Manchester Town Hall 2 Antiques Roadshow


Manchester Town Hall 2

Fiona Bruce and the team return to Manchester Town Hall, where objects include a painted panel found in a disused biscuit factory and a picture by LS Lowry.


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Manchester Town Hall - the ultimate example of civic pride

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and they say its foundations are built on bales of cotton.

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Hmm.

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Welcome back to the second helping of the Antiques Roadshow from Manchester.

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'The official opening of Manchester Town Hall

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'was to be a glamorous affair,

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'so the monarch was invited.'

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But Queen Victoria declined to attend

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when she got wind of the Mayor's radical beliefs.

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He'd wanted to produce a newspaper for the poor called

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The Poor Man's Guardian - outrageous!

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Ironically enough, though, it was the Mayor who stood in for her

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when this magnificent building was opened on the 13th September 1877.

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And here he is, the radical himself, Abel Heywood.

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The architect was a northern lad, Alfred Waterhouse.

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He designed cotton flowers all over the building.

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It became known as King Cotton's Palace -

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a reference to the vast amounts of cotton imported to Manchester

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for the manufacturing of textiles.

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And you can see bees everywhere too,

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as busy Manchester was a hive of industry.

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130 years on and the town hall is just as busy as ever.

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This is still the place you come to register births, marriages and deaths

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and it's a favoured Hollywood location.

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Only recently Meryl Streep was spotted striding down these corridors

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dressed in the familiar attire of Margaret Thatcher.

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The Mayor's staterooms are where the great and the good have been wined and dined

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over the last century or so.

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Benjamin Disraeli, Dr Stanley Livingston - I presume?

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Sorry, couldn't resist that.

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Winston Churchill - he was made a Freeman of the City,

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they've all been entertained here.

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Today we are the guests of Manchester City Council

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and what a spectacular place for our experts to weave their magic.

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The story of Manchester's industrial history

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is dominated by a word, which you hear all the time,

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and it's cotton, cotton, cotton, cotton, cotton and cotton.

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It's what you hear all the time.

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There's another part of Manchester's industrial history,

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which is pressed glass.

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And Ancoats was stuffed with pressed glass works.

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That's Manchester,

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that really is a piece of Manchester's genuine past,

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as much as any cotton you could think of - and it's survived!

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I'll tell you what, it's survived a lot more than the cotton, hasn't it?

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Yes.

-It's in a lot better condition that a shirt you would have bought!

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So, come on, tell us about your bit of it.

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Well, it's a piece that was always in Grandma's house

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and when Grandma died 18 years ago, obviously, the house was cleared

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and it was just passed down to myself, as a member of the family,

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and when we had family get-togethers

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Grandma always used to put the celery in it!

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Which is really bizarre, bearing in mind it's a celery vase! THEY LAUGH

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Is it really? Right.

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It's a celery vase.

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It's not really, they've described it as a celery vase

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because the tax on practical glass was less than on fancy glass.

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So, if they called it a flower vase it would have cost more

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but because they called it a celery vase you could sell it cheaper.

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-Right, so...

-And as for date, well, we know how old it is

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cos there's a little mark down here.

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It's a design registration lozenge.

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It's about 1865.

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-Oh, REALLY?

-Yeah, really.

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1865?

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It's not a fantastically valuable thing. What's it worth?

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£30 or £40 quid sort of money but the fact is, it has survived

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-and it's still here...

-It is.

-..proudly proclaiming MANCHESTER!

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So we can use it for celery then? Legally!

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THEY LAUGH

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Cock Robin merrily singing his heart out on a Victorian tree branch,

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in a gold frame, in the original fitted box.

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What's the story behind it?

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It was my maternal Grandmother's.

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I know nothing about it

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and I would like to know how the robin got there!

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-Yes, because he's trapped within, isn't he, really?

-Yes he is, yes.

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It's in incredibly good condition.

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The reason is, as I do always say,

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if you've got the original box for the item,

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goodness me, that really does help to keep the condition

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absolutely top grade.

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What it is, it's called a reverse crystal painting.

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Take a bubble of rock crystal, engrave it from the back

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-and paint the detail of the robin from the back.

-Oh.

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So it's painted on and if you could see, literally, behind it,

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you'd see that there's a sort of engraved hole filled up with paint.

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Very high quality gold frame, 18 carat gold frame,

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and at the back, like all the best Victorian pendants,

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-a locket compartment for you to put a photograph or a lock of hair.

-Yeah.

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Probably given, do you not agree, as a Christmas present? Do you think?

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-Probably, yes.

-I would have thought so.

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-All right, been in the family all these years.

-Yes.

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Do you wear it?

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I don't now but I have worn it when I was much younger,

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I used to wear it with a black velvet ribbon with an evening dress.

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It's not valueless, they are very collectable

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and this one is a particularly good one, in a Hunt and Roskell box.

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Would you like to hear that it's worth something in the region £2,500?

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That's a very nice surprise, thank you.

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-Would you be pleased then?

-I'd be very pleased, yes.

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Just my height, this.

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Oh, God, yeah. It's handy to lean on.

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-It's a big pot!

-Good.

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Where did you get it from?

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My mother bought it in 1945...

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..from in a shop in Manchester.

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-Fantastic, and you've had it ever since?

-Yes.

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-Do you like it?

-I do like it, yes.

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Do you know what it all means?

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I don't, not at all.

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I'll tell you something.

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As I approached this pot I knew instantly what it was...

