Blair Castle 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Blair Castle 2

Fiona Bruce and the team return to Blair Castle in Scotland. Their discoveries include a Mickey Mouse toy with a poignant history and a collection of miniatures.


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We've reached the most northerly point on our journey with the Roadshow,

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and our venue today even has its own railway station.

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And what a spot for it!

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow

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from Perthshire in the Scottish Highlands.

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In 1844, the Duke of Atholl objected

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to a proposal for a railway to run through his land,

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the Blair Atholl Estate, near Pitlochry.

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These paintings were done to convince the Duke

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how trains would enhance the look of the landscape.

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It took until 1863 for the line to finally arrive.

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On the eve of the opening, the Duke

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took a trip around his estate, enjoying the novel experience

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of travelling more than 50mph!

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A stone's throw away from the station is our venue.

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Known as the gateway to the Highlands of Scotland,

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Blair Castle sits in the centre of an estate

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which covers a staggering 145,000 acres.

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Thank goodness the Duke of Atholl changed his mind

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and allowed the railway to be built through his land,

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because the train brought one of our experts to Blair Castle

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only this morning. You came on the sleeper. I had a wonderful time.

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I bet I had a better journey than you. You probably did.

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Thank heavens the station's still open. Over to you now to kick off proceedings.

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Thank you. Here we go.

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Well, from the Highlands of Scotland

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to a part of London I know very well, Finsbury Circus.

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I used to live down the road. Oh.

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But not Finsbury Circus as I knew it.

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What's going on? This is Finsbury Circus

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as painted as a circus during the war

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when my mother-in-law, who's in the centre here,

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was in charge of all the next-of-kin Red Cross parcels

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that came into London to be sent on out to the prisoners-of-war.

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They had to open them, check all the contents,

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make sure that nothing was disallowed,

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repack them, and then sent them to Geneva

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so they could be sent to the prisoners-of-war. So this was a vital place

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and are these cartoons of all the people working with her? They are.

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This was painted by one of the team,

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a lady called Mary McNeil. Right.

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I think it's a wonderful image, evocative of a very essential

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but often forgotten wartime service.

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The Red Cross parcel was absolutely crucial

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for the thousands of people in prisoner-of-war camps.

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Because it went through the Red Cross, it was allowed.

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If you read any biography or story about escapes,

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Colditz or wherever, the day the parcels arrived was always a wonderful moment.

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Yes. They were sent out every three months.

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Yes, we also know, indirectly of course,

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they used things like the tins of milk

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from the parcels for escape attempts.

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They made air vent tunnels, all sorts of things.

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They weren't allowed files or knives. No, and I love the way you say they were checked,

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because of course families would think, I'll put in a knife, I'll put in a file.

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And had those gone through and been found by the Germans - and the same happened in reverse -

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the whole thing would have fallen into abuse and the Red Cross would have been stopped doing it.

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This is one insight into that. It's a lovely cartoon.

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She's not a great artist, not a professional, it doesn't matter,

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it brings to life the sort of spirit of the time,

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and you can see the characters of certain people,

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the poodle, the bird, they're obviously reflective of how they actually were.

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The poodle was a Cockney who was in charge of cash

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and at one time the person was found to be pinching the money. Ah.

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So she was sacked and another Cockney came in who was very efficient.

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A poodle on its best behaviour. That's it.

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It's a great item, it's history rather than a painting.

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What's it worth? Gosh. I think because of what it shows,

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and the insight into a very difficult period in British history,

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it's an insight that to me is worth ?300 to ?500, certainly. Mm-hm.

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Just the family history. That's nice.

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Thank you very much. And now back to the wilds of Scotland.

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I hope you enjoy it. I shall.

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You're really getting value for money here.

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You've brought in not one vase, but at least 30.

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There's a lot on it, isn't there? Fantastic detail. Yeah.

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Lovely, I love it. When did it come to you?

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We had it given to us about 30 years ago,

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but it's been in the family for as long as I can remember,

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and I've always loved it. There are a pair.

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You've only brought one of the pair,

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which is just as well, otherwise we could spend all day looking at these. Well.

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How closely have you looked?

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Well, every time I take them down off the cabinet to dust them,

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which isn't very often,

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I see something different and think, ooh, lovely.

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And I was just looking today,

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I noticed this lovely pot of fruit or flowers up here.

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You can keep seeing things,

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but you need to stand very closely

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and this vase here is just so beautifully painted.

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This arrangement of vases, of teapots, of fruits,

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generically in China is known as "a thousand scholar's objects"

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and when you see it on a vase like this,

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it's really re-affirming the scholarship of the owner.

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These are all, or many of them,

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are the things you'd expect to see on a scholar's table. Yes.

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As decoration, but also referring to all sorts of things,

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much deeper, in Chinese culture.

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And let's just have a look, shall we?

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You've got a fabulous flower pot here,

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and the painter's actually painted the scene

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you would see on a celadon flower pot.

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There's a little figure... Gorgeous. ..crossing a bridge on a stream.

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These extraordinary fruits are known as "Buddha's hand citron".

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Then you've got this table with scholar's objects.

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No scholar's table would be complete without a screen,

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and on this one you've got a dragon pursuing a pearl. Right.

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And there you've got an ancient Chinese bronze.

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Wow. Amazing.

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It's known as a chui. A chui.

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And dates all the way back to the Zhou and the Shang dynasties.

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So I mean, we could go on and on with this.

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Each one of these vases is credible in its own right

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and then the painter has done a fantastic job of converting

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these beautiful patterns which you're used to seeing on much bigger pieces,

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onto these tiny miniatures.

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Do you think one person painted the whole thing, or would it have been done by different artists?

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I think one person painted the whole thing.

