Weald and Downland 1 Antiques Roadshow


Weald and Downland 1

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There's a place in Sussex where you can travel back in time.

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These are some of the last working oxen in the country.

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With its 15th and 16th century buildings, this place seems as if

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the centuries have just passed it by unchanged -

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a timeless rural idyll.

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But all is not as it seems. 40 years ago, none of this was here,

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not Chris, our oxen herder, not the animals, not the fields,

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not even the buildings.

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It's the remarkable location for this week's Antiques Roadshow -

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the Weald and Downland Museum.

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BELL RINGS

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BIRD TWEETS

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Today we're in West Sussex, seven miles from Chichester.

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I think our experts will approve of the Weald and Downland Museum.

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It's like a sanctuary for endangered buildings,

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rescued and lovingly rebuilt.

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But they might be surprised to find it all owes its existence to,

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of all things, Crawley New Town.

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Why? Well, in the post-war years, Crawley was chosen as the spot

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for thousands of new houses to replace those bombed out in the war.

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To many, it seemed a dream come true, but for one man

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it was the start of a mission.

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Roy Armstrong had devoted his life to teaching

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and the history of Sussex.

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For him, the people of Crawley were having their roots torn away.

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He described seeing wonderful medieval buildings

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from the old village of Crawley literally consigned to the flames.

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Determined to save other timber- framed buildings from the same fate,

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Roy decided to create a museum of buildings, and in 1965,

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he set about trying to find space for all his rescued houses.

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As you can imagine, with exhibits that size, you need a lot of room.

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An eccentric millionaire, Edward James, came to the rescue,

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offering Roy 50 acres of his ancestral land

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for a peppercorn rent of a pound a year.

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Soon, buildings began to arrive -

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houses due to be submerged under a reservoir, a toll house

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that had been hit by a lorry and was due for demolition, a granary

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in the way of a new road, and the landscape here

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began to change around the houses, barns and workshops.

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40 years since the museum opened,

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it's as if these buildings have always been here.

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I'm sure Roy would be delighted to know

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that the Antiques Roadshow is setting up its stall

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alongside one of his rescued houses from Crawley Old Town.

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So you researched this on the internet?

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Yes, but unfortunately we were unable to find

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anything about it at all.

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-I'm surprised, because you've got quite a lot of clues here.

-Right.

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What did you put into the internet?

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-That's down to my husband, he did that.

-Ah, you're blaming him.

-Yes.

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I am, yes.

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If you went back to the internet, what would you do with this mark?

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I would probably have to try and find the number?

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-Would that make sense?

-Start with the number?

-Yes.

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-That's the wrong approach.

-Oh, dear, never mind!

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-You've got this wonderful word Florian.

-Right.

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-Florian ware, and underneath you've got Macintyre.

-Ah-ha.

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If you put any of those in, you'd hit straight away what this is.

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-Right, OK.

-When do you think it was made?

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-Erm, my mum felt that my grandmother had it in the 1920s.

-OK.

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Other than that, I know nothing about it.

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-I'm going to go back one generation further.

-Right.

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-This dates to around 1900, 1910 maybe.

-Really?

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-Why did it come to you?

-Erm, my grandmother

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passed it on to my mum, who has allowed me to have that

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because the colours are so lovely,

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and they match the curtains that I bought for my new bedroom!

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-So it's to match the curtains?

-It was, yes.

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Now, when you look it up on the internet,

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you will find under Macintyre a very famous name - William Moorcroft.

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-Right.

-He designed for Macintyre's

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-around the year 1900, before he went solo with his own factory.

-Right.

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This is the sort of thing he did.

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-He was a brilliant designer using floral motifs.

-Yes.

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-And you can see, he loved colour.

-Yes.

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And all of these outlines are tube- lined, rather like icing a cake.

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-Right.

-So, quite sophisticated.

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-You liked it because it matched the curtains.

-I did, yes.

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It's probably worth somewhere in the region of,

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let's say between £600 and £900.

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Never! Really?

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Gosh, I think my mum will be quite pleased with that,

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but I would never part with it, never.

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Have you still got the curtains?

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Erm, I have, but I don't use them.

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I love him, he's the best dog-painter in the world, for me -

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Cecil Aldin.

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And here we've got a really amusing picture of this poor terrier

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being fed medicine,

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inscribed, "To Dr Cameron, may your doses never grow less."

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-Who was Dr Cameron?

-That Dr Cameron was my grandfather,

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and he was in practice in Clapham in London at that time,

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and I presume this was a gift from a grateful patient.

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And I would think Cecil Aldin was a grateful patient

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because he didn't suffer from great health -

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towards the end of his life, he went to live abroad in warmer climes.

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-Yes.

-I see you've brought a photograph...

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That just shows my grandfather outside his house in Clapham.

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He's got an original Scottish car - an Argyle, made in Glasgow.

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-Oh, was it?

-It's a rather period piece, a lovely little picture.

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-This is a very early work by Cecil Aldin.

-Yes.

-It's '05,

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and he was born in the 1870s, but it's a really lovely

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illustration of how good he was as a sort of character painter

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-and getting, you know, a dog's character.

-Yes.

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-And I presume this is your grandfather feeding the dog?

-Yes.

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-He had a great sense of humour, Cecil Aldin.

-Yes, I've seen some of

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his other doggie pictures, and they're great fun.

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-They're very popular when they come up for sale.

-Yes.

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And it's such a nice personal story - are you a doctor yourself?

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And my father was, too, yes, we're three in a row.

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Good old family doctors, love it.

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Well, this I think, if it came up for auction,

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would make probably somewhere in the region of £1,500-£2,000.

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Yes, yes, so I shall have to look at the insurance a little, I think.

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Yes, thank you very much for that!

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Well on the face of it, it looks like a good early Rolex Submariner.

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-How did you acquire it?

