Lulworth Castle 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Lulworth Castle 1

Fiona Bruce and the team find themselves in the middle of a tank firing range as the Roadshow sets up camp at Lulworth Castle in Dorset.


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This week, we've come to the beautiful Dorset coast.

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Here, near the famous beauty spot of Lulworth Cove,

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stands Lulworth Castle, set in glorious secluded grounds.

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Just the place to relax.

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Enjoy the peace and quiet...

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ARTILLERY FIRE

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Or maybe not!

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This week, the Antiques Roadshow comes to you from a castle

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with a very unusual back garden.

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ARTILLERY FIRE

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BELL RINGS

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Since 1916, part of Lulworth Castle's huge estate has been

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a firing range... with the odd tank here and there.

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Back then, when tanks first arrived in the quiet lanes of Dorset,

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they were so new and so secret, they were known as "hush-hushes"

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and the residents had to pull their blinds down

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and stay in the back room as they passed by.

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These days, tanks aren't quite so hush-hush.

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I've come to Bovington,

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It's filled with historic tanks, spanning the decades,

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including the first-ever tank, Little Willie.

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And guess who gets to drive this one?

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A 432 armoured personnel carrier.

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I've got some illustrious predecessors.

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King George V was in a tank here in 1928,

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Princes William and Harry learned here, and then, who could forget?

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That Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher, in a headscarf and goggles.

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Well, I was tempted but I can't find those.

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Instead, I've been given this rather natty helmet.

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Off we go!

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Of course they won't let me loose in this thing alone.

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Instructor Roy Avery will be keeping a close eye on me.

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The faster you go, the lighter it becomes.

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I wasn't thinking of going too fast.

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Well, I don't know, you might get carried away!

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ENGINE GRINDS AND ROARS

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'You'd think something weighing 15 tonnes would be slow and lumbering,

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'but with a top speed of 32mph, this is really pretty nippy.'

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Shall I go straight ahead? Yeah.

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'I'll tell you what. Perched at the front, it feels a lot faster.'

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'I think I could rather get to like riding in tanks,

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'and despite all the noise,

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'perhaps Lulworth has reason to love them, too?'

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It seems that the big guns and the tanks are doing some good,

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protecting the heathland, acting as a big, noisy nature reserve.

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In fact, this is a World Heritage Site.

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The only one that also doubles as a firing range.

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Since today's venue, the castle, is just over there,

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is a company called Whitanco, and it's your family company.

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It is indeed.

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My grandfather and grandmother both died

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when my father was five years old,

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and I was shown this catalogue when I was a child.

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And you said, "Great, where's the company!?"

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That's true. But, of course, at the time, it was just a catalogue

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of some old toys, and I was more into toys of the time.

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This came out of, basically, the attic, you know,

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and from there I've been trying to research the company

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and find the toys. Brilliant!

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So when did all this start?

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This started in 1997.

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Quite late, I have to say. Very late!

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As far as the toy market is concerned. Very late.

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You know, the market was pretty well developed by that point.

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That's right, unfortunately.

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So, I can't believe that there are any huge bargains to be had,

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but let's just talk about Whitanco which is, as we can see

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on their 1921 catalogue,

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it's a shortened form of the company name, Whiteley, Tansley and Company.

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because let's put it into context.

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Before the First World War, most tin plate toys were coming from Germany.

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That's right. And after the First World War,

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the British were not very keen on buying German-produced goods,

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and so Whitanco had really

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a very fertile ground to exploit.

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But looking at the actual quality of the products,

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one has to say that it's a bit mixed.

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On the one hand, you have this big limousine down here,

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which would rival any of the really expensive

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and desirable toys made from...

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really the 1910 period upwards, in Germany.

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I mean, it's a fabulous limousine. Yeah.

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And then you get to something like the spinning top, which obviously...

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One of the objects here that is most arresting, perhaps, is the tank.

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Here we are in Dorset. Just up the road there is Bovington Tank Museum.

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that we're looking at a tank. Does it work? It does, it does.

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so it's something that people would be familiar with.

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Let's see if it works after all these years.

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OK. You're safe!

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So, as far as value's concerned,

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this won't be a great discovery moment for you

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because you've been buying them over the last 13 years.

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So, I think that the values vary

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between perhaps ?800 to ?1,000 for the limo,

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down to under ?100, for instance, for the spinning top.

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Within that range, we've got other things

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at ?300, ?200 and so on,

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so is it like getting the family back together again?

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Every part I find is a bit like finding part of my grandfather, you know, who died in 1923.

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Well, good luck with it. Thank you.

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I'm looking at a piece of paper here

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which is headed with the word "abdication".

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Now, that takes us straight into

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very exciting contemporary history.

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I don't know what it is about the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

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They are just so much part of our imagination.

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There are films, there are books,

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there've been wonderful sales of the Duchess' jewels.

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It's something that we all grab onto as part of our history,

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even though it's actually a terrible story, when you look at it.

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This seems to be an abdication statement, but why have you got it?

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I have got it because my great uncle was the Naval Secretary at the time

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and he was obviously sent this.

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So what we're looking at here, is not that famous broadcast

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where he said, "I can't live without the woman I love". No.