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If you compare it with painters in the City of Jingdezhen in China today,

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you would expect the painting of this piece

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to have taken approximately 20 or 30 days.

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Right. And you've got two of them. Yes, isn't that wonderful?

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It dates to the mid 19th century so it's 160-odd years old.

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OK, it's a family thing.

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We're going to have to tell you what it would be worth.

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I think it's somewhere between... We're talking about a pair? Yes.

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Somewhere between ?3,000 and ?5,000.

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Right. Lovely.

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But I won't be selling them, I love them.

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Well, I think this is a really special little piece of glass.

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I presume you've known it for years. Well, my grandmother was fostered,

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and when she was 13,

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her father came to North Wales and wanted her to keep house for him in Shropshire.

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Her friends were really upset that she was leaving,

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and that was given to her as a leaving present.

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So about 1910 she was given that and I've had it since she died in '97.

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And what do you reckon of it?

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I don't know much about it, other than that she was given it.

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I really don't know. Do you peer into it and examine it?

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As a child, I loved it and that's why I asked for it

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when Nana died, because of the little animal figures in it.

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There's a veritable zoo living in here, isn't there? You wouldn't think...

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To the casual glance,

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you could just pass over this as another piece of life's fluff,

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but if you zoom in on here, there's a whole world living inside here. What have we got?

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Monkeys, goats, donkeys

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and all sorts of other things going on in there.

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Most interestingly there's some letters in there, aren't there?

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Yes, that's what I wondered about, because I wondered if it was made

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in that year, in 1848, or what.

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There's also, there's a date and a letter, isn't there? There's a B.

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Yeah. And an 1848. Yes. So I've no idea.

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And the B pretty good

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because it is La Cristallerie de Baccarat,

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Baccarat. Right. Ie, one of the world's greatest paperweight makers.

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Oh, right. Not just French, but "hot French"! Oh, right.

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And the detail in here, the packed, compact,

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action-packed centre of this,

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is the result of an amazing amount of very hard work. Mmm.

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It's a bit bashed, so the bad news comes with the good. Mm-hm.

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That's called a wallop in anybody's language. Right. That's another one.

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Uh-huh. Which leaves it worth only...

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?700 or ?800. Oh, right.

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That's lovely. And I'm pleased to know that it's a good one. It is.

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Judging by the finial on this lovely silver jug

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and a splendid badge on your jacket,

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do you have a connection with this piece?

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Yes, I do. This was presented to the curling clubs in Atholl

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by the Duke of Atholl in 1853,

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and Eve and I are both members of Dunkeld Curling Club,

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and the Duke of Atholl was also a member.

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That's the connection. Right.

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Now, we have with us

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Eve Muirhead, who is the triple junior world champion, is that right?

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Yeah, yeah. I'm the first person to win three years in a row, which was great.

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I'm fortunate enough to travel around the world.

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My first medal was won in USA, second one in Sweden

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It's fantastic we've got all this history here,

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surrounding curling.

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Was curling actually played here at the castle?

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Yes, it was played

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in the grounds of the Hercules Garden

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and this is a picture of the Hercules Garden and curlers taking part.

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Do you know when this might have been taken? About the 1900s.

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Right. So you had to be assured

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that the water froze over every year in order to play.

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Yes, we didn't play every year, unfortunately, but most years, yes.

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Right. Well, let me talk about the silver jug at the moment. It's got

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beautiful engraving on the front, here, of a curling scene

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and you've very kindly brought along a book here which seems to have

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an almost identical engraving by Sir George Harvey.

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What I particularly like is the chap throwing himself on the ground

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in despair at having lost a game. Does that still happen?

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Yes, it can happen.

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This piece was actually made in England

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and it's got a good set of hallmarks here, made by the Barnard Brothers.

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Oh, right. And made in London in 1841. Oh, we didn't know that.

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So it was made quite a bit earlier than when it was first presented.

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So I suspect that the Duke of Atholl had this hot-water jug

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in the house somewhere, didn't have any use for it and thought,

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"I'll give that as a curling trophy."

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Yes, we're very pleased he did.

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Because there's quite a few years between when it was made

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and when it was first presented. Yes.

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Now, I need to sort of put a value on it,

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which is pretty nearly impossible because, you know,

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there's so much local history in this,

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and how do you value local history?

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If the jug didn't have any engraving on it whatsoever,

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we'd be saying it was sort of ?1,000-?1,200.

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If it was sold somewhere miles away from here,

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I think it might make ?3,000. Oh.

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But it could make any price, because there'd be

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a lot of people around here who'd love to get their hands on it,

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because it's a very handsome piece of silver.

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There are a lot of clubs around here. That's correct, yes.

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But that symbolises, really, what it's all about,

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so thank you so much for coming along.

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No problem. Thank you for speaking to us.

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This is a clan heirloom with a rather unusual story, isn't it?

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And when I say, "clan", it's MacPherson Clan. Correct.

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There are MacPhersons in... I feel embarrassed to say clan,

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but Bruce, Sutherland and MacPherson are where my family comes from.

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You couldn't come from better stock, if I may say so.

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So, tell me about this spoon, then.

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It was the property of a very colourful gentleman

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called Captain John MacPherson, who lived at the end of the 18th century

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in a farm called Ballachroan about 40 miles north of here.

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He was a very successful person on two counts.

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One was in farming, a very advanced farmer,

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he introduced rotation of crops, turnips for winter feeding,

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both of which were unusual at that time. Neeps?

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Yes, very much neeps. And, secondly, he was a recruiter for the army.

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Remember we were fighting the French, there was a dire need of young men to join the infantry.

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He adopted slightly underhand methods when recruiting for the army.

