Castle Coole 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Castle Coole 1

Fiona Bruce and the team visit Northern Ireland at Castle Coole near Enniskillen. Amongst the objects catching the experts' eyes are a pair of tea caddies.


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Today we've headed as far west as the Roadshow has ever visited in the UK.

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We're in Northern Ireland, near the town of Enniskillen in Fermanagh.

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In the distance is our venue, which may be welcoming a few first time visitors today,

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because even though it was built in 1789, it's still a relatively well-kept secret.

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Time to change all that.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Castle Coole in County Fermanagh.

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There's always a flutter of excitement among our experts

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when they get the list of the venues the Roadshow's going to be visiting.

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None more so than Castle Coole. We were very keen to come here.

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You in particular, Christopher Payne.

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What makes it so special? It's one of my favourite Georgian buildings.

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I'd never seen it until today. Just look at it.

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That fantastic austere avant-garde edifice made of Portland stone,

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all the way from Dorset.

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It came here in Lord Belmore's brig, The Martha, all the way by sea.

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Can you imagine?

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And what about inside? Go and have a look. It's exquisite, very expensive.

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Go and have a look.

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I will.

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Castle Coole was built between 1789 and 1798

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as a summer retreat for a prominent Irish politician,

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the First Earl of Belmore.

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And as Christopher said,

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the architect was a fashionable young Londoner called James Wyatt.

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Castle Coole is said to be the perfect example of his work.

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But do you know what?

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He never came here.

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The fact that James Wyatt never visited here is surprising.

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Apparently, he was hopelessly disorganised

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and soon lost interest in his commissions,

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leaving infuriated owners

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with half-finished houses seething in his wake.

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So really, they're very lucky here at Castle Coole

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that not only did he finish it, but it's also such a beautiful house.

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It wasn't just the house that he designed.

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He also had quite a lot to do with the interior as well.

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A very talented chap.

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This room, the saloon, was the heart of the house.

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It was where important family gatherings were held.

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It was where the entire household, family and servants,

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used to hold morning prayers.

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And I can see what Christopher Payne meant about the exquisite craftsmanship.

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The family spared no expense bringing over the best artisans

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from as far afield as Italy.

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And there's a ladies workroom where they used to sit

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and do their needlework, furnished in the fashionable Chinese style.

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It reflects the importance of being seen to be cultured

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and cosmopolitan.

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I can see why our experts were so excited about seeing this place.

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I think it's time we joined them outside.

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And our hosts here at Castle Coole near Enniskillen

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are The National Trust.

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It really is rather a special watch and chatelaine.

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Now tell me, what do you know about it?

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Nothing really at all. I found it in a cupboard.

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Sorry, you literally found it? As I was cleaning out...

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Yes, as I was tidying up the little cupboard

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and I found this in the box and wondered what it was.

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Somebody must have collected this, or loved it, at some stage.

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Well, I presume my father bought it.

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He was interested in clocks and restored clocks,

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so I presume he had it in the house, but I wasn't aware of it, no.

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That's absolutely fantastic. I mean...

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So this is something you've just come across, literally discovered.

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Yes. Wonderful. Yes. Yes.

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So had you thought of it as a man's watch or a lady's watch?

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Well, I wondered if it would be a lady's watch for days gone by,

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but I wasn't too sure.

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You're absolutely right.

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The lady of the house would have worn that, on a belt,

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and there would have been all sorts of other things here,

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little etuis perhaps with baby scissors, maybe a needle and thread,

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we've got the key.

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It might have had more little objects applied to the chatelaine. I see.

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It is actually English through and through, dating from 1775-1780.

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Right. It's 22 carat gold, amongst other things,

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but the inset stone is what we call a dendritic agate.

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Oh.

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These impurities are dendritic because they look like trees.

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It's from the Greek "dendron," meaning a tree. Right.

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What do you think of it? It's very pretty.

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I think it's pretty.

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I mean, we've got this absolutely magnificent diamond push piece here,

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lovely white enamel dial,

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winding through the dial, obviously, because it's a consular case.

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Gold beetle and poker hands,

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exactly what you'd expect for the period, and there we are,

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a lovely verge movement, and signed "Crosthwaite of Dublin."

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So having said it was English, it still is English, but he would have been the retailer of it. Ah.

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He didn't make this. So he didn't make it?

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No, he put his name to it. I see, right.

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It would have been a special commission. Oh.

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From an extremely rich client.

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You've never seen this thing before, it's just sitting at home.

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Been sitting at home.

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You think your father, as a clock enthusiast, found it. Well, bought it, yes.

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Bought it, put it somewhere safe

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so that prying hands couldn't get near,

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but prying hands have now found it. Absolutely, yes.

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And would prying hands be rather glad to know that at auction

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it would make ?7,000 to ?9,000?

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GASPS

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Very nice.

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That's very good.

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It's wonderful to come to Northern Ireland here

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and for you to have produced three things that are just so Irish.

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Yes. These cups...

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The idea of having the set with one large and a pair of smaller cups

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is something which you find time and time again in Ireland. Yeah.

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And the quality of the workmanship,

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and we are talking 18th century with these,

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they are really fantastic, equal of anything being produced in London.

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And when you look at the way the handle is produced...

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Most handles, when you look at the top there,

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just go straight into the body from that scroll.

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Here, you've got these lovely mouldings

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and look at that lovely little diminishing baluster just there.

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The sort of period we're looking at, of course...

