Charlecote Park 1 Antiques Roadshow


Charlecote Park 1

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit Charlecote Park near Stratford-upon-Avon to discover more family treasures, including a collection of gold boxes and a royal gift.


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Transcript


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This week we follow the River Avon four miles upstream from Stratford

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to visit a home that's been owned by the Lucy family

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since the 12th century.

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The Victorian owners of Charlecote Park brought treasures from every corner of the world

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to decorate their home.

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So, I think they'd rather approve of our visitors bringing their own antiques here today.

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And with crowds like this, it looks like we're in for a busy day.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Warwickshire.

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You must admit, we choose some exquisite locations

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as our Roadshow backdrops!

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Just look at this Elizabethan manor,

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nestling in a beautiful parkland setting.

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What's not to like about a place like this?

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When George Hammond Lucy brought his new wife, Mary Elizabeth,

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here to Charlecote Park in 1823, she was not impressed.

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She confided to her diary that the windowpanes rattled

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with every gust of wind and that it was cold, so cold.

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So, they set about giving the house a major revamp.

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The couple were keen to make their old-fashioned,

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draughty house more comfortable.

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But instead of giving it a modern makeover, they turned the clock back

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300 years and revamped it to look more Elizabethan...

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..even adding this fake barrel-vaulted ceiling

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in the Great Hall,

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which is painted plaster instead of timber.

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George and Mary Elizabeth then went off on two Grand Tours in the 1840s

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bringing back magnificent furniture

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and exotic decorative objects, like this huge alabaster vase -

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not exactly the most practical thing to put in your suitcase!

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Sitting alongside 500 years of family portraits,

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their newly-acquired belongings at last made a home to be proud of.

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Today we're welcoming guests,

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courtesy of the modern-day Lucy family

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who, along with the National Trust, have rolled out the red carpet.

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Let's see what other family gems await us we join our experts.

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Unless I'm mistaken, we have a piece of Royal gold

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in front of us, don't we? Tell me about it.

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It belonged to my husband's great-grandfather.

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He was a hairdresser

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to King Edward VII

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when he was Prince of Wales

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and he travelled on his journeys abroad.

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And one day the Prince had asked his hairdresser to cut his hair

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on a Sunday and he refused to do this, on the basis that

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he was a very principled man and said that Sundays are sacred

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and therefore, "No, I will not cut your hair."

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However, he was surprised to be called the following day

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and the Prince agreed

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that it was a very good thing that he had said what he had said,

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and he took the pin out of his lapel

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and handed it to his hairdresser.

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Fantastic story, isn't it?

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And your husband's ancestor had refused to cut,

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not only the hair of a Prince of Wales, but also a future Emperor,

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so it's rather smart

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to turn an Emperor down, isn't it? Absolutely, yes.

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And an Emperor of India, which may be a hint of what's going on here

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because we can see that this is supplied by a firm in Madras

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and it's more than likely that this

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was presented during his visit to India.

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Yes. We know it's the Prince of Wales,

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because here are the three feathers

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and the little legend underneath that says "Ich dien",

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which means "I serve" - strange, as it should be the hairdresser

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serving the Prince of Wales!

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The Prince of Wales. "I serve" is the present Prince of Wales' cipher

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and it's bound with this mysterious snake.

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Have you thought about the snake at all? No idea, no.

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I haven't even thought about it. No.

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Well, the snake biting its tail, which effectively this is,

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is a very ancient symbol called the ouroborus,

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the eternally renewing circle,

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and it's an emblem of eternal affection, or eternal regard.

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Oh, yes. So, it was obviously a very thing to receive from the Prince.

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The only issue I'd have about the story

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is that it's highly unlikely

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that the Prince would be wearing his own cipher on his own pin.

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This is a very typical Royal presentation piece,

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set with a little emerald in the front.

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But, it's a fantastic story, isn't it?

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And beautiful in its wonderful fitted case.

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Yes. I think Edward VII's a much more popular sovereign

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than might at first be imagined.

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People are very interested in his history

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and something very much from his heart would carry quite a premium.

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And I think anybody who had the chance of buying this,

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and they don't have any chance... No.

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..would be quite pleased to give you

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maybe ?800 and maybe ?1,000, why not?

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A lovely thing. Thank you very much. Thank you very much indeed.

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The first question I'd like to ask is

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what is a Polish picture doing in the Midlands?

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Well, my great-great-grandfather bought it in the 1920s

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in New York and he landed there in the 1880s, 1890s from Poland.

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From Poland. Yeah. So, why did he leave Poland in the 19th century?

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Polish Jew. Right.

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Being Jewish and Polish at that time wasn't particularly a good thing,

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so he left for Ellis Island to find a better life.

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Poor chap. But he found a better life in America?

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Yeah, he ended up being a paper-mill owner. Very good.

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I guess he must have done quite well for himself and decided...

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He was feeling nostalgic.

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Yeah, exactly.

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Upset and homesick.

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All those tall buildings of New York,

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he probably fancied a bit of Poland back on the wall.

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So, he bought this rather beautiful picture.

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It's interesting because it's by an artist that is quite well known,

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Wywiorski. OK.

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As it clearly says on this label, but it's beautifully signed here.

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And "MG". Do you know what the MG? No. Mikhail Gorstkin. But curiously,

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it says underneath that,

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"Munchen 85".

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Now, all good painters went off to Germany to perhaps hone their skills

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and just get a bit slicker

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and neater and tidier and they did it beautifully.

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And, I suppose, the best schools at the time were in Germany,

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so any artist worth his salt, especially from Poland,

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went off to Munich to really train up, and so in 1885 this was painted.

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Even though it says "Munchen" here, it's not necessarily painted in Munich. We don't know.

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But they put that as a sort of a stamp, like a sort of degree almost.

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Yes. It showed that he was international

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and he was a good artist.

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Look at it, it's fantastic quality, isn't it?

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Yeah, it's beautiful. Absolutely fantastic.

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It seems to me, it sort of portrays a slightly sort of warlike image here

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of the mighty Polish army.