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He was reputed to go and make a young man rather drunk,

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put a shilling in his pocket and say,

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"Ha-ha! You've taken the King's shilling, come and join with me."

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Similarly in... because of his success,

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his neighbours suspected he was in league with the devil.

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His success recruiting for the army? Yes, and also as a successful farmer.

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They were envious, obviously. They spread rumours that he was

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in league with the devil, that the devil would give him success in this world

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but things would catch up with him at the end of the day.

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So, where does the spoon come in?

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The spoon comes in, in so far that before his recruits were marched off,

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he used to feed them with broth, probably from his own produce,

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and this was the spoon that was used to spoon it out. Oh, I see.

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So he'd be stirring his neeps and tatties and what have you. Yes.

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You're worried this bit will drop off, I'll be very careful...

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and then he would pass it to the, sort of, hapless recruit.

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That's right. Yes. You're mine now.

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However, Nemesis caught up, because on the last few days of 1799,

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he and four companions went up into the Cairngorms,

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into a very remote place called Gaick, for a hunting expedition.

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They did not return. A party went out to look for them,

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they discovered there'd been an avalanche.

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The bothy where they'd been staying had been swept away

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and all five men died. So, the devil caught him at the end of the day.

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So the devil won out. But the spoon remains.

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Thank goodness he didn't take it with him!

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Great story. Thanks very much.

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Thank you very much, Fiona.

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Well, in April 1919, this is a lost luggage label, and, do you know,

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I'm rather pleased that this object was retrieved from lost luggage.

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It's a sensational piece of 18th-century engineering.

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But there's a wonderful story with it.

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It was a machine owned by Queen Charlotte, wife of George III,

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and she had a lady-in-waiting, Mrs Delaney,

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who was a very famous lady and very famous for her embroidery.

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And Queen Charlotte and the King had a party at Windsor

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and presented this machine to Mrs Delaney

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in thanks for all that she'd done for the Queen and the Royal Family.

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She has been well documented, and nobody has anything

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but lovely things to say about Mrs Delaney

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and she became a companion for the Queen, for Queen Charlotte,

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and they were rough contemporaries, but her work is renowned.

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There has just been, for instance, an exhibition in New York

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featuring Mrs Delaney's work.

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Her work appears in the British Museum, in Windsor Castle,

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in all the royal collections, and she is this super-star

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in embroidery terms. People worship Mrs Delaney's needlework.

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And, in fact, there is a tiny scrap of her work here,

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which shows what she is perhaps best known for,

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which was working in bright colours on black.

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I do love this little section in the letter.

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She describes the machine here,

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"a weaving machine for making fringes of a new and most delicate structure,

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"yet it is of such simplicity as to be very useful.

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"You will imagine my grateful feeling when the Queen presented it to me."

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So, indisputable provenance and a lovely object,

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made of mahogany which of course was the new great material of the day.

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With ivory.

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You've got this to hold the strings, which are knotted onto here

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and then you would have woven these incredibly delicate fringes,

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here we go, which were the height of fashion at the time.

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And alongside that you've got another great mechanical device.

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It's a spool winder. On goes the spool.

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And you turn the handle

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and the thread is put on evenly, backwards and forwards.

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It's got a lovely feel to it, I love 18th century design. It's wonderful.

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It's as smooth as smooth. It is, it is, it's got a great feeling to it.

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It's a lovely piece of cabinet maker's art.

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There's a button here, for instance.

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You push that, and there is the secret drawer.

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And value... With the royal connection, I have no hesitation

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in thinking that this would fetch

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upwards of ?10,000.

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CROWD GASPS

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Oh...oh, dear.

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No, I shall never be tempted.

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I say I shan't be tempted.

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So, we've got Minnie and we've got Mickey.

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You have inherited or played with these?

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Yes, no, they were never allowed to be played with,

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they've been in a pillow case since 1936

0:19:360:19:40

when their owner, who was my uncle, died. Oh. He had rheumatic fever

0:19:400:19:44

and he was very poorly. Whenever he got too ill, he was taken to hospital

0:19:440:19:47

and they were his friends in hospital.

0:19:470:19:50

He died on his 11th birthday.

0:19:500:19:52

11! And they were with him when he died

0:19:520:19:54

and the pillow case that he was lying on when he died,

0:19:540:19:58

was what they used to wrap them up and he's been in that pillow case...

0:19:580:20:02

Well, how many years is that? Quite a few decades, anyway.

0:20:020:20:05

Yes, absolutely. This is the first time they've spent any time out.

0:20:050:20:24

that got my eye when you brought them in.

0:20:240:20:27

Mainly because Mickey is more common, he's by, probably, Dean's,

0:20:270:20:32

which is an English company and they made lots of them.

0:20:320:20:34

Minnie is in such good condition, this is what is so extraordinary,

0:20:340:20:39

so he obviously talked to them, but he didn't handle them very much

0:20:390:20:43

because she's completely untouched in terms of...

0:20:430:20:46

She's pristine.

0:20:460:20:49

I'm going to pick her up, do you mind? Go for it.

0:20:490:20:53

I just love these little shoes,

0:20:530:20:56

heels, I mean absolutely enchanting.

0:20:560:21:00

Now, you probably know, because you've read that.

0:21:000:21:03

That is the Steiff label, Steiff being the German teddy bear maker,

0:21:030:21:07

if you like. Well known for teddy bears but they made all sorts

0:21:070:21:10

of other animals and toys and this is the first Minnie

0:21:100:21:14

I've actually seen, in this condition, by Steiff.

0:21:140:21:17

Really? Yes, and she would have had, and I can see it,

0:21:170:21:28

And I've actually been to Germany

0:21:280:21:30

and seen how they put these buttons in, they're metal

0:21:300:21:34

and they clamp them in and they're very difficult to take out,

0:21:340:21:37

but obviously your uncle, your uncle's mother... Yes.