-Um, my grandfather gave it to me.

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He knew I was a big James Bond fan.

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He gave it to me about five or six years ago.

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And do you know when he bought it?

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I was under the impression it was 1952 in Hong Kong.

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'52, no, that would be a little bit early.

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Let's just have a look at the reference number,

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and actually it's lucky that you haven't got the metal strap

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because I can now see here the reference,

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and there it is, it's the 6536.

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Absolutely right, it's what they refer to as the "James Bond."

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It's not actually the one that was worn by Sean Connery

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in the early Bond films, particularly Thunderball,

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because that was the 6538 which had the bigger winding crown.

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That's the one that collectors all want is the big heavy winding crown.

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But this is the earlier one,

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circa 1958, and the other difference is, of course,

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this goes down to 100 metres, 330 feet, and the later reference

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goes down to 200 metres, 660 feet, that's the Bond one.

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The main thing is, it's a correct watch

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and there are a good few fakes around.

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Has anybody tried to give you a price guide on this before?

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A few years ago a local dealer said he'd give me

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-200 quid for it.

-Were you tempted?

-I wasn't.

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I wouldn't part with it, it's a sort of a family heirloom,

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it's close to my heart, but I'm just curious about how much it was worth.

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Damn sensible decision,

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because if you'd taken the £200 then,

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you might now have seriously regretted it.

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As I say, it's the early one,

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it has no shoulders to the winding crown, it's absolutely gorgeous,

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the condition is just as you'd expect for something of this age.

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Never, never, never have the dial repainted -

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it will ruin an awful lot of its value.

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So that 200 quid that you could have taken,

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in this state, I'm going to quote you -

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hope you're happy,

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£7,000 to £8,000.

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GASPS IN CROWD

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Crikey.

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You can take it away thinking you could have taken

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that 200 quid.

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-Thank you very much. Oh. Superb.

-Are you happy?

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Yes, thank you very much. I'll put it on.

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JAMES BOND THEME PLAYS

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It looks like someone's had a bit of a brutal attack on here.

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-What's happened?

-Yes, I'm afraid they did.

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Back in December 1965, my dad became very curious about this box,

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it had been in the family for,

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well, as long as he could remember.

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My grandfather told him it had actually been bought as

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a job lot at an auction by my great grandfather, who was born in 1843.

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So, Dad searched around for some keys, tried various keys,

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nothing worked, and against all his best principles,

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he actually had to use a screwdriver to gently ease the lock.

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When he opened it up, he'd been told it was just a load of old bottles

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-and of no particular interest.

-And there we are.

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He decided to have a look at the bottles and he picked one up.

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Now, as he picked one up, something fell to the floor

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and when he looked down,

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there was a piece of folded paper on the floor,

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and when he opened it out, he couldn't believe his eyes.

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Because actually it seemed to be signed by the Duke of Wellington.

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-And here we have the folded piece of paper.

-Yeah, that's right, yes.

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That was it, that was all he knew,

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so there's a Duke of Wellington piece of paper and the decanters.

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I mean my father was quite creative in his imagination,

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very interested in history,

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so immediately he thought, "Right, OK, I'll contact Coutts Bank,"

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who very, very kindly wrote back to him and confirmed that, yes,

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the Duke of Wellington did hold an account with them.

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Well, what's interesting is that the cheque is dated March 1823

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and the cheque's for £195.

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And £195 in 1823,

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if you use an average earnings index,

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is nowadays is in excess of £100,000

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-So this is a cash cheque.

-Yes.

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In other words, he was going to Coutts to cash

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a cheque for £100,000

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-What on earth for?

-The mind boggles.

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Yeah, the mind does boggle,

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and the mind boggles in all sorts of different ways

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because he had a number of mistresses over the years,

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including one called Harriet Wilson,

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who threatened to write her memoirs and he said "publish and be damned."

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Sorry, can I just stop you there. That's very, very strange.

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My daughter is called Harriet Wilson, so...

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Well, how bizarre is that? I had no idea.

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Nor did I!

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Well, there we are, how extraordinary,

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well, Harriet Wilson threatened to write her memoirs and they were

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salacious, inevitably and he said, "publish and be damned."

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Anyway, so is this £100,000

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to pay off someone like Harriet, who knows?

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But there's another thing that happened in 1823 -

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his son bought a commission in the army.

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He was in the 81st Regiment of Foot.

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Was that to buy his son's commission?

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-It's still an awful lot of money.

-It is.

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And he, you know, it's odd to have as cash.

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But it is a campaign decanter case,

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so, did the Duke take it on his campaign?

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In which case, was it at Waterloo?

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And then subsequently he kept using it and a few bottles got smashed?

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-We just don't know.

-Just never know.

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So, as far as valuation is concerned,

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the easiest part is the cheque.

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Cheques from Wellington appear on the market

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and as a cheque it's worth, perhaps £50.

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-Right.

-As a Duke of Wellington cheque.

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The campaign decanter case is a little bit tired,

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to be perfectly honest.

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There are two decanters missing, the rest are a little bit nibbled,

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so it's worth £600 maybe a little bit more, it's that sort of order.

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But if we could ever prove that this

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was taken to the Battle of Waterloo, then it's worth tens of thousands.

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-So a wonderful thing.

-Thank you very much, thank you.

-Thanks.

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At first sight, this looks like a well modelled version of an eagle,

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-do you know what it is?

-Yes, well, it's a car mascot,

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either to go on the radiator cap or, in fact, be screwed on to the bonnet.

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Well, that's absolutely right, because if we take it out,

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you can see it's got this thread

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which would have gone onto the radiator cap,

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or onto the bonnet, as you say.

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Does it have any history that you know about?

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Well it does. It was given to me by a friend,

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who used to be a private secretary

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to the old Duke of Kent, Prince George. Oh, yes.

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He received it from Hurstpierpoint College,

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which is where I went to school.