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-Japanese.

-Lovely.

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-It isn't!

-Oh.

-THEY LAUGH

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-Once I got close, I realised I was wrong.

-Right.

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It's actually got a fair amount of Japanese influence on it

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-but it's actually Chinese.

-Oh, right.

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-And dates from the middle of the 19th century.

-Right.

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-So it's 150 years old.

-Right.

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Do you know what these are?

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Look like overgrown tulips.

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-They're actually peaches!

-Oh, right.

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And a peach in China, is a symbol of longevity.

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Well, it's an omen that she bought it - she lived to be 98!

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It works!

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So, you're going to live to 98 - oh, you're not 98 yet are you?

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I'm 80!

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Er, down here we've got...

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-immortals on different animals...

-Yes.

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..and they're the Taoist immortals, not Buddhist but Taoist.

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-Different religion.

-Right.

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And I think this would be very saleable

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to the modern Chinese market.

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And I think you would get somewhere between £5,000 and £8,000 for it.

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Do you know how much it cost?

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No, tell me.

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-I'm going to show you.

-Yes.

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My Dad bought it, in a shop, a furniture shop in Manchester...

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..in 1945...

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-..five pounds.

-It's gone up 1,000 times.

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The first one I bought about 15 years ago,

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just from a local antiques fair,

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and then the other one I bought about six or eight months later,

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again just at a local antiques fair, so...

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Are you an Art Deco collector?

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Because these obviously do date from the 1930s.

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I do like the Art Deco period.

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-So you're a bit of a magpie, yeah?

-Yeah.

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Well, first of all, let's just look at the features,

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cos the features immediately tell you that you're looking at something

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-which is from that, sort of, inter-war period.

-Yes.

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Because it's amazing, you can look at fashion plates

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and ladies have got these elongated faces,

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erm, and also it doesn't need much for me to know

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that there's a mark behind there that's going to say Goldscheider,

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although it's a little bit obscured.

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So we know that they're made in Austria,

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and this one, I notice, benefits actually from a label as well.

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Yeah, I only noticed that last night when I took them off the wall.

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-And you've been living with them for 15 years!

-I know.

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That's incredible.

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I mean, I love this particular one, I've seen this one before

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-because look at that hair!

-Mmm.

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-Ringlets of jade green.

-Yeah.

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I mean, to be honest with you, it looks like a hairdresser's nightmare

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-where a perm has gone badly wrong in the rinse, or whatever!

-It does.

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But this is the sort of object that collectors are very keen to have.

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They made a whole range of wall masks, including THIS one.

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Now, this one does set the pulse racing.

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I've got say it's a rare subject.

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Anything to do with skiing these days is always at a premium.

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You even find auctions in London dedicated to skiing posters and skiing memorabilia,

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so she would sit well in two distinct sales.

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-Obviously an Art Deco sale and a skiing sale.

-Yes.

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Well, let's just go back to this girl.

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-How much did you pay for that?

-120 for that one.

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-OK.

-That was more expensive than the other one.

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All right, well let's take this one.

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120, today...

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the market for that is going to be nearer £300 or thereabouts. OK.

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Now, when you say more expensive for our ski girl.

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That was the cheaper one.

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-Oh, that was the cheaper one?

-Yeah.

-Oh, right, so how cheap is cheap?

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-Well, it was £100 for that one.

-£100.

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Erm, I've not seen this before,

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and I've seen a lot of Goldscheider masks,

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so I wouldn't hesitate to quote you somewhere in the region of £800

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to possibly, possibly £1,000.

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Wow, that's amazing!

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That is amazing.

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So, the Crystal House or Crystal Palace

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-was built for the Great Exhibition in 1851...

-Yes.

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..and it was, you know, the most exciting thing that had happened at that time.

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Six million people -

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-a third of the population of Great Britain - came to see it.

-Wow.

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It was 990,000 square feet

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and so there were a tremendous number of commemoratives made for this event...

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-and you've brought one.

-Yes.

-Where did you get?

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-I got it from my great aunt.

-And did she go? Do you know?

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I'm not sure

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but I think it must have been passed down through the family.

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Well, it was such a spectacular event

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and many, many things were produced...so they're quite common.

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Right.

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But I've never seen this one before.

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Right.

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-So, and I LOVE the verse.

-Yes, so do I.

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-Because it's not very good, is it?

-It's strange.

-It's very strange.

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"These are the soldiers so gay and so bright

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"Who like to play best but are willing to fight

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"In defence of the Police, so active and bold

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"Who mind not the heat and fear not the cold."

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THEY CHUCKLE It's lovely.

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So produced for this -

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I haven't seen this one before, so rarer than most,

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and I think you would have to pay about £500.

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Wow! Just for this?

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My goodness.

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Heavens!

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I can't believe that, I really can't.

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So if you don't mind me asking you, sir,

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this is meant to be hanging in Mottram Church,

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what's it doing, today, at Manchester Town Hall?

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Well, we, in 1980, bought a biscuit company in this cotton mill

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and, within a year, we were clearing out store rooms

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and were throwing out all the junk.

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And some of the boys discovered this amongst the junk.

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So, you bought your biscuit factory

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-that happened to be an old cotton mill.

-Yes.

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This was found there.

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Yes it was.

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It's been hanging in reception in the biscuit factory ever since.

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-And so its history is incredibly rich, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

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Because it says here,

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"The South Side of Mottram Chancel is Repaired By and Belongs to

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"the Earl of Warrington as Lord of the Manor of Stayly."