0:21:370:21:43

..must have thought, "I'm not going to let my poor child,

0:21:430:21:46

"who's poorly anyway, start eating a metal button."

0:21:460:21:49

Which was probably lead.

0:21:490:21:51

Will you hand them down, will you?

0:21:510:21:54

That's up to my mother because it was her brother that died

0:21:540:21:57

and she has six children, so she has to decide which of us...

0:21:570:21:59

I'm the eldest so hopefully she'll choose me. But she has five others.

0:21:590:22:03

I really loathe to tell you what I think she's worth.

0:22:030:22:08

I think he's probably worth...

0:22:080:22:09

probably about ?200 to ?300.

0:22:090:22:11

Right.

0:22:110:22:13

But this one in this condition,

0:22:130:22:15

and it's Minnie which is rarer than Mickey...

0:22:150:22:18

I would not hesitate putting

0:22:180:22:20

?3,000-?4,000 on her.

0:22:200:22:23

Wow!

0:22:230:22:25

She's quite pricey, isn't she?

0:22:250:22:27

I just think she's heaven. Great.

0:22:270:22:29

Have you ever looked really closely at this face?

0:22:330:22:38

It's a wonderful serene expression, beautifully modelled.

0:22:380:22:43

She is, she's great. Do you know, this dates from 1680?

0:22:430:22:46

No!

0:22:460:22:48

I didn't realise it was nearly as old as that. How did you get it?

0:22:480:22:52

My husband inherited it from his mother and he just remembers it

0:22:520:22:56

on her dressing table in Ireland but doesn't know anything

0:22:560:22:59

about the background of it. So, she might have been a collector?

0:22:590:23:02

She was definitely a collector. All round the house were things

0:23:020:23:05

that she had collected at auctions and also on her travels.

0:23:050:23:08

It's a beautiful figure,

0:23:080:23:10

it's Chinese, it's Chinese Blanc de Chine porcelain, white of China.

0:23:100:23:13

It's a figure of the Bodhisattva, Kuan Yin,

0:23:130:23:16

she's the goddess of mercy. Yes.

0:23:160:23:17

And usually she's seated on a lotus throne

0:23:170:23:20

but here she's got two attendants either side,

0:23:200:23:23

and it's a really beautiful piece of sculpture.

0:23:230:23:26

The robes, they hang loosely, they flow, terrific thing.

0:23:260:23:30

Blanc de Chine was made in the Dehua area and the Fujian Province

0:23:300:23:34

towards the end of the Ming Dynasty

0:23:340:23:35

and right up to the present day. You can get really quite brand-new

0:23:350:23:39

white figures, which are really nasty.

0:23:390:23:41

So how can you tell that it is that age?

0:23:410:23:44

The way it's been sculpted, this lovely creamy colour of the glaze

0:23:440:23:48

and it's very strongly moulded. The way the base is finished... Yes.

0:23:480:23:53

..is quite right for the end of the 17th century. Yes.

0:23:530:23:57

It's a really lovely figure and it's a really nice thing to see.

0:23:570:24:00

And, great.

0:24:000:24:02

It's got a value, of course.

0:24:020:24:04

At the moment it's filthy, but once it's been cleaned up,

0:24:040:24:07

it's in lovely condition.

0:24:070:24:09

If you went down the end of Bond Street,

0:24:090:24:12

into Clifford Street, somewhere like that you'd expect to pay

0:24:120:24:15

?5,000-?5,500 for this.

0:24:150:24:17

My goodness, worth cleaning then? Absolutely. Carefully, carefully.

0:24:170:24:21

Will do. Thank you. Thanks for bringing it. Thanks for your help.

0:24:210:24:25

Now, he's a boy isn't he, not a girl.

0:24:250:24:28

Absolutely right, yes, in fact he is my great-great-great-grandfather.

0:24:280:24:32

Crikey. What date would that be, roughly?

0:24:320:24:35

We're looking at 1760s.

0:24:350:24:37

And he went on to be a soldier? He's playing with toy soldiers there.

0:24:370:24:41

He did, even though he was dressed in a little smock,

0:24:410:24:44

which they tended to be in that period,

0:24:440:24:46

he went on to join the Enniskillen Dragoon Guards. Right.

0:24:460:24:50

And became Lieutenant Colonel. So a very high ranking officer. Yes.

0:24:500:24:53

And who painted it?

0:24:530:24:55

We think it's Masquerier and that's why I brought it today

0:24:550:24:58

because I'm absolutely fascinated.

0:24:580:25:00

And Masquerier is a really interesting character, isn't he?

0:25:000:25:03

They thought he might have been a Napoleonic spy... Yes.

0:25:030:25:06

..during the Napoleonic Wars,

0:25:060:25:08

which is great fun, but he proved he was actually born in Chelsea,

0:25:080:25:12

so that was all right.

0:25:120:25:13

So he managed to get off the hook on that one. I didn't know that.

0:25:130:25:16

But it's a sweet little portrait but there are little things about it

0:25:160:25:21

that make me worry it might be rather more studio than the master.

0:25:210:25:24

Mmm-hmm. Slight weaknesses in the hand, for example,

0:25:240:25:27

And I think, actually, I might feel the need to downgrade it.

0:25:270:25:31

Shall we say that it's a little more studio than master?

0:25:310:25:34

Fine. I think we have to. Yes.

0:25:340:25:36

But at any rate, even there, it's still worth, I would say,

0:25:360:25:39

between ?4,000 and ?6,000. Thank you.

0:25:390:25:41

So, staying with your great-great-great-grandfather. Yes.

0:25:410:25:46

This is a miniature of the Masquerier painting. That's right. Isn't it?