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But this is almost more important,

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as this is the formal statement of abdication

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which he then signed, a crucial piece of history.

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If we look at the back, there's a circulation list

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and they're all very, very important naval officers, First Sea Lord,

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the First Lord of the Admiralty.

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It was obviously very, very restricted access. Is that him? Yes.

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Naval Secretary. Yes.

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He must have been a very senior and distinguished naval officer

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to be part of this process.

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I think I'm going to read the first sentence because it really says it all.

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"After long and anxious consideration,

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"I have determined to renounce the Throne

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"to which I succeeded on the death of my father,

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"and I am now communicating this, my final and irrevocable decision".

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This had never happened in history before.

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This is the moment all our lives changed, really.

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Obviously, there's been a whole film about it, which we've all enjoyed.

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So you always had it? Yes. It's been in the sort of family papers?

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Yes, it's been in a drawer, and I just...

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But you brought it today. Yes. I thought it'd be interesting.

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It's more than interesting, it's very valuable.

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I can see a collector being very excited by this -

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a rare chance to get something

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which was the instrument of changing history.

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I'm going to say it's going to be between ?500 and ?1,000. Gosh!

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And why not? It's a great family treasure. Yes.

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And a great national treasure. Thank you very much.

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Because we're surrounded here with loads and loads of sheep,

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wonderful landscape beyond, too,

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Lulworth must be the perfect setting to see a really lovely Victorian landscape

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by Charles Jones, depicting sheep.

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You can see lower right that there's a monogram and it's dated 1888.

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And he was known as "Sheep Jones",

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the artist Sheep Jones from the Victorian period.

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And that's all he painted.

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Occasionally the odd cow, but mostly sheep.

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And I thought we might just go and see whether we think,

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make our own judgments, whether Mr Jones WAS a great sheep painter.

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Excellent.

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These have to be the largest pair of knickers I've ever seen, I think!

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I've never tried them on, I can tell you.

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I'm extremely glad you haven't!

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My sister has been holding on to them all these years, all wrapped away.

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So, because of this great insignia here, we can tell they were actually

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owned, and presumably worn, by Queen Victoria. Correct.

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And, seemingly, when she was a young girl, she had a 20-inch waist.

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Nine children later...

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Yes. That's halfway there.

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I think she's 50-something. So where did you get these?

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My sister's husband had a second-hand shop back in the '60s.

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And he inherited it from his father.

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They were cleaning the shop up and painting bits,

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and they were using this pile of rag out at the back.

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And here it was... And my mother spotted these.

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The Queen's knickers. The Queen's knickers.

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You've done a bit of research on that. I have.

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Some went about two years ago and I think they fetched getting on for 3,000, ?4,000.

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I can't remember the exact figure. Gosh!

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There's a lot of interest in Queen Victoria, royal memorabilia... Yes.

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There's a tremendous upsurge of interest now.

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And, of course, the Americans are fascinated, the Japanese. Yes.

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Unfortunately, I don't think these would fetch that now. Right.

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The thing about it is, she had a tremendous number of pairs of these

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and for all the different houses she had,

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so there are quite a lot of them around

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and I would say, really, now,

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probably ?500 to ?600.

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Right. OK. But still... OK.

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For a pair of knickers. Exactly! LAUGHTER

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Probably worth saving, then.

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If we imagine Charles Jones standing here with his easel

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in 1888, painting this lovely landscape with the sheep beyond.

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I think comparing this picture with the present beautiful landscape,

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he was pretty good and I now can see why he had his reputation

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as Sheep Jones.

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You get all the light and wonderful texture,

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but also the landscape's good. Tell me, where did it come from?

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It came from my mother. She was a housekeeper at Keele University,

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at the Provost's Lodge,

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and the Provost there was a man called Sir George Barnes,

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who, unfortunately, died of a long illness,

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which my mother looked after him,

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and the family were so grateful, they bequeathed her this picture,

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and since then it's been in our family.

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But we greatly admire it.

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It's something to be wondered at, isn't it, really? Yeah.

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The features are unbelievable.

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That's a lovely bit of history.

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It's always good to know a good bit of history on a painting.

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Of course, he was a very good painter.

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He exhibited at the Royal Academy.

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Your picture is painted quite late in his career, '88.

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But I have seen earlier pictures, from the '60s - 1860s, 1870s -

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which are much, much tighter in quality.

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And I think it's from the '60s he got his reputation

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for being one of the great animal painters of his time. Yes.

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Anyway, this is still a very good picture by Charles Jones,

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Sheep Jones. Brilliant, yes.

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And this is worth ?3,000 to ?5,000. Wow!

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Thank you.

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Don't know...

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Well, there we are. It's an insurance job for me, isn't it? Thank you.

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What a gorgeous carriage clock.

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How did you get it?

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It's been in the family for quite a few years.

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My mother had it for many years and she got that, we think,

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from her grandmother,

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who was born somewhere in the middle of the 19th century.

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What sort of date do you think the clock might be?

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Well, somewhere... 1870s on, I would've thought.

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But I don't... Where you put more accurately than that.

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Well, I think that's fairly useful. It's a little bit later than that.

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I'd happily say 1875 to 1880 for that clock.

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Maybe just a little bit later.

