us a challenge earlier on, to work out which of these three

0:31:020:31:06

figures is the basic model worth about - was it £200?

0:31:060:31:09

£200-£300.

0:31:090:31:11

The better one, up to 2,000.

0:31:110:31:13

-Yeah.

-And the best one up to 8,000.

-Yes.

-I've put them in the order I think.

0:31:130:31:17

I reckon this is the basic one because it looks the most basically painted.

0:31:170:31:21

It was a toss-up between these two, I've got to be honest. In the end, I thought

0:31:210:31:27

this was such an unusual shape - I've never seen anything like this before -

0:31:270:31:30

she could either be the best or the worst and I plumped for the best.

0:31:300:31:34

I have no idea, is the truth of the matter.

0:31:340:31:37

So come on, tell us about them and how we would be able to tell the difference.

0:31:370:31:41

Well, I mean, these figures are all about the period.

0:31:410:31:45

We are Art Deco 1925-1935,

0:31:450:31:46

which really, as we know, it comes out of Paris and the 1925 exhibition.

0:31:460:31:53

It's all about exoticism, it's all about Josephine Baker, the rise of Hollywood,

0:31:530:31:57

and everything gets about fashion and these gorgeous girls.

0:31:570:32:01

And also beautiful bodies.

0:32:010:32:03

Oh, fabulous, I mean these girls were sexy, they were sassy,

0:32:030:32:06

they were about clothing and dancing, and everybody was having fun.

0:32:060:32:11

This is a brilliant era, and of all the factories, and there were many that made figures,

0:32:110:32:15

really the best ones are coming out of Europe.

0:32:150:32:17

They're coming out of Germany, Austria and Italy. And we start this end

0:32:170:32:21

with this figure, which is actually made by the firm of Katzhutte or Hertwig,

0:32:210:32:25

the Hertwig Company, and if you look underneath, it's actually

0:32:250:32:28

very clearly marked with a little cat inside a house.

0:32:280:32:33

And Katzhutte means cat house, so if you've got that mark, you know you've got a Katzhutte.

0:32:330:32:39

Now they were, you know, they were

0:32:390:32:41

a firm of note, they were a fairly heavy going firm,

0:32:410:32:44

they produced lots and lots of figures,

0:32:440:32:47

but they were looking over the fence at their rivals and thinking,

0:32:470:32:50

"We can do that, we can do it cheaper, quicker, and get it out."

0:32:500:32:54

That's what all of this is about, the amount of man-hours that have gone into making them.

0:32:540:32:59

So she's nice, she's stylish, she's got a good pose.

0:32:590:33:04

But when you move to the middle here, we're going into Austria now, to the Goldscheider firm.

0:33:040:33:08

19th century in their origins and massive manufactures of figurines.

0:33:080:33:13

And by the 1920s and '30s they were employing some of the leading artists of the day, and it's starting to get

0:33:130:33:19

a little bit more unusual, a bit more quirky. I mean, here she is in her tulip dress.

0:33:190:33:24

And also, looking at the paint work, there's just so much

0:33:240:33:28

-more care and effort gone into her face particularly.

-Exactly. This has been air brushed in, and painted on.

0:33:280:33:33

She is beautiful, I think.

0:33:330:33:35

She's gorgeous. I've known this girl a long, long time. LAUGHTER

0:33:350:33:38

I think we should hear more.

0:33:380:33:40

Absolutely. When you get to the end, she's Italian, and the Italians know their fashion.

0:33:400:33:47

-Bit of va-va-voom about it.

-Bit of va-va-voom.

0:33:470:33:49

I mean, all of these girls are "a la mode", but she is on the button.

0:33:490:33:53

She's designed by a lady called Helen Konig Scavini, who actually formed the firm Lenci.

0:33:530:33:58

And the thing about Scavini as a senior designer was,

0:33:580:34:03

she just had it.

0:34:030:34:04

This has got humour, it's called Colpo di Vento, which basically means "in the wind"

0:34:040:34:09

and she is literally holding her skirt down, and holding her hat on, and this humour, this comedy

0:34:090:34:14

comes through in Lenci and it's what people love, but also if you just pick her up and have a look,

0:34:140:34:20

-she's also clearly marked underneath, you've got all the marks there of the firm.

-Oh, yeah.

0:34:200:34:26

Lenci, made in Torino, and the big thing is look at the faces, and just look at her eyes underneath there.

0:34:260:34:31

Scavini did these beautiful, smoky, almond eyes which actually, they are...

0:34:310:34:36

again, it's this sex appeal, it's just sexy, it just oozes that spirit of that time.

0:34:360:34:43

And they're all fabulous, but she is the one that struck me the most.

0:34:430:34:46

Well, you are a very stylish girl.

0:34:460:34:49

-Time to put you out your misery?

-Yes, so come on.

-You've got it absolutely bang on.

-Have I?

0:34:490:34:54

-Hooray, we've done it!