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Had you thought about date at all? I don't know, I've had them a long time, they were handed down to me.

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I didn't know they were Irish until you said they were Irish! Right.

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Never knew that. Well, there we are.

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And I've had them for about 25 years, you know, in my own house.

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But I know nothing about them.

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No, no, well, you're a lucky man. No, know nothing.

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So you're looking at the reign of King George II with these. Yes.

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And actually, there's one very useful pointer

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when you look at the actual marks.

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What we've got here is the figure of Hibernia, obviously for Ireland.

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Yes.

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But that was a tax mark for agricultural development projects

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that was introduced in 1730.

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They've got to be after 1730.

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I mean, here we're looking at a date of around 1740,

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that sort of period.

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Beautiful original armorials there,

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and what's fascinating as well

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is that if we look at the reverse,

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we've got the family crest there.

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Now, when we look at this cup,

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we've actually got a different maker,

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but that same crest appears there.

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This should be your ancestry.

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Could be.

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Yeah, well, you've got to look into that. Yeah.

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The Irish market has... shall we say been a little bit turbulent.

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Downhill.

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So, my thinking is for the pair,

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we should be looking in the order of ?2,000-?2,500.

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And for the single cup, the same sort of value.

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That's wonderful.

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So you've got the best part of 5,000 there.

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That's great, yeah, didn't realise that at all, they've been lying... up for 25 years...

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Didn't cost me anything. So, there you go.

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What could be better? That's it.

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You might wonder why

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a lump of moulded glass has got me very excited,

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which actually it is because it represents a rough diamond,

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and from this rough diamond came nine very, very famous stones which are in the Crown Jewels.

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Ah.

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So tell me first, what made you buy this?

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Well, I was in a charity shop and I saw it,

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and I thought it was very interesting.

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I've always been interested in geology

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and when I read that it was the Cullinan diamond,

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I thought "How interesting,"

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and I looked at it, I liked the glass and the form of it,

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and I bought it.

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Do you know, what is very interesting with diamonds is

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that people don't realise that this is how diamonds can look like,

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in the raw, before they are cut and polished.

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This is around about 3,106 carats.

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It was found...the replica... Obviously, this is a replica.

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Replica, yes. But...

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Otherwise I'd be off down the road if this was a real one, right now.

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No, no, it was found in 1905 in South Africa. Yes.

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And only about 18 feet below the ground,

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in a mine, in an open cast mine.

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And would it have looked like this?

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Yes, this is exactly how it would look.

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It's pure carbon that's been crystallised under real...

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lots of heat and pressure. Yes.

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The pressure,

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if you can imagine you've got a coin and you put the Eiffel Tower

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on top of that coin,

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that is the pressure needed to crystallise carbon and a lot, a lot of heat,

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and it's about 160 kilometres below the earth's surface is where diamonds are formed.

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It then travelled, eventually,

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to King Edward VII,

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and he gave it to the Asscher family to cut.

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Now, to cut a diamond,

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you can only cut a diamond with another diamond.

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There's two ways of cutting it.

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You either cut it with the grain, or against the grain.

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So they made the two stones that are really famous.

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One's in the sceptre, the Star of Africa, so the 500 carats,

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and that's in the sceptre in the Crown Jewels.

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And the other one,

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which is called the Cullinan Two, is in the Imperial State Crown.

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Now, when Mr Asscher had to start cutting this,

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they spent a very, very long time

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working out how they were going to cut it,

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and he decided to cleave it himself.

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Now, if you cleave it incorrectly, you can shatter,

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maybe, the stone, so... and it's only one blow.

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My goodness.

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So he sat there, he carved a little groove in the stone. Yes.

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And with a chisel, he just had to make that one cut,

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that one bang to make it split where he wanted it to split.

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Where he wanted it split.

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And the story goes that he did that, and then he fainted.

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As you would.

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As you would, and it went according to plan.

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Lovely silver label you have there.

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The hallmark is 1908, and that was when it was cut. Really? Wonderful.

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So that's really lovely. Yes, it is lovely.

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So what did you pay for it in..? I paid ?60 for it.

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All right, well, I just think...

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I just love what it represents, and quite a few other people loved this as well.

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I would say, if one was to sell it at auction, you'd be looking at about...

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in the region of about ?1,000 now.

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Oh, my goodness, oh, my goodness. Yes, oh, it's fabulous.

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I can only assume you've got a very large house.

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You would be assuming quite wrongly, but it fits into the room.

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How? With great difficulty.

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Why did you buy it?

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I bought it because I loved it.

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I had gone out to buy a suite of furniture,

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and I had bought the suite of furniture,

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and then I went around the corner to look at other things,

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and I saw this, and I thought it was the most beautiful thing,

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and I thought, I wish I could have that,

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and then I thought, why not have it? And I bought it.

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Fair enough. So what happened to the suite of furniture?

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I went back to the man and I said,

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"I've seen something beautiful that I want, I would prefer to have,"

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and he said, "That's OK," and he give me back the cheque.

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Well, anyway, thank you for bringing it along to us.

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I know already there is a signature here somewhere, isn't there? Yes.

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Do you know anything about Lamb of Manchester?

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I just knew that it was Lamb of Manchester.

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He pointed it out to me, but I know nothing about it.

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I mean, it's a very important firm, Lamb of Manchester.

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Oh, right, yes. They were working until around 1900.

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And their earliest work was what we call the Aesthetic Movement,

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William Morris, Arts and Crafts, if you like.