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The joy is that on the inside of the box here,

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we've got the signature of Jean Badollet and Company.

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Jean actually died in the 1850s,

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but there were a series of Badollets up until the 1920s

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and they had an uninterrupted line of clock and watch makers for three centuries, as a family.

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So these are great, great people.

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Now, the very best carriage clocks are always signed. Ah.

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This is particularly lovely because we have a full signature,

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very unusually, on the side of this plate.

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Do you see, on the edge of that plate? Oh, I see, yes.

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Now, that is a sign of great quality. Ah.

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The movement itself,

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in all honesty, is going to be French. And the platform,

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that's the bit on top, the rectangular silvered bit,

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will almost certainly be made in Switzerland.

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So it would've been finished by Badollet

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in their Geneva manufacturing.

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We have a top-of-the-range case, beautifully engraved with flowers.

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The porcelain dial is lovely.

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We've got this little cherub within the dial centre.

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Do you have it working? No.

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It used to work about 15 years ago or so,

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but it's gradually got slower and slower,

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and finally it's ground to a halt.

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It really is worthwhile having it cleaned and overhauled.

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With that case and that clock - it's a jolly good thing -

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I think, ooh, happily ?3,500.

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Not bad at all! Thank you very much for that.

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So, again, worth spending a little bit of money having it cleaned.

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I definitely shall. Great.

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Now, what qualifies our experts to be called such, you might wonder.

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Well, one thing, among many, is their ability to spot subtle

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differences that can make a huge financial impact on the object.

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Like this teapot, for example.

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We've got three teapots here.

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They all look pretty similar to me, but one of them is worth about ?200,

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one about ?2,000,

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and one is much rarer, is worth about ?20,000.

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Fergus Gambon has set me, you, and our visitors, a challenge,

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to see if we can tell the difference.

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I'll have to do some homework but let's see if our visitors can help.

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Do you know anything about teapots?

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No.

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But you like drinking tea? Absolutely.

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Well, that's a start.

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Best.

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Best, yes. OK.

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Better.

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Better, I'll move it for you.

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Basic.

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And why do you think that's the best?

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Er, because of this detail here on the lid.

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Why do you think this is the cheaper one?

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I think it looks transfer printed.

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This one just looks like

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a bit of a cheap copy that someone's made at home really.

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Someone's knocked up? Yeah.

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I'll look really stupid then, won't I?

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Do you know, you have made me a very happy man.

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Oh, I'm glad of that.

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Some are, and some aren't.

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They were in a sense presentation,

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so, yes, at the time of Baptism and particularly, for example,

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with these Apostle spoons, there you can see, we've got St Peter.

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The key a very obvious feature for him there.

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But it's a Barnstaple spoon,

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and some of the best spoons in the 16th and 17th century were actually

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made in Barnstaple, there were some really top spoon makers there.

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The thinking is that if you were going to be called Peter...

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You'd have one made. With St Peter on the top,

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you know, being born with a silver spoon in your mouth. True.

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So at the christening side, baptismal side, you'd get that.

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But then of course you can also get

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what's known actually as a Puritan spoon.

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It wasn't known as a Puritan spoon in the 17th century

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when it was made, but here we've actually got a marriage.

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Ah yes, yes.

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And we can go to other end of life as well.

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And here we've got two absolutely fascinating ones,

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they're a pair of spoons and the inscription that we've

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got here "Martha Pope" and "Memoria 1629".

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Oh, right. It was quite usual at the time of a funeral for there to be

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funeral gifts and spoons were particularly used in this way.

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That's exciting, but this one...

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What we've got on the top here is this figure of a lion.

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Ah, right.

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It's so beautifully modelled,

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can you see how you actually can see behind the legs?

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Good heavens.

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So many of them were just a sort of blob of metal.

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And this one was actually made by Robert Wade,

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and he was working in Bridgwater and in Taunton as well.

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And that again is 17th century.

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I should have listened to my husband when he told me about them.

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So he was actually the collector?

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Oh, yes, as a small boy he used to bicycle round the countryside.

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Gosh. Where do we start with value?

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A spoon like this,

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I would think today...

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we're looking at about ?6,000.

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Good gosh, yes.

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I knew it was valuable, but nothing like that, I must say. Right.

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This one, I have to say Puritans are really quite rare, ?2,000 to ?3,000.

0:20:440:20:52

Yes.

0:20:520:20:54

And the Robert Wade spoon, very desirable, ?3,000 to ?4,000.

0:20:540:21:00

Ooh... Getting rather frightened!

0:21:000:21:03

It adds up...

0:21:030:21:05

These, this pair, they've got to be ?5,000, ?6,000 for the pair.

0:21:050:21:09

Well, they're going straight in the bank again. Right.

0:21:110:21:15

I mean, overall, we're probably looking in excess of ?30,000...

0:21:150:21:20

maybe ?40,000.

0:21:200:21:22

Gosh, yes, that's quite something, isn't it?

0:21:220:21:24

I knew they were good, but not that good.

0:21:240:21:27

Well, no doubt the castle holds a secret or two, but I gather your desk does also?

0:21:330:21:38

It's got lots of secret drawers, yes.

0:21:380:21:41

Are you going to show me? I'll try.