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That's quite nearby, isn't it?

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-It's quite nearby, just over the top there.

-Yeah.

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And this was for opening the chapel tower,

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and the eagle represents the weather vane,

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on top of the chapel tower.

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How wonderful! So, that's not a bad thing to be given

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because there's something rather special about this

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from all other car mascots, and that's...

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It's actually made of silver,

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because if we pick it up and look here,

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it's got a nice set of hallmarks.

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Maker's mark W&H, that's for Walker and Hall.

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-Right.

-Crown, that it's made in Sheffield

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and the date letter for 1930,

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and it actually has a slightly 1930s look about it.

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But, you can imagine you don't really drive round

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in a car with a silver mascot

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on the front because it's likely to get nicked.

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But silver mascots are incredibly rare for that reason.

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-Right.

-And, also, because they're not legal any more,

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you can't put a mascot on a modern car because,

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for health and safety reasons,

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they've become very, very collectable,

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so, something like this, with a good story behind it,

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is going to be sought after by...

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I can think of quite a few collectors

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that would be really keen to have something like this.

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If this was plated, or made from another metal...

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-Right.

-..it would only be worth a few hundred pounds

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but, because it's silver, it's so much rarer,

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with that great story, £2,000-£3,000.

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Good Lord! Really?

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Oh, well, that's a nice gift to have received, isn't it?

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

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A beautiful portrait of a lovely lady. Can you tell me who she is?

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Yes, she was my granny, Nadia.

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She was born in Irkutsk in central Siberia,

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-which is a long way from where she died, which was Paddington.

-Wow!

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But, on the way, she was taken with her father and with her siblings

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on the Trans-Siberian Railway,

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where they met a lot of people.

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There were 90,000 people working on the railways...

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At the time.

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-..at the time. And some of the people were circus people.

-Right.

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So, they taught her, and her brothers and sisters,

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how to do different acts, singing and dancing,

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-magic acts, acrobatics and things.

-Acrobatics.

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Acrobatics! And when they got down to Vladivostok

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that was the journey's end, I think it was two years later,

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they then joined a circus,

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which took them down the whole length of China,

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and they eventually got down to Bangkok.

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And the girls used to dance, and the girls danced so beautifully,

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and they were so elegant, that the King of Siam got to hear about this.

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-Ah!

-And he came around to see them.

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He said, "I want you girls to come back and dance in the palace",

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-which they did.

-Right.

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And she actually had to go with her mother to make sure

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-there was no hanky-panky going on.

-Right.

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-And, at the end of it, he gave her this bracelet here.

-Wow!

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It's composed of some coins, which are known as ticals,

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and these coins are very specific to Siam.

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Now we know it as Thailand, and these ticals are usually in silver.

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So, it's very unusual to be in gold.

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And the reason they're in gold

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is because they're a gift from the King, so around 1910.

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The Royal Family were really the only people eligible

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to have gold ticals.

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-It's a wonderful name, isn't it, ticals?

-It is, it is.

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You've got seven in all here,

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and then with a lovely little medallion at the bottom for the...

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From the King.

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From the King, exactly. So, the Imperial crest of Siam

0:17:580:18:01

and then, of course, you've got the lovely white elephant

0:18:010:18:04

with enamel and detail here,

0:18:040:18:07

and the elephant itself showing the freedom of the country.

0:18:070:18:13

It's a free country, it never was invaded.

0:18:130:18:16

In terms of value, I think in auction,

0:18:160:18:18

you could see it fetching £2,000 to £3,000.

0:18:180:18:22

-OK.

-And I hope, on a good day,

0:18:220:18:23

it should fetch the top end of the estimate.

0:18:230:18:26

Yes, I wonder if the Siamese family would like to buy it back.

0:18:260:18:29

You never know.

0:18:290:18:31

Give them a ring.

0:18:310:18:33

One of the limiting factors of most decorative objects

0:18:350:18:38

is a factor called gravity,

0:18:380:18:40

which means that basically you've got to put them on the floor,

0:18:400:18:44

a table, a shelf, the mantelpiece.

0:18:440:18:46

You've got to put them on a surface. The thing I love

0:18:460:18:49

about these, is they take us into another dimension

0:18:490:18:53

and I'm very keen on going into another dimension.

0:18:530:18:56

Great! A sun catcher.

0:18:560:19:00

-Yes.

-Good thing, eh?

0:19:000:19:02

Lovely, yes, it's wonderful, and it hangs in front of a picture window

0:19:020:19:06

and getting all the light from the west through it.

0:19:060:19:10

-It's beautiful.

-It glows.

0:19:100:19:11

I think it kind of brings a smile to your face, it does mine.

0:19:110:19:14

-That's it.

-It's called the Sunspot.

0:19:140:19:17

Generically, they're sun catchers

0:19:170:19:19

but this one is specifically the Whitefriars Sunspot

0:19:190:19:24

and it was always made in this colour

0:19:240:19:26

with sort of various striations, designed by Geoffrey Baxter

0:19:260:19:30

in 1970-ish, and they're not bad money actually.

0:19:300:19:35

-So, you found yours in...?

-No, it was a present.

0:19:350:19:39

It was a gift, I should think in the '70s probably.

0:19:390:19:42

Well, I think it's a nice... I love them.

0:19:420:19:45

It's a happy thing and on a value, £100 to £150 but...

0:19:450:19:48

-That's wonderful.

-I think it's enough to bring a smile to anybody's face.

0:19:480:19:52

I should think so. Marvellous. Thank you, Andy.

0:19:520:19:55

You've probably heard by now, how the market in Chinese antiques

0:20:060:20:09

is thriving, with the Chinese

0:20:090:20:12

so keen to buy back objects from their own heritage.

0:20:120:20:15

Now, our ceramics specialist, John Axford,

0:20:150:20:18

has set us a particularly difficult task this week.