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But this is much more a Renaissance style. Right.

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It's rather unusual for Lamb and I think it probably makes it date to around 1900,

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right at the end of their... or Lamb's life, anyway. Yeah.

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What I think's fascinating about it,

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and I hope somebody can tell me about it,

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this does appear to be machine-carved. Yes, yes.

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You seem to know that. Well, I thought, looking at it, it would be.

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But I wouldn't know.

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In 40 years of looking at furniture,

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I've never found one of these machines. Oh.

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And I'd love to find one because I don't know how they worked, it's extraordinary. Yes.

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It's very regular carving, and this wonderful oak. I bet you know what the wood is.

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It's supposed to be burr oak.

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Yes, it's a type of cut of oak, not exactly burr oak,

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but it's beautiful quality wood, isn't it? Yes.

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Is this a favourite piece in the house?

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It is for me. I think it's like a work of art.

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It is a work of art, and to me,

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I just sit and have a cup of coffee and enjoy it.

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And talk to it?

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I think, I think of the person who would have worked

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and did all of this sort of thing, and...

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I would like him to know who... is now in his grave...

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that I get as much enjoyment out of it as he would have done creating it.

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That's a lovely story, it's a lovely story.

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I like that very much. Did you pay a lot of money for this?

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Well, I haven't told my husband. Is he listening?

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But I did...

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Well, I paid ?3,999 for it.

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So just under ?4,000 for it. Yes, yes, yes.

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What would the leather suite have cost you?

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It was something... a thousand and something.

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So, what would the leather suite be worth today?

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Nothing.

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And you paid a lot of money for this. Yes, yes.

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More than I've ever heard anyone pay for...

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Well, I thought I... Why shouldn't I sit and enjoy something?

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And the money...money be there when I'm not there.

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Well, I think the value is going to hold. Yes.

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I'm not going to value it at less than you paid for it. I don't mind.

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But I think around ?4,000. It seems quite a lot. Yes, yes, yes, no.

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It's worth a lot more than that leather suite. Yes, yes.

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Thank you very much indeed. Thank you very much.

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Take a look at these diamond rings.

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They are gorgeous,

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and our jewellery specialist Jo Hardy

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tells me that one is worth about ?2,000,

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one is worth ?20,000

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and one is worth ?50,000.

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And she's set me, and you, a little challenge to try and work out which is which,

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so I'm going to have a little look,

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ask our visitors here and then all will be revealed.

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So, you've brought in this rather lovely carriage clock,

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and the first thing I notice on the top is a rather unusual inscription

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that's been engraved into the glass.

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"William Jenner Esq MD."

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Who was he?

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I did some research after buying the clock,

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and he's mentioned in the Dictionary of National Biography,

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and what I discovered about him was

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he was President of the Royal Society of Physicians,

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he was the Chief Physician to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

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Fantastic. And he would have looked after Prince Albert up to the time that he died.

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Right, and we've got a date there,

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1865, which is lovely,

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and then we've got a donor here. "From George Thompson."

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Do you know anything about him? No, no.

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He didn't come up in research. No. But another very grateful patient, perhaps.

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Very good, yes, yes.

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Makes sense, doesn't it? Yes, it does.

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Well, the clock is absolutely top of the range.

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This would have been a very, very generous present at the time. Right.

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You're probably well aware of the fact that it's got three subsidiary dials,

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the central one being an alarm.

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The hands have been changed. That's not the original hand. Right.

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And then the other two subsidiaries...

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Well, basically starting this side with the day of the week and then the date.

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Very nice feature, all with an engraved and machine-turned mask.

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The case is what we call a gorge case. That's the top of the range carriage clock case,

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with all the pinched corners,

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and let's see if there's any details of the movement,

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as to who might have made it.

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I cannot see any factory mark there at all,

0:19:220:19:25

but it's almost going to be... certainly be someone like Drocourt or one of the other very good makers,

0:19:250:19:31

and the wonderful give-away here

0:19:310:19:34

is we've got two hammers striking on two bells.

0:19:340:19:38

Right, OK. Now, I'm hoping it might be either a petite sonnerie or a grande sonnerie...

0:19:380:19:43

Do you know what I mean by that particular expression? No, no.

0:19:430:19:46

OK, well, let's just have a look.

0:19:460:19:49

And there you've got the selector lever in the base,

0:19:490:19:53

hours and quarters, quarters only, or silent.

0:19:530:19:57

I wasn't aware that that facility was there.

0:19:570:20:00

Well, it's a good facility because otherwise you're going to get fed up with the quarter striking.

0:20:000:20:04

So it's a grande sonnerie. It's a grande sonnerie carriage clock.

0:20:040:20:08

So it's beautifully made, absolutely top of the range clock.

0:20:080:20:15

It needs a little work on it, but in top retail condition,

0:20:150:20:19

this would be retailing for probably anything between ?9,000 and ?12,000.

0:20:190:20:25

Very, very nice. I wasn't expecting that, actually.

0:20:250:20:30

Were you not? No, I wasn't, no, that's very nice.

0:20:300:20:33

It's a lovely clock. Well, thank you very much.

0:20:330:20:38

We've got three diamond rings here. A basic one...

0:20:500:20:53

They all look pretty nice, frankly, but a basic one worth ?2,000.

0:20:530:20:57

The better one worth ?20,000, and the best one is worth ?50,000.