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Now, the great question is, what about a valuation?

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Have you had it valued? No, not at all.

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It's got a great, very grand frame.

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Yeah. Which is typical of sort of Victoriana.

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But I would have thought it was worth between sort of ?5,000 and ?7,000.

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Blimey. Wow. Any good? Yeah, I won't tell my dad.

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He's over in Vegas at the moment, so he might get a bit excited

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and go and blow the money!

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I think that's wonderful.

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Don't tell him, otherwise he'll spend it all on the slot machines.

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He doesn't know we're here, so...

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Now, when most people buy a new living room suite,

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they tend to buy new these days,

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but you've brought Granny's sofa with you.

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Thank you. I absolutely adore this.

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I'm a huge fan of Art Deco, so as soon as I saw this,

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I just had to have it.

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It probably didn't arrive in your house. How did you get it there?

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It was on an online auction site and the reserve on it

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was rather high, and I just loved the look of it,

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I just fell in love with it,

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I thought, "I've got to get this out of my system, even if I didn't get it." I put a ?15 bid on it.

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Two days later I got a rather disgruntled e-mail saying,

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"Please collect from me within two days, I'm moving",

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and I got it for ?15.

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Really? Yeah. That's astonishing,

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but it couldn't have gone to a better home, really,

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because you are the epitome of sort of vintage elegance.

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Thank you. You're dressed in '40s and we're looking at something

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10 years earlier, a 1930s suite, but it's gone to a great home,

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you're obviously passionate about previous eras.

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Hugely passionate. My little cottage is just full of 1930s, a bit of Art Deco, 1940s,

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World War II memorabilia and a bit of '50s stuffed in there, as well.

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But my passion is the '30s and '40s, so it goes beautifully, yeah.

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What I love about this is it is so of its time.

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I mean, just sitting back in here you feel like you are...

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at an Odeon Cinema, which of course...

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It kind of reclines and it's got that elegance of the cruise ships

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that I love - this streamlined elegance.

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Streamlined, and here, I mean, just underneath you here when we get up,

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it's that curve. Oh, it's gorgeous.

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It's the curve of every bay window

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in a new suburban house in the '30s and it is emulated here.

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And, interestingly, I had a little peek earlier and underneath,

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it's got this rather darker blue colour.

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Yeah, actually, I think it used to be a very dark blue at some point.

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And the reason it's faded, of course,

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is that those 1930s living rooms were suntraps

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and Crittall windows were all about suntrap windows,

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they let in the light.

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So, out went all the old kind of dark oak, turned Elizabethan style legs,

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and in came moderne style,

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of which this is the epitome, really.

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I adore it, I think it's fabulous. There's a chair we haven't got here.

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That's right, it's two chairs and the two-seater sofa.

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So you've got a complete suite.

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And I think that it's considerably more exciting in terms of value

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than the ?15 you paid for it.

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I think that anyone who potentially decided to steal it away from you,

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if they could get a look in,

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I think you're looking at a suite probably worth about nearly ?800.

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You're kidding me!

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Really?! Yes.

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My parents are going to be so angry because they HATE this!

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Oh, that's made my day, thank you very much.

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It's stunning. It's comfortable.

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It's comfortable and cosy. It is. It's just getting up off it.

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You need a cup of tea to figure out your way off it again,

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because you can flail around a little bit,

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but it's nice reclining, isn't it? Yeah.

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Let's watch the pictures!

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MUSIC: In The Mood by Glenn Miller

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It's an unusual watch

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and I've a feeling we've got an unusual history behind it.

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Who wants to speak first?

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Well, I'll let Isabella speak first

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because she knows more of the background of the family,

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and I will tell you how I came by it.

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And this is grandfather's watch.

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My father was a pilot in the war

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for the Polish Air Force

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and finished up in a POW camp in Romania,

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just by Constanza, where he met my mother,

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who had been taken from her family to be a cook in a POW camp.

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So, she was Romanian? Well, she was born in Romania.

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Ah, OK. And when the war was over, my parents were displaced persons...

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our parents were displaced persons, couldn't go back to their countries

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and, very fortunately, England gave them a home.

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So you went to Poland about 20-odd years ago.

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Yes, 25 years ago I decided I wanted, I needed, to go

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and have a look and see what was going on.

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There was a far distant relation there and she took me

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to see Great-Great-Aunt Anushka,

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which was a very lovely old lady who was in charge of this watch.

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She had actually rescued it from the house prior to the Germans,

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or the Russians,

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marching over and taking all the possessions and she'd hid it.

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She'd wrapped it up beautifully in some cloth

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and then buried it in a deep bucket of yellow flour.

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And that's about it, I know nothing more about it.

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It's a great story. A lovely story.

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Fantastic. We have a photograph

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of Grandfather. I have a photograph of my grandfather.

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Would you like to see it? Yes.

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Let's have a look.

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Isn't that great?

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And the fob is hidden by his coat.

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That's right, and that's my grandmother.

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Very beautiful. She is, isn't she? Absolutely beautiful.

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Who's that? Our father.

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Love the haircut. I know!

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What a tremendous story. Yes.

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Not sure I can beat that -

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telling you about the watch is... Tell us about the watch!

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I'll tell you about the watch. Can I hand you that? Of course you can.

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The watch is Swiss and it's a hunter watch, a hunter-case watch

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so called because it has this cover over the top of the dial.

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But what is unusual about the watch is the complexity of the movement

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and it shows on the dial,

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the day and the date and the month

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and also the phases of the moon,

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and also the seconds and the hours

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and the minutes in an 18-carat case, made around 1920.

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It's very beautiful.

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At auction, it would fetch between ?600 and ?800.

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Good Lord! And possibly more.

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Love it and treasure it.

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I think it's fairly well known that I'm a glass nutter.

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I can't help myself. If I'm driving around the country...

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I was driving up here yesterday,

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there's not a charity shop I didn't stop in. Screech! Another one!

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And whether it be a boot fair, antique shop, antique centre, I can't help myself.

