Seaton Delaval 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Seaton Delaval 1

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts visit the recently reopened Seaton Delaval Hall, where they see one of the most sophisticated clocks ever seen on the show.


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We're just outside Newcastle on the windy northeast coast of England.

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We're at a stately home...

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"Nothing unusual in that," I hear you say...

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but what is different is that local people raised almost

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£1 million to stop this place falling into private ownership.

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So what is it about this home that made them so keen to save it?

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Seaton Delaval Hall,

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home for centuries to the Delaval family.

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There's a picture on the cover of the brand-new brochure

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of many of the people involved in raising the money

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that enabled the National Trust to buy Seaton Delaval Hall.

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So why did 100,000 residents speak out

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against the Hall being sold to private developers?

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Was it because of the lineage

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stretching back as far as William the Conqueror?

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Was it because their ancestors worked down the family mines

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or in the family glassworks?

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Or was it the flamboyant lifestyle of previous residents here?

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Whatever the reason, one of the most obvious answers must be that,

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amidst the suburban sprawl, industrial landscape

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and romantic coastal scenery, stands a haven of peace -

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Seaton Delaval Hall.

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Perhaps that's the most likely explanation as to why

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the place is loved so much by the local community.

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Designed in the early 1700s by the great Sir John Vanbrugh -

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the architect of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard -

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its future was suddenly thrown into doubt by the death in 2007

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of its owner, Lord Hastings,

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who devoted a lifetime to its rescue and care.

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But this isn't the first time that the local people have come to the rescue of the Hall.

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At dusk on 3rd January 1822,

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sailors out at sea thought the sunset seemed unusually bright.

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Seaton Delaval Hall was on fire.

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Hundreds of people rushed to the scene and managed to save

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some of the building, and some of the family's portraits and possessions.

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But, as a result, the Hall wasn't fully occupied by the family

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until the 1980s, when the late Lord and Lady Hastings took up residence.

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Even today, the Great Hall is preserved as a ruin -

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a reminder of its past. As for the future,

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well, the role of local people here at Seaton Delaval Hall is unique.

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They can use the place for community gatherings and celebrations,

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but also, they are crucial to the running of it,

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and you can spot them working in the house.

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That's Liz, (doing a guided tour.)

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Even outside in the gardens,

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volunteers like Michael are busy keeping it all looking beautiful.

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Just one of the gardening team, making sure the grounds

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are in perfect order for this week's Antiques Roadshow.

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If my house was to catch fire this evening, that would be

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the first thing that I'd grab to remove, take from the house.

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I love it. I've had it 50-odd years.

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Right. What do you think it is?

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Just a naive toy.

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I bought that from a gentleman whose family had lived in the same house

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forever, and it was a house, little cottage in Shildon

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which backed onto the original Darlington-to-Stockton railway

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and I can only assume that that's a toy made by a father

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for his son as he watched that chugging up and down

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outside his back yard.

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Well, that story is wonderful, and it could be fantasy,

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but, actually, I'm thinking along the same lines.

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-Really? Ah.

-Let's look at it briefly.

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It's incredibly crude and it's made of re-used components.

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This is probably a leg of a chair. That could be a stair banister.

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It's old bits and pieces knocked together - as you say -

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to please a child,

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and it looks like a locomotive of the 1820-1830 period.

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I think I should explain the reason why I'm so excited.

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We're right at the birth of railways. The Stockton and Darlington -

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up the road, in effect - was opened in 1825.

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The Liverpool and Manchester -

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Stevenson, the great name associated with it -

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opening a few years later. It's not quite the Rocket, you know,

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but it's looking like it.

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It's certainly based on a locomotive of that period.

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So, if this is actually recording those very early years

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of railway history, it is an extraordinary document.

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-Well, I love it.

-You love it.

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-You'd save it from your house.

-Yes, I really do.

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I'd save it from my house because I am holding what could be

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the oldest toy train in the world.

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Have you thought of that?

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No, I'd never thought of it in that respect, no, not at all.

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I mean crude, basic, like something that's been knocked together

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by someone who wasn't even a very good carpenter.

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I had things like that when I was a child.

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-I expect you did, too.

-I certainly did.

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But it's got to start somewhere. Now, if I'm right,

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if this is the world's earliest toy train, what's it worth?

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HE LAUGHS

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That... I'd never thought of it in those terms.

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It is, quite literally, one of those things that I won't part with.

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I'll sell most things, but certainly not that.

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-We'll never prove it.

-No, of course not.

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It's either worth £20 as a piece of curiosity or it's worth...

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£5,000.

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You know, it's somewhere between those two, but we'll never prove it.

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-No, never will.

-I mean, we both love it.

-I do. May I take it?

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You... Sadly, you can take it.

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Thank you very, very much. Glad to have shared your enthusiasm.

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-And yours.

-Thank you.

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Basically they were given to me, and I was very lucky.

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I lived in Newport, Monmouthshire - as it then was called -

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43 years ago, 1968...

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and I was a student and there was another student who was graduating that year,

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and he had found these. I think they were about to go in a skip.

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I think if they'd gone in the skip, they would have been seriously damaged.

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He told me that it was a church that was being destroyed

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and so he rescued them. And he couldn't take them with him when he left,

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so I took them from him, and I've carried them with me ever since.

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Well, when you think about

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all the churches that have been demolished

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in the last 50, 60 years, it's scary to think

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of the sort of things that would just be thrown in a skip.

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-Absolutely.

-So, yeah, rescue is the word, isn't it?

-It is.

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Well, let me just say that

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when it comes to items of a religious nature,

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they tend, generally, to be ignored,

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-certainly from the 19th century, anyway.

-Yeah.