-So you're a bit disappointed, aren't you?

0:34:540:34:57

I'm disappointed. Shucks, you've got it.

0:34:570:34:59

That is complete fluke because this was such an unusual one, I didn't know what to make of her.

0:34:590:35:03

The Italians know their fashion and it just oozes from this figure,

0:35:030:35:08

and that's why this figure, you'd be looking at a price upwards of sort of £8,000 for her.

0:35:080:35:14

I mean, value here, we're looking about sort of £200 to £300 mark.

0:35:140:35:18

Move to the middle, we're looking at towards sort of £2,000.

0:35:180:35:23

When you get to the end, it's all about the quality, it's about

0:35:230:35:26

the amount of man-hours that have gone into it, and also about the humour.

0:35:260:35:30

Hooray, I got it right. It probably won't be repeated, but now at least, if you have

0:35:300:35:35

an Art Deco figure at home, you've got some idea now what to look for.

0:35:350:35:39

-Your husband collected jade.

-He did.

0:35:520:35:56

And can I ask you whether you like it.

0:35:570:35:59

Not particularly.

0:35:590:36:01

Why not?

0:36:010:36:02

There's something eerie about it.

0:36:020:36:05

Eerie?

0:36:050:36:06

Well, neither of my children liked it.

0:36:060:36:10

As children, they used to run past it.

0:36:100:36:13

It used to be on a shelf along the landing and they would run down the stairs as fast as they could.

0:36:130:36:20

-This was the bogey man.

-It was.

0:36:200:36:22

First of all, what part of the world does it come from? That you presumably know.

0:36:220:36:25

I'm assuming China, yes.

0:36:250:36:27

Yeah, it is Chinese and it's known in China as a Buddha's hand citron.

0:36:270:36:32

It is a member of the citrus family, it's almost inedible but it is fragrant.

0:36:320:36:39

-Oh.

-The Chinese like putting Buddha's hand citrons into rooms

0:36:390:36:43

in order to give the room a perfume and well, I think you'd agree, that it is very finger-like, isn't it?

0:36:430:36:50

-Mm, oh, yes.

-The fingers referring to Buddha

0:36:500:36:54

make this a very significant Buddhistic symbol.

0:36:540:36:59

The fingers appear to be drawing in.

0:37:000:37:03

Exactly, that's what's eerie about it.

0:37:030:37:06

But that should encourage you, because the Chinese see that as pulling in wealth,

0:37:060:37:12

and just to make the point even more auspicious,

0:37:120:37:15

we have these little bats flying around,

0:37:150:37:19

which also bring wealth and happiness,

0:37:190:37:21

so you've got one major Buddha's hand citron and you've got

0:37:210:37:25

a second Buddha's hand, and look at the carving on that, the under cutting, the attention to the leaves.

0:37:250:37:30

And when you think that jade is an incredibly hard substance,

0:37:300:37:33

to create something that complicated in a very, very hard substance is actually really rather clever.

0:37:330:37:40

-OK, well the question is - is it going to bring you wealth?

-Bit late now.

0:37:410:37:46

-Do you know how much your husband might have paid for it?

-No idea.

0:37:470:37:52

Well, the fashion for jade at the moment is quite good, the Chinese in particular like buying jades

0:37:540:38:01

of a good quality - this is quite auspicious.

0:38:010:38:04

It's difficult to date it exactly when it was carved.

0:38:040:38:07

It could be 18th century, I have a feeling it's more likely to be 19th century, but it's a good object

0:38:070:38:14

and I think in today's market it would probably fetch

0:38:140:38:18

-somewhere in the region of £10,000 to £20,000.

-Good. I don't think he'll sell it, though.

0:38:180:38:25

Do you know, I have never seen this engraving before?

0:38:260:38:30

Good Lord, really?

0:38:300:38:32

I mean, I think it's an absolute joy.

0:38:320:38:36

-Who did it belong to?

-My grandmother.

0:38:360:38:38

-What sort of period?

-'20s.

-Right.

-'20s or slightly earlier, I imagine.

0:38:380:38:43

So your grandmother owning this - tell me about her.

0:38:430:38:46

-Well, she was a chorus girl in the Gaiety Theatre.

-Wow.

0:38:460:38:51

-And my grandfather, his parents actually owned the Gaiety Theatre at the time.

-Wonderful.

0:38:510:38:58

And were not particularly pleased that he married a Gaiety Girl

0:38:580:39:02

and I understand cut him off without a penny.

0:39:020:39:05

-Oh, that's so sad.

-There we are.

0:39:050:39:07

-And of course it is a lady's visiting card case.

-Absolutely.

0:39:070:39:12

The quality of this is above the norm.

0:39:120:39:15

Oh, that's good to hear.

0:39:150:39:17

Because generally what you find is the top just flips back on a hinge, or slides off, in some cases.

0:39:170:39:24

But this one, with this button release, is lovely, a nice sign of quality.