0:20:180:20:21

We have three blue and white Chinese vases.

0:20:210:20:24

They don't look superficially that different, but one is basic -

0:20:240:20:28

worth about £50, one is better -

0:20:280:20:31

worth considerably more, £20,000,

0:20:310:20:34

and the best one is worth £200,000!

0:20:340:20:39

So, I'm keeping my distance.

0:20:390:20:41

We're going to be asking our visitors to take a look at them

0:20:410:20:44

and, at those prices, no touching.

0:20:440:20:47

We've seen some interesting collections on the Antiques Roadshow

0:20:470:20:52

over the 33 years that I've been doing it,

0:20:520:20:55

but I'm almost having to restrain myself here with excitement,

0:20:550:21:00

because this is just a tiny part

0:21:000:21:02

of a huge collection of handcuffs, leg irons,

0:21:020:21:07

all kinds of restraining equipment, which you've got.

0:21:070:21:11

-How many have you got at home?

-820 different models at home.

0:21:110:21:14

It was, at one time, the world's largest collection

0:21:140:21:17

and featured in the Guinness Book of Records for four years.

0:21:170:21:20

A chap in America has now got a larger collection than me,

0:21:200:21:23

so, I'm about second or third in the world now.

0:21:230:21:25

Presumably you came to this through what - the police force or...?

0:21:250:21:29

No, my grandfather was a member of the Magic Circle

0:21:290:21:31

and, at the age of seven, he gave me

0:21:310:21:33

a birthday party with magic at the end of it.

0:21:330:21:35

About a year later, the Houdini film was on television with Tony Curtis

0:21:350:21:39

and Mum sent me to bed halfway through it,

0:21:390:21:41

and I never saw the other half of it.

0:21:410:21:43

Next, day I went to the library and got interested in Houdini,

0:21:430:21:46

and performed at a local Scouts,

0:21:460:21:48

and performed straitjacket escapes upside down from burning ropes.

0:21:480:21:51

You're an escapologist?

0:21:510:21:53

-I was an escapologist, yes.

-I know you are married.

-I am married, yes.

0:21:530:21:57

Now, what's it like being married to a collector of anything,

0:21:570:22:03

but of this kind of material?

0:22:030:22:05

-Did you know he was a collector when...

-Yes, I did.

0:22:050:22:07

-..when you knew him?

-Yes.

-What did you think of that?

0:22:070:22:10

Well, I thought they were teasing me

0:22:100:22:11

when they told me that he had this collection of handcuffs, you know.

0:22:110:22:15

So, I was quite surprised when I saw them, yes.

0:22:150:22:18

-And you realised that...

-That it was true, yes.

0:22:180:22:23

But when you look at them,

0:22:230:22:24

looking at it not from a sort of collector's point of view,

0:22:240:22:27

but when you look at them, what goes through your mind?

0:22:270:22:30

Well, I have to say, I know that when Chris looks at them,

0:22:300:22:33

he sees how they're made and the locks and everything else.

0:22:330:22:37

And I have to say when I look at some of them,

0:22:370:22:39

I just see the suffering, so we look at them with different eyes.

0:22:390:22:42

So, you think about who they were put on to.

0:22:420:22:45

Yes, yes, yes.

0:22:450:22:46

-Interesting.

-And some of them in particular

0:22:460:22:49

are difficult to look at for me.

0:22:490:22:52

OK, so that's an interesting sort of female-male

0:22:520:22:54

different way of dealing with it.

0:22:540:22:57

So, there are probably three that stand out.

0:22:570:23:00

You know, I suppose these are the most bizarre, these sort of mittens.

0:23:000:23:05

The most unusual, yes, yeah. Patented in 1929 by James Mackenzie,

0:23:050:23:09

30 to 40 of these were actually made up

0:23:090:23:12

and they were used for transporting prisoners on the railways in America.

0:23:120:23:17

Unfortunately, the prison guards found they were too effective

0:23:170:23:20

and if the call of nature was necessary for one of the prisoners,

0:23:200:23:24

the prison officers refused to attend to the prisoners

0:23:240:23:28

and they were actually withdrawn,

0:23:280:23:31

and we know of only 22 that are still in existence 80 odd years later.

0:23:310:23:34

-Gosh. And this, this is part of that, is it?

-Yes.

0:23:340:23:40

-That's like a ball and chain.

-It is.

-But more...

0:23:400:23:42

Well, I don't know, is it as heavy as a ball and chain?

0:23:420:23:45

That weighs 16 lbs - that weighs.

0:23:450:23:47

-Goodness!

-And that fits on top of the stirrup

0:23:470:23:49

which is... With the boot attached to it.

0:23:490:23:52

The railways found it far more useful than having a ball and chain,

0:23:520:23:57

because railway workers could get on with their duties far more better,

0:23:570:24:04

but, with this attached to your leg, it's virtually impossible to run.

0:24:040:24:08

It's very disorientating.

0:24:080:24:09

-One leg weighs 18 lbs more than the other leg.

-Absolutely.

0:24:090:24:12

-It's virtually impossible to run away.

-One can see that.

0:24:120:24:15

If one had to say which is the most valuable here,

0:24:150:24:19

would it surprise me? Would it be the least obvious?

0:24:190:24:22

I think probably the most valuable will be these bar cuffs here,

0:24:220:24:26

which I would... The last pair of those sold,

0:24:260:24:28

there's only two pairs known, and the pair that recently sold

0:24:280:24:31

didn't have the belt attached to it,

0:24:310:24:34

and they fetched 17,000, and that was about three, four months ago.

0:24:340:24:38

-A remarkable collection.

-Thank you.

-Fascinating history.

0:24:380:24:42

And thank you very much indeed

0:24:420:24:44

for breaking them out of the attic and bringing them down here.

0:24:440:24:47

-Thank you very much.