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-And these are, I think it's fair to say, 19th century.

-Yes.

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But there's a little bit more to them, I think,

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in some respects. I think we've got part of the subject here,

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-because they've formed a frame, haven't they?

-Yes.

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-I can't help but think that there would have been something central.

-I wish I knew what it was!

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Well, I think that'll keep you guessing for the rest of your life.

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-Yes.

-But just looking at them stylistically, I can say that,

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you know, that they are very much of the early 19th century.

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-Oh, right.

-But they're also... They go back further in time

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because there's a hint of the Italian Renaissance here.

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-Yes, isn't there? They're lovely.

-And they're not late 19th because, you know,

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late-19th-century angels tend to have large wings,

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-they belong to the Pre-Raphaelite movement.

-Yes.

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And these, I have to say, are a little bit earlier.

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The good thing is, everybody loves angels.

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Have you done any research on these people at all?

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I haven't. I briefly looked to see whether I could find out what churches

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were destroyed in Newport in 1967-1968,

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without any success, I have to say.

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OK, so, with something like this, you know, you're left pondering.

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Who's going to be interested? It's the sort of thing I expect to find

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in an architectural sort of salvage place.

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Yes, oh, I'd hate to see them in a salvage place.

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-Well, you've moved house with these, have you?

-They've lived in about 10 or 11 different places now.

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Oh, my goodness me!

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It's very difficult to put a definite value on them,

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-because they are, you know, they're only plaster.

-Yes.

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And I'm just sort of pulling a figure out of thin air,

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but I can't help but think that if I went into an architectural place

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wanting to buy these, I think they'd be asking me around about £800.

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-Right.

-But, let's face it, you know,

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how can you put a price on six angels?

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-Absolutely.

-Because most of us are very happy to have one guardian angel in our lives.

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-Yes.

-And you've got six.

-I know. Aren't I lucky?

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-It's a very handsome oak director's clock, isn't it?

-Yes.

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But what I particularly like is this magnificent

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engraving down here of this iron bridge.

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What do you know about that one?

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It was donated to a Mr Bell in commemorating

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the building of the bridge over the River Wandswick.

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-Does the bridge still exist?

-Yes.

-Train bridge

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-or road bridge?

-Train bridge.

-It just looks sensational.

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-How local is it, just a few miles?

-About seven miles, perhaps.

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Oh, right. Dated 1909, which is obviously

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-the completion of the bridge, I imagine.

-Yes.

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Now, these big director's clocks

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were either made in the UK or in Germany.

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They are all roughly this size, they come in oak, mahogany

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or even in ebonised wood, but the instant giveaway

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that the country of origin is one particular one,

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is the fact that...

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It is quarter-chiming, you've got your strike/silent,

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but it's only two-train.

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In other words, normally these big clocks have three trains,

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-so going, striking and quarter-chiming.

-Right.

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And I'd expect to see, on an English example, lots of gongs

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or even eight bells, but here, we've just got the two trains.

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So, let's just hear what sort of sound it's going to make

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on the quarters. Just running it past the three-quarter.

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CLOCK CHIMES

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So, a nice, mellow quarter-strike really, isn't it?

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Let's have a look at the movement.

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There we go, a typical small-size German movement,

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and even signed here.

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Do you see that factory stamp down at the bottom?

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-Oh, yes.

-The "W&H", that's Winterhalder and Hoffmeier.

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Now, they did make big-size movements as well,

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but this is the slightly cheaper version.

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So... Is it something you've bought recently, or not?

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Approximately 15 years ago. I bought it from a friend.

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-And what did he charge you?

-He charged me...I think...

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-it was around about £400.

-400 quid.

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Do you think you were tucked up, or do you think you got a fair deal?

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I'll wait and see.

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RICHARD LAUGHS

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I think your £400 today is going to be

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-roughly £1,500 at auction.

-My goodness.

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-So, he didn't do you too badly, did he?

-He's forgiven.

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Forgiven! Great word, I like it.

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Well, it's unusual to see one work by John Gilroy,

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but four lovely watercolours by this artist is very unusual.

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Is he a friend of the family, or did you buy them, or...?

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-He was a friend of my mother's family.

-Right.

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And these pictures were all done in her autograph album.

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-Oh, I see, in a sort of visitors' book sort of thing, was it, or...?

-Well, they were friends.

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-Right.

-I think, quite close friends.

-More than friends.

-Oh, right, was he an admirer?

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-I think so.

-An admirer, that's correct, yes.

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-And is this beautiful woman here your mother?

-Yes.

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Oh, how lovely, so it really is a very sort of intimate portrait.

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-Very special.

-Special portrait.

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-And Gilroy was also the man responsible for the great Guinness advertisements.

-Indeed.

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If I remember, the man with the girder on his shoulder...

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"Guinness gives you strength".

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-That's it, and also the toucans.

-Yes.

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Which was...you know...

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still I think used 30 or 40 years later, wasn't it?

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-Two can.

-Two can, exactly.

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And he did do royal portraits, as well.

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-So he did royal portraits and I believe he painted Churchill.

-Yes.

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-And Gielgud and...

-All the important people.

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-And your mother-in-law, your mother.

-That's correct.

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But aren't these drawings absolutely...

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-These sort of cartoons here, I love.

-These are First World War cartoons.

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First World War, so, he wasn't that old,

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-because I think he was born in 1898.

-Correct.

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So, towards the end of the First World War - he was in his 20s, so he was a young man.

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-Yes, that's true, yes.

-And I love this, "a small scotch". Do you know anything about that?

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My father-in-law was Scottish

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and when I was 50,

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my generous mother-in-law presented me with those.

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Oh, how lovely. So was your father-in-law a small man?

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Yes, he was.