0:21:410:21:43

Have you ever counted them?

0:21:430:21:45

I haven't, no, but it's lots.

0:21:450:21:47

And where does it come from? It belonged to my grandmother.

0:21:470:21:50

We think she got it as part of a payment of a bill.

0:21:500:21:54

Shall we have a go? Yes, if you're up for it.

0:21:540:21:56

Well, I can see a pin here.

0:21:560:21:57

Yes. And it normally starts with a nail or a pin, doesn't it?

0:21:570:22:01

Yes, yes. That's right, that's right.

0:22:010:22:03

That's right, there's one at the back of there.

0:22:030:22:07

OK, well, that's stained beech. Oh, is it?

0:22:070:22:10

That doesn't look quite as old as some of the rest of it.

0:22:100:22:13

That's more 19th-century, bit of pine and a bit of oak together.

0:22:140:22:18

And these are all little drawers here.

0:22:180:22:20

Shall we lift that whole section out?

0:22:200:22:24

Demolishing your desk! No, it's fine.

0:22:240:22:27

Just goes on and on, doesn't it? Yeah.

0:22:270:22:29

And so you know it goes back to the 1940s.

0:22:290:22:31

Yeah, way before that. It was old then.

0:22:310:22:34

Yes, and what's your idea of its date?

0:22:340:22:36

1890, something like that?

0:22:360:22:39

Yes, that's right. Oh, is it?

0:22:390:22:40

Almost any date you said, could have been right.

0:22:400:22:43

It could? Ah!

0:22:430:22:46

Looking at the back, the back is all early 20th century, there are

0:22:460:22:50

some stunning bits of timber here which date from the 17th century.

0:22:500:22:54

This all looks like George III oak side table,

0:22:540:22:58

but actually it doesn't quite fit. Can you see the legs overhang? Yeah.

0:22:580:23:02

The base is actually too wide for the top. Yes.

0:23:020:23:04

And then sort of, to try to piece it together,

0:23:040:23:07

and there's a very nice lock in there,

0:23:070:23:09

but then this escutcheon is a bit of early 20th-century fretwork.

0:23:090:23:13

Oh, is it? So almost any date you care to mention. A mixture, yeah.

0:23:130:23:18

What's it worth? ?150 maybe ?200.

0:23:180:23:21

SHE LAUGHS But you won't find another one for that!

0:23:210:23:25

I'm absolutely certain I will never see another piece of furniture just like this.

0:23:250:23:29

No. The only thing now is, we've got to put it all back together again.

0:23:290:23:33

I hope you know where everything goes. After you!

0:23:330:23:36

Well, I know where this one goes. Yeah, that's in.

0:23:360:23:40

Earlier on, our ceramics specialist, Fergus Gambon,

0:23:530:23:56

set us a little challenge, to try and work out

0:23:560:23:59

which of these three teapots is basic - worth about ?200,

0:23:590:24:05

better - worth about ?2,000, and the best - worth about ?20,000.

0:24:050:24:09

Now, they're all English, all 18th-century and, to me,

0:24:090:24:12

they look pretty similar. We all struggled a bit with this, actually.

0:24:120:24:16

Fergus, this was quite hard.

0:24:160:24:18

I didn't quite know where to begin, actually. Are we looking for marks?

0:24:180:24:23

I think marks are what we are not looking for. Oh, OK.

0:24:230:24:26

Marks would be easy, if it was all marks, the thing would be easy.

0:24:260:24:30

Most, or a lot of, 18th-century English porcelain

0:24:300:24:33

is completely unmarked,

0:24:330:24:34

or sometimes, there's a mark of an entirely different factory,

0:24:340:24:38

so the way we do it, is not look at the marks.

0:24:380:24:40

We look at the marks last.

0:24:400:24:42

We look at the paste and the glaze, and the shape and the decoration.

0:24:420:24:46

Now, some of these are in better nick than others. Yes.

0:24:460:24:50

That one's got a whopping great crack there.

0:24:500:24:53

And then a crack inside as well.

0:24:530:24:56

Yes, yes. Does that affect the value?

0:24:560:24:59

Generally, damage makes a big difference, it really does.

0:24:590:25:02

A damaged item is worth less than half of the perfect one.

0:25:020:25:05

It depends what kind of objects you're looking at.

0:25:050:25:08

If it's something, perhaps there's only one or two in the world,

0:25:080:25:11

if it's damaged, it doesn't matter, because you won't get another.

0:25:110:25:15

A crack in a teapot is a pretty fundamental problem.

0:25:150:25:18

It makes it unusable, doesn't it?

0:25:180:25:20

But, a crack in a teapot actually indicates

0:25:200:25:23

how well the teapot's made, because when you make a cup of tea,

0:25:230:25:27

you pour boiling water into the pot, and not all porcelains are the same.

0:25:270:25:31

A good porcelain teapot won't crack. We're very used to teapots

0:25:310:25:35

that don't crack, but in the 18th century,

0:25:350:25:37

many teapots that people paid good money for, they took them home,

0:25:370:25:40

they poured boiling water in, and they cracked, just like this.

0:25:400:25:44

And it's often a circular crack like that which is a heat-shock crack.