-Brilliant.

0:24:470:24:48

Blue and white china, three vases that don't look that different.

0:24:500:24:54

But the basic one is worth £50,

0:24:540:24:56

the better one £20,000,

0:24:560:24:59

the best one is worth £200,000.

0:24:590:25:02

Which do you think is which?

0:25:020:25:04

I'd probably say this was the cheapest one.

0:25:040:25:07

-The cheapest, basic one?

-Yeah, basic one.

-OK.

0:25:070:25:09

Which do you think is which?

0:25:090:25:12

I think perhaps this one, about 50 quid, something like that.

0:25:120:25:15

-OK, so that's the basic one, right.

-Yeah.

0:25:150:25:18

-This one would be better.

-Right.

0:25:180:25:20

-I think the middling one is this one here.

-That one.

0:25:200:25:24

200,000.

0:25:240:25:26

This one's the most expensive.

0:25:260:25:28

-The best?

-Yeah.

-You think this is the best?

0:25:280:25:30

That's the most expensive one.

0:25:300:25:32

-That one.

-Would you like something like this in your home?

0:25:320:25:35

I'd love to have something like that in my home,

0:25:350:25:38

-thanks, if you're offering.

-You must be joking!

0:25:380:25:40

Well, what a funny little thing!

0:25:440:25:46

Why have you brought it today?

0:25:460:25:48

Well, it actually belongs to my mum,

0:25:480:25:50

and it was given to her by a very good friend in the 1960s.

0:25:500:25:54

-She just saw it and sort of gave it to my mum as a gift.

-Right.

0:25:540:25:57

-She said it was old then.

-Yes.

0:25:570:25:59

But I don't know what it is, where it came from, nothing.

0:25:590:26:02

It's very much under speculation,

0:26:020:26:03

but I think that the key to it is that it's decorated

0:26:030:26:06

with enamelled flowers, and it's clearly made of silver

0:26:060:26:10

and it's in brilliant condition because it's oxidised,

0:26:100:26:13

it's blackened and it gives a feeling of deep antiquity to it,

0:26:130:26:16

-which I think it deserves.

-Right.

0:26:160:26:18

It's not in absolutely perfect condition, it's damaged at the back,

0:26:180:26:22

but I don't think that matters terribly much

0:26:220:26:24

because what we're interested in, is what it is,

0:26:240:26:27

-and where it comes from.

-Right.

0:26:270:26:29

And I think that the enamel flowers on the front, are the key,

0:26:290:26:32

-because with flowers come scent, doesn't it?

-Right.

0:26:320:26:35

And there was a positive obsession with scent

0:26:350:26:38

in almost every generation but our own, for various odd reasons.

0:26:380:26:42

They thought that bad humours - indeed disease -

0:26:420:26:46

-would come from the smells from which they were surrounded.

-Right.

0:26:460:26:50

Because of the stench and the filth in the streets with open middens

0:26:500:26:53

and animal remains, and God knows what lying around in the street -

0:26:530:26:57

-and then the conjunction of plague in these urban situations.

-Right.

0:26:570:27:02

They felt - completely erroneously - that the smell from the streets

0:27:020:27:07

was part of the way in which these infections invaded you.

0:27:070:27:10

The way to protect yourself was to mask the smell of the urban climate

0:27:110:27:16

and to burn fragrant woods,

0:27:160:27:19

to get far-fetched spices from the Orient,

0:27:190:27:22

-and you'd need to fix them.

-Right.

0:27:220:27:25

And perfume fixative which would be ambergris or civet.

0:27:250:27:29

-Ambergris is a sort of phlegm coughed up by whales.

-Ooh!

0:27:290:27:33

-You don't fancy that.

-That's revolting!

0:27:340:27:36

Coughing whales, a big cough.

0:27:360:27:40

And the civet is extracted from the tail end of a rather fierce cat.

0:27:400:27:45

-So where's this all going?

-I don't know.

0:27:450:27:48

Are you worried yet? You won't get a plague from it,

0:27:480:27:51

although I rather suspect it could come from that period. Anyway...

0:27:510:27:55

To mask it you'd put the scents of the flowers, the essences,

0:27:550:27:59

into these ambergris, civet, musk, and then carry them round

0:27:590:28:03

in, perhaps, little tubes of waxy material which would lodge in here,

0:28:030:28:07

and then don't forget this is completely open work

0:28:070:28:09

and it's open work because the scent would exude from that

0:28:090:28:12

-and you'd carry it.

-Right.

0:28:120:28:14

Then when plague was ripping through the country,

0:28:140:28:16

as it did in 1608 in London,

0:28:160:28:19

it was one of the most terrifying plagues

0:28:190:28:21

-where hundreds of thousand of people were dying.

-Right.

0:28:210:28:25

This is some sort of pomander.

0:28:250:28:28

A pomander means an apple of ambergris

0:28:280:28:31

and this is a quasi magical object, made of silver,

0:28:310:28:35

decorated with enamel.

0:28:350:28:37

-How old is it?

-It is, I believe, 17th century.

0:28:370:28:41

-Possibly 18th century.

-What? Right.

0:28:410:28:43

-The 17th century was the big plague, yeah.

-Yes.

0:28:430:28:45

And how to value it? I don't know, what did you think it was worth?

0:28:450:28:49

I don't know. My mother thought it was...

0:28:490:28:51

She called it a bit of old tat.

0:28:510:28:53

Oh, well, she was right about the old, but not about the tat.

0:28:530:28:57

There's a magical cure here. People do collect these things.

0:28:570:29:00

They collect them very avidly, there's a great company of people

0:29:000:29:04

who want to collect aromatic goldsmiths' work,

0:29:040:29:07

which is what this is, almost jewellery,

0:29:070:29:09

and I think they'd be jolly pleased to give you something

0:29:090:29:12

in the region of £2,500 for that today.