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So, Mottram church, where is that?

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Well Mottram church is in Stalybridge,

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which is in the village of Mottram itself.

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And it's between Stalybridge and Glossop,

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about 15 miles east of Manchester.

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This shield actually dates from 1694,

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when the Earl of Warrington placed it in the church at Mottram.

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Because this armorial, the sort of focal point of it,

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-is incredibly detailed, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-It goes back generations, really.

-Yes.

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Explaining, you know, his blood line,

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-it's a bit like a family tree, if you like.

-Yes.

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So, presumably, it was hanging in the chancel or...

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actually, looking at it,

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one wonders whether it might even have formed part of the, sort of,

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the panelling within that chancel.

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-There's a curious square just here, isn't there?

-Yes.

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-A good repair!

-Yes, a good repair, possibly even a door or something.

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We're not sure whether it's a door or a panel

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but it certainly hung in the chancel for about 150 years

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and it was only moved by a guy called Chapman,

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a wealthy mill owner from the area,

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who bought the chancel from the church and decided, in his wisdom,

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that he was wealthy enough to take out all the accoutrements

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that were in the chancel, replacing them with his own.

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So, at that time the armorial shield disappeared,

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that was in 1854 or thereabouts,

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and destroyed everything that was within it for his own goods.

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And this of course disappeared at that time.

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But interesting that it was never actually destroyed or thrown away,

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and not hard to imagine why

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because it STILL has that richness to it, doesn't it?

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And so when you purchased the old cotton mill as your biscuit factory,

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what did you pay for it?

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Oh, we paid well over the odds, we paid £1.

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A pound? SHE LAUGHS

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-A whole pound.

-And that was for the factory, machinery and this.

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-One whole pound?

-One whole pound, yes.

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Well, we bought the debt as well, I have to say,

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but, you know, not a bad deal.

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Well, it is such a visually attractive object

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and a very similar armorial panel to this

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was sold a couple of years ago, at auction,

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-and I think probably surprised everyone by fetching £12,500.

-Yes.

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Now the question with this is, where does that sit alongside it?

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I think its provenance is fantastic.

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So, I would think, really, that it's got to be worth at least that much,

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possibly as much as...

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£15,000.

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Sounds very nice, yes, I wouldn't argue with that, sounds very good.

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Not for sale!

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-My father used to work for the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company...

-Right.

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..in the Abadan Oil Refinery.

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And then planned to live out there but unfortunately,

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along with other foreign residents, were thrown out

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after some dispute over the oil company,

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-and he came home and brought these Persian rugs with him.

-Right, OK.

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Well, let's talk a bit about exactly where they come from.

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We call them Kashan - Kashan is a city in the Isfahan Province of Iran,

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and rugs, traditionally, were made there

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in the 17th and early 18th century, to this pattern,

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and they were made in royal workshops. Very, very high quality.

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Of course rugs from that period are extremely rare

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and extremely valuable.

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I use the term "rugs", as well,

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because people seem to get a little bit confused -

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often people say "carpets",

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Carpets, in my mind, have to be something quite a lot bigger.

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These are very definitely rugs.

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The interesting thing about the business of making these rugs

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is when the Afghans invaded Iran in 1722,

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production of these rugs virtually ceased

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and production didn't really resume until around about the mid 19th century,

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and there's a very interesting little idiosyncrasy

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that ties these in with Manchester.

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Would you have any idea what that might be?

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I understand that some of the carpets were made of Manchester wool.

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Ah, well, that's good, because actually you've pretty well hit the nail on the head!

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Because, in fact, there was a shortage of good quality wool in the late 19th century.

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Between about 1890 and 1930 they couldn't get enough good quality wool

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to manufacture these rugs in Iran,

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so, effectively, what they did was, they imported merino wool from Manchester,

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which is quite incredible, isn't it?

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So that's the connection.

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But I think dating them is a LITTLE bit difficult.

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They're 20th century.

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When did he pick them up?

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1950s?

0:18:410:18:43

I reckon that my father probably left Iran,

0:18:430:18:47

Persia, about 1950, at the latest.

0:18:470:18:50

Right, OK, well, frankly I think they date from pretty close to that period.

0:18:500:18:55

I can see that this one's got some new fringing on the bottom of it,

0:18:550:18:59

a replacement fringing,

0:18:590:19:00

but I think they date from around that period

0:19:000:19:02

or not long before that period,

0:19:020:19:04

so they're early 20th century, perhaps.

0:19:040:19:07

Price wise, a matching pair like this

0:19:070:19:10

are probably going to sell for about £2,000 at auction.

0:19:100:19:14

You're joking!

0:19:140:19:15

That is a surprise.

0:19:190:19:20

I mean, to me the value of the rugs is the sentimental value,

0:19:200:19:24

that my father worked there and brought them back here.

0:19:240:19:27

If there is a connection with Manchester,

0:19:270:19:29

well, that would be fantastic

0:19:290:19:31

thinking that the rugs have come home.

0:19:310:19:33

-Lars, how's it going?

-OK, thank you.

0:19:360:19:38

How many items do you think you've seen today, so far?

0:19:380:19:41

-Cos there've been SO many people here.

-Items? My goodness...

0:19:410:19:43

-Well, how many people then?

-People...

0:19:430:19:45

somewhere between 200 and 300 people on ceramics, just me, yeah.