0:20:570:21:03

Have a look and...

0:21:030:21:05

I mean, use these.

0:21:050:21:06

Tell me which you think is which. It's just pot luck, isn't it?

0:21:060:21:10

You think that's basic, why? It looks it.

0:21:100:21:12

OK! If you're right... Hope that's not the most expensive one.

0:21:120:21:17

It's very difficult because they're beautiful. I think maybe that one.

0:21:170:21:23

I'm not too sure.

0:21:230:21:24

You think that one's the...

0:21:240:21:26

The dearer of the two, more expensive.

0:21:260:21:28

The ?50,000. I'm not sure.

0:21:280:21:30

I think basic here because it's quite blingy

0:21:300:21:35

and it doesn't look as expensive.

0:21:350:21:37

Is there a lady in your life? Yes, she's standing over there.

0:21:370:21:40

Have you bought her a diamond ring? I did yes, not so long ago.

0:21:400:21:43

So you should know what you're talking about.

0:21:430:21:45

Well... Come on, then. She picks, I pay.

0:21:450:21:47

I'll go with the bigger one being the basic one. Oh, really? Why?

0:21:470:21:51

Small is best, sort of thing. Are you saying that because he's listening over there? Yeah.

0:21:510:21:55

Fancy a diamond ring yourself?

0:21:550:21:57

Yeah, I wouldn't mind one.

0:21:570:22:00

Do you know, back in the Ming Dynasty,

0:22:040:22:08

they had stables in the Forbidden City. Right.

0:22:080:22:11

For elephants.

0:22:110:22:12

In China, they were given as a tribute by the Kings of Burma,

0:22:120:22:16

to the Chinese.

0:22:160:22:18

So they actually had stables for them. That was, what, 1368-1644.

0:22:180:22:23

By the time you get to the 18th century,

0:22:230:22:25

elephants had become really quite an important imperial symbol.

0:22:250:22:28

The Emperor Chien-Lung, who reigned in the middle of the 18th century,

0:22:280:22:32

for his birthday processions, he had elephants paraded in front of him

0:22:320:22:36

with vases tied on their backs, and they symbolised peace.

0:22:360:22:39

They have a really interesting history.

0:22:390:22:42

These ones here are a little bit later,

0:22:420:22:46

they date from the 19th century, but when...

0:22:460:22:48

How did you get them? My father-in-law bought a chest of furniture.

0:22:480:22:53

He bought a chest of furniture? Yes, and they were in one of the drawers.

0:22:530:22:57

So that's how they come about.

0:22:570:22:59

That's a pretty damn good find.

0:22:590:23:00

Extraordinary little faces they've got on them, haven't they?

0:23:000:23:04

These date from the middle of the 19th century, they're Chinese.

0:23:040:23:07

It's called famille rose decoration, it's a French term, actually,

0:23:070:23:11

related to the decoration, which is this pink enamel. Yes.

0:23:110:23:14

Which you don't see in Chinese art until after about 1720.

0:23:140:23:17

These ones here would be made for the export market,

0:23:170:23:20

so they were made to be decorative, and they certainly are that,

0:23:200:23:25

with all these flowers all over them and so forth.

0:23:250:23:28

I just can't believe they turned up in a drawer. Yeah!

0:23:280:23:31

So they've been what...passed down the family since? Yeah, my husband's.

0:23:310:23:35

And what do you do with them now, then?

0:23:350:23:37

They were wrapped up in a box.

0:23:370:23:39

What, just wrapped up in a box?

0:23:390:23:40

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:23:400:23:42

OK. I think you've got an amazing find there.

0:23:420:23:46

He did extremely well. They are really quite valuable things now.

0:23:460:23:49

There is a bit of damage. There's a bit of restoration, on one of the trunks

0:23:490:23:53

and on the tail, a little break here. Yes.

0:23:530:23:56

But it's not going to make a huge amount of difference.

0:23:560:23:58

In auction today, I could see these making ?6,000, ?7,000.

0:23:580:24:03

Mm. There you are.

0:24:030:24:06

You know, the crowd behind you are far more astonished than you are.

0:24:060:24:10

It's a lot of money to find in a drawer.

0:24:100:24:12

It is, yeah, yeah, right.

0:24:120:24:15

This utterly captivating little painting really caught my eye

0:24:180:24:22

because I loved all the different chiming colours in it,

0:24:220:24:26

and I thought, how sweet is that?

0:24:260:24:28

And then I saw that it's actually signed by Rex Whistler,

0:24:280:24:32

the great muralist and society portraitist

0:24:320:24:35

and illustrator of books, and I wondered,

0:24:350:24:40

who is that little girl and why is she sitting up in bed like that?

0:24:400:24:43

Well, it's me. It's you, you're the little girl. Yes.

0:24:430:24:47

Why are you in bed?

0:24:470:24:48

Because I'd just had my tonsils and adenoids out

0:24:480:24:52

and I think my mother thought that I would sit still if I was in bed.

0:24:520:24:58

Rex Whistler came round and painted my picture.

0:24:580:25:02

You're being kept busy by cutting up little bits of coloured paper.

0:25:020:25:05

That would keep any child busy, I'm sure. It did, yes.

0:25:050:25:08

But how old were you? I think I was seven, six or seven.

0:25:080:25:12

Because that looks like a child's portrait of Rex Whistler on the blackboard behind,

0:25:120:25:16

and he's signed it "Rex Whistler" on the blackboard and dated it there.