0:29:120:29:15

Really(?) Good heavens!

0:29:160:29:20

Gosh, she will be shocked when I tell her!

0:29:200:29:23

-Ooh... Oh, dear I'd better be more careful with it.

-Better had.

0:29:230:29:26

I know this is a Korean chest, but we don't know any more about it,

0:29:270:29:31

so I'm hoping that you can tell us something.

0:29:310:29:34

How do you know it's Korean?

0:29:350:29:38

We replied to an advertisement in our then local paper in Hong Kong

0:29:380:29:43

for somebody selling Korean chests

0:29:430:29:46

and we assume, therefore, that it was from Korea.

0:29:460:29:49

Well, it is Korean, definitely.

0:29:490:29:52

Let's look. I think the actual configuration of the drawers

0:29:520:29:56

and the doors is absolutely typical. I can't resist opening one of them.

0:29:560:30:00

-I love this butterfly motif. Isn't it pretty?

-It is.

0:30:000:30:02

-Is it a moth, or a butterfly?

-I would assume it's a butterfly.

0:30:020:30:06

It's nicer, isn't it?

0:30:060:30:08

This is elm here which is very typical of Japanese,

0:30:080:30:12

and to a certain extent Chinese, and Oriental furniture, to use elm.

0:30:120:30:16

But when we...

0:30:160:30:17

That's very interesting, it's got a very soft pine back on it

0:30:190:30:23

and these slide back and forward. Yes, I see.

0:30:230:30:27

How old do you think it is?

0:30:290:30:31

I think it's 19th century,

0:30:310:30:33

but I'm not certain.

0:30:330:30:37

How did you get it here?

0:30:370:30:40

-Today?

-Mm.

-In the back of the car because it comes into three pieces.

0:30:400:30:44

-And not too heavy?

-No.

0:30:460:30:48

-Nice and light, isn't it?

-Nice and light, yes.

0:30:500:30:53

Do you want a chair?

0:30:530:30:55

No, well, I hope... I don't think so.

0:30:550:30:58

-It's not very old.

-Oh! Oh, how disappointing.

0:31:000:31:05

Right...

0:31:050:31:06

-I'm sorry to disappoint you. It is not 19th century.

-Right.

0:31:060:31:11

Shame.

0:31:120:31:14

We didn't spend a great deal so it's not the end of the world.

0:31:140:31:17

I think I'm going to be brave, and ask you how much you paid for it.

0:31:170:31:21

Well, we can't exactly remember,

0:31:210:31:23

but it was less than £100, probably quite a lot less.

0:31:230:31:27

That's lucky,

0:31:310:31:34

because I know that people paid over £1,000 for these

0:31:340:31:36

-in English and European antique shops.

-Mm-hm.

0:31:360:31:39

In probably the 1970s almost every provincial antique shop in the UK

0:31:390:31:44

had one, and probably Europe, had not exactly the same,

0:31:440:31:47

but a similar type of modern Korean cabinet.

0:31:470:31:49

Whether the Koreans made them as that dreadful word, fakes,

0:31:490:31:53

I don't know, or whether they were making in the traditional style.

0:31:530:31:58

Let's be generous and say it was traditional style,

0:31:580:32:01

and somebody very cleverly started importing them.

0:32:010:32:03

Had you had one of these and you bought it for £1,000,

0:32:030:32:06

-I'd be saying to you today that it was worth £500.

-Mm-hm.

0:32:060:32:09

Luckily you bought yours for...

0:32:110:32:13

You can't remember, but under £100, so yours has gone up to £500.

0:32:130:32:18

Well, that's ideal, thank you very much.

0:32:180:32:20

I'm quite happy with that.

0:32:200:32:23

Well, quite a challenge this week.

0:32:340:32:37

Our ceramics specialist, John Axford,

0:32:370:32:39

has brought along three vases.

0:32:390:32:40

As you know, we were talking to our visitors in the programme earlier.

0:32:400:32:44

One of them is a basic blue and white Chinese vase worth about £50.

0:32:440:32:48

One of them is worth £20,000, so quite a difference.

0:32:490:32:53

One of them is worth £200,000.

0:32:530:32:57

And, frankly, I'm just a bit nervous standing near them. Erm...

0:32:570:33:00

This is a difficult one. I've put them in the order I think they are,

0:33:000:33:04

basic, better, best.

0:33:040:33:06

John, how can you tell because they are all blue and white vases,

0:33:060:33:09

and apart from the difference in the patterns,

0:33:090:33:12

they don't look that different.

0:33:120:33:13

It is very difficult. Yes, they're all blue and white.

0:33:130:33:17

They were all made in the same place, in Jingdezhen,

0:33:170:33:19

and, actually, also they're all copies of earlier pieces.

0:33:190:33:23

-They're all copies?

-They're all copies.

0:33:230:33:27

You have to start with some knowledge

0:33:270:33:29

of the history of Chinese porcelain.

0:33:290:33:31

Blue and white started in China in the middle of the 14th century

0:33:310:33:34

and by the time they get to the 15th century

0:33:340:33:36

they're making terrific pieces.

0:33:360:33:38

Some of the best Ming pieces are made then.

0:33:380:33:40

These pieces then get copied and copied and copied

0:33:400:33:43

throughout the centuries.

0:33:430:33:45

In the British Museum, you could see vases like all of these there.

0:33:450:33:48

It never occurred to me that they would all be copies.

0:33:480:33:51

I assumed the one with the stonking valuation would be genuine.

0:33:510:33:55

I mean, what should we be looking for?

0:33:550:33:57

Start with quality.

0:33:570:33:58

Well, start with the designs.

0:33:580:34:01

This one and this one, they're designs that go back to 1400

0:34:010:34:06

and have been copied, but the quality should be very good.

0:34:060:34:09

This vase is very fuzzy, it didn't fire very well.