0:19:450:19:48

Wow, wow. Anything stand out particularly?

0:19:480:19:52

Well, we've seen a HUGE variety of things

0:19:520:19:54

but the thing that, sort of, stands out is a recent report from outside,

0:19:540:19:58

that a gentleman, who has been seen in here,

0:19:580:20:00

with what he says was valued at £5,000,

0:20:000:20:04

has broken it outside.

0:20:040:20:06

Ooh.

0:20:060:20:07

Now, I don't recall seeing anything worth £5,000

0:20:070:20:10

so, it's a bit of a mystery.

0:20:100:20:13

Well, at least it broke outside, and not inside.

0:20:130:20:17

I'm hoping he's going to bring the bits in!

0:20:170:20:19

Here we are, standing in Alfred Waterhouse's, in my opinion,

0:20:220:20:25

his masterpiece, the great Town Hall.

0:20:250:20:29

And you might think it's a bit O.T.T.

0:20:290:20:31

and then you look at your clock,

0:20:310:20:33

which is, again, a wonderful example of Victorian...decoration.

0:20:330:20:38

Is it something you have at home sitting in pride of place?

0:20:400:20:43

It is, yes. We, erm...

0:20:430:20:45

It's in the hall and people see it and remark on it when they,

0:20:450:20:48

when they visit and it's a conversation piece.

0:20:480:20:52

The clock isn't too accurate but we love it, you know, yeah.

0:20:520:20:57

You've exactly said the words, you, "love it,"

0:20:570:20:59

because some people might say this is something that is SO Victorian

0:20:590:21:05

and it's over-ornate.

0:21:050:21:07

I mean, just starting at this top and this sort of wonderful dome,

0:21:070:21:10

with the finials and the lion's head coming down to the spandrels -

0:21:100:21:14

and what are these strange ears at the side?

0:21:140:21:18

They are so over-the-top Victorian in many ways

0:21:180:21:22

and either you love it, or you hate it,

0:21:220:21:24

and, I have to say, I'm a bit of a 19th century fan, so I love it.

0:21:240:21:27

Now, as a clock, it was made in Germany.

0:21:270:21:30

-Probably around about 1900 somewhere about 1890.

-Really?

0:21:300:21:35

So about 110 years old but as a long case clock, not terribly exciting,

0:21:350:21:39

not terribly valuable UNTIL you reveal what's in the front here.

0:21:390:21:44

Yes.

0:21:440:21:46

And we open it up and what do we have? We have a disc musical box

0:21:460:21:50

and that makes it really desirable to a collector.

0:21:500:21:54

And what makes this interesting is that you can have endless discs.

0:21:540:21:57

How many have you got at home?

0:21:570:21:58

Six or seven, similar sort of things.

0:21:580:22:02

That's probably the favourite tune, I think, that we've got on for you.

0:22:020:22:05

Because so often with musical clocks, it has one tune, or maybe two,

0:22:050:22:09

and I should after ten years -

0:22:090:22:10

my goodness you'd be rather bored with those tunes!

0:22:100:22:12

-But you can change the discs and change the tune.

-Yes, of course, yes.

0:22:120:22:15

And the whole clock, musical movement, was made in Leipzig

0:22:150:22:19

by the company called Symphonion.

0:22:190:22:22

-Right.

-There were two big companies,

0:22:220:22:23

Polyphon and Symphonion, great competitors.

0:22:230:22:26

But this is a Symphonium long case clock,

0:22:260:22:29

it was made for the home -

0:22:290:22:30

some were made for pubs, where you put a penny in the side,

0:22:300:22:32

but this is a home model.

0:22:320:22:34

And therefore, to a collector, a rare piece.

0:22:340:22:37

At auction today...

0:22:380:22:40

..we're probably thinking about a figure of between £7,000 and £9,000.

0:22:410:22:45

Really? As much as that? Gosh.

0:22:450:22:48

TUNE TINKLING

0:22:480:22:50

-Now you're a father of how many children?

-Four children.

0:23:080:23:12

Four children, OK, and you've brought me

0:23:120:23:14

a book written by a daddy.

0:23:140:23:17

That's right, with two of his children.

0:23:170:23:20

Right, OK. And if we have a quick look at it,

0:23:200:23:24

it's called The Lion Skin.

0:23:240:23:27

If we open it up to the first page,

0:23:270:23:31

we'll see that it's written

0:23:310:23:33

by a Mr Hudson

0:23:330:23:35

-for his children in 1925.

-Yes.

0:23:350:23:40

Apart from the name, do we know where, where this came from?

0:23:400:23:43

Well, my daughter bought this property

0:23:430:23:46

with lots of furniture and miscellany.

0:23:460:23:49

-Right.

-And this was part and parcel of it.

0:23:490:23:52

There were two very, very elderly people there

0:23:520:23:56

and I would feel that possibly one of those was one of the children.

0:23:560:24:01

And what can you tell me about the story itself?

0:24:010:24:06

Well, it's a story about children pestering their father...

0:24:060:24:10

-Right.

-..for a lion's skin,

0:24:100:24:13

and he goes to Africa to just do that.

0:24:130:24:16

Here's the opening page. As you say, The Lion Skin by a daddy.

0:24:160:24:19

Beautifully drawn. The sort of execution is lovely.

0:24:190:24:24

The quality is sort of naive,

0:24:240:24:27

but very, very good as well

0:24:270:24:29

and he heads off to Africa by way of London

0:24:290:24:34

where, in those days, you could go and buy a gun.