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And what I really like about this is your story which is about your dad.

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He was a similar, kindred spirit to mine, I think. He was, yes.

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He used to travel to work with a briefcase walking past antique shops

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and on the way home he often popped into them

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and he used to get home with my mum and open the briefcase

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and pull something out and she used to say,

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"Oh, no, not again", or sometimes, "Oh, wonderful!"

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And this is something that he pulled out of the bag one day.

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Well, I think that's a jolly nice thing to pull out of the bag. It's a really pretty thing.

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It was made not far from here, in Stourbridge, by John Walsh Walsh.

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His name was John Walsh, but he didn't think that was wacky enough,

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so he changed his name by deed poll to John Walsh Walsh.

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And the way you make this is you've got cobalt oxide,

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this is pre-Lalique, remember?

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Laliquesque, isn't it? But this probably dates from about 1900,

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1910, which is way before Lalique.

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And you blow this into a mould that is impressed with the pattern.

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You then take it out of that mould

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and re-blow it in a smooth mould,

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then you reheat it and what happens

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is that act brings on the opalescence in this.

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Right. It's called the brocade pattern

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and you can see that that's really logical that it should be.

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And I think it's jolly nice. Do you like it? I love it. But the imperfections in it,

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would they have been in the manufacture?

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Oh, absolutely. I mean, the day this was made,

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it looked identical to the way it is now.

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It hasn't changed one iota, very pretty. And its value,

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?400 to ?500.

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That's wonderful!

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My father would have been delighted, thank you very much indeed.

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Well, I've always believed

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that good design is good design.

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It doesn't matter whether it's 200 years old or 50 years old.

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But this is a wonderful time-line of seating. How do they connect to you?

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Well, we've just always collected interesting chairs.

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We bought several different houses

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and one of them had a very modern interior

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and so we then wanted to make it minimal and we bought this Marcel Breuer.

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But we had two of them, we've only got the one now.

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And then the chair at the end? Well, this was because we had a house that had been Gothicised

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by Sanderson Miller and we were looking for things

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that would echo the Gothic revival.

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And the interior designer who was helping us found it in London.

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I don't know where he found it

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and I don't know anything about it, really.

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I think it's fair to say then,

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quite clearly, that you are a chair fetishist.

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Yes. Is that correct?

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That is right. Well, I'll let you into a little secret, so am I.

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Good. I've got a house full of chairs. Have you?

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And I find myself being drawn to them in the most peculiar of reasons.

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It's about shape and form.

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Yes. But what you've got here, as I say, a time-line ranging from...

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At this end we have something that we'd class Regency Gothic,

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so 1810 to 1820,

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running through here in the middle,

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as you quite rightly said, Marcel Breuer `

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first designed in 1925, the height of the Bauhaus.

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Yes. This was a development.

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It's everything, this transformed the mass manufacturing of furniture

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and became an iconic chair. Yes.

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Icons are, it's a big term to use, but, no, an iconic chair.

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Yes. Sweeping through to your landmark piece,

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your Charles Eames lounge chair and ottoman.

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That's right. This chair, of course, created between 1953 and '54,

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went into production in 1956. Right.

0:17:540:17:57

And has been in continuous production every year

0:17:570:18:00

since it was first initiated. Yes.

0:18:000:18:02

And, to me, probably one of the most important chairs of the 20th century.

0:18:020:18:07

Yes. But the interesting thing is values.

0:18:070:18:10

Now, I always think you look at a Roman coin and you think,

0:18:100:18:14

"Well, it's Roman, so it must be worth hundreds."

0:18:140:18:17

Well, no, Roman coins can be bought for pounds, shillings and pence.

0:18:170:18:21

So, by that token, we have a chair here that is in essence

0:18:210:18:25

no more than 50 years old in its design,

0:18:250:18:29

yet a chair at the other end that is 200 years old. Yes.

0:18:290:18:33

But the prices couldn't be further apart.

0:18:330:18:36

If I say to you today a lovely...

0:18:360:18:38

And it is a beautiful chair with some lovely trompe l'oeil decoration,

0:18:380:18:42

I would say probably refreshed at some point in its life,

0:18:420:18:45

but the prices actually start here at, say, ?400 or ?500.

0:18:450:18:50

We move to Mr Marcel Breuer and we have a chair, a Wassily chair,

0:18:500:18:56

a later reproduction,

0:18:560:18:58

but worth...?500 to ?600.

0:18:580:19:01

Goodness. And we sweep our way round

0:19:010:19:04

to a wonderful Charles Eames 670 and 671 lounge chair and ottoman,

0:19:040:19:09

beautifully beaten up.

0:19:090:19:11

Eames actually said he wanted the chair, when lived in and used,

0:19:110:19:15

to look like a fantastic baseball glove.

0:19:150:19:19

Well, it does!

0:19:190:19:20

It does, doesn't it? It does!

0:19:200:19:22

Today a good issue like this, a good early issue,

0:19:220:19:26

you're not going to be able to replace for much less than ?3,000.

0:19:260:19:30

Oh, no! Wow!

0:19:300:19:34

They are all icons of their time.

0:19:340:19:37

Their time. So, well done, you. You have a fantastic eye.

0:19:370:19:40

Oh, thank you very much indeed, thank you. My pleasure. Well, gosh.

0:19:400:19:45

This is an incredibly intense,

0:19:470:19:49

and almost sensual portrait, by Val Prinsep.

0:19:490:19:53

And very often with these really wonderful portraits by Prinsep,

0:19:530:19:58

you get a great connection between the artist and the sitter.

0:19:580:20:02

Now, she was obviously a great beauty of her time, but you certainly feel

0:20:020:20:06

that either she was in love with him, or he was in love with her.

0:20:060:20:09

Now, tell me, do you know who she was? I do know who she was.

0:20:090:20:13

She was, in fact, my great-grandmother. What was her name?

0:20:130:20:17

Her name was Agnes Bowman.