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-Or did he like scotch?

-BOTH: Both!

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When he discovered I came from Durham, he said,

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"Oh, well, he can no' help that".

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I love it. Well, they're unique, they're very intimate to you,

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and I think that they're absolutely lovely.

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The more I look at them, the more I love them, and the more,

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in my mind, the value's going up. Probably not a good thing, actually!

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All we have left of sentimental value, rather than money.

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Exactly, exactly. Well, do you want to know what they're worth?

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-Yes, well of course.

-Yes, please.

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I've going to say for the four, because it's going to be a bit easier. I think for the four,

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they're worth around sort of £1,500 to £2,000.

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-Really?

-They're jolly nice.

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A collection of enamel lapel badges

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from various local racing venues, and a racing game.

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You must be a man of the turf.

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No, they belonged to me grandfather

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and when he died, in 1953, they were left to me.

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So, every time he went to a meeting, he got a lapel badge.

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Well, no, he joined the actual racecourse,

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and that was what you used to get when you paid your subscription.

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OK. Well, I also assume, when he couldn't go racing, he took a game that he could play at home.

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I don't know exactly where this came from.

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All I know is that he used to own five pubs in Durham

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and whether somebody came into the pub and offered it to him or not,

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-I don't know.

-Well, I'm very excited about the game,

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more than the lapel badges. We might be talking about, I don't know,

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£20, £30, £40 each.

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But you've got quite a lot of them.

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They all add up - a few hundred pounds.

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But this is something very special.

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This is made by a manufacturer called William Britain,

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who manufactured these in London.

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Very famous for making lead soldiers

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over a period from 1890 all the way up to...

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They're still in production today.

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William Britain's obviously long gone,

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but this is a very early, 1880/1890, gaming toy.

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So how it worked was that you would actually wind

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a piece of string around here, give it a tug then this inertia wheel

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would spin around and that would activate all the horses

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to race round the course,

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and obviously one would win.

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Well, he obviously loved it and it's obviously been well played with.

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If you had to buy it today,

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you're talking about a figure between £800 and £1,200.

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Ooh.

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If there is one word guaranteed to quicken the pulse

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of any glass expert on the Roadshow, it is Lalique,

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and Eric Knowles knows a thing or two about Lalique.

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He's given us three vases.

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One of them is worth about £400 - that's the basic one.

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The better one is worth 800.

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And then the best one is worth £2,000.

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Now, which is which?

0:16:420:16:43

It's certainly not obvious to me, so I'm going to ask our visitors,

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see if they've got a clue.

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We're fortunate enough to see quite a lot of salt-glazed stone ware

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on the Antiques Roadshow,

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but with its wonderful border of beautiful flowers,

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there's a little bit more to this than meets the eye.

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But tell me your connection to it.

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Well, it belongs to my mother-in-law, one of a pair,

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and the other one has a sunflower on,

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and we looked for something interesting to bring along

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and then when I looked at the bottom I saw "17-1-82",

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I said, "Oh, 1982," and she went,

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"Hardly, Maggie! I'm 90, and I remember it as a very little girl."

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And that's... We don't know anything about it.

0:17:330:17:36

So you don't know where it came from or who made it?

0:17:360:17:38

-No, no. She doesn't, either.

-Let me unravel the mystery for you a bit more.

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-You pointed out that mark on the bottom.

-Yes, 1982.

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"17-1-82."

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-Not 1982, but 1882.

-OK.

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And above here, we have a very important mark.

0:17:520:17:55

-"RW Martin, London and Southall".

-Oh, right.

0:17:550:17:58

Which stands for Robert Wallace Martin, one of the Martin Brothers.

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-Oh.

-Who at the end of the 19th century were probably

0:18:030:18:06

-the most famous studio potters of their time.

-Really?

-Oh, yes.

0:18:060:18:10

They became renowned

0:18:100:18:11

for the manufacture of fine stone ware

0:18:110:18:14

and they're really famous for their wonderful comic grotesque birds,

0:18:140:18:17

-which we call the Wally Birds.

-Ah.

0:18:170:18:19

But the nice thing about the Martin Brothers is that every single piece is unique.

0:18:190:18:25

Every single piece is different. But they had a wonderful understanding

0:18:250:18:28

of the potter's art and all the way through from 1873,

0:18:280:18:31

when they first started in Fulham, to 1915,

0:18:310:18:35

-when they closed in Southall, they produced beautiful pots.

-Oh.

0:18:350:18:39

Now, this one does have one little bit of damage.

0:18:390:18:42

-Damage, yes.

-Just on the edge of the foot.

0:18:420:18:44

But, that said, your lovely Martin Brothers jug

0:18:440:18:47

would easily fetch somewhere in the region of £600 to £800.

0:18:470:18:52

Oh, really? That's amazing.

0:18:520:18:56

So, I think you can go back now and inform your mother-in-law...

0:18:560:19:01

You can impart all that information, but continue to love it

0:19:010:19:04

-with a little bit more knowledge.

-OK. Thank you very much.

0:19:040:19:07

Now, what do you think, in the 18th century, was the greatest fear

0:19:070:19:13

and danger to many houses throughout the world, but certainly in Britain?

0:19:130:19:18

-Fire.

-Correct. Well done. You're absolutely right.

0:19:180:19:24

This house being a prime example.

0:19:240:19:27

I mean, gutted in the great fire in the early 19th century,

0:19:270:19:32

and the central part of the house clearly never recovered.

0:19:320:19:35

And that was the big problem, and so the ingenuity of dozens and dozens

0:19:350:19:43

of inventors and patentees went into making candle wick trimmers.