0:24:340:24:37

-Certainly something you couldn't do nowadays.

-No!

0:24:370:24:40

And then later on, he gets on board a ship,

0:24:400:24:43

travels all the way to Africa,

0:24:430:24:47

where he finds this lion, which rather conveniently...

0:24:470:24:50

Strangely, in the desert.

0:24:500:24:51

In the desert, yes. And what happens to the lion?

0:24:510:24:54

The lion somehow manages to deflect the bullet

0:24:540:24:58

and off comes the tail, which clearly upsets the lion.

0:24:580:25:02

Something that we know

0:25:020:25:05

doesn't happen nowadays, thankfully. The lion's a protected species

0:25:050:25:09

and there are so many. But back in those days, there wasn't quite

0:25:090:25:12

the sort of same attitude towards hunting that there is now.

0:25:120:25:15

That's right.

0:25:150:25:17

And then, towards the end, once the father has managed

0:25:170:25:21

to sort of run away

0:25:210:25:25

from this now enraged lion.

0:25:250:25:27

-Enraged!

-Exactly.

0:25:270:25:29

He finally escapes back to England

0:25:290:25:32

and meets up with his children again

0:25:320:25:35

after visiting a taxidermist, essentially,

0:25:350:25:39

where he buys a lion skin.

0:25:390:25:42

So the whole adventure

0:25:420:25:45

has been sort of for nought in a way, but he's ended up

0:25:450:25:48

getting the lion skin to give to his children who then can relax.

0:25:480:25:52

-That's right.

-And presumably stop pestering him.

0:25:520:25:56

-Yes.

-I think it's beautifully illustrated. He obviously spent time

0:25:560:25:59

with them, actually sitting down composing the whole thing

0:25:590:26:03

-and the result is, as we said, a unique object...

-Very nice.

0:26:030:26:08

..that is actually worth a bit of money, funnily enough.

0:26:080:26:12

Well I think this, if it came up at auction, would certainly

0:26:120:26:16

make in the high hundreds, easily over £1,000.

0:26:160:26:18

-Good heavens!

-Yeah.

0:26:180:26:20

Well, for decades and decades the name Carlton Ware

0:26:200:26:23

has been synonymous with some fantastic ceramic creations,

0:26:230:26:27

from floral embossed wares, to teapots with legs.

0:26:270:26:31

But in the middle of it all, there is a period where they produced

0:26:310:26:34

some of the most opulent and extravagant wares,

0:26:340:26:37

like these in front of me.

0:26:370:26:39

So tell me, how come you are the lucky owner of two fabulous pieces?

0:26:390:26:43

Well, they've been in my family for as long as I can remember,

0:26:430:26:46

they originally were my Grandma's and she's always had them.

0:26:460:26:50

I believe before that,

0:26:500:26:52

I think they were her dad's,

0:26:520:26:55

-possibly back to the 1920s, I think.

-OK.

0:26:550:26:58

So give me a bit of a background of you and your family in the 1920s.

0:26:580:27:02

-Were you, shall I say, well-heeled?

-I can't say I was.

0:27:020:27:06

What about Grandma and Granddad?

0:27:060:27:08

I think yes, they were. My Grandad started, with his father,

0:27:080:27:12

a building firm back in the 1920s and as far as I know did quite well.

0:27:120:27:16

They were quite wealthy.

0:27:160:27:18

So these would have been bought for Grandma then? Or Great Grandma?

0:27:180:27:21

-Great Grandma as far as I've been told by my dad.

-So both of them?

0:27:210:27:24

Both of them. There was a third piece.

0:27:240:27:27

there was another vase exactly like that one

0:27:270:27:29

and there was an accident a few years ago with it

0:27:290:27:32

-and I threw it away.

-OK.

0:27:320:27:37

Well, everything you're saying

0:27:370:27:39

in terms of the time, the era, adds up perfectly

0:27:390:27:42

because this is Carlton Ware in the 1920s.

0:27:420:27:45

Specifically, this is Carlton Ware about 1929

0:27:450:27:49

under the artistic directorship of a chap called Enoch Boulton,

0:27:490:27:52

and he was a designer of some serious excellence.

0:27:520:27:55

I mean, he really was the boy.

0:27:550:27:57

He knew what he was doing and he was reacting to everything

0:27:570:28:01

that was coming out of Europe in 1925 at the big Paris Exhibition.

0:28:010:28:05

And in fact a lot of people today now say that this happened.

0:28:050:28:08

These vases, these pieces actually epitomise

0:28:080:28:12

the British interpretation

0:28:120:28:14

-of the Art Deco Movement at this period.

-Oh, gosh.

0:28:140:28:17

These are seriously important design items of their time.

0:28:170:28:21

-Right.

-So this period, there is good and there is great.

0:28:210:28:25

And is that the zigzag pattern? Am I right in..?

0:28:250:28:29

Well, the pattern is actually, for me, another name

0:28:290:28:32

that just perfectly epitomises the whole era.

0:28:320:28:36

This is known amongst all of us, and from the pattern books, as Jazz.

0:28:360:28:40

Oh, OK.

0:28:400:28:42

And what else is going on in the 1920s and 30s? It was the Jazz Age.

0:28:420:28:45

It was the music, the new creation, the new people.

0:28:450:28:48

These really daring, daring young people

0:28:480:28:51

who were doing everything different to their parents.