0:20:170:20:19

I think the history of the picture, Agnes Bowman's father

0:20:190:20:24

was Sir William Bowman, who was a surgeon at Kings College Hospital,

0:20:240:20:29

living in Kensington.

0:20:290:20:30

At the time, Val Prinsep was living in Kensington as well

0:20:300:20:34

and I think they must have known each other.

0:20:340:20:37

And I have a letter, which I could not find before coming here today,

0:20:370:20:41

that relates to this, from Val Prinsep, thanking Sir William Bowman very much.

0:20:410:20:48

I think he must have treated either Val Prinsep or his wife.

0:20:480:20:51

Yes. But thanking him very much for looking after whoever it was

0:20:510:20:54

and I feel that this picture, this painting,

0:20:540:20:58

is actually a thank you to Sir William from Val Prinsep.

0:20:580:21:02

Isn't that lovely? Mmm.

0:21:020:21:03

A piece of history and it's stayed with the family, too, which is great.

0:21:030:21:07

Well, I found it at the bottom of my mum's chest in her hall

0:21:070:21:11

when I cleared her house out after she died, four years ago. She didn't know it was there.

0:21:110:21:16

So, it's been tucked away, a little treasure tucked away.

0:21:160:21:19

Yes. Val Prinsep is an interesting character.

0:21:190:21:21

He was very social, but he was one of the great artists.

0:21:210:21:24

He admired Lord Leighton so he was very much a classical painter,

0:21:240:21:27

but he also was involved with the Oxford Union decoration,

0:21:270:21:31

with Rossetti and some of the Pre-Raphaelites.

0:21:310:21:34

He was influenced by Rossetti and you get a Rossetti feel about this picture. Absolutely.

0:21:340:21:39

It's beautiful, isn't it?

0:21:390:21:40

A highly successful artist. A wonderful life.

0:21:400:21:43

He became a Professor at the Royal Academy in 1901. Oh, right, I didn't know that.

0:21:430:21:47

But you often see pictures on such a vast scale by him and this is just a little gem, it's just a little jewel

0:21:470:21:53

and you almost really feel that you know this sitter.

0:21:530:21:56

Absolutely, well, she's very beautiful, isn't she?

0:21:560:21:59

It's inscribed lower right.

0:21:590:22:01

Just under the mount, there's a little inscription which says, "V Prinsep to W Bowman",

0:22:010:22:06

which is a lovely personal touch.

0:22:060:22:08

Yes, yes. This is a really rare lovely oil painting,

0:22:080:22:12

in totally original condition.

0:22:120:22:14

It's been tucked away, it hasn't been touched.

0:22:140:22:17

But this is a very desirable picture. Right.

0:22:170:22:20

And certainly worth ?8,000 to ?12,000.

0:22:200:22:22

Are you joking? Somebody prop me up!

0:22:240:22:29

Good heavens! Well, Mum didn't know obviously, did she?

0:22:290:22:34

Thank you so much.

0:22:340:22:37

I don't know if the team may be trying to tell me something,

0:22:390:22:42

but this is the second time

0:22:420:22:44

I've found myself discussing toilet roll on the programme!

0:22:440:22:48

What can you tell me about this?

0:22:480:22:50

It was a toilet roll that was rejected by The Beatles

0:22:500:22:53

when they were recording at Abbey Road Studios.

0:22:530:22:57

And why did they reject it?

0:22:570:22:58

Apparently, because it was too hard and shiny.

0:22:580:23:02

So, it does look like there's a piece been torn off,

0:23:020:23:04

but I don't think they got very much further with it.

0:23:040:23:07

Each sheet's stamped with "EMI Ltd" as well, which I think put them off.

0:23:070:23:11

It was the record label. Yeah. And they didn't like that. Do you know what that reminds me of?

0:23:110:23:16

It's like that tracing paper loo roll.

0:23:160:23:18

It doesn't look very nice. It used to be, like, British Rail?

0:23:180:23:21

You thought, "Why did anyone MAKE loo roll like this? It's not comfy, it doesn't work."

0:23:210:23:25

Exactly, exactly. And so the Beatles rejected this loo roll.

0:23:250:23:28

The Beatles rejected it and

0:23:280:23:30

I believe it's the only one in existence. Are you surprised?

0:23:300:23:34

Yeah, there are no others!

0:23:340:23:37

And how did you come by it?

0:23:370:23:39

My father bought it in the 1980 Sale Of The Century at Abbey Road Studios. It came up for auction.

0:23:390:23:45

When they were selling... Everything off, yeah.

0:23:450:23:48

It was on the original backing plate,

0:23:480:23:49

but the glass case has been a later addition to preserve it a little bit.

0:23:490:23:53

How amazing! So, I mean,

0:23:530:23:55

what level of fame do you have to have reached

0:23:550:23:58

where your rejected loo roll

0:23:580:24:00

becomes something that is sold at an auction? I mean, my goodness!

0:24:000:24:05

Obviously, the Beatles, yeah!

0:24:050:24:07

And a letter. "Toilet roll. Most things went very smoothly...

0:24:070:24:10

"..they complained was too hard and shiny.

0:24:150:24:17

"The paper was immediately withdrawn and things became much smoother

0:24:220:24:26

"for the staff after that." Fnar-fnar!

0:24:260:24:28

Bit of a wag, this Ken Townsend. So Ken Townsend, General Manager.

0:24:310:24:35

He was General Manager of EMI. Yeah.

0:24:350:24:37

Right. So, who bought this again? Your father?

0:24:370:24:39

My father, yeah. And, I hardly dare ask, how much did he pay for this?

0:24:390:24:44

In 1980, he paid ?85 for it.

0:24:440:24:47

In an edition of the book about Abbey Road,

0:24:470:24:52

Ken Townsend's actually disgusted that it made ?85,

0:24:520:24:55

because recording equipment of the time

0:24:550:24:58

was making less than he paid for the toilet roll, so... No! Yeah, yeah.

0:24:580:25:02

My word! It's a strange old world, the antiques business, isn't it?