0:25:160:25:19

I think he probably asked me to do it.

0:25:190:25:22

I might have said, "You're painting me, now it's my turn to paint you."

0:25:220:25:26

But it's typical of the wit that he had, isn't it? I know.

0:25:260:25:30

That he would do that. I know. In that little thing.

0:25:300:25:32

Don't you love the way that yellow works with the blue ribbon and the nightie and then this pink flower.

0:25:320:25:37

I love the way it's lit from the window,

0:25:370:25:40

the whole thing beautifully lit, and it's a painting in oils.

0:25:400:25:43

Quite thinly painted, but beautifully glazed and finished.

0:25:430:25:47

There's no question that you're getting better, is there?

0:25:470:25:50

You look really healthy in there.

0:25:500:25:53

Talking of wit, you've got a drawing there by him, haven't you?

0:25:530:25:56

Yes, he gave it to me as a present.

0:25:560:25:59

Let's see. So after he painted you... he gave you this. He gave me a present, yes.

0:25:590:26:03

Because, you see, I grew up with that book that he wrote with his brother Laurence,

0:26:030:26:07

and illustrated with reversible faces.

0:26:070:26:10

This is a reversible face. Yes. So on one side we've got Henry VIII...there he is.

0:26:100:26:15

Yes. I love this. It just gets me every time.

0:26:150:26:17

You turn it upside down and you've got one of his wives,

0:26:170:26:21

Anne of Cleves.

0:26:210:26:22

Yes. Who was very, very ugly.

0:26:220:26:25

But didn't he call her the Mare of Flanders?

0:26:250:26:28

That's right, and sent her straight back again.

0:26:280:26:31

Well, I think it's absolutely hilarious,

0:26:310:26:33

and this is the original? This isn't the print from the book? It's the original, yes.

0:26:330:26:38

This is the actual original. He must have liked you very much. I don't know.

0:26:380:26:42

Well, he certainly did, I would say. Right, right.

0:26:420:26:45

So, he's a great muralist and society painter, isn't he?

0:26:450:26:48

And isn't the cafe in The Tate painted in murals by him? That's right, yes, yes.

0:26:480:26:52

Let's talk about the drawing first.

0:26:520:26:54

If that drawing came onto the market,

0:26:540:26:56

then I'm afraid it's not in fantastic condition.

0:26:560:26:59

It's been through the wars, hasn't it? I'm afraid it has, yes.

0:26:590:27:02

In which case I could really only put ?1,000 to ?2,000 on it. Right.

0:27:020:27:07

But it's still quite a lot for what it is.

0:27:070:27:09

Amazing for the size of it, isn't it? Yes, but it's such a funny thing, I love it.

0:27:090:27:13

Yes. And then on this painting...

0:27:130:27:15

Well, that's a little more difficult.

0:27:150:27:17

I can't remember seeing anything quite as lovely as this by him.

0:27:170:27:21

And I feel that it would make between ?6,000 and ?8,000 at auction.

0:27:210:27:26

Right. But I think that if the right people saw it,

0:27:260:27:29

well, it would soar away and it may not stop until you get to ?15,000.

0:27:290:27:35

Really? Really? Really? Well, hopefully I don't need to sell it.

0:27:350:27:39

Well, of course not.

0:27:390:27:41

No. Well, thank you very much.

0:27:410:27:43

Thank you.

0:27:430:27:44

Jo, you set us this task earlier on

0:27:560:27:59

of trying to work out which of these diamond rings is the basic one,

0:27:590:28:03

worth about 2,000,

0:28:030:28:04

the better one worth a great leap to 20,000

0:28:040:28:07

and then the best worth a socking 50,000.

0:28:070:28:11

It was so difficult, I have to say.

0:28:120:28:15

I, in the end decided, to be perverse, thinking you might have bowled me a googly...

0:28:150:28:20

to put this as the basic because it looks the most ritzy, this is better because I had no idea,

0:28:200:28:25

and this is best because it has a slightly yellowish tinge to it, looked beautiful.

0:28:250:28:29

That's about it, that's as scientific as it got.

0:28:290:28:33

What should we be looking for?

0:28:330:28:35

Well, with diamonds, you have the four Cs,

0:28:350:28:37

which is cut, clarity, colour and carat weight.

0:28:370:28:43

All four of those elements make up to how you value a diamond.

0:28:430:28:46

So it's not just the size of it, then?

0:28:460:28:48

No, no, no, no, it has to be... either be the inclusions...

0:28:480:28:52

If there's inclusions... What does that mean?

0:28:520:28:54

Impurities in the diamond, then the price drops,

0:28:540:28:58

because that's allowing less light to come back to the eye.

0:28:580:29:02

The colour... What you want is like an ice cube.

0:29:020:29:06

And you put an ice cube on the white of a card and it's colourless,

0:29:060:29:10

well, that's what you're looking for with a diamond, the colour is colourless. Oh.

0:29:100:29:14

And then a little bit more yellow that comes into the diamond,

0:29:140:29:18

the less the price.

0:29:180:29:19

OK. I can see which way this is going already, but right.

0:29:190:29:22

Until you get to a really amazing yellow

0:29:220:29:25

and that's a fancy coloured diamond and it shoots up in price again. Right.

0:29:250:29:29

Cut is also very important because you want to be able to get the maximum light back to the eye,

0:29:290:29:35

so you want to have the light coming down through the diamond,

0:29:350:29:38

bouncing across the diamond, and coming back up again,

0:29:380:29:42

and if it's too shallow or too deep,

0:29:420:29:44

the stone will actually look dull.