0:19:430:19:48

Because, you've got to think,

0:19:480:19:51

in the 18th century, candles were not as well refined as the candles

0:19:510:19:55

we have today, and the wicks did gutter and splutter

0:19:550:19:59

and grew long and incandescent, and if you just cut it off,

0:19:590:20:02

what happened to the bit that you cut off?

0:20:020:20:06

-It would fall on the floor.

-It would fall on the floor,

0:20:060:20:08

and go through a gap in the floorboards,

0:20:080:20:11

where there would be a lovely draught underneath

0:20:110:20:14

and the house would burn down. And so, as I say,

0:20:140:20:16

the ingenuity of all sorts of inventors went into creating

0:20:160:20:20

candle snuffers that avoided that.

0:20:200:20:22

So, your candle is guttering, it needs trimming, you open that...

0:20:220:20:26

just as a pair of scissors.

0:20:260:20:28

Originally, this would have automatically risen as you scissored it.

0:20:280:20:33

As you closed it, cut the wick, it snaps down, trapping the bit of wick in the box.

0:20:330:20:39

Very simple, very ingenious and it must have saved many a house.

0:20:390:20:44

This example was made in the second quarter of the 19th century.

0:20:440:20:48

They're not quite Georgian - maybe in the 1840s.

0:20:480:20:52

They are... Where do you think they were made?

0:20:520:20:55

-Italy or...

-No, no, they are English.

0:20:550:20:58

-They're English.

-They are, almost without doubt, made in Sheffield.

0:20:580:21:01

-Right.

-Possibly Birmingham.

0:21:010:21:04

So, they are a perfect example of one of the measures taken

0:21:040:21:08

to avoid the great danger of 18th- and early-19th-century houses.

0:21:080:21:12

What are they worth?

0:21:120:21:15

In that condition...

0:21:150:21:17

Interesting, but less than perfect... Probably £100, the lot.

0:21:170:21:22

-Right.

-But you can't get away from, I think,

0:21:220:21:25

-the fascination of the story.

-Well, my grandfather actually...

0:21:250:21:29

Even though he had electricity and gas, he read by candle.

0:21:290:21:35

-Right up to his dying day.

-And did he use these very ones?

0:21:350:21:39

Yes. That's why they're like that now.

0:21:390:21:42

Right, so they've been used and overused for much longer than their normal working life.

0:21:420:21:47

I would think so!

0:21:470:21:49

We have got three glass vases here.

0:21:550:21:59

One's worth 400, another's worth £800,

0:21:590:22:03

and then the best one of all is worth £2,000.

0:22:030:22:06

Have a little look and tell me which you think is which.

0:22:060:22:10

I would think, maybe, that one.

0:22:100:22:12

-This one?

-Basic.

-Basic.

-I think.

0:22:120:22:16

-No, this one.

-That's the better one.

-The better one.

0:22:160:22:19

Right, which means by an inexorable process of deduction...

0:22:190:22:22

-Quite.

-..this is the best.

-The best one.

-Why do you think this is the best one?

0:22:220:22:26

It's old, it looks old.

0:22:260:22:29

-The best is this one?

-Probably, because it's more small and dinky.

0:22:290:22:33

It's just prettier and fancier than the other two.

0:22:330:22:36

-So, you think this is the best one?

-Yes.

0:22:360:22:38

-This is pretty lovely, this one. Are you sure?

-You're trying to persuade me.

-Well...!

0:22:380:22:43

-I don't know, I just have a feeling about it.

-A feeling?

-Yes.

0:22:430:22:47

What do you think? What do you think, Fiona?

0:22:470:22:49

-You tell me.

-Well, now, that would be telling.

0:22:490:22:52

-Eric Knowles is going to tell us very shortly.

-OK.

0:22:520:22:55

-Are you going to stick with these?

-Yes, I will do.

0:22:550:22:58

There's one area of antiques that's seen a meteoric rise

0:22:590:23:03

in the last few years, and that's in all things Chinese.

0:23:030:23:07

You've brought along a very pretty tea set that's typical of tea sets

0:23:070:23:13

made in Canton and Shanghai in the early 20th century.

0:23:130:23:18

And if we pick this up, and have a look at the bottom,

0:23:180:23:23

it's got the maker's mark - "HC" for Hung Chong.

0:23:230:23:27

Fairly prolific maker in the late 19th century

0:23:270:23:30

and early 20th century, but decorated in typical prunus leaves,

0:23:300:23:35

and has become very sought-after in just the last few years.

0:23:350:23:42

But you've also brought along...this.

0:23:420:23:45

Now, that's what I call a bowl.

0:23:450:23:49

It seems that you have some connection with the Far East here.

0:23:490:23:53

Is that where they were acquired?

0:23:530:23:56

Yes, Great Uncle lived in Shanghai in the early 20th century

0:23:560:24:00

and he worked for ICI, and then he was captured during the war,

0:24:000:24:06

and, after the war, he took everything to South Africa with him,

0:24:060:24:10

and it's passed down the line,

0:24:100:24:12

-so we've got hundreds of Chinese things.

-Hundreds?

-Hundreds.

0:24:120:24:16

SHE LAUGHS

0:24:160:24:18

Well, that's a good start!

0:24:180:24:22

This, actually, isn't Chinese.

0:24:220:24:24

-Oh, right.

-It's Japanese.

-Oh, right.

-Japanese is still pretty sought-after,

0:24:240:24:28

but not quite had the same rise in popularity that the Chinese market has seen.

0:24:280:24:34

But it's a well-known design with all these wonderful lily leaves

0:24:340:24:39

round the side, and it looks like it's had a little bit of damage

0:24:390:24:43

in places, but it's obviously had quite a history.

0:24:430:24:47

Great parties.