0:25:460:25:50

And you've got these miniatures, any one of which we could take.

0:25:500:25:53

Problem is we haven't the time.

0:25:530:25:55

So, I'm just going to pick out three which just scream quality to me.

0:25:550:25:59

And I think you know the ones I mean. I think I do.

0:25:590:26:02

They're by John Smart the Elder.

0:26:020:26:04

This one, and this one and that one. That's right.

0:26:040:26:06

They are wonderful. Thank you.

0:26:060:26:10

I would have considered that perhaps the earliest John Smart

0:26:100:26:13

that I'd ever seen, it's dated 1765.

0:26:130:26:15

Really? When he was still very young. Yes, yes.

0:26:150:26:17

And it has that restraint, and that very blue palette

0:26:170:26:20

and that very simple background that he became famous for innovating,

0:26:200:26:24

and particularly, particularly good at.

0:26:240:26:27

And he's wonderful, there's such insightful character in his face,

0:26:270:26:31

and it's such a fine portrait.

0:26:310:26:33

And he was very famous for delineating every eyelash

0:26:330:26:37

and the general character of the man just shines out,

0:26:370:26:40

although tiny, in a very, very powerful way.

0:26:400:26:42

This one's later, this is 1770 when he started painting them

0:26:420:26:47

a little larger, and the palette changed, as you can see,

0:26:470:26:49

from 1765 to this richer, warmer palette.

0:26:490:26:54

They're just, they're just... just wonderful.

0:26:540:26:57

I'm not going to try and value the rest of your miniatures now.

0:26:570:27:01

Let's take the 1765 one first.

0:27:010:27:05

Being early is not necessarily good for John Smart.

0:27:050:27:08

But this early I think I'd better be safe and put

0:27:080:27:10

?10,000 to ?15,000 on that, but that's conservative.

0:27:100:27:14

You ought to insure it for a lot more. Really?

0:27:140:27:16

Yes, I would say ?20,000. Really? Yes.

0:27:160:27:19

And then this one, which is very pretty. I mean, it is later, 1770,

0:27:190:27:23

but it's larger and it has that warmer palette and, of course,

0:27:230:27:26

it's a female sitter again, and rather a pretty one, I think.

0:27:260:27:29

That one, I think we'd better put

0:27:290:27:31

?20,000-?30,000 on, for sure.

0:27:310:27:34

But we ought to be a little safe

0:27:340:27:36

and perhaps put ?40,000 on it for insurance.

0:27:360:27:39

Gracious. Yes.

0:27:390:27:43

And then we come to this and what a cracker he is.

0:27:430:27:46

I think we're going to have to put ?20,000-?30,000 on him,

0:27:460:27:50

but insure it for ?50,000. 50. Yes.

0:27:500:27:54

Heavens. But they are wonderful,

0:27:560:27:58

really, really good. Fascinating. Well, thank you very much indeed.

0:27:580:28:02

So have you known this long, madam?

0:28:040:28:06

Yes, I have. How long have you known it? 46 years.

0:28:060:28:10

And do you smoke it?

0:28:100:28:11

No. So where does it come into your family?

0:28:110:28:14

Oh, it came through my husband.

0:28:140:28:17

So does he smoke it?

0:28:170:28:19

No, I'm a non-smoker.

0:28:190:28:21

So where did you get it from?

0:28:210:28:23

From my mother.

0:28:230:28:24

Did she smoke out of it?

0:28:240:28:26

No, she collected it.

0:28:260:28:29

Ah, she collected antique, wacky stuff?

0:28:290:28:33

Red glass, Bristol glass. Bristol.

0:28:330:28:36

Well, don't get me going on Bristol glass,

0:28:360:28:38

because it's about as Bristolian as I am from Hong Kong.

0:28:380:28:43

There's no way. This was made in about 1880, thereabouts. Right.

0:28:430:28:49

And I can tell you, as a statistical fact,

0:28:490:28:52

there were no glassworks in Bristol at that date. Oh.

0:28:520:28:55

This was probably made in Yorkshire, I would think.

0:28:550:28:59

Oh, right.

0:28:590:29:01

But what a wacky item.

0:29:010:29:03

I don't think it was ever intended to be used really.

0:29:030:29:05

It's purely a silly thing which is naturally the reason I like it so much.

0:29:050:29:10

Good.

0:29:100:29:12

That's nice.

0:29:120:29:13

The values of these have fallen, they're not what they were.

0:29:130:29:17

Yes.

0:29:170:29:18

Nonetheless, I mean, what a completely preposterous idea,

0:29:180:29:21

to have a glass pipe, but I just love the idea of you knowing

0:29:210:29:24

it for so long and neither of you thinking of using it.

0:29:240:29:27

Value today is not a great deal, about a couple of hundred quid.

0:29:270:29:30

OK.

0:29:300:29:31

But I can't imagine a wackier pair to own it.

0:29:310:29:35

Thank you very much.

0:29:350:29:36

You're most welcome.

0:29:360:29:38

We'll have some whisky in it. You won't! You cheeky girl.

0:29:380:29:41

Looking at these figures,

0:29:440:29:46

they could date from no other era than the 1950s.

0:29:460:29:49

They absolutely shriek the decade.

0:29:490:29:51

They're by the Briglin Pottery in London

0:29:510:29:54

and designed by the Parkinsons from Kent, and what a stellar cast.

0:29:540:29:58

We've got Paul Robeson, Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud, Margot Fonteyn

0:30:000:30:05

and Vivien Leigh.

0:30:050:30:06

How did these stars come into your life?

0:30:060:30:08

Well, it comes into my life through my late aunt who lived in London

0:30:080:30:13

and very much supported the theatre in London.