0:25:440:25:50

So, seeing a teapot cracked in that way,

0:25:500:25:53

that was made in the 18th century, isn't that unusual.

0:25:530:25:55

They were really struggling. I'm now thinking I've made the wrong choice,

0:25:550:25:59

given what you've just said.

0:25:590:26:01

I decided that this, in consultation with our visitors here... Right.

0:26:010:26:05

..was basic, because it just didn't look very detailed. Right.

0:26:050:26:09

I was very torn between these two.

0:26:090:26:11

Because this looked finer, the paintwork on it. Yeah.

0:26:110:26:15

The detail was just so beautiful, and the colour of it's so beautiful.

0:26:150:26:19

But it's got this whopping great crack. Quite a long crack.

0:26:190:26:22

So I put that as better. Yes.

0:26:220:26:23

Even though I don't like it as much, I put this as best

0:26:230:26:26

because it has this lovely detail on the top. Right.

0:26:260:26:29

And hasn't got a crack.

0:26:290:26:30

No, OK.

0:26:300:26:32

You've got it all wrong. Oh!

0:26:320:26:34

Which you love, of course!

0:26:370:26:39

Not one of them is right. Oh, no, not one!

0:26:390:26:42

No. So if we start at the bottom,

0:26:420:26:45

the basic is that.

0:26:450:26:47

Why? Which is the, as you say, the kind of best-looking one.

0:26:470:26:50

Yes, right. Well, it's Worcester, it isn't cracked.

0:26:500:26:54

Worcester porcelain was warranted to stand the heat.

0:26:540:26:57

So that's a good thing.

0:26:570:26:58

That's a good thing. But lots of teapots were sold because of that.

0:26:580:27:02

Everyone wanted them. They sold lots of them.

0:27:020:27:04

And this is printed, not painted, and it's also quite late.

0:27:040:27:08

It's about 1780-1785, and by that date, much of the interest has gone

0:27:080:27:13

for 18th-century English porcelain collectors.

0:27:130:27:16

OK, I'm liking you less now, Fergus. Sorry!

0:27:160:27:18

I'm sorry, I'll carry on! And then the better one is this one.

0:27:180:27:22

Oh! And it's also Worcester, but it's a bit earlier than the basic,

0:27:220:27:28

it's about 1758 to 1760.

0:27:280:27:36

I mean, for porcelain collectors this is a wonderful design,

0:27:360:27:39

a hand-painted dragon, after Chinese porcelain.

0:27:390:27:48

as opposed to ?200 for the basic.

0:27:480:27:50

Yes, good. And so this one is the best?

0:27:500:27:54

This one is the best. With the big crack and damage?

0:27:540:27:57

The big crack, well, because it's early,

0:27:570:27:59

really early on in the history of English porcelain.

0:27:590:28:02

That little teapot was made between 1746 and 1748.

0:28:020:28:07

How can you be so precise?

0:28:070:28:09

The factory was in production for a very short period of time.

0:28:090:28:12

Which factory was that?

0:28:120:28:14

Limehouse in the East End of London in what is now Narrow Street,

0:28:140:28:17

and there were a very, very, very small number of them,

0:28:170:28:21

and the fact that it's cracked is a negative point,

0:28:210:28:25

but there isn't another.

0:28:250:28:38

So it's really all a question of the noughts.

0:28:380:28:42

?2,000,

0:28:420:28:47

Gosh!

0:28:470:28:48

For a totally unmarked teapot.

0:28:480:28:54

So, basic, better and best and all I'll say in my defence

0:28:540:28:58

is I did always really like this one, Fergus.

0:28:580:29:03

you've got some idea what to look for, if you didn't already.

0:29:030:29:11

look on our website and you can see the locations we'll be coming to.

0:29:110:29:14

The address is:

0:29:140:29:18

We're in Montmartre in the 1890s,

0:29:260:29:29

absolutely my favourite time

0:29:290:29:32

in any city in the world, 1890s Paris.

0:29:320:29:35

And this is by Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen, you can see that.

0:29:350:29:39

He was a Swiss, and he knew Toulouse-Lautrec,

0:29:390:29:42

he knew Alphonse Mucha, and they were pretty well involved

0:29:420:29:46

in the same business, in that they were designing posters.

0:29:460:29:50

And particularly, what Steinlen did, was design posters

0:29:500:29:54

for Le Chat Noir, an exhibiting venue and music hall

0:29:540:29:58

in Montmartre. And of course, his great love was cats.

0:29:580:30:03

Steinlen's own house was a meeting house for all the Parisian cats.

0:30:030:30:10

Lift a cushion and there was another one.

0:30:100:30:18

Um, I got it in a garage sale about a year ago.

0:30:180:30:21

That great source for great art.

0:30:210:30:31

and I loved the composition of it.

0:30:310:30:34

I love the colours of the tortoiseshell cat,

0:30:340:30:37

and it looked French, because when I looked at it,

0:30:370:30:41

I thought of Toulouse-Lautrec, immediately.

0:30:410:30:44

Immediately, I thought of his posters and his other engravings

0:30:440:30:48

and things like that, and that's what actually...

0:30:480:30:51

But did you know anything about it? I didn't know the name, no.

0:30:510:30:55

But I could see that it was...