0:24:470:24:49

HE LAUGHS

0:24:490:24:51

But the main thing about silver from this part of the world

0:24:510:24:55

is the Chinese themselves are buying huge quantities.

0:24:550:24:58

A Chinese tea set like that, a few years ago,

0:24:580:25:02

would have made £300.

0:25:020:25:06

Now, that is worth 700, 800, maybe 1,000.

0:25:070:25:13

Wow.

0:25:130:25:14

This bowl - made again in the early part of the 20th century -

0:25:140:25:20

is not solid.

0:25:200:25:22

It's actually lined and a lining of silver and hollow inside.

0:25:220:25:26

If I tap it...

0:25:260:25:27

-HOLLOW TAPPING

-Come in!

0:25:270:25:29

..you can hear that it is hollow inside.

0:25:290:25:32

Still, it's staggeringly good size, isn't it?

0:25:320:25:36

Apart from being a little dirty! When cleaned up, it will look terrific,

0:25:360:25:40

and I think that, also, is a pretty saleable piece.

0:25:400:25:45

-I would comfortably think that would make 4,000.

-Right.

0:25:450:25:51

This is a copy of Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets.

0:25:530:25:56

As every Harry Potter fan will know,

0:25:560:25:58

that's the second in the series -

0:25:580:26:00

the one after The Philosopher's Stone -

0:26:000:26:02

-but this is a rather special volume to you.

-Yes.

0:26:020:26:05

-Signed, on the title page, by members of the cast.

-Yes.

0:26:050:26:09

-Can you tell me who's who here?

-There's Rupert Grint, who played Ron,

0:26:090:26:13

Emma Watson, who played Hermione,

0:26:130:26:17

-Chris Columbus, who was the director of the first two films...

-Right.

0:26:170:26:21

-..Daniel Radcliffe...

-Daniel Radcliffe, excellent.

0:26:210:26:23

..and a signature from Sean Haggerty.

0:26:230:26:25

-Sean Haggerty, who played Oliver Wood.

-Yes.

0:26:250:26:27

Okey dokey. How have you come by this volume?

0:26:270:26:30

Well, I was an extra on the first two films.

0:26:300:26:33

And I gave it to the director, Chris,

0:26:330:26:37

and he got it signed by the cast and himself.

0:26:370:26:40

-I've got the first book signed, but didn't bring it today.

-You've got The Philosopher's Stone?

-Yes.

0:26:400:26:45

-But not a first edition.

-No, not a first edition.

0:26:450:26:47

Well, this is not a first edition, either. On the back of the title page, we should have a full set

0:26:470:26:51

of numbers there - zero to ten - which we haven't, but I don't think that matters in this instance.

0:26:510:26:57

-It's the signatures and the history that it all means to you.

-Yes.

0:26:570:27:00

That sounds to be a very sort of glamorous actress lifestyle you were leading as a young lady.

0:27:000:27:05

Not really, it just got me out of school for a few weeks!

0:27:050:27:08

This is a document that says you were allowed to take time off school and go and be an extra in the films.

0:27:080:27:13

-Yes.

-What did you actually do?

-Just got dressed up as a witch

0:27:130:27:16

and was around in the background, basically! It wasn't very glamorous.

0:27:160:27:21

-It sounds like fun.

-Yes.

-And you got paid for this?

0:27:210:27:24

Just £35 a day. Nothing to break the bank.

0:27:240:27:27

-But when I was eleven, that was quite a lot.

-A fortune.

-Yes, a fortune.

-Excellent stuff.

0:27:270:27:32

Well, you got to see the stars of the show, and I guess this means a great deal to you.

0:27:320:27:36

Yes, it was a really good experience.

0:27:360:27:38

Yes, well it's a very nice volume. Because it isn't a first edition,

0:27:380:27:41

-it doesn't have that sort of high, high value.

-Yes.

-But I, nevertheless, say,

0:27:410:27:45

if you ever came to sell it, in the current market, it would be

0:27:450:27:48

very well received, and something like £400 to £600 would be

0:27:480:27:52

an auction price that I would be quite confident of achieving.

0:27:520:27:55

Oh, right, brilliant.

0:27:550:27:57

-Thanks very much for coming along today.

-OK. Thank you very much.

0:27:570:28:01

When it comes to Lalique, who can forget one particular item

0:28:100:28:14

that came Eric Knowles' way a couple of years back at a Roadshow in Scotland?

0:28:140:28:18

It's been up in our loft. We were cleaning out our loft

0:28:180:28:21

and we came across this, and we were going to bin it.

0:28:210:28:24

-We thought it was just a heap of junk.

-Yeah.

0:28:240:28:26

So, we were going to bin it and then we thought, no,

0:28:260:28:29

we'll hold on to it - we heard the Antiques Roadshow was coming.

0:28:290:28:32

And that's how I've held on to it, but I bought it at a car boot.

0:28:320:28:35

And it had a plant inside it, a kind of purple plant.

0:28:350:28:39

That was the reason we bought it - for the plant -

0:28:390:28:41

-because it was quite nice in the bowl.

-Yeah. Do you know who made it?

0:28:410:28:45

-No, I don't know anything about it.

-Oh, right, well can I tell you?

-Yes.

0:28:450:28:49

OK. If you look very carefully, there's actually a name on it,

0:28:490:28:52

and the name is sort of lurking behind here. We'll turn it around.

0:28:520:28:56

And that name is Lalique.

0:28:560:28:59

And, so...

0:28:590:29:01

-Have you heard of Lalique?

-Lalique? No.

0:29:010:29:04

Lalique, no? OK. Well, you're on a rapid learning curve today.

0:29:040:29:07

-So car boot.

-Yes.

0:29:070:29:09

For plant, how much were they asking for the plant?