0:29:440:29:45

And then the weight, the carat weight, that's obviously sort of the size of the diamond.

0:29:450:29:51

So putting it altogether, but just having a big one,

0:29:510:29:54

but with lots of inclusions,

0:29:540:29:56

is not necessarily good

0:29:560:29:58

because you might want one that's smaller but better inclusions and a whiter stone.

0:29:580:30:02

I've got a sinking feeling because I think I've got them completely wrong,

0:30:020:30:06

in completely the wrong order then.

0:30:060:30:08

Go on, move the signs, let's see.

0:30:080:30:10

Well, you've done pretty well, actually. Have I?

0:30:100:30:13

Yeah, you have sort of done very well.

0:30:130:30:15

I'm going to move... That's going to stay the same.

0:30:150:30:19

You were trying to trick us with that, weren't you? This one...

0:30:190:30:22

I'm going to change this one to here, and this one to here.

0:30:220:30:29

Right. Why is this the best one, then? Because it looks quite plain.

0:30:290:30:33

It does, but it's very, very white,

0:30:330:30:35

it is one of the top colours you can get for a diamond

0:30:350:30:40

and it has a wonderful signature, Cartier. Which I didn't spot!

0:30:400:30:43

You'd think after working on this programme for four years, I might have worked that out.

0:30:430:30:48

Can I put this one on, just to show how fabulous it is? Yes, yes.

0:30:480:30:50

Because I suspect it's what it looks like on the hand, look at that.

0:30:500:30:54

Oh, it's beautiful, it really is beautiful. Those...

0:30:540:30:57

It's a perfect cut, you can see how much the light is coming back to the eye,

0:30:570:31:01

how much it's sparkling. That is beautiful.

0:31:010:31:04

It is gorgeous. OK, Mr Cartier, I didn't spot that.

0:31:040:31:07

And for a diamond like that, you don't need a fancy setting.

0:31:070:31:10

The diamond's doing all the talking.

0:31:100:31:13

This one, that I thought was better because it was slightly yellowy, is the reason it's not. Exactly right.

0:31:130:31:18

Now you can see, quite obviously can't you, against this one,

0:31:180:31:21

how it is slightly more yellow, and you can see that visibly,

0:31:210:31:24

so that's why that is the second one.

0:31:240:31:26

And this is the basic one, even though it looks the fanciest one.

0:31:260:31:31

Mmm.

0:31:310:31:33

It's in an Art Deco mount, and they are diamond baguettes,

0:31:330:31:37

but the centre stone is a fake.

0:31:370:31:40

Oh. Crafty. It's a cubic zirconia.

0:31:400:31:45

I wondered if you might have slipped one of those in,

0:31:450:31:47

but I thought 2,000 seems a lot for a fake but... Right.

0:31:470:31:50

Well, the stone itself is worth ?10, it's the mount,

0:31:500:31:54

it's all in the mount. Right, right.

0:31:540:31:55

But you know, sometimes what happens

0:31:550:31:58

is that someone who has a fantastic diamond,

0:31:580:32:00

they might put it in the bank and put a cubic zirconia in so they can...

0:32:000:32:07

They don't have to walk around with the real thing.

0:32:070:32:10

The secrets of the trade! Right. So that's the basic one.

0:32:100:32:13

Well, how fascinating.

0:32:130:32:15

I sense we have an avid collector of tea caddies here.

0:32:170:32:20

That's correct. How long have you been after these chaps?

0:32:200:32:24

20 years.

0:32:240:32:25

And where did you actually get these from?

0:32:250:32:27

They come from an auction.

0:32:270:32:30

Right.

0:32:300:32:31

Is this a recent auction?

0:32:310:32:34

It was only last week.

0:32:340:32:36

Oh, right, oh, so right, fresh. OK, right, OK.

0:32:360:32:40

Well, let me have a look at them.

0:32:400:32:42

They're very interesting and this is obviously tortoiseshell as you...

0:32:420:32:46

I'm sure you realise. Yeah. And this lovely Regency shape...

0:32:460:32:50

the sarcophagus shape of this one, but let's have a look.

0:32:500:32:54

Studied silence.

0:32:570:32:59

What were they described as in the... catalogue, presumably, was it?

0:33:030:33:07

It was tortoiseshell tea caddies.

0:33:070:33:10

Right. Did they date them?

0:33:100:33:13

No date.

0:33:130:33:14

What date do you think they are?

0:33:150:33:17

I think about 1780, 1790.

0:33:180:33:22

Well, the shape is a little bit later than that,

0:33:220:33:24

I'm not going to split hairs with you, but we would call them Regency, 1810. Yes, that's what I mean.

0:33:240:33:29

But we're roughly in the same date as the house that we're standing in front of, yeah, yeah.

0:33:290:33:35

Well.

0:33:350:33:37

These aren't old. A week?

0:33:370:33:40

Well, they're probably older than a week.

0:33:400:33:43

But I'm afraid they're modern copies.

0:33:450:33:47

Made in China?

0:33:470:33:49

Possibly made in China, or Taiwan, anyway, somewhere like that,

0:33:490:33:53

and I'll try and explain a few reasons why.

0:33:530:33:56

I think, picking them up, looking at the underside here,

0:33:560:33:59

that is fabricated date and age.