0:30:550:30:56

Is it a silk screen, is it, or something like that?

0:30:560:30:59

Yes, it's a kind of screen print and it's on silk actually,

0:30:590:31:02

it's the boldest, most powerful image

0:31:020:31:04

of the most cat-like cats you've ever seen. Yes.

0:31:040:31:06

And it really does have a simplicity that punches home, doesn't it?

0:31:060:31:16

Did you bargain to get it down that low? Definitely, yes.

0:31:160:31:20

Haggled? I haggled. Yeah, yeah. From ?30!

0:31:200:31:23

From 30? So he was a hard bargainer himself, wasn't he?

0:31:230:31:27

Oh, I'm dreadful when I get going, actually.

0:31:270:31:30

Well, it's probably worth about ?2,500, actually so... Right!

0:31:300:31:34

So you did pretty well. I did, didn't I?

0:31:340:31:36

Yes. Yeah, you really did.

0:31:360:31:38

There's a collector's market for these things,

0:31:380:31:40

and it is just such a good one. Yeah.

0:31:400:31:43

Very sought after. Good.

0:31:430:31:45

I'm holding here, one of the great singles from The Beatles,

0:31:480:31:51

from their very earliest days, "Please Please Me"

0:31:510:31:54

released in January 1963.

0:31:540:31:56

But, do you know, somebody has defaced it and put "FT" on it.

0:31:560:32:00

Who is FT? That was me.

0:32:000:32:02

Ah, useless!

0:32:020:32:04

That was my name before I was married.

0:32:040:32:06

And you were a Liverpool girl? I can hear the accent. I am, yes.

0:32:060:32:10

And did you ever go and see The Beatles?

0:32:100:32:12

I went every lunch hour with a group of friends

0:32:120:32:15

because I worked round the corner from where the original Cavern was.

0:32:150:32:20

How amazing! And we used to go every lunch hour to see them,

0:32:200:32:24

before they were really, really famous. Yes, yes.

0:32:240:32:27

We must have been one of the first groupies. Amazing!

0:32:270:32:30

Because we followed them round Liverpool, everywhere they went. Fantastic!

0:32:300:32:34

And it got to the stage that, when they saw us, they used to say, "Hello, girls, how are you?"

0:32:340:32:38

Oh, fantastic! But, you know,

0:32:380:32:40

the problem is, that not only has it been defaced on this side,

0:32:400:32:44

but you turn it over, blow me down, it's been defaced on the other side!

0:32:440:32:48

Yeah, well.... But actually, this is a bit better, isn't it?

0:32:480:32:51

Because on the other side, it's been defaced

0:32:510:32:54

by the people you'd like to have it defaced by,

0:32:540:32:56

which is all the boys in the band,

0:32:560:32:58

and, in fact, Paul McCartney has signed it twice. He has.

0:32:580:33:02

Did you have to pay him with a kiss?

0:33:020:33:04

No, I didn't, but I was really very appreciative that he did that.

0:33:040:33:09

He was your favourite, was he? He was my favourite.

0:33:090:33:12

Does this bring back wonderful memories for you, in your heyday?

0:33:120:33:18

Stomping down the Cavern. Stomping down the Cavern, yes.

0:33:180:33:21

It's worth something. Is it? Yes.

0:33:210:33:23

Never really thought about it, it was just, it's a much-travelled...

0:33:230:33:28

I've travelled all over the world, lived all over the world,

0:33:280:33:32

and that's always come with me, no matter where I went,

0:33:320:33:35

and I always made sure I knew where it was. Good job.

0:33:350:33:38

Yes, we just thought, well...

0:33:380:33:40

Recently, an early signed album fetched over ?10,000.

0:33:400:33:46

So I think your single could probably make around ?3,000.

0:33:480:33:54

I thought it was worth about ?500!

0:33:540:33:57

You've got something which is what everybody else wants. Right.

0:33:570:34:02

Good job you wrote your initials on it.

0:34:020:34:05

Yes, but they can't have it, it's mine!

0:34:050:34:07

Thanks very much indeed. Thank you.

0:34:070:34:10

So what do you do with a pot like this?

0:34:130:34:18

My mother believed it was a punch bowl.

0:34:180:34:21

She doesn't really know much about it,

0:34:210:34:23

she can remember it as a little girl. Yes.

0:34:230:34:26

It's not a punch bowl, it's actually called a posset pot. Oh, right.

0:34:260:34:31

A posset was a most extraordinary drink with curdled milk

0:34:310:34:35

and wine and stuff in it, horrible stuff.

0:34:350:34:38

And you sucked it out of this spout.

0:34:380:34:40

The spout is for sucking this dreadful drink out! Lovely.

0:34:400:34:44

Supposed to make you better or well. But that's what it's for.

0:34:440:34:48

And the date of it is going to be somewhere around about 1680-1690.

0:34:480:34:53

It's very old, then. Very, very old, very old, yes.

0:34:530:34:57

The difficulty with these posset pots of that period,

0:34:570:35:01

with this style of decoration, is whether they're English or Dutch.

0:35:010:35:05

There's always arguments about this.

0:35:050:35:07

The style of figures look a little bit Dutch,

0:35:070:35:10

but I'm convinced they're English. Oh, right.