0:29:090:29:12

-I only paid £1! The vase and the plant.

-You paid a pound, right, OK.

0:29:120:29:18

-Well, it's worth a mere £25,000.

-Oh, my God.

0:29:180:29:23

Looking back at that, it was a heck of a moment, wasn't it?

0:29:250:29:28

It was. I waited 28 years for that moment.

0:29:280:29:32

28 years on the Antiques Roadshow, that is,

0:29:320:29:34

so, yeah, very special, very special indeed.

0:29:340:29:37

-Now, we've got more Lalique.

-Yeah.

-You like your Lalique, Eric, I know.

0:29:370:29:41

-Yeah.

-So you set us a challenge. There's a basic vase here worth, what, £400, is it?

0:29:410:29:45

-£400.

-The better one, £800, and then the best one 2,000.

0:29:450:29:49

-Correct.

-Everyone thought something different amongst those I asked.

-Oh, good.

0:29:490:29:54

Now, I feel confident that this one is the basic one.

0:29:540:29:58

-OK.

-It was an absolute toss-up between these two.

-Yes.

-I think they're both beautiful. I thought,

0:29:580:30:02

that's better and this is the best, just because I like it best.

0:30:020:30:05

-But I couldn't be any more scientific than that.

-So, you want to know which one's right, do you?

0:30:050:30:10

-I do, and I have a horrible feeling I've got it wrong.

-Well, bit of yes and a bit of no.

0:30:100:30:15

-Fiona, forgive me, I've taken a bit of a liberty with you.

-Right.

0:30:150:30:18

-Because we've gone back a few series.

-Nothing new in that, Eric.

0:30:180:30:21

No, but, either way, I hate to say that I've played a little bit of a trick in so far as...

0:30:210:30:26

Let me, first of all, tell you that this is the basic one.

0:30:260:30:31

This is the better one. Now, when I say "trick", I'm simply mentioning this to you.

0:30:310:30:36

To all intents and purposes, anybody would be forgiven for thinking

0:30:360:30:39

that was a Lalique vase, because it's actually very well designed,

0:30:390:30:43

and the use of the opalescent is fantastic.

0:30:430:30:46

-But this is not Lalique.

-Oh.

-This is a firm called Verlys.

0:30:460:30:50

There were lots of other people making opalescent glass in France, who were his contemporaries.

0:30:500:30:55

Sabino is another name, and Barolac in Czechoslovakia.

0:30:550:30:59

But that is quite a special piece, and that is why it's worth £400.

0:30:590:31:04

So, even though it looks like Lalique, it could be as beautiful as Lalique,

0:31:040:31:08

because it's not actually Lalique...it's basic.

0:31:080:31:11

This particular one is just that bit exceptional, because it's a great design.

0:31:110:31:15

So often the design is quite... wanting, for better of another word.

0:31:150:31:20

But this one... I can tell you now...

0:31:200:31:24

This is your better, and this is called "Acacia"

0:31:240:31:28

and it's beautifully stained, it's a lovely shape, it's a great design.

0:31:280:31:32

Lalique is the master of design. He transforms what is,

0:31:320:31:35

to all intents and purposes, a simple, moulded glass vase,

0:31:350:31:39

and he turns it into a work of art. It's a rare talent.

0:31:390:31:42

Now, from a value point of view, we're looking at around about £800.

0:31:420:31:48

So, 400, 800,

0:31:480:31:51

but when it comes to 2,000, right next to you.

0:31:510:31:55

Because, well... I hate to say -

0:31:550:31:58

it is bigger, but there's better definition, it's a great design.

0:31:580:32:03

The staining which has all been applied, just lifts those feathers.

0:32:030:32:07

-It's called Plumes.

-And is it rarer?

0:32:070:32:09

It is rarer. So, it's got the two qualifications -

0:32:090:32:13

rarity and size on its side, so I have to say...

0:32:130:32:17

I knew there was something going for it!

0:32:170:32:19

-Well, you got that one right.

-Well, there you are.

0:32:190:32:23

Ten out of ten, at least for this one.

0:32:240:32:26

Size and rarity - that's what you're looking for in Lalique.

0:32:260:32:28

If you think you might have some Lalique at home, Eric would certainly like to see it.

0:32:280:32:33

Why not bring it along to one of our Roadshows?

0:32:330:32:35

You can see the dates and our locations on our website:

0:32:350:32:39

Unfortunately, I can't tell you a great deal

0:32:460:32:49

apart from I inherited it from my mother, but I think

0:32:490:32:52

it might be a bit older than that - possibly her mother, grandparents,

0:32:520:32:55

something like that, but that would be about the turn of the century.

0:32:550:32:59

No information was imparted to you, this is a special locket

0:32:590:33:02

-within the family context?

-I'm sorry, nothing at all, no.

0:33:020:33:05

So, there's nothing, really, we can add to that.

0:33:050:33:08

My mother died some years ago, so I can't go and ask questions.

0:33:080:33:11

Well, it follows and conforms with the design of many lockets.

0:33:110:33:14

It's never been a locket that opened, though, has it?

0:33:140:33:17

No, you would remove that back and perhaps use it to contain...

0:33:170:33:21

perhaps hair, or indeed, these days, of course, a photograph.

0:33:210:33:24

And it's pink and green enamel on a black background.

0:33:240:33:28

-Oh, I thought that was just painted.

-No, no, it's enamelled.

0:33:280:33:33

And then to almost augment that, to reinforce that issue,

0:33:330:33:37

on the tapered pendant loop, there's another flower, as well.

0:33:370:33:43

It's mounted on a modern gold chain, and I'm terribly disappointed

0:33:430:33:47

to tell you that the chain is not very exciting at all.