0:28:510:28:54

And how much more different could this be

0:28:540:28:57

from a load of Victorian chintz and florals?

0:28:570:29:00

-So with great, comes great interest.

-OK.

0:29:000:29:05

With great interest, I have to tell you, comes great prices.

0:29:050:29:09

OK.

0:29:090:29:10

And you threw one of these away.

0:29:100:29:12

Well if I tell you that you've thrown away

0:29:120:29:16

-somewhere in the region of £800 to £1,200.

-Wow.

0:29:160:29:20

Oh, gosh. Oh, dear.

0:29:200:29:23

And if we then move up to the bigger piece,

0:29:230:29:26

-and we actually call these the gondola.

-Yeah.

0:29:260:29:28

If we actually go up to this,

0:29:280:29:30

you're looking somewhere more like £1,500 to £2,000 for it.

0:29:300:29:33

Wow. Oh, dear.

0:29:330:29:36

These epitomise everything

0:29:360:29:38

that was going on in that era at its absolute best.

0:29:380:29:42

The interpretation, the understanding, the idea

0:29:420:29:45

and, more importantly, the execution.

0:29:450:29:47

-They are an absolute joy, so continue to treasure them.

-I love them.

0:29:470:29:50

Yeah, fabulous. Thank you.

0:29:500:29:52

Last time the Antiques Roadshow team visited Manchester Town Hall

0:30:050:30:09

was back in 1989 - there were lots of great finds but it was also a

0:30:090:30:13

rather sobering day for a young man who met our art expert Philip Hook.

0:30:130:30:16

So this is just what we wanted to find in Manchester,

0:30:180:30:21

the familiar image of the industrial landscape

0:30:210:30:25

and the magic signature at the bottom here, LS Lowry.

0:30:250:30:29

Can you tell me how you came by these two pictures?

0:30:290:30:32

Well, I've a classic car restoration company.

0:30:320:30:35

And about three years ago I was doing

0:30:350:30:37

a job for a chap in London on an E-type Jaguar and he was short of

0:30:370:30:41

the payment by about £250 and we was casually talking about antiques and

0:30:410:30:46

what not, old cars, and he asked me would I like to take this painting.

0:30:460:30:49

And I took the painting and that's how I acquired it.

0:30:490:30:52

Well, you brought these in earlier and I've had the chance

0:30:520:30:55

to consult with Sandra Martin from the Manchester City Art Gallery

0:30:550:31:01

and I'm afraid she tells us neither of these are actually by Lowry.

0:31:010:31:05

Yeah, well...

0:31:050:31:08

Which is not the best news, and apparently there are - even now

0:31:080:31:11

- fakers at work producing Lowrys - it's a big business when a Lowry...

0:31:110:31:17

I mean had this been genuine it could have been £20,000 or £30,000.

0:31:170:31:21

Rupert Maas you're on our art team today -

0:31:250:31:27

any fake Lowrys turned up so far?

0:31:270:31:29

Not as yet, but we're always on the QV for them.

0:31:290:31:31

The thing is that they were faked prodigiously

0:31:310:31:34

particularly by the Greenhalgh family, you know, local boys

0:31:340:31:38

from Bolton, Shaun Greenhalgh now doing time for faking Lowrys

0:31:380:31:42

and they're out there in their thousands perhaps.

0:31:420:31:45

We don't really know but we do see a lot of fake Lowrys.

0:31:450:31:48

And people are increasingly turning to the net to buy paintings these days, aren't they?

0:31:480:31:53

Yes, well it seems easy but you're only looking at a photograph,

0:31:530:31:55

you can't see the actual thing

0:31:550:31:57

and it's a particularly dangerous thing to do.

0:31:570:32:00

What kind of things are being faked these days?

0:32:000:32:02

Well, Lowry has been faked - everyone knows now -

0:32:020:32:05

a lot of people do, that there are fake Lowrys out there,

0:32:050:32:08

so people - the fakers - they move on to pastures new

0:32:080:32:11

and I understand that Greek painting is being faked a bit now

0:32:110:32:16

and also progressive Indian painting.

0:32:160:32:18

They tend to target the areas which are in the sort of twenty

0:32:180:32:22

to thirty thousand pounds maximum range because that is the area

0:32:220:32:26

which is least researched and most remunerative.

0:32:260:32:28

Pays the most!

0:32:300:32:31

Thank you! Pays the most, but anything below that

0:32:310:32:34

is not worth doing and anything higher than that,

0:32:340:32:37

somebody's written a book about it and there's knowledge. Knowledge is the faker's enemy.

0:32:370:32:42

Rupert, thanks very much.

0:32:420:32:44

You have been warned.

0:32:440:32:46

These were inherited by my husband,

0:32:470:32:49

they came down through his mother's side of the family

0:32:490:32:51

and we know very little about them

0:32:510:32:53

other than the fact that we think they may be Italian

0:32:530:32:56

because there's some boxwood packing on the back of them.

0:32:560:33:00

We think they're ivory and we think, or he thinks,

0:33:020:33:04

that they are book ends or book backs from somewhere

0:33:040:33:08

and the reason he thinks that

0:33:080:33:10

is because the two corners here appear to be...

0:33:100:33:12

Like have a small chamfer on them, and that's all we know about them.

0:33:120:33:16

Right, well we can't see that.