0:33:590:34:03

The baize in here... well, that can be replaced, obviously.

0:34:050:34:08

An awful lot of silvering left in there,

0:34:080:34:13

and usually that's gone for this period.

0:34:130:34:16

The lock... I'm not aware of any of these being made...

0:34:160:34:20

It's essentially an English type tea caddy

0:34:200:34:23

with a circular pin and circular hole there.

0:34:230:34:26

That's more of a Continental lock and pin,

0:34:260:34:30

and the brass isn't quite right.

0:34:300:34:32

This to me, again, the outside is the same, a bit too good to be true.

0:34:320:34:36

I'm sorry about this. OK.

0:34:370:34:39

Why have you got this oak here? Why, what's that for? And there's no...

0:34:390:34:43

When you look at that, when you think about it... Really fresh.

0:34:430:34:46

You've got the experience of 20 years of collecting,

0:34:460:34:50

and in hindsight, you can see how fresh that is.

0:34:500:34:52

There's a lot of dirt around, and, you know,

0:34:520:34:56

you don't see dirt in tea caddies very often,

0:34:560:34:58

not unless they've been buried or something like that.

0:34:580:35:02

I'm afraid you have two modern fakes.

0:35:020:35:04

Forgeries.

0:35:040:35:06

It's your word. I'm afraid so, they are absolutely brand new.

0:35:060:35:10

Whether it's last year or last month, I'm not sure.

0:35:100:35:14

And you wonder how many are around when you see these.

0:35:140:35:17

Did you pay a lot of money for them?

0:35:170:35:19

I wouldn't like to tell you.

0:35:190:35:21

You're not going to tell..!

0:35:210:35:24

Well, I wonder if there's a recourse.

0:35:240:35:26

Don't think so.

0:35:260:35:27

I'm not sure that I really should be giving a value on the Antiques Roadshow of these,

0:35:290:35:33

because I don't want to give any credence at all

0:35:330:35:37

to the fact that these are fake pieces,

0:35:370:35:39

they shouldn't be on the market.

0:35:390:35:41

And another reason for that is that this is...we always call it tortoiseshell...

0:35:410:35:45

it's turtle shell. That's splitting hairs in a way, but it's illegal to trade in this,

0:35:450:35:50

and you need a CITES licence to get them in and out of Europe,

0:35:500:35:53

so, you know, I think I'm going to leave the value out.

0:35:530:35:56

They're not old. I'm afraid you were sold a pup.

0:35:560:36:00

Looks like it.

0:36:000:36:03

Tell me what you paid for them.

0:36:030:36:04

Whisper it to me. Nobody'll hear.

0:36:040:36:08

I'll say it out. This is for all your benefits.

0:36:080:36:12

The larger of the two was ?1,500 before fees,

0:36:120:36:16

the smaller one was ?1,100 before fees.

0:36:160:36:19

Thank you for being so frank with us.

0:36:190:36:22

So you're chatting roughly ?3,000.

0:36:220:36:26

I'm so very grateful that you've allowed us to record these,

0:36:260:36:30

because I think it's important that the public see what's going on. I agree with you.

0:36:300:36:34

They're really good copies, they're fakes, they've taken you in.

0:36:340:36:37

You're an experienced collector. We all have this problem.

0:36:370:36:41

Not experienced enough on this occasion.

0:36:410:36:44

Well, well, it's very important people get the very best advice.

0:36:440:36:47

I'm very grateful you've shown them to us and to everybody else. Thank you.

0:36:470:36:51

I don't want to give the impression of being rude when I say this,

0:36:540:36:58

but these three pieces have been worn out.

0:36:580:37:02

Give me some information about why they're so worn.

0:37:020:37:05

They belonged to my father, and he inherited them from my great uncle.

0:37:050:37:10

He worked in London and he was a maitre d'

0:37:100:37:14

in a gentleman's residence. What, like a club? A gentlemen's club.

0:37:140:37:19

A private gentlemen's club. Right, right.

0:37:190:37:21

He acquired them from a gentleman

0:37:210:37:24

who unfortunately ran up quite a substantial account.

0:37:240:37:28

Oh, really? Yes.

0:37:280:37:30

So he was somebody who was there and he enjoyed himself enormously

0:37:300:37:35

and then on the day of presenting him with the cheque, it evaporated.

0:37:350:37:38

He couldn't... Correct, yes.

0:37:380:37:41

Oh, dear. So what did he say to him?

0:37:410:37:43

"Well, you've got to pay for your bill somehow or other"?

0:37:430:37:47

Yes. He said to my great uncle,

0:37:470:37:51

"Well, have you any other means by settling your account?"

0:37:510:37:55

and he said that he had actually three sapphire and diamond rings in platinum, and a watch.

0:37:550:38:03

Yes.

0:38:030:38:06

And would that do, to settle the account, and he liked them so much

0:38:060:38:10

and decided to purchase them and settle the gentleman's account.

0:38:100:38:14

Yes, it has to be said that it worked out rather well for the family, didn't it? Don't you agree? Yes.

0:38:140:38:20

When was he working at the club in London? He would have been working probably during WWII,

0:38:200:38:26

right up until about 1960. '65, he died.

0:38:260:38:30

I think that these two rings... Now, you know what they are, they're diamond, sapphire and platinum.

0:38:300:38:35

Yes. I think they were made in around about 1935.

0:38:350:38:38

Right.