0:33:470:33:50

No, I'm not interested in the chain, anyway.

0:33:500:33:52

It's the locket that's got a bit of a focus to it and the reason is -

0:33:520:33:55

and I've been perhaps a little bit naughty

0:33:550:33:57

because I'm showing it the wrong way round,

0:33:570:34:00

because this is the back of the locket

0:34:000:34:03

and you can see all the delicacy of the design there with that

0:34:030:34:06

stylised spray, but when you turn it over,

0:34:060:34:10

the front of the locket is surely a tour de force of decoration.

0:34:100:34:17

That is a very serious design on the front of that locket.

0:34:170:34:22

So, it's a cloisonne effect,

0:34:220:34:24

where they fill individual little cells with colour.

0:34:240:34:28

And the work is incredibly deft, and when you look at the complexity

0:34:280:34:32

of the design here, it's really very, very concentrated.

0:34:320:34:37

It's tiny, individual little cells of colour

0:34:370:34:39

forming a stylised naturalistic floral study.

0:34:390:34:45

Now, the story about it is, in the 19th century in France,

0:34:450:34:49

in around about 1860-70, there was a jeweller called Falise.

0:34:490:34:54

Now, Falise was one of these very important pioneering goldsmiths

0:34:540:34:58

who was active at that time, and he had a son.

0:34:580:35:02

So, there were father and son working together,

0:35:020:35:05

and they specialised in this kind of incredibly intricate detail of work.

0:35:050:35:10

They were inspired by the East -

0:35:100:35:13

Japan, India, Persia - and they executed these designs

0:35:130:35:19

with incredible complexity of style and panache.

0:35:190:35:23

Now, this isn't signed, but I think it shouts Falise.

0:35:230:35:28

So, there's the front again. Let's look at the back once more.

0:35:300:35:34

Enamelled device on the back, and that's another feature of Falise -

0:35:340:35:39

it's not just enough to do the front, let's do the back as well.

0:35:390:35:44

The value of Falise is reasonably substantial.

0:35:460:35:51

If... Now, I'm going to be a little careful here.

0:35:510:35:54

IF, after research, it was established, categorically, that it was Falise,

0:35:540:35:58

-then would you feel happy with £1,000 for it?

-Much happier, yes.

0:35:580:36:01

-Well, it's not worth £1,000, unfortunately.

-Oh, shame.

0:36:010:36:05

-I think it's worth £3,000 to £5,000.

-Good Lord!

0:36:050:36:09

Wow! I'd no idea it was that.

0:36:090:36:12

Well, it's only a little glass, but, boy, does it tell a big story.

0:36:140:36:17

-It certainly does.

-Go on.

0:36:170:36:19

They were sold to raise money for the widows of the miners

0:36:190:36:23

killed in the Hartley Pit Disaster in 1862.

0:36:230:36:27

And where's Hartley Pit?

0:36:270:36:30

-That way. Not very far.

-And how far?

-Ooh, five miles at the most.

0:36:300:36:34

Five miles. So, the nature of the accident was,

0:36:340:36:38

as far as I understand it,

0:36:380:36:41

that there was a beam across the deep shaft

0:36:410:36:45

and the cage that took the miners down that big, big pit...

0:36:450:36:49

The beam broke, and the cage collapsed right to the bottom

0:36:490:36:54

-and the elements of the beam jammed the cage down the bottom.

-That's right.

0:36:540:37:00

And 199 of them died down below

0:37:000:37:03

and five died on the surface, attempting to rescue them.

0:37:030:37:08

And it was a disaster that changed the face of mining

0:37:080:37:11

in that, from that day forward, two shafts needed to be sunk for a pit,

0:37:110:37:17

because if you blocked one, nobody could get out.

0:37:170:37:21

So, what's your connection with it?

0:37:210:37:24

It actually belongs to my mother-in-law and she was left it

0:37:240:37:27

by someone who lived in the village, when they died.

0:37:270:37:30

So, when you consider what this glass represents,

0:37:300:37:35

to do a valuation on it seems almost a travesty.

0:37:350:37:38

But we must, because that's the essence of the Roadshow.

0:37:380:37:41

And so if you were to put this glass into auction,

0:37:410:37:44

you'd probably get no more than £150 for it.

0:37:440:37:47

But what's the message that this glass sends to us?

0:37:470:37:50

Well, it's written very clearly on here and it says,

0:37:500:37:54

"Accidents will happen".

0:37:540:37:56

That's right.

0:37:560:37:59

Now, just tell me... We're in Northumberland.

0:37:590:38:02

How come you've got this fantastic GERMAN table regulator?

0:38:020:38:06

This clock has been handed down through my family for about five generations.

0:38:060:38:11

The story goes - can't be 100% sure it's accurate -

0:38:130:38:17

that there were three sisters.

0:38:170:38:20

One of them wanted to marry a Danish Count, and the family was against it.

0:38:200:38:25

But her two sisters helped persuade her parents to allow the marriage

0:38:250:38:30

to go ahead, so the Count had three clocks made,

0:38:300:38:34

and this is one of them. He gave two to the sisters who had helped persuade the parents,

0:38:340:38:39

and one to his wife as a wedding present.

0:38:390:38:41

That is a great story.

0:38:410:38:44

It's a great story. I can't guarantee the accuracy but it's...

0:38:440:38:47

And there's every possibility it could be right -

0:38:470:38:50

this would have been an amazingly expensive thing

0:38:500:38:53

when it was new, and to commission three, well...

0:38:530:38:57

-Yeah. He was a Count.

-Yes, but not all counts are wealthy!

0:38:570:39:01

Clearly, this one was.