0:30:130:30:17

She and her late husband supported also the potters.

0:30:170:30:21

Her home was a shrine to the '60s and didn't move.

0:30:210:30:26

Even up to her death in 1990 it was still very much a home of the '60s.

0:30:260:30:33

So a temple. It was a temple.

0:30:330:30:35

It sounds just the sort of place I would love to go into. Yes.

0:30:350:30:38

Did she know the people behind the Briglin factory?

0:30:380:30:41

She did. Yes, she did.

0:30:410:30:43

Was it Brigitte Goldsmith?

0:30:430:30:44

It was Brigitte Goldsmith through my late uncle.

0:30:440:30:48

Well, it's fascinating because it was Brigitte Goldsmith

0:30:480:30:52

whose husband was Herbert Lom, no less.

0:30:520:30:55

Another stellar figure from the film world particularly.

0:30:550:30:58

There was this great tradition in Britain of making

0:30:580:31:05

so they turned to Richard and Susan Parkinson who had a pottery in Kent. Yes.

0:31:050:31:09

And Richard... Susan designed them,

0:31:090:31:12

and Richard made them and these are very typical,

0:31:120:31:16

this sort of greeny colour, this use of this decoration here, this almost scruffy look to it.

0:31:160:31:23

Here on the bottom we've got perfect mark "designed and made

0:31:230:31:27

"for Briglin by Susan Parkinson" and it's numbered number six.

0:31:270:31:30

Now these were quite expensive figures to make, they were

0:31:300:31:34

in the Design Centre in London and they were four guineas apiece.

0:31:340:31:39

Paul Robeson is the rarest figure, maybe no more than six were made.

0:31:390:31:43

There are two missing. Oh.

0:31:430:31:45

Maria Callas is missing and Alec Guinness is missing.

0:31:450:31:48

So it's not the full set.

0:31:480:31:50

But they are so rare on so many levels and I don't know

0:31:500:31:54

if you know, but when these were on sale, Charlton Heston bought a set.

0:31:540:31:58

Yes, he did.

0:31:580:31:59

And the Duke of Edinburgh bought a set. What a stellar cast.

0:31:590:32:02

Absolutely.

0:32:020:32:03

Apart from... Myself! Apart from these people here.

0:32:030:32:06

And the difficulty for me, pricing them,

0:32:060:32:09

is pricing something which is so rare.

0:32:090:32:12

But we know what Briglin pottery makes,

0:32:120:32:15

we know what the Parkinsons' work makes,

0:32:150:32:17

so I've been doing a little bit of calculation

0:32:170:32:20

and I think, bearing in mind that Paul Robeson is the rarest figure

0:32:200:32:24

and bearing in mind that it's not the full set.

0:32:240:32:27

These figures, to the right collector,

0:32:270:32:29

could make anything between ?8,000 and ?10,000.

0:32:290:32:32

Oh, my goodness me.

0:32:320:32:34

So I hope you've got a lot of bubble wrap and cotton wool

0:32:340:32:37

and you're not going back on a rackety train home.

0:32:370:32:41

Absolutely not. My goodness.

0:32:410:32:43

What a wonderful tribute to your aunt who had immaculate taste.

0:32:430:32:46

She had wonderful taste.

0:32:460:32:48

And I'd have loved to have met her, she sounds fabulous.

0:32:480:32:51

She was a lovely lady, I miss her very much.

0:32:510:32:53

Thank you for bringing them, it's made my day.

0:32:530:32:55

These are the nicest things I've filmed this year, I love them.

0:32:550:32:58

Just before the Roadshow started this morning

0:32:580:33:02

I was really hoping and dreaming I would see some really good

0:33:020:33:05

Scottish art from the 20th century and you've brought along

0:33:050:33:09

a fabulous picture of Edinburgh by a very rare painter, William Crozier.

0:33:090:33:17

Yeah, all we know is the painting's called Edinburgh By Moonlight,

0:33:170:33:32

And they both exhibited together quite a bit and they formed,

0:33:320:33:44

And they tried to move away from sort of the traditions

0:33:440:33:47

of 19th century art and moving more towards modern art.

0:33:470:33:51

Do you know a great deal about Crozier?

0:33:510:33:53

Not really, no. Don't know an awful lot about him.

0:33:530:33:56

Well, it sounds to me

0:33:560:33:57

like this was a gift from Crozier to your grandfather.

0:33:570:34:00

But Crozier had, slightly tragic,

0:34:000:34:02

because he's recognised as one of great Scottish modern artists.

0:34:020:34:05

But he was a haemophiliac.

0:34:050:34:07

He was born in 1893 and died in 1930

0:34:070:34:12

so he had a very short life.

0:34:120:34:14

Crozier is well known for his cubist pictures.

0:34:140:34:18

He went to France and studied under Andre Lhote,

0:34:180:34:21

so there's a cubist element to his pictures which are very favourable.

0:34:210:34:25

And there are four pictures I think, in the National Gallery of Modern Art,

0:34:250:34:28

and there was a great show in 1995.

0:34:280:34:30

So he's very well sought after.

0:34:300:34:33

But because of his short lifespan

0:34:330:34:35

there aren't a great deal of pictures out there.

0:34:350:34:41

You can almost imagine being here, an evening in Edinburgh

0:34:410:34:44

on the streets, and the little gentleman on the left is lighting

0:34:440:34:47

probably a pipe or a cigarette

0:34:470:34:49

which creates this great glow.

0:34:490:34:51

I would date this to about 1920

0:34:510:34:53

and it gets slightly away from his cubist subjects and more towards

0:34:530:34:58

the traditionalist subjects that you'd see

0:34:580:35:00

by artists such as Anne Redpath.

0:35:000:35:02

This is a very rare and sought after painting.