0:25:020:25:06

Very strange.

0:25:060:25:07

At last we have an answer to that age-old riddle,

0:25:240:25:27

"Why does a chicken cross the road?"

0:25:270:25:29

Now we know why - to get to a brand of chicken food.

0:25:290:25:33

And this is wonderful! Look, there is mayhem going on here,

0:25:330:25:36

there are dead chickens, there are running chickens,

0:25:360:25:39

there are pecking chickens, there's all sorts of gesticulation,

0:25:390:25:43

and I don't know what going on here.

0:25:430:25:45

Tell me how this wonderful object came to be in your hands.

0:25:450:25:49

These were sent out to shops as a form of advertising.

0:25:490:25:52

You put them in your window or somewhere in your shop and it advertised the product. Yeah.

0:25:520:25:57

When the war came, I don't believe it was ever sent back. Oh, I see.

0:25:570:26:01

So, they were given to you really on loan by the manufacturers

0:26:010:26:04

and then they'd come and pick them up. Well, I'm very pleased

0:26:040:26:07

they didn't come back,

0:26:070:26:08

because this is giving us an enormous amount of pleasure.

0:26:080:26:12

I have to say that all my early years,

0:26:120:26:14

from the time that I was born until the time that I was 18,

0:26:140:26:17

was spent in the company of chickens.

0:26:170:26:19

Ah, right. It made me the woman I am today.

0:26:190:26:22

And, in fact, one of my great confidants,

0:26:220:26:24

when I was about four, was a very stately Rhode Island Red cross Light Sussex that had the name Mrs Green.

0:26:240:26:30

So, you know, I can empathise exactly

0:26:300:26:33

wanting to have the comfort of a good feed at some point.

0:26:330:26:36

It's not unusual to have an automated advertising campaign

0:26:360:26:40

and these came in all sorts of different shapes and sizes.

0:26:400:26:43

This is perhaps one of the most complex ones.

0:26:430:26:45

The earlier ones were clockwork and you might have a smoker,

0:26:450:26:50

an automaton smoker,

0:26:500:26:52

where smoke would blow out from his cigarette holder.

0:26:520:26:56

You may have a tea drinker.

0:26:560:26:58

There were all sorts of early clockwork types.

0:26:580:27:02

But this is one of the most complex.

0:27:020:27:04

Has it always been in reasonably good condition?

0:27:040:27:07

Have you done any work to it?

0:27:070:27:09

My engineer over here has helped me get it back together

0:27:090:27:12

so that we could bring it today.

0:27:120:27:14

But we've still got work to do here, because this is no longer pecking.

0:27:140:27:18

And, of course, this no longer runs.

0:27:180:27:23

But what has happened is that

0:27:230:27:25

the chickens have been run over by this lorry,

0:27:250:27:28

and the lorry driver's come to say,

0:27:280:27:31

"I'm terribly sorry, I've run over your chickens", and, hopefully, he'll do it now.

0:27:310:27:39

There we are. And the farmer says, "What are you doing?

0:27:390:27:44

"I'm going to punch you on the nose."

0:27:440:27:46

I wonder how effective it was as a sales technique?!

0:27:460:27:50

I'm told that the kids used to stand in the street

0:27:500:27:53

and watch these and they loved them,

0:27:530:27:55

because, of course, they hadn't got any telly or anything.

0:27:550:27:58

So, this was as good as a telly? Yes.

0:27:580:28:00

Of course it was. Well, I love it,

0:28:000:28:02

and there is a huge interest in early advertising material,

0:28:020:28:06

particularly something as complex

0:28:060:28:09

as this, with so many different movements.

0:28:090:28:12

I could see it very much taking pride of place in a museum,

0:28:120:28:18

talking about the times.

0:28:180:28:20

I agree absolutely, dating from just before the Second World War.

0:28:200:28:27

And value, I would put a value of between...

0:28:270:28:31

?400 and ?700, definitely.

0:28:310:28:35

And if one can get it back into full working order,

0:28:350:28:38

it's going to certainly fetch four figures. Great object.

0:28:380:28:41

Well, do you know, I am a firm believer in starting work

0:28:460:28:50

right at the bottom and working your way up. And this chap here,

0:28:500:28:54

in this army record book, started in the army at the age of 14 years,

0:28:540:28:59

one month, and at only four foot,

0:28:590:29:02

nine-and-a-half inches tall. That's right.

0:29:020:29:04

But quite clearly he went on

0:29:040:29:06

to do wonderful things if these are his medals.

0:29:060:29:09

He was obviously very, very highly decorated.

0:29:090:29:13

And this is him. Yes, that's William Henry Dale, my grandfather.

0:29:130:29:18

And he was born in 1869 and he enrolled in the Royal Engineers

0:29:180:29:23

when he was only 14 years old

0:29:230:29:26

as a boy trumpeter, and from there

0:29:260:29:28

he rose through the ranks to be Lieutenant Colonel.

0:29:280:29:32

Wow! And he was very, very honoured

0:29:320:29:36

in many ways by the end of his career.

0:29:360:29:39

You know, getting the Military Cross, getting the OBE

0:29:390:29:42

and many, many other medals which you can see there.

0:29:420:29:46

He's got an amazing array of medals, hasn't he? Mmm, he has. Quite spectacular.

0:29:460:29:50

He must have been... I mean he was obviously a career soldier...

0:29:500:29:54

Absolutely. ..spending decades in the army,

0:29:540:29:57

dedicated to the service. Yes.

0:29:570:29:59

What did he do? Well, a lot of it,

0:29:590:30:01

he started off in Africa and that was a continent which he loved.

0:30:010:30:06

He spent years in Egypt and his job was

0:30:060:30:10

actually to survey and create telegraph links

0:30:100:30:16

across the wild parts which had been unsurveyed in Africa.

0:30:160:30:19

That's terribly important, of course. It is.

0:30:190:30:21

It was very, very dangerous work.

0:30:210:30:23

It involved using a lot of native workers who knew the terrain.