0:39:010:39:02

-So, I have to say that W Bofenschen is not a maker that I know particularly well at all.

-Right.

0:39:020:39:08

But looking at the case style,

0:39:080:39:10

the bronze and the gilt-bronze,

0:39:100:39:12

we'd be looking around about the 1830s-1840s.

0:39:120:39:16

-Right.

-And I see from this rectangular-footed base,

0:39:160:39:20

-it should have a glass dome. Do you have that?

-I have one.

0:39:200:39:23

It's not the original one,

0:39:230:39:25

but I do have a glass dome it's normally under, yes.

0:39:250:39:29

Right. OK, well, let's just look at the clock.

0:39:290:39:31

First of all we've got this wonderful running seconds

0:39:310:39:34

around this outer chapter ring,

0:39:340:39:37

and then you've got twin subsidiaries there,

0:39:370:39:39

for the minutes and the hours.

0:39:390:39:41

But the most beautiful thing about it is its visible escapement,

0:39:410:39:45

which is a coup perdu spring-detent escapement.

0:39:450:39:49

It's absolutely superb.

0:39:490:39:51

And then, running down to the pendulum, which I'm briefly going to stop...

0:39:510:39:57

Not only is that incredibly heavy, but look at the complexity.

0:39:570:40:02

It's bi-metallic, so you've got strips of brass and steel,

0:40:020:40:05

and then you've got this wonderful temperature scale here.

0:40:050:40:10

And at the moment, it being a rather warm day,

0:40:100:40:13

it's going up from average towards the warm.

0:40:130:40:16

-On a very cold day, it would be right down here towards the German kalt - cold.

-Yes.

0:40:160:40:21

Just set it going again.

0:40:210:40:23

That is as lovely a pendulum as I've ever seen.

0:40:230:40:26

Does this actually indicate the temperature?

0:40:260:40:30

-This pendulum compensates for the change of temperature.

-Ah, right.

0:40:300:40:35

What accuracy are you getting out of it at home?

0:40:350:40:38

It loses about two or three minutes over a week, between windings.

0:40:380:40:41

-Then it needs serious adjustment.

-Right.

0:40:410:40:44

You should get this to... I would say to you,

0:40:440:40:47

within...a couple of seconds a week, I'd like to see this.

0:40:470:40:51

-Is it possible for me to adjust it?

-Yes.

0:40:510:40:53

Because if I stop the pendulum, and we just turn around...

0:40:530:40:57

-From the back, you can see here, your fine adjustment on the pendulum.

-Oh, right.

0:40:570:41:03

By moving this knob,

0:41:030:41:06

that effectively is like a rack and pinion,

0:41:060:41:08

it's moving the suspension spring up and down

0:41:080:41:11

within there, and here you've got a knob.

0:41:110:41:14

-That's much more for coarse adjustments.

-Right.

0:41:140:41:18

It is absolutely gorgeous. Well, I'll tell you something -

0:41:180:41:21

German precision table regulators are very scarce,

0:41:210:41:25

very scarce indeed.

0:41:250:41:27

As a result, it's actually quite a difficult thing for me to price,

0:41:270:41:31

-not that you'll ever sell it, I'm sure.

-No. It's my daughter's.

0:41:310:41:34

Your daughter's. What a lucky girl!

0:41:340:41:36

I'm going to say to you that, at auction,

0:41:360:41:39

I can see this making between...

0:41:390:41:42

-20,000 and 25,000.

-Oh, wow!

0:41:420:41:46

It is a sensational and highly technical object.

0:41:460:41:50

Very, very hard to find another, although you say there are two more!

0:41:500:41:54

And I'll tell you something - technically, it's the finest clock I've ever seen on the Roadshow.

0:41:540:41:59

Oh, my word! Oh, God!

0:41:590:42:01

I'm pleased I brought it along for you, then.

0:42:010:42:04

So I am I, absolutely.

0:42:040:42:05

We get some colourful characters at the Antiques Roadshow -

0:42:070:42:09

we've had our fair share of them today -

0:42:090:42:12

but none, may I say, as colourful as this chap.

0:42:120:42:15

Sir Francis Delaval.

0:42:150:42:17

In the 18th century, resident of Seaton Delaval Hall.

0:42:170:42:20

Now, he liked practical jokes, and going to bed as a guest at Delaval Hall

0:42:200:42:25

while he was in residence, was a pretty unnerving experience.

0:42:250:42:29

For example, guests would be going to bed,

0:42:290:42:31

undressing and suddenly find that one of the walls

0:42:310:42:34

of the bedroom would be raised by a mechanical hoist,

0:42:340:42:37

and suddenly they would be exposed, in their nakedness, to the public view.

0:42:370:42:42

And if you think that's bad, even worse...

0:42:420:42:45

There was one bedroom with a four-poster bed

0:42:450:42:47

and by dint of a mechanical winch on the other side of the wall,

0:42:470:42:51

the four-poster bed would be lowered,

0:42:510:42:55

complete with occupants, into a tank of cold water

0:42:550:42:58

in the middle of the night!

0:42:580:42:59

Certainly not somewhere I'd like to have stayed.

0:42:590:43:02

The reason we know what he looks like,

0:43:020:43:04

is this is one of the paintings saved by the local community

0:43:040:43:06

from the fire here at Seaton Delaval Hall.

0:43:060:43:09

So here he is, Sir Francis Delaval, prankster extraordinaire.

0:43:090:43:13

From the Antiques Roadshow, until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:130:43:17

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts travel to Northumberland for a visit to the recently reopened Seaton Delaval Hall.

Family treasures under scrutiny include a handmade wooden model that could be the world's first toy train, one of the most sophisticated clocks ever seen on the show and a large cache of oriental finds.