0:35:020:35:04

And I could certainly see it making ?2,000 to ?3,000 on the present market.

0:35:040:35:09

Wow. That's a shock.

0:35:090:35:11

It's a very simple question, do you like this?

0:35:130:35:16

Well, it's a nice shape, it's quite tactile and I don't know, I just

0:35:160:35:20

liked it, just bought it and thought I'd just keep that in the shed.

0:35:200:35:25

So it lives in a shed? It's been in the shed a long time.

0:35:250:35:27

Not in the house? You can't like it that much.

0:35:270:35:30

OK, well it's my turn now. I don't like it very much at all.

0:35:300:35:33

I think it's quite a crude pot, I think it's fairly lumpy,

0:35:330:35:37

this sort of Japanese-style tea glaze is very, very mottled.

0:35:370:35:43

I just think I've seen better pots. OK.

0:35:430:35:48

But I'm sorry to disagree with you. It's a matter of taste.

0:35:480:35:51

That's OK. I still like it, no matter.

0:35:510:35:53

Good, but the point is, it isn't actually whether you and I like it or not. No.

0:35:530:35:59

This is a pot that was made by one of the greatest

0:35:590:36:04

studio potters working in Britain.

0:36:040:36:07

OK. Does that surprise you?

0:36:070:36:09

Well, it does really yes, because I just bought it as it was a pot.

0:36:090:36:15

Have you heard of, have you heard the name Bernard Leach?

0:36:150:36:18

Yes, I have heard of him. OK, that's fine, we're not going there. OK.

0:36:180:36:22

Bernard Leach came back from Japan,

0:36:220:36:25

I think at the end of the First World War and he came back

0:36:250:36:29

and started his pottery in St Ives in the very early '20s,

0:36:290:36:33

and he brought back with him a Japanese friend,

0:36:330:36:36

Shoji Hamada, and they worked together

0:36:360:36:38

to set up the whole sort of studio pottery movement in Britain.

0:36:380:36:42

Right. And this pot dates from that early period.

0:36:420:36:47

So this was made in 1923-1924. Gosh, really?

0:36:470:36:51

And it was made by Hamada.

0:36:510:36:53

There's the evidence.

0:36:560:36:57

That's the standard

0:36:570:37:01

St Ives Leach pottery mark, which all the pieces had. OK.

0:37:010:37:04

That is Hamada's monogram.

0:37:040:37:06

Oh, my goodness.

0:37:060:37:08

Now Hamada only marked pieces in the first few years of his life

0:37:080:37:12

because he said after a while,

0:37:120:37:14

"I shouldn't really have to mark things, the pot is my signature.

0:37:140:37:18

"If people can't tell it from the pot, they shouldn't know me." Gosh.

0:37:180:37:22

And so pieces with his signature on, or his monogram,

0:37:220:37:26

only occur in the first two to three years of production.

0:37:260:37:31

So you like it very much, I don't like it at all,

0:37:310:37:33

but it is Hamada, it is early, it is an important piece, I acknowledge that.

0:37:330:37:38

Therefore, we've got to talk about value.

0:37:380:37:40

So how would you feel if I said to you ?1,000?

0:37:400:37:43

I'd say that would be very nice.

0:37:430:37:46

But I'm not going to give it to you, because I wouldn't pay ?1,000

0:37:460:37:49

to save my life to have that pot, but that's what it's worth.

0:37:490:37:53

Oh, my goodness, that is fabulous.

0:37:530:37:55

I think it only cost me a pound, or 50p.

0:37:550:37:58

Well, you did very, very well.

0:37:580:38:00

I'd like to think I might have bought it for a pound or 50p, but I fear I might not have done.

0:38:000:38:05

There are lots of treats involved with working on the Antiques Roadshow

0:38:070:38:11

and I have to say, one of them

0:38:110:38:13

is very occasionally

0:38:130:38:15

to come across something that is

0:38:150:38:18

the best of its kind,

0:38:180:38:20

and this is one of those moments.

0:38:200:38:23

Now your job here is...?

0:38:230:38:24

I'm the archivist,

0:38:240:38:25

so I look after all the papers

0:38:250:38:28

and documents mainly

0:38:280:38:29

and also have a curatorial role

0:38:290:38:32

for the display

0:38:320:38:33

and the things in the castle.

0:38:330:38:35

But there is rather a lot of them.

0:38:350:38:37

There's six rooms of documents

0:38:370:38:38

so there are few things I don't know.

0:38:380:38:40

You're forgiven for not knowing

0:38:400:38:42

about something quite as esoteric as this.

0:38:420:38:44

It is a train set, obviously,

0:38:440:38:47

and for me it is,

0:38:470:38:49

perhaps the expression,

0:38:490:38:50

one of the best expressions

0:38:500:38:52

of the master tin-maker's art.

0:38:520:38:55

This is all hand-made out of tin,

0:38:550:38:58

with occasional little pieces of brass,

0:38:580:39:00

a few tiny exceptions,

0:39:000:39:02

the little whistle here

0:39:020:39:04

is turned wood,

0:39:040:39:05

the lamps here are turned wood,

0:39:050:39:08

the carved figures are wood covered

0:39:080:39:11

in a sort of gesso and then painted,

0:39:110:39:14

but otherwise it is exquisite

0:39:140:39:17

metal working at its very best.

0:39:170:39:21

Do you know who the original owner would have been,

0:39:210:39:24

The child that it was bought for?

0:39:240:39:26

No, I'd like a date from you first.

0:39:260:39:28

I've got a couple of options here,

0:39:280:39:30

so if you can give me some sort

0:39:300:39:31

of indication of when it was made.

0:39:310:39:34

All right. I'm going to have to come to that,

0:39:340:39:36

because that's the sort of end of the story.