0:30:230:30:27

When he reached the rank of Major,

0:30:270:30:30

his brother officers, because he was moving onto another posting,

0:30:300:30:34

wanted to make a silver figurine for him.

0:30:340:30:37

And he said, "I don't want an effigy of myself,

0:30:370:30:40

"I want one of my workers."

0:30:400:30:42

Well, he was quite clearly a distinguished soldier.

0:30:420:30:46

There's no doubt about that from these wonderful decorations.

0:30:460:30:49

And, you know, they have a considerable value, of course.

0:30:490:30:53

I hadn't thought of that.

0:30:530:30:55

From an insurance point of view,

0:30:550:30:57

passing these things down the family, at the moment,

0:30:570:30:59

the medals, the silver trophy,

0:30:590:31:03

his army records, the photographs,

0:31:030:31:06

and I guess you've got other things,

0:31:060:31:08

have you, of his? Yes. OK, I would say that,

0:31:080:31:11

from an insurance point of view,

0:31:110:31:14

they're worth...

0:31:140:31:16

?15,000.

0:31:160:31:18

Really? I had no idea.

0:31:180:31:20

I've never, ever thought of their monetary value. No, I'm just very, very proud of what he achieved.

0:31:200:31:26

Well, we're used to seeing glass

0:31:300:31:32

formed into vases and plates and bowls,

0:31:320:31:34

but it's not every day that you end up with a glass knife

0:31:340:31:38

and it's amazing, because this is really sharp.

0:31:380:31:43

I mean, if it were a letter opener

0:31:430:31:46

and it blunted its way through an envelope

0:31:460:31:49

I could understand this, but this is really sharp

0:31:490:31:52

and I've never seen one before!

0:31:520:31:54

And the beauty of it is that we've got the blah-blah that goes with it.

0:31:540:31:58

"The Nutbrown glass knife

0:31:580:32:00

"is manufactured of specially-prepared glass.

0:32:000:32:03

"While the makers do not guarantee it is unbreakable..." blah-blah-blah,

0:32:030:32:07

"..it's absolutely fantastic for preparing grapefruit and it's ideal for cakes, pies and meats, etc."

0:32:070:32:12

I mean, that's just great! What's the story, where did you find it?

0:32:120:32:16

Well, my girlfriend was working in a charity shop,

0:32:160:32:19

well, she did it voluntary from finishing her job...

0:32:190:32:22

Great. ..and I popped in there and I saw it and I bought it for ?5.

0:32:220:32:27

Well, I think that's obviously a bargain.

0:32:270:32:29

I mean, it is a wacky object. I mean,

0:32:290:32:31

how many have survived? There's a little chip up the top.

0:32:310:32:34

You paid a fiver. I reckon that's a pretty safe bet.

0:32:340:32:37

It's got to be worth at least, what, ?6.

0:32:370:32:39

Wow, I've made a profit!

0:32:390:32:41

Thank you very much. You're welcome. Thanks for bringing it.

0:32:410:32:45

I went to a car-boot sale and I was looking in a glass cabinet

0:32:450:32:49

and I saw this ring and thought, "Wow!"

0:32:490:32:53

The gentleman said he wanted ?40 for it

0:32:530:32:56

and I bought it for my wife to wear on special occasions, really.

0:32:560:33:00

You know, it's such a nice ring.

0:33:000:33:02

And does she? No.

0:33:020:33:04

What do you mean, no?

0:33:040:33:05

She thinks the amethyst is a bit too large.

0:33:080:33:10

There's something about the colour that made me think,

0:33:100:33:13

"Was this really silver?" You're absolutely right.

0:33:130:33:16

It is not silver, it is platinum.

0:33:160:33:19

It is 1900,

0:33:190:33:24

but what I love about this

0:33:240:33:27

is the attention to detail,

0:33:270:33:29

which you can only get with platinum.

0:33:290:33:31

Silver is too soft and it tarnishes

0:33:310:33:34

and it's not strong, so, therefore,

0:33:340:33:38

you can't make something very delicate-looking with silver,

0:33:380:33:41

but you can with platinum.

0:33:410:33:43

I love the way that the working carries on underneath,

0:33:430:33:46

so even when you're wearing the ring,

0:33:460:33:48

you've still got the working...

0:33:480:33:50

You should be a jeweller, I reckon!

0:33:500:33:53

I reckon you should be a jeweller because you are absolutely right.

0:33:530:33:57

What I love is this attention to detail and how soft and smooth it is,

0:33:570:34:02

and it curves, so it really fits snugly on your finger.

0:34:020:34:05

Yeah. It's very rare you will find rings today

0:34:050:34:08

that go to this length for no money, really.

0:34:080:34:12

It's an amethyst. It is set with diamonds, not that many diamonds.

0:34:120:34:16

On the side here, we've got a baguette-cut diamond

0:34:160:34:20

and we have some single cut diamonds.

0:34:200:34:23

So you know, intrinsically, you're not talking very much.

0:34:230:34:26

You gave ?40 for it, how long ago?

0:34:260:34:29

About 10 years ago.

0:34:290:34:31

About 10 years ago. What if I said to you today

0:34:310:34:35

it would be round about ?800 to ?1,000 instead?

0:34:350:34:38

What would you say? What would you think?

0:34:380:34:40

Thank you very much!

0:34:400:34:43

Very nice.

0:34:430:34:44

Good day's work.

0:34:440:34:45

Hilary, I know you're a bit of an Archers fan... I am.

0:34:500:34:53

..and like a good cup of tea.

0:34:530:34:55

Now, someone has brought in this kind of Archers memorabilia.

0:34:550:34:58

The cups, the jigsaw puzzle and a game here.

0:34:580:35:02

I just wondered if you wanted to give it the once-over.

0:35:020:35:04

How would you appraise these?

0:35:040:35:06

Well, you know, it's always lovely to see The Bull.

0:35:060:35:10

Not how I imagine it.

0:35:100:35:12

And, you know, Hollerton Bakeries.