0:34:090:34:12

Look here, there's a scar on the side. See that, like a thumb print.

0:34:130:34:17

It's been made pretty badly. The colour of this blue,

0:34:170:34:20

which is this very turquoisy colour

0:34:200:34:22

is really quite wrong for an early piece.

0:34:220:34:24

I was hoping that fuzziness was a mark of antiquity,

0:34:240:34:27

-but there you go.

-I'm afraid, Fiona, this is the basic vase.

0:34:270:34:31

-I'm older than this is.

-No!

0:34:310:34:34

-So that's the basic one.

-That is the basic one.

0:34:340:34:37

That's worth no more than £50.

0:34:370:34:39

Right, I'll definitely stick to the day job.

0:34:390:34:41

Going on to the better, the vase nearest you.

0:34:440:34:48

-This one.

-This is the one I thought was basic.

0:34:480:34:50

That's the one you thought was basic. Look at the decoration.

0:34:500:34:54

We've got little dots painted in here,

0:34:540:34:56

that's copying an earlier technique,

0:34:560:34:59

it's reviving a style but the painting is rather cartoony.

0:34:590:35:02

It's a good vase.

0:35:020:35:04

It's quite a rare vase, late 19th century made for the Chinese.

0:35:040:35:08

Yes, in auction today that's £20,000.

0:35:100:35:12

See, I thought it looked...

0:35:120:35:14

I mean, I'm embarrassed to show my ignorance,

0:35:140:35:16

but it looked like it had been transferred on,

0:35:160:35:19

-obviously it's hand painted, then?

-Yeah, all three are hand painted.

0:35:190:35:22

Right.

0:35:220:35:24

Da, da, da, da, da!

0:35:240:35:25

This is obviously the humdinger.

0:35:250:35:29

Now, it's beautiful, but why is this

0:35:290:35:33

worth at least £200,000,

0:35:330:35:36

because it doesn't look that dramatically different?

0:35:360:35:38

It is brilliantly painted, the painting,

0:35:400:35:43

the quality is fantastic. It dates from the 18th century.

0:35:430:35:46

There is only one original Ming vase like this is known to exist

0:35:460:35:50

in the Percival David Foundation in the British Museum in London.

0:35:500:35:54

-So an original?

-There's only one...

-Would be worth?

-Who knows?

0:35:540:35:58

-Millions.

-Many, many millions.

0:35:580:36:00

They started reproducing this design in the 18th century.

0:36:000:36:03

It is difficult to tell, it's about the quality of the painting,

0:36:030:36:07

the space of the decoration, the surface of the glaze,

0:36:070:36:09

the way the base is finished

0:36:090:36:11

and all of these things come together

0:36:110:36:13

to make it a genuine 18th century piece.

0:36:130:36:17

It's a terrific vase

0:36:170:36:19

and, yes, it is coming up for auction

0:36:190:36:21

and I'm expecting it to make in excess of £200,000.

0:36:210:36:25

Gosh!

0:36:250:36:27

-Blimey!

-Quite!

0:36:270:36:29

Well, I'm embarrassed by my lack of scholarship,

0:36:290:36:33

let me just move these round then.

0:36:330:36:35

It breaks my heart to do it, so basic,

0:36:350:36:38

better, best.

0:36:380:36:39

I could not have got it more wrong.

0:36:390:36:42

If you have some blue and white china at home,

0:36:420:36:44

who knows? It may be worth £200,000.

0:36:440:36:47

We'd love to see it at the Roadshow.

0:36:470:36:49

Bring it along very carefully.

0:36:490:36:51

You can check out our locations on our website:

0:36:510:36:54

bbc.co.uk/antiquesroadshow.

0:36:540:36:57

Fiona, one final thought.

0:36:570:37:00

-You got all three wrong.

-Yes.

-You don't get the job, I'm sorry.

0:37:010:37:04

Charming!

0:37:060:37:07

Well, I hope you won't be offended

0:37:100:37:13

if I tell you that I think these extraordinary elaborate figures

0:37:130:37:17

are an affront to the modern taste for minimalism.

0:37:170:37:20

Minimalist they are not.

0:37:200:37:22

I mean, the detail in them is breathtaking,

0:37:230:37:27

wonderful little shells

0:37:270:37:28

and a lady selling fish here,

0:37:280:37:31

and the chap with a hare and a duck on a stick over his shoulder.

0:37:310:37:36

Really richly elaborate and wonderfully decorative things.

0:37:360:37:39

What do you know about them?

0:37:390:37:40

I know they were a wedding present to my wife's great grandparents.

0:37:400:37:48

Yeah.

0:37:480:37:50

I believe, I don't know the exact year, but around 1900.

0:37:500:37:53

Let's pick it up and have a look at the mark

0:37:530:37:56

and here we have an applied, pink triangle mark.

0:37:560:38:00

Impressed into that it says Royal Dux Bohemia

0:38:000:38:03

and there's an E in the centre there

0:38:030:38:06

and that stands for a man called Eduard Eichler

0:38:060:38:09

and he was the proprietor of the Royal Dux factory,

0:38:090:38:14

which was in a place in Bohemia called Dux.

0:38:140:38:17

He specialised in elaborate,

0:38:190:38:22

highly-styled and wonderful figures like this.

0:38:220:38:27

Date-wise, it works very well with your family provenance about 1900,

0:38:270:38:31

-that fits for me.

-OK.

0:38:310:38:34

But, you know, looking at these figures in the 21st century,

0:38:340:38:39

we live in a land of black leather sofas, white walls,

0:38:390:38:43

blonde wood floors

0:38:430:38:44

and, you know, 20 years ago, when I started looking at things like this,

0:38:440:38:49

people tried to make their houses like the inside of a country house,

0:38:490:38:52

or a Victorian villa. The more you could stuff into them,

0:38:520:38:56

the more elaborate they were, the better.