0:33:160:33:19

I don't think they're book ends or book backs,

0:33:190:33:21

I think they're almost too delicate,

0:33:210:33:23

even imagining how precious books were at this time,

0:33:230:33:26

so I don't think they're that.

0:33:260:33:28

-The packaging on the back - let's discount that as well.

-OK.

0:33:280:33:32

-So these have been in the family a long time?

-Yes.

0:33:320:33:34

OK, well they are ivory.

0:33:340:33:37

That's the right fact. And they're beautifully, beautifully carved.

0:33:370:33:40

Have you ever tried to look into the iconography, the story behind them?

0:33:400:33:44

Some years ago my husband photographed them and e-mailed it

0:33:440:33:48

down to the Victoria and Albert in London, who said that they thought

0:33:480:33:52

that the pictures themselves came from a Rubens painting.

0:33:520:33:55

Right, Rubens painting.

0:33:550:33:58

I'm not a painting specialist.

0:33:580:34:00

So I'm going to be brave

0:34:000:34:01

and say I don't think they are from a Rubens painting.

0:34:010:34:05

But the scenes are roughly the time of Rubens, sort of 1600-ish,

0:34:050:34:08

-something like that.

-Right.

0:34:080:34:11

I'm pretty sure this is Henry IV of France.

0:34:110:34:15

Right. Yes.

0:34:150:34:16

King of Navarre, King of France

0:34:160:34:19

and this is clearly... All these heavenly maidens up here,

0:34:190:34:22

are clearly bringing him a portrait of his bride-to-be.

0:34:220:34:25

Right, oh right.

0:34:250:34:27

-Marie de' Medici - very important Italian family.

-Right.

0:34:270:34:30

And I just wonder if this is his betrothal here, or at least

0:34:300:34:34

he's having a look to see if he wanted the portrait or whatever.

0:34:340:34:37

Great way to get married, isn't it?! "Oh, she looks all right, yeah".

0:34:370:34:41

And then over here, I suspect this is clearly the birth of a child.

0:34:410:34:45

-But I think it's not religious, it's secular.

-Right.

0:34:450:34:48

-And that is the birth of their first child, their first son.

-Right.

0:34:480:34:51

Who became Louis XIII of France.

0:34:510:34:53

So I think this is celebrating an important event in French history.

0:34:530:34:57

Because without him, that dynasty - the Bourbon dynasty -

0:34:570:35:00

probably wouldn't have survived, so this is very, very important -

0:35:000:35:03

all the 18th century kings we know about, the Louis, are all from him.

0:35:030:35:07

Yes, right.

0:35:070:35:08

Dolphin of course is the son of the king, is a dolphin or the dauphin.

0:35:080:35:13

Dauphin, yes.

0:35:130:35:14

Now, they come from the harbour town of Dieppe in northern France,

0:35:140:35:18

on the Channel.

0:35:180:35:19

Where all of the ivory shipments and a lot of imports into France came.

0:35:190:35:24

-There's a big school of Dieppe ivory carving.

-Right.

0:35:240:35:28

They're not - sadly - the same date as Henry IV of Navarre.

0:35:280:35:31

They're not late 16th, early 17th century.

0:35:310:35:34

He died in 1610, but it's great carving

0:35:340:35:37

from a very, very important centre, so date-wise about 18...

0:35:370:35:43

They're quite early - 1850, 1860, something like that.

0:35:430:35:47

Right.

0:35:470:35:48

Well, I think certainly...

0:35:480:35:50

..minimum insurance value of £5,000.

0:35:510:35:54

Right.

0:35:550:35:57

Well, it was bought in 1961,

0:36:000:36:03

that was a present for a belated wedding anniversary.

0:36:030:36:07

Fantastic, so was it just these two pieces, or more?

0:36:070:36:10

No, there's the small one

0:36:100:36:12

and there's the dressing table to go with it and there's a stool as well.

0:36:120:36:16

And a stool as well? My goodness me.

0:36:160:36:18

Yes, there's actually a single wardrobe to go with that as a set.

0:36:180:36:22

-So you've got the whole bedroom suite in one?

-Yes, that's right.

0:36:220:36:25

In its day, enormously fashionable as well.

0:36:250:36:27

So doing your hair and make-up,

0:36:270:36:30

you must have looked very much a fashionable person of the moment.

0:36:300:36:33

That's right, yes.

0:36:330:36:35

The story behind these objects -

0:36:350:36:36

there are a number of different things.

0:36:360:36:39

And fashion I'm going to come back to.

0:36:390:36:40

First of all, the fact that it's still a large piece

0:36:400:36:44

and this walnut veneer over here

0:36:440:36:46

and this very sort of architectural shape,

0:36:460:36:48

harks back to the Art Deco movement,

0:36:480:36:50

-so the pre-war fashion for Art Deco, architectural stepped forms.

-OK.

0:36:500:36:53

But, of course, things did start to change.

0:36:530:36:56

After the war there was a new style, there was a new fashion,

0:36:560:36:59

so although at first glance it feels very solid and architectural,

0:36:590:37:04

you start to see features like this.

0:37:040:37:07

This almost looks like a chemical model or a chemical structure

0:37:070:37:10

within these little balls here and these lines,

0:37:100:37:13

and of course the 1951 Festival of Britain,

0:37:130:37:15

a lot of that was about - chemical structure,

0:37:150:37:17

the world of tomorrow, the future.

0:37:170:37:19

And have you noticed on here, this wonderful curving form there?

0:37:190:37:22

Yes, exactly, yes, yes.