0:35:120:35:15

Yes, I feel that I could just walk in there and I could be part of the set. You realise, of course,

0:35:150:35:19

that Borsetshire is the one county in the British Isles

0:35:190:35:22

that The Antiques Roadshow has never visited.

0:35:220:35:25

We should put that right. We want a visit to Borsetshire.

0:35:250:35:28

Lower Loxley could definitely...

0:35:280:35:31

Couldn't it? Lower Loxley would be perfect to film the Roadshow.

0:35:310:35:35

What would these things be worth, do you think? Well, not a huge amount.

0:35:350:35:38

I love the cups and saucers.

0:35:380:35:40

They would probably be worth, I don't know, ?10 to ?15 each.

0:35:400:35:43

These, I suppose, ?20 to ?30.

0:35:430:35:47

I suppose you've got ?50 to ?70 worth here.

0:35:470:35:50

I can think of a way we could double that value at a stroke. How? Go on.

0:35:500:35:53

Do you recognise this lady?

0:35:530:35:55

No, you won't. Kathy from the Archers.

0:35:550:35:58

Otherwise known as Hedli in real life, and these are hers.

0:35:580:36:03

These are my treasures. Oh, Hedli, how wonderful to meet you.

0:36:030:36:06

I have more. It's lovely to see you!

0:36:060:36:08

Well, you see you want to... I'm going to shut my eyes, speak, speak!

0:36:080:36:12

If I said something like, "Kenton, I've had enough, it's about time you left."

0:36:120:36:16

The problem is, you weren't having enough with Kenton!

0:36:160:36:18

Let's not go into that too much!

0:36:180:36:21

That's a bit astute! Now, has anyone got a pen I could borrow?

0:36:210:36:25

A pen, a pen? Oh, we need a pen.

0:36:250:36:29

Thank you, sir. Right, Kathy.

0:36:290:36:32

I have to call you Kathy, would you do the honours and sign this?

0:36:320:36:35

Does it actually add to the value or does it detract from it?

0:36:350:36:39

I thought this would spoil it. If it's YOU, Kathy.

0:36:390:36:42

All right, I'm going to sign it, then. OK, right.

0:36:420:36:46

What would you say it's worth now, Hilary?

0:36:460:36:49

It was 20 quid two minutes ago.

0:36:490:36:51

Now...signed by Kathy?

0:36:510:36:53

Do you know, people always say on the Antiques Roadshow that we create markets.

0:36:530:36:58

Well, do you know, we just have.

0:36:580:37:00

It's definitely double. That's definitely 50 quid's worth now.

0:37:000:37:04

Well, there you go. All you Archers collectors out there,

0:37:040:37:07

just talk to me and I can double the value of all the memorabilia!

0:37:070:37:11

Well, thank you very much.

0:37:110:37:13

Thank you, thank you.

0:37:130:37:14

ARCHERS THEME PLAYS

0:37:140:37:16

Although there's no title on it, auctioneers have a habit

0:37:230:37:26

of creating cheesy titles for these things and I can't help feeling that

0:37:260:37:29

she ought to be called something like Sweet Reverie or something like that.

0:37:290:37:33

You don't know what she's called?

0:37:330:37:35

Haven't a clue. No, no. No relation at all. Is she not? No.

0:37:350:37:38

Well, she's very beautiful.

0:37:380:37:40

But it's obviously been reframed.

0:37:400:37:42

Did you buy it, or how did you come by it?

0:37:420:37:44

No, well, it came from an aunt in Switzerland and when the box

0:37:440:37:48

of all of her effects came over to an aunt's flat

0:37:480:37:52

and my brothers went along,

0:37:520:37:53

we decided what we'd like to take away with us. Right.

0:37:530:37:56

And, rather stupidly, I decided I'd take away a box full of old picture frames.

0:37:560:38:01

And when I looked through, fairly rapidly,

0:38:010:38:04

I just saw this wooden panel

0:38:040:38:06

and I thought it was the back of a picture frame.

0:38:060:38:10

So, I just put it back in the box,

0:38:100:38:11

and about five years later, my wife wanted a picture frame,

0:38:110:38:15

so she went to the box, and she said, "Have you seen this?"

0:38:150:38:18

So, I said no, and that's what it was.

0:38:180:38:20

And I thought, "Crikey, it's really quite beautiful".

0:38:200:38:23

So, she's been languishing in this box. So, she's been languishing.

0:38:230:38:26

She had a little chip of paint up in the top here somewhere.

0:38:260:38:30

I took it to a dealer in Bristol and they touched it up and cleaned it

0:38:300:38:35

and framed it, so this is what I've got.

0:38:350:38:38

So, we don't know long she's been lying in this box. No, no.

0:38:380:38:40

Your aunt didn't like it, either. How bizarre. I don't think she did.

0:38:400:38:44

Why would you not like it? It's absolutely beautiful.

0:38:440:38:46

No, well I think it got so dusty, she didn't know what she had.

0:38:460:38:50

What a shame. I mean, she missed out, didn't she?

0:38:500:38:52

Yes, absolutely. Well, I mean,

0:38:520:38:54

it says here clearly E C-A-S-T-R-E-S, Castres,

0:38:540:39:00

who was a Swiss artist, Edouard Castres,

0:39:000:39:03

born in the 1830s, dies in 1902.

0:39:030:39:05

And you mentioned it's on panel, and I think it's quite clear,

0:39:050:39:09

looking at the picture that it's on panel,

0:39:090:39:11

because it has this jewel-like quality when the paint sits

0:39:110:39:15

on the surface like this, rather than is absorbed to a certain extent, so all the colours really look glowing.

0:39:150:39:20

And I think it has a fabulous vibrancy to it.

0:39:200:39:23

And, of course, it's beautifully observed in every way.

0:39:230:39:26

Not only is she very beautiful, but this nice little still life here.

0:39:260:39:29

In the middle, yes.

0:39:290:39:32

It's just lovely, isn't it? Yes, I love the light on the coffee pot. Do you think it's after a ball or...?