0:38:560:38:58

Now it's exactly the opposite.

0:38:580:39:00

That's why I say, you know, these things are just

0:39:000:39:02

the antithesis of British taste

0:39:020:39:05

and the value of them is almost like a barometer of that taste.

0:39:050:39:08

At auction today, I think, these wonderfully elaborate,

0:39:100:39:15

richly decorative, high quality figures are worth

0:39:150:39:19

-in the region of £800 to £1,200.

-OK.

0:39:190:39:22

But when I tell you that 20 years ago,

0:39:250:39:28

when I started doing this job,

0:39:280:39:32

they were worth twice as much,

0:39:320:39:35

1,500 to 2,000.

0:39:350:39:37

-One day, they'll come back.

-Well worth keeping hold of.

-Keep 'em.

0:39:390:39:43

This is a stunningly pretty clock.

0:39:450:39:47

Can you tell me anything about its past life?

0:39:470:39:49

Well it was given to my grandmother for her wedding,

0:39:490:39:53

-and we think it was about 1903 that she was married.

-Right.

0:39:530:39:57

And here she is.

0:39:580:39:59

-In the middle.

-In the middle.

-I love all the costumes.

0:39:590:40:02

-Are they all related?

-They're all sisters.

-Good heavens!

0:40:020:40:05

Yes, it was a large family, and three sons too.

0:40:050:40:08

And it came from your grandmother.

0:40:080:40:10

It came from my grandmother and it was given to me

0:40:100:40:12

-for my 18th birthday.

-It's a fabulous present.

0:40:120:40:16

I particularly like the enamel dial

0:40:160:40:18

which has got a Latin lettering which I think is "festina lente"

0:40:180:40:24

and my schoolboy Latin makes me think that's something like

0:40:240:40:27

"make haste slowly."

0:40:270:40:29

She always told me it was "hurry slowly."

0:40:290:40:32

-Hurry slowly, yes, exactly.

-Yes.

0:40:320:40:34

But what's so nice about this is the condition, it's really gorgeous.

0:40:340:40:40

Just look at the enamel round here, this tree and the lovely colouring,

0:40:400:40:45

even the colour of the dial itself is absolutely wonderful.

0:40:450:40:49

You've obviously looked after it extremely well.

0:40:490:40:52

I thought it was special.

0:40:520:40:53

-Yes, and it's in the high Art Nouveau taste.

-Right.

0:40:530:40:57

But if we turn it round,

0:40:570:40:58

what gets even more interesting are the marks at the back here

0:40:580:41:04

-and we can see it's got the mark here for Liberty & Company.

-Ah.

0:41:040:41:09

Now, Liberty & Company were one of the real pioneers

0:41:090:41:14

of the Art Nouveau style, particularly at this period,

0:41:140:41:19

and it's got a date letter here.

0:41:190:41:21

Made in Birmingham in 1901.

0:41:230:41:26

That would marry with the wedding present at 1903, wouldn't it?

0:41:260:41:29

Exactly, absolutely.

0:41:290:41:32

They had a very important designer working for them,

0:41:320:41:35

at that time, called Archibald Knox.

0:41:350:41:38

-Knox designed a number of clocks.

-Yes.

0:41:380:41:40

-I'm pretty certain this is designed by Knox.

-Right.

0:41:400:41:43

-This is prettier than most.

-Oh!

0:41:430:41:47

Now I have to tell you that Archibald Knox is very much

0:41:470:41:50

-the flavour of the month at the moment.

-Oh!

0:41:500:41:54

So, not only have you got a lovely item,

0:41:540:41:58

-you've got a rare item.

-Oh.

0:41:580:42:01

You've got a very collectable item.

0:42:010:42:04

I've got the difficult task of trying to tell you

0:42:060:42:09

what it might be worth.

0:42:090:42:11

Right.

0:42:120:42:13

I think comfortably £15,000 to £20,000.

0:42:130:42:16

AUDIENCE GASP

0:42:160:42:18

Oh!

0:42:180:42:20

What a wonderful present I was given.

0:42:200:42:23

-What a lovely grandmother you had.

-Yes.

0:42:230:42:25

This is, this is just so special and it's so wonderful.

0:42:270:42:32

I've almost fallen in love again in my life.

0:42:320:42:36

It is an absolutely stunning piece

0:42:360:42:39

and such a pleasure and a privilege to handle it and see it.

0:42:390:42:43

Well, thank you very much.

0:42:430:42:45

That's really good news and the family will be delighted.

0:42:450:42:48

Thank you very much.

0:42:480:42:49

What do you think this is?

0:42:520:42:54

Answers on a postcard, please.

0:42:550:42:57

Scrap that, we can't cope with the admin, I'll just tell you.

0:42:570:43:00

It is a prosthetic leg for a bull.

0:43:000:43:03

As you tie it on.

0:43:030:43:05

Tie it on here at the top

0:43:050:43:07

and look, it's articulated and everything.

0:43:070:43:09

You might wonder why would anyone go to all the trouble

0:43:090:43:12

to make a prosthetic leg for a bull, lovely though they are.

0:43:120:43:15

This might give you a clue.

0:43:150:43:17

Here's a prosthetic leg

0:43:180:43:21

and just look at the bedroom eyes that the cow is giving the bull.

0:43:220:43:26

All I can say is, it must have been a very valuable blood line!

0:43:260:43:31

From the Antiques Roadshow team

0:43:310:43:33

here at the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum,

0:43:330:43:35

until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:350:43:37

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit the Weald and Downland Museum in Sussex. Thousands of family heirlooms come under scrutiny, including some with intriguing provenance, like a mysterious chest once owned by the Duke of Wellington, a bracelet gifted by the King of Siam, and a rare watch known as The James Bond.

Perhaps the most curious find is a collection of old handcuffs and body restraints owned by a man with over 400 similar items.


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