0:39:360:39:39

We need to establish first of all

0:39:390:39:41

who it was made by. Right.

0:39:410:39:43

And on the bottom of several

0:39:430:39:47

of these little pieces

0:39:470:39:48

there is the name Buchner.

0:39:480:39:50

Now Buchner is, sounds German, is German.

0:39:520:39:56

He was based in Nuremberg and we know that he was there in the 1870s.

0:39:560:40:01

Oh, right, that's nice, yes. So that is one clue.

0:40:010:40:06

However, in 1835 the Bayerische Ludwigsbahn,

0:40:060:40:11

the Bavarian State Railway,

0:40:110:40:14

ordered the first commercial locomotive for Germany.

0:40:140:40:18

A train that was christened "der Adler", the Eagle.

0:40:180:40:22

That train ran in 1835.

0:40:220:40:25

Now while it would be wonderful to think that this was

0:40:250:40:29

from that period, I think it's a tad later.

0:40:290:40:33

No, but that would fit pretty well, I quite like that. Ooh, go on then.

0:40:330:40:37

Because in 1840, this man was born.

0:40:370:40:43

He later went on to become the 7th Duke of Atholl,

0:40:430:40:48

so I'm wondering if five years on, this would have been

0:40:480:40:53

perhaps the height of fashion for some duke to buy for their son.

0:40:530:40:59

Would that fit well with the period? That would fit really well.

0:40:590:41:04

Because I think around 1845-1850 is exactly where I would put this.

0:41:040:41:08

That would be perfect.

0:41:080:41:10

I'm quite glad about that, yes. That's really exciting.

0:41:100:41:13

There would be somebody here at that age

0:41:130:41:15

that would really be thinking a train is a good present.

0:41:150:41:20

What I'd like to do is to just enjoy the object,

0:41:200:41:24

because the more you look at it, the more fabulous it is.

0:41:240:41:29

The boiler here is faceted,

0:41:290:41:31

just as the original would have been,

0:41:310:41:33

you've got the tender here

0:41:330:41:34

and then coming back,

0:41:340:41:35

you've got the three classes of coach.

0:41:350:41:40

First class, closed in. Right.

0:41:400:41:42

Second class, just with a roof and third class,

0:41:420:41:46

well, you take your risks.

0:41:460:41:47

You hope it's a day like this.

0:41:470:41:48

As it always is, in Scotland!

0:41:480:41:51

But look, just look, look,

0:41:510:41:53

I'm sure you've done this, Jane,

0:41:530:41:56

but I'm going to do it too. Yes.

0:41:560:41:57

In there, all these fabulous little people.

0:41:570:42:02

It looks like a sort of outing from Jane Austen,

0:42:020:42:05

a little bit later in date,

0:42:050:42:06

but you know, there they all are off on their picnic or whatever.

0:42:060:42:12

It's interesting as well,

0:42:120:42:13

because they were having proposals

0:42:130:42:15

for the railway to come here

0:42:150:42:17

in the 1840s and the then duke

0:42:170:42:20

was a bit doubtful about it, and later became quite enthusiastic,

0:42:200:42:25

and it was this son that finally saw

0:42:250:42:27

the railway come through here.

0:42:270:42:30

So it really ties in very well.

0:42:300:42:32

Isn't that extraordinary?

0:42:320:42:33

It's the right sort of date for it all happening.

0:42:330:42:36

So the bringing of a model train, a toy train,

0:42:360:42:40

into the household could have triggered all that?

0:42:400:42:43

Obviously the son got very enthusiastic about the railway,

0:42:430:42:45

he was a director and he was here when it went through. Yes.

0:42:450:42:49

And the night before the railway opened,

0:42:490:42:51

they gave him a special ride

0:42:510:42:53

from the top of his lands at Drumochter,

0:42:530:42:56

and he went at the unprecedented speed

0:42:560:42:58

of 50mph for the first time ever.

0:42:580:43:01

Isn't that great? It's a good story.

0:43:010:43:03

It's a fabulous story and I'm not going to doubt it.

0:43:030:43:05

I think you're absolutely right on that, it's too good to miss.

0:43:050:43:09

Let's talk about value.

0:43:090:43:11

This is an incredibly esoteric thing,

0:43:110:43:14

it is not mainstream. Right.

0:43:140:43:15

There are probably half a dozen people in the whole world

0:43:150:43:18

who would want this,

0:43:180:43:20

but they have deep pockets

0:43:200:43:22

and I would be confident in saying

0:43:220:43:24

that this would fetch

0:43:240:43:25

something between

0:43:250:43:27

?25,000 and ?35,000 at auction

0:43:270:43:29

and for insurance, certainly ?50,000.

0:43:290:43:32

It's still going back in the case

0:43:320:43:34

and back in there I'm afraid!

0:43:340:43:36

And you've got the key? That's it.

0:43:360:43:39

Thank you so much for bringing it

0:43:390:43:40

out of its glass case

0:43:400:43:42

and for linking it in with the history of railways at Blair.

0:43:420:43:51

We've had rather a locomotive theme on the show today.

0:43:530:43:56

We started with the railway and we've ended with a rather smaller version.

0:43:560:44:00

We're all rather chuffed.

0:44:000:44:01

From the whole Antiques Roadshow team from Blair Castle

0:44:010:44:04

and the Scottish Highlands, until next time, bye-bye.

0:44:040:44:07

Subtitles by Ericsson

0:44:340:44:38

Fiona Bruce and the team of specialists return to Blair Castle in Perthshire, Scotland. Their discoveries include a Mickey Mouse toy with a poignant history, a breathtaking collection of valuable miniatures and a humble wooden spoon with a remarkable story attached.