0:38:380:38:40

But the sapphires are these Burmese blue,

0:38:400:38:42

this royal blue that we find with the very best of the best sapphires.

0:38:420:38:47

Now this one is a faceted sapphire.

0:38:470:38:49

Right.

0:38:490:38:51

And this one is a polished en cabochon.

0:38:510:38:54

The diamonds are on the shoulders. Yes.

0:38:540:38:56

There. Ultimately, if someone were to buy them,

0:38:560:38:59

they would have those sapphires polished. Right.

0:38:590:39:02

Now we move on to the most seriously distressed item of the three,

0:39:020:39:07

which is the wrist watch, which is so distressed that it is...

0:39:070:39:11

I mean... What word could one use to describe it?

0:39:110:39:14

It's in a mess, isn't it? It really, really is.

0:39:140:39:18

My father says it's worth something in scrap

0:39:180:39:21

and I thought I'll bring it along.

0:39:210:39:23

Well, it... All right, well, first of all I'm going to start off

0:39:230:39:27

by saying that the bracelet is simply white metal, it's steel.

0:39:270:39:30

So there's no scrappage there, sorry to say.

0:39:300:39:32

Let's have a look at the case. The face... You can see, it's worn out.

0:39:320:39:38

This is very difficult to touch because it's very loose,

0:39:380:39:42

but what I've done is, I've taken the little screws out of here.

0:39:420:39:45

OK, right. To reveal the core, to look inside it.

0:39:450:39:48

Right.

0:39:480:39:50

Now we move on to the interesting feature of this.

0:39:500:39:54

Now remember the man who owned it in the first place before your great uncle. Yes, the gentleman.

0:39:540:39:58

Now, do you see that mark there? Yes.

0:39:580:40:00

That little stamp there, platinum. Definitely.

0:40:000:40:03

Now, look at the combination here of the yellow gold

0:40:030:40:08

against the platinum. Yes.

0:40:080:40:11

Now, that's a bit classy.

0:40:110:40:12

You can see that here there's a tiny little individual number

0:40:120:40:17

that's been stamped onto the case at the back. Right.

0:40:170:40:20

So we're moving things up a stage, this is numbered. OK.

0:40:200:40:23

Platinum and 18 carat gold.

0:40:230:40:26

Oh.

0:40:260:40:27

And the little mark there is French.

0:40:270:40:29

The reason that I wanted to unscrew the screws from the side of the case

0:40:290:40:34

was to have a look at the movement.

0:40:340:40:38

Now, you're going to be disappointed. Not signed. Oh, right.

0:40:380:40:43

But the movement is by something called the European Watch and Clock Company Ltd.

0:40:430:40:49

So that throws up a very interesting conjecture,

0:40:490:40:53

because if it's by the European Watch and Clock Company,

0:40:530:40:56

they were people who used to make their movements

0:40:560:41:00

for a very significant company.

0:41:000:41:02

Right.

0:41:020:41:04

Shall we move on to values?

0:41:050:41:07

I'm scared now. This is stored in the garage.

0:41:070:41:12

It ain't going to be stored in the garage any more, that's for sure.

0:41:120:41:17

It's been 30 years in our garage. Right. I'm scared.

0:41:170:41:22

Right. OK, ready?

0:41:220:41:24

OK. I don't know.

0:41:240:41:25

This is going to be...in its existing state ?1,000 to ?1,500.

0:41:250:41:30

OK. That's very good.

0:41:300:41:33

Right. This one here, I love that sapphire,

0:41:330:41:35

it's got a real glow of blue to it.

0:41:350:41:39

?1,500 to ?2,000, I suppose, something like that.

0:41:390:41:45

Now, do you remember I told you about the European Watch Company?

0:41:450:41:48

Yes. They used to make movements for a company called Cartier.

0:41:480:41:53

Oh, no. I don't...

0:41:530:41:55

I don't...!

0:41:550:41:58

Are you ready? No, I'm not!

0:41:580:42:02

Are you ready?

0:42:020:42:03

We'll be all right.

0:42:030:42:05

?5,000.

0:42:050:42:07

Oh!

0:42:070:42:08

Worth getting fixed, really.

0:42:090:42:12

Can we have them fixed?

0:42:120:42:15

What needs to happen with that, it needs to be restored,

0:42:160:42:20

it also needs to go to Cartier

0:42:200:42:24

so that they can state categorically that it is their watch.

0:42:240:42:29

Subject to their confirmation, that it is Cartier,

0:42:290:42:32

all the factors in place, so what are we talking about here?

0:42:320:42:36

Between the one, two, three pieces here...

0:42:360:42:38

oh, I don't know, ?7,500 to ?10,000.

0:42:380:42:42

Thank you very much, John. Thank you.

0:42:420:42:45

Thank you very much. You're a treasure.

0:42:450:42:49

What a great result for those two ladies. That was just fantastic.

0:42:530:42:58

And all I can say is, ?7,500 to ?10,000,

0:42:580:43:01

that must have been one heck of a bar bill!

0:43:010:43:04

From Castle Coole in County Fermanagh,

0:43:040:43:06

from all of us here, until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:060:43:10

Fiona Bruce and the team visit Northern Ireland for a busy day of evaluations at Castle Coole near Enniskillen.

Amongst the objects catching the experts' eyes are a pair of tea caddies that raise suspicions, a valuable carriage clock with royal association, and a watch and two rings accepted as payment for an unpaid bar bill which provide a surprise ending.