0:35:100:35:13

And the trees are painted in a very traditionally English way.

0:35:130:35:16

These are sponge trees, rather like children at school

0:35:160:35:21

drop a sponge in colour... Yes. ..and then dab it.

0:35:210:35:24

Dab it, yes. So these are all dabbed-on trees.

0:35:240:35:26

Wonderful way of making a tree.

0:35:260:35:28

And I think the whole thing is an English pot.

0:35:280:35:33

It's had a hard life. A very hard life, very hard life!

0:35:330:35:36

It's in a body called Delftware, tin-glazed pottery,

0:35:360:35:41

so underneath this tin glaze lies a brown earthenware body

0:35:410:35:46

which makes it look a bit like porcelain.

0:35:460:35:49

The idea was make it look posher than it was.

0:35:490:35:52

And then you painted it with these gorgeous paintings.

0:35:520:35:55

I think very primitive, but wonderfully exciting painting.

0:35:550:35:59

Unfortunately it has been considerably damaged.

0:35:590:36:02

There are rivets on it. There are, yes, it's held together with rivets.

0:36:020:36:06

These rivets hold cracks together.

0:36:060:36:08

A wonderful process of repairing pots in the days before good glues,

0:36:080:36:12

you had to rivet. Drilled tiny holes and pulled a little metal rivet,

0:36:120:36:18

into the crack, and then you clamped it together,

0:36:180:36:21

and it stayed like that for evermore.

0:36:210:36:24

I mean, those rivets are probably 18th century.

0:36:240:36:27

A safety pin for crockery then, really. I know! Absolutely wonderful.

0:36:270:36:30

If it had been perfect without cracks and chips and damage,

0:36:300:36:35

I suppose I would have to put it to around about ?3,000-?4,000. Mm-hm.

0:36:350:36:40

But it has been a sad wreck. I know.

0:36:400:36:44

But still, as a wreck, I think it's still worth

0:36:440:36:47

about ?800 to ?1,000. Right, thank you. That's very nice.

0:36:470:36:51

Which is jolly nice. Thank you. Yes, for something that's as old as it is,

0:36:510:36:55

it's done very well. Yes.

0:36:550:36:56

Sometimes our visitors have a little bit of a wait to see our experts.

0:36:590:37:03

There's quite a queue here.

0:37:030:37:05

You walk along and see some fascinating things...

0:37:050:37:07

CHILD SINGS ..or hear some fascinating things.

0:37:070:37:10

Hello, chappie! Connor, Connor, say hello.

0:37:100:37:14

Hello! I can hear you all the way back there.

0:37:140:37:17

I should imagine so. What's this?

0:37:170:37:19

It's a blackjack,

0:37:190:37:22

it's a tankard, I think, that was made from Oliver Cromwell's war horse.

0:37:220:37:27

Made from Oliver Cromwell's war horse! How amazing.

0:37:270:37:31

And you've got the provenance

0:37:310:37:32

so you know that it was from Cromwell's horse? Yeah, yeah.

0:37:320:37:36

Our experts will love to see it. Yes, yes.

0:37:360:37:38

And enjoy the singing as well! Yeah, lovely, yes. Great.

0:37:380:37:41

CONNOR SINGS HAPPILY Thank you.

0:37:410:37:44

Do you normally have these on your sideboard filled with something sustaining? No.

0:37:470:37:52

We have them on our sideboard without anything in them.

0:37:520:37:55

Well, that's probably why they're not stained! THEY LAUGH

0:37:550:37:59

Do you know where they come from?

0:38:000:38:02

Well, I inherited them from a doctor who worked for the China Inland Mission.

0:38:020:38:08

He was a neighbour and a good friend. That's fantastic.

0:38:080:38:11

I don't really know more about them than that, which is why I'm here!

0:38:110:38:15

Do you like them? I love them.

0:38:150:38:18

What we've got is quite thinly blown glass.

0:38:180:38:22

These are very light in weight,

0:38:220:38:24

much lighter than I might have expected

0:38:240:38:26

for glass of this date, which is about 1865-75. Mm-hm.

0:38:260:38:33

Let's start at the back on this one, and one has a wreath of thistles

0:38:340:38:39

and immediately you think "Scotland". Yeah.

0:38:390:38:43

And turn it round, and indeed

0:38:430:38:46

we've got Scots of one sort or another,

0:38:460:38:50

led by a woman, beating the bejesus out of each other.

0:38:500:38:55

They've killed this man, or she's killed this man.

0:38:550:38:59

I don't know what this scene is.

0:38:590:39:01

It may be from Walter Scott's novels, Sir Walter Scott.

0:39:010:39:06

It would not be difficult to find out. Why Scotland?

0:39:060:39:11

Because of Balmoral.

0:39:110:39:12

Albert had gone up there, built Balmoral to a great castle,

0:39:120:39:17

loved by him and Queen Victoria.

0:39:170:39:20

So all things Scottish had suddenly become de rigueur, really.

0:39:200:39:24

And I'm sure that's what this is a reflection of.

0:39:240:39:29

The other one... Slightly odd.

0:39:290:39:31

We have on the back...

0:39:320:39:35

a spider spinning a web with ivy leaves.