0:39:320:39:37

Well, what is she dreaming about?

0:39:370:39:40

I know. She's got a spinning wheel here and is this something to do with time, and so on, passing?

0:39:400:39:45

Well, you obviously love the picture.

0:39:450:39:48

Yes. And it is, I think, absolutely beautifully painted.

0:39:480:39:52

So, it arrives in a box of stuff.

0:39:520:39:54

Yes, exactly. So, it hasn't cost you anything.

0:39:540:39:57

Apart from a splodge of paint and a frame.

0:39:570:40:01

Well, he's very desirable. And, actually, it's a very pretty picture.

0:40:010:40:05

Right now, these genre pictures are perhaps not as hot as might have been a year or two ago,

0:40:050:40:09

but it will come back and it's a good Swiss artist.

0:40:090:40:13

I would have thought at auction today you could expect somewhere between ?3,000 and ?5,000 for it.

0:40:130:40:17

Right. So...

0:40:170:40:20

Oh, that's good. Yes!

0:40:200:40:21

Your aunt did you proud.

0:40:210:40:24

Yes, absolutely, yes.

0:40:240:40:26

I wonder if she knew. Yes.

0:40:260:40:28

Well, look at these gold boxes, don't they look fantastic?

0:40:300:40:33

They are status symbols

0:40:330:40:34

from the 18th and 19th century, but, tell me, how are they yours?

0:40:340:40:38

Well, back in about the late 1950s,

0:40:380:40:41

my sisters and I had a little bit of money coming in from a trust fund

0:40:410:40:45

and instead of reinvesting it in boring old stocks and shares,

0:40:450:40:48

my father decided to buy these

0:40:480:40:50

and he collected them over the '60s

0:40:500:40:53

and possibly '70s and he would also do swaps.

0:40:530:40:56

He would try and get better ones

0:40:560:40:58

than the ones he'd already bought.

0:40:580:41:00

So, that's what we ended up with.

0:41:000:41:02

Fantastic. That's a true collector,

0:41:020:41:04

advancing the collection.

0:41:040:41:06

But it's very rich and spectacular.

0:41:060:41:09

But in the front we have the three that I've chosen to talk about

0:41:090:41:12

and I think I'll talk about this one first which a very exotic

0:41:120:41:16

and sort of almost sugary perfumed box, isn't it?

0:41:160:41:18

Have you thought about why it looks like that?

0:41:180:41:21

Possibly it's for sweets.

0:41:210:41:23

It may well have been for sweets,

0:41:230:41:25

but it was made in Geneva,

0:41:250:41:26

which was a great centre for enamelling

0:41:260:41:28

in the early 19th century,

0:41:280:41:30

and they were making these gold boxes for export to the Orient.

0:41:300:41:34

And this was almost certainly made for the Turkish market.

0:41:340:41:37

Oh. For the Sultanate out there.

0:41:370:41:39

And it's lavished with all the skill

0:41:390:41:42

and meticulous craftsmanship of Swiss manufacture -

0:41:420:41:45

but oddly enough, to be sold abroad.

0:41:450:41:47

This is a technique called micro mosaic

0:41:470:41:50

and that's something brought back from abroad

0:41:500:41:53

for the British market, fundamentally.

0:41:530:41:55

And it's made up of tiny tesserae of coloured glass which have been fused together.

0:41:550:42:00

And when you take a lens to it, it looks like brickwork,

0:42:000:42:02

but you move away and it's for all the world like an oil painting.

0:42:020:42:06

It's a miracle of craftsmanship.

0:42:060:42:08

This one here looks as if it's 18th century, but it's not, actually.

0:42:080:42:12

It's in the Rococo manner and it's a revival of an 18th-century style.

0:42:120:42:16

It has a core of Siberian jade, which is the clue to what this object is.

0:42:160:42:21

And it's made by a craftsman

0:42:210:42:23

who was one of the satellite firms for Faberge.

0:42:230:42:27

Faberge was very interested in the entire 18th-century form of decoration,

0:42:270:42:31

including gold boxes and so it fits in jolly nicely,

0:42:310:42:35

but it's probably made in the very late 19th or early 20th century. Yes.

0:42:350:42:39

So, it's a bewildering collection to value.

0:42:390:42:42

It not only includes snuff boxes and snuff mulls,

0:42:420:42:45

but also cases for sealing wax decorated with four colours of gold,

0:42:450:42:49

alloys of gold, decorated with engine turning.

0:42:490:42:53

But let's have a stab at valuing

0:42:530:42:54

these in the front and then move backwards from there.

0:42:540:42:58

This gold box is probably worth

0:42:580:43:01

today ?5,000, ?6,000.

0:43:010:43:04

Crikey! And this one here in the middle,

0:43:040:43:07

the micro mosaic box, it's a very bold one.

0:43:070:43:10

I think that that's going to be...

0:43:100:43:13

?15,000. Whoa!

0:43:130:43:16

And this one,

0:43:160:43:18

if we can draw it into the fold of Faberge that would be wonderful,

0:43:180:43:23

but as it is, a Russian cigarette case, very exotic, very beautiful

0:43:230:43:27

in the 18th-century taste, overlaying a hard stone core,

0:43:270:43:30

well,

0:43:300:43:32

?20,000 for that.

0:43:320:43:34

And so, I suppose, all the gold boxes on this table must be,

0:43:360:43:42

when you add them all up, it must be nudging between ?50,000 and ?60,000.

0:43:420:43:47

My goodness! So, snuff away, it's wonderful!

0:43:470:43:51

Wonderful things to see.

0:43:510:43:54

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:43:540:43:57

I hope you've enjoyed our day here in the sunshine at Charlecote Park.

0:43:570:44:01

Until next week, bye-bye.

0:44:010:44:03

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit Charlecote Park near Stratford-upon-Avon to discover more family treasures. Amongst the objects on view are an exquisite and highly valuable collection of gold boxes, and, bizarrely, a toilet roll from the Abbey Road studios which the Beatles made a complaint about.


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