0:39:240:39:30

The maker's mark there, we've got the maker George Heath.

0:39:300:39:33

-1887 is the actual date on it.

-Is it?

0:39:330:39:37

-I mean, for example, look at that engraving. Can you see how that bird just goes across there?

-Yes, yes.

0:39:370:39:42

-And all this of course down to the opening of Japan to the West.

-Mm, mm.

0:39:420:39:47

Now, as to value... gosh, what is the most gorgeous Geisha worth?

0:39:470:39:52

I think you'd be hard pushed at auction to get her for less than £1,000.

0:39:530:40:00

Good Lord.

0:40:000:40:02

Good Lord.

0:40:020:40:03

Well, that's marvellous.

0:40:030:40:06

I think she's gorgeous, not just marvellous, she's wonderful.

0:40:060:40:09

It's well known by the people who watch this programme that I'm very excited by railway history.

0:40:090:40:14

I just love the way it fits into our lives.

0:40:140:40:18

What we've got here are some exceptional things that really go back to the early days of railways.

0:40:180:40:22

And here we have, I know, an image of John Dixon, who was an associate engineer, surveyor,

0:40:220:40:29

working with Stevenson in those early days.

0:40:290:40:33

So where do you fit in?

0:40:330:40:34

Well, all these records were in my husband's family history box

0:40:340:40:38

and I did go through them 30 years ago and found all these items.

0:40:380:40:44

-He is a Dixon, is he?

-Yes, he is, yes.

0:40:440:40:46

Right, so we've got a direct link back into those early days.

0:40:460:40:49

-Yes.

-This is a letter from Dixon, who was there.

-Yes.

0:40:490:40:53

-During the Rainhill trials.

-Yes.

-When The Rocket was first shown. He's describing what he saw.

-Yes.

0:40:530:40:58

I mean, I think it's just, you know, I touch that, and I'm there myself.

0:40:580:41:02

-Absolutely.

-Here is someone who was watching The Rocket, a great success.

0:41:020:41:07

-Yes.

-All the other locomotives fail.

0:41:070:41:09

And that was the beginning of the modern railway history.

0:41:090:41:12

Absolutely. Amazing.

0:41:120:41:14

And these are extraordinary - very early Stockton and Darlington tickets.

0:41:140:41:17

-Very thin bits of paper...

-Very thin.

0:41:170:41:20

..that were cut out and filled in by the man in the ticket office.

0:41:200:41:25

-Yes, yes.

-And again, this is the very beginning of that history.

0:41:250:41:28

-Yes.

-I think it's extraordinary, I'm really excited by just the physical contact of these things.

0:41:280:41:35

-Yes, they are.

-But most of all I want to know about this. Why have you got a parcel?

0:41:350:41:41

Well, this is a parcel which was produced by my husband's great-uncle,

0:41:410:41:46

and he had made up a parcel which is the intimate story of the origin of the railways

0:41:460:41:53

-and he made it up in 1925 at the centenary of the Stockton to Darlington Railway.

-1925.

0:41:530:42:00

But it says at the bottom that it's to be carefully preserved for

0:42:000:42:04

the bicentenary of the Stockton to Darlington Railway in 2025.

0:42:040:42:11

This is annoying - we've got 14 years to wait.

0:42:110:42:13

-I know, it's all sealed up with sealing wax.

-I'm not allowed to open it.

-So we're not allowed to open it.

0:42:130:42:19

-I mean, as to valuing that, I've no idea. Until we know what's in it.

-Until we know what's in it, no.

0:42:190:42:24

-It could be thousands of pounds, or ten pounds.

-Oh, yes.

0:42:240:42:27

But it's a great time capsule. The letter is a hugely valuable document.

0:42:270:42:32

A witness of the Rainhill trials.

0:42:320:42:34

I can see that fetching up to £2,000 or £3,000, because it's such

0:42:340:42:38

-an important document in terms of the railway history.

-Goodness.

0:42:380:42:41

The tickets - what's a railway ticket worth?

0:42:410:42:44

Not much. These sort of tickets from those early days are going to be

0:42:440:42:49

£50 to £100 each, possibly more.

0:42:490:42:52

-So I think one of these tickets would easily take me home.

-I don't think so!

0:42:520:42:58

I wonder if anyone would notice if I just prised this open here.

0:43:040:43:08

I expect they would, and Paul Atterbury would have my guts for garters,

0:43:080:43:11

because it says here, "Not to be opened till 2025".

0:43:110:43:14

Until next time, from Layer Marney and all the team here, bye-bye.

0:43:140:43:19

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit Layer Marney Tower near Colchester in Essex to meet one of the biggest Roadshow crowds on record.

Their busy day finds them focusing on a one-off clock made for the Great Exhibition in 1851, a painted portrait that looks modern and which has an astonishing valuation and a plain kitchen table which turns out to have quite a story, having been used as the campaign headquarters for Mary Whitehouse's Clean Up TV campaign.