0:39:350:39:39

Mm-hm. Now, the ivy, of course, is poisonous.

0:39:390:39:45

So we've got two symbols,

0:39:450:39:48

maybe death-related.

0:39:480:39:50

And here we've got a figure of either night,

0:39:500:39:55

or possibly Death,

0:39:550:39:58

taking the soul away,

0:39:580:40:00

which I find rather curious subject matter to have on a decanter.

0:40:000:40:05

Where were they made?

0:40:050:40:07

They could be Scottish,

0:40:070:40:10

they could be Ford of Edinburgh,

0:40:100:40:13

but I think they were probably made in Stourbridge,

0:40:130:40:16

which is just outside Birmingham, by Stevens and Williams. Yes.

0:40:160:40:20

They were wonderful quality glass engravers.

0:40:200:40:23

They're not a pair, so let's look at them separately.

0:40:230:40:26

This one I think would probably make

0:40:260:40:29

around ?1,500 to ?1,800. Really?

0:40:290:40:33

And that one, probably a bit more, ?1,800 to ?2,500.

0:40:330:40:37

They're really very nice objects.

0:40:370:40:40

Keep them out of the way of the grandchildren.

0:40:400:40:43

Or my cat, which wrote off a ?1,000 teapot the day before yesterday.

0:40:430:40:48

Ohhhh! Yes.

0:40:480:40:50

It's still alive, but only just! LAUGHTER

0:40:500:40:53

At school, the one person we all learned about was Oliver Cromwell.

0:40:570:41:00

You ask anyone, that's who they learned about.

0:41:000:41:03

It's unusual and unbelievably exciting

0:41:030:41:05

to have Cromwell's name round the top of this jug.

0:41:050:41:09

I mean, tell me about it.

0:41:090:41:10

Well, from what I understand,

0:41:100:41:13

it was deposited into my family's bank,

0:41:130:41:15

which is Hoare Bank in Fleet Street, in London,

0:41:150:41:19

and from there the last person I know to have it

0:41:190:41:22

was my grandad's father, which is a Wilfred Hoare.

0:41:220:41:25

When he passed away, he left it to my grandfather

0:41:250:41:29

and he left that to my father,

0:41:290:41:31

so that's actually come from the Hoare Bank in Fleet Street in London.

0:41:310:41:35

Jacks like this, as they're called,

0:41:350:41:37

presumably you know what they're for. Yeah, ale jugs.

0:41:370:41:40

Exactly, and they would have been made

0:41:400:41:42

as one of a set of ten or 15, or something like that.

0:41:420:41:46

But to have his name, Cromwell's name,

0:41:460:41:50

Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland...

0:41:500:41:54

and he actually became Lord Protector in 1653. Right.

0:41:540:41:57

So it's possibly made for the party of that event. Mm.

0:41:570:42:00

Great, you've also got his crest.

0:42:000:42:03

I mean, is it something you like?

0:42:030:42:05

Yeah, I quite like it, yeah.

0:42:050:42:06

And the construction being leather.

0:42:060:42:08

Yeah, from what I understand,

0:42:080:42:10

it was actually made from the war horse that Cromwell used to ride,

0:42:100:42:14

so when the horse died,

0:42:140:42:16

they had this jug made.

0:42:160:42:23

Um... The great thing about this is obviously,

0:42:230:42:28

Cromwell, one of the most controversial political

0:42:280:42:30

and military figures in English history.

0:42:300:42:33

I mean, really, defeated the Royalists during the Civil War,

0:42:330:42:36

turning England to a republican state for a short time.

0:42:360:42:39

It's got everything you need. And as a jug,

0:42:390:42:44

or a jack, I mean, it's an exciting thing.

0:42:440:42:47

And really, it would have a good value.

0:42:470:42:50

?3,000, ?5,000, something like that.

0:42:500:42:54

Mm-hm. Yeah. But with this connection,

0:42:540:42:57

with Cromwell, I would have thought

0:42:570:43:02

Yeah. CROWD GASP

0:43:020:43:05

Good beer money. I'll have to fill that up with beer then, I think!

0:43:050:43:09

Exactly! Well, it's the most exciting thing I've seen in years.

0:43:090:43:13

Imagine what historic moments that beer jack could have witnessed.

0:43:130:43:20

I started the programme driving a tank,

0:43:210:43:24

and I thought it couldn't get much better than that.

0:43:240:43:26

But now I've moved up in the world, I'm in an armoured car.

0:43:260:43:30

And not just any armoured car, a Rolls Royce armoured car!

0:43:300:43:34

From Lulworth Castle and the whole Antiques Roadshow team,

0:43:340:43:38

until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:380:43:40

The knives are sharpened and the heat is on. It can only mean one thing.

0:44:210:44:24

I've never, ever seen that!

0:44:240:44:26

Britain's best chefs are back in town.

0:44:260:44:29

Fiona Bruce and the team find themselves in the middle of a tank firing range as the Roadshow sets up camp at Lulworth Castle in Dorset. Amongst the finds are a rare copy of the abdication papers of Edward VIII, a piece of furniture with a secret - multiple sets of hidden drawers - and a leather tankard made for Oliver Cromwell during the Civil War.