0:37:220:37:24

But it also looks a little like a car grille,

0:37:240:37:27

and of course all those things

0:37:270:37:29

became really influential in the post-war period.

0:37:290:37:33

Now we know who it was made by, of course,

0:37:330:37:35

because if we open this up...

0:37:350:37:36

-..it says "Beautility".

-Yes.

0:37:380:37:41

Beautility Furniture Limited was founded in 1894 in London.

0:37:410:37:44

Good company, it lasted through into 1950s and '60s,

0:37:440:37:47

and I mentioned fashion and it sold fashionable furniture,

0:37:470:37:50

so you could buy the whole thing and immediately take part

0:37:500:37:53

in a new fashion of the age, the new style of the age.

0:37:530:37:57

But there's a little bit more to it, isn't there?

0:37:570:38:00

There is, there's a secret door.

0:38:000:38:02

There's more to this wardrobe than it looks,

0:38:020:38:04

because if we slide this open here,

0:38:040:38:07

you reveal a full-length mirror,

0:38:070:38:09

just so you can admire yourself before you go out.

0:38:090:38:12

And down here you'd have been able to store hair brushes,

0:38:120:38:14

so if you needed to just...

0:38:140:38:16

That final tweak before you go out on the town -

0:38:160:38:18

there it all is, ready for you.

0:38:180:38:21

Why do you still have it? Do you still like it today?

0:38:210:38:24

Well, actually the main story is me Mum's actually moved in with us now,

0:38:240:38:28

so we have nowhere to store it

0:38:280:38:29

and we need to get rid of it, basically.

0:38:290:38:32

That's why, unfortunately,

0:38:320:38:34

because it is a nice piece of furniture

0:38:340:38:35

and me Mum does love it, she's had it since like 1960

0:38:350:38:39

so...it's unfortunate, really.

0:38:390:38:41

Absolutely.

0:38:410:38:43

Well, returning to fashion again,

0:38:430:38:45

these pieces really have been out of fashion for a very long time

0:38:450:38:48

and if you're looking to sell it, how do you sell these sorts of pieces?

0:38:480:38:52

They're still not wildly fashionable today.

0:38:520:38:54

However, fashions change again, they're changing,

0:38:540:38:57

there are a big number of younger people

0:38:570:39:00

who are really looking for these stylish pieces from the 1950s.

0:39:000:39:03

-Really?

-Absolutely.

-That surprises me.

0:39:030:39:05

You might get... A good quality vintage or retro shop

0:39:050:39:08

might be asking sort of about £80, £60 to £80 for that

0:39:080:39:12

and maybe around £100 to £150 for that, with the dressing table,

0:39:120:39:15

you're probably nudging over the £200, £250 mark.

0:39:150:39:18

Right, OK.

0:39:180:39:19

My advice to you personally would be to keep it,

0:39:210:39:23

as I think you might get a bit more money in the future.

0:39:230:39:25

Right. OK, we'll bear that in mind.

0:39:250:39:27

My goodness, it's dusty, so it must be old.

0:39:290:39:33

How old?

0:39:330:39:34

I don't know exactly, we've had it just over 20 years

0:39:340:39:38

but I don't know exactly how old it is.

0:39:380:39:40

And where did it come from?

0:39:400:39:42

My father bought it off somebody

0:39:420:39:43

and it's just been sitting in a warehouse ever since.

0:39:430:39:47

20 odd years ago, that would take us to around 1991?

0:39:470:39:50

Yeah, yeah.

0:39:500:39:51

-Which is exactly the date we've got on this lovely colourful sticker.

-OK.

0:39:510:39:55

The year of the Ram, 1991.

0:39:550:39:58

But the thing that really interests me is this here.

0:39:580:40:02

Now have you translated this?

0:40:020:40:03

I haven't no, no.

0:40:030:40:06

You ought to have done, because that's going to help you date it.

0:40:060:40:09

In here, we've got a date.

0:40:090:40:11

Those two characters tell us that this was made

0:40:110:40:14

either in 1804 or in 1864.

0:40:140:40:18

-OK.

-The Chinese cycle of years goes in 60-year chunks.

-OK.

0:40:180:40:23

So we can say that this gong

0:40:230:40:24

almost certainly dates to either 1804 or 1864.

0:40:240:40:31

From the point of view of value, or importance,

0:40:310:40:34

it doesn't make any difference.

0:40:340:40:36

-Right, OK.

-We just say it's 19th century,

0:40:360:40:38

and as far as I'm concerned, that fits perfectly with the gong.

0:40:380:40:42

OK.

0:40:420:40:43

Now the stand could be anywhere in the 19th century,

0:40:430:40:47

it's a very, very traditional Chinese stand

0:40:470:40:50

-and it is indeed a stand for a gong such as this.

-Yes.

0:40:500:40:53

The only problem with it is,

0:40:530:40:55

you haven't got the little circular cushion

0:40:550:40:58

that usually sits just between the gong itself...

0:40:580:41:01

-Ah right, OK.

-..and the top of the stand.

-OK.

0:41:010:41:04

And the reason to have a cushion on there

0:41:040:41:06

is when you actually strike the piece, it allows it to resonate.

0:41:060:41:10

Ah.

0:41:100:41:11

So, I think this dates from the 19th century.

0:41:110:41:14

-Do you use it for anything?

-No, like I said,

0:41:140:41:17

it's just been sitting there for the past 20-odd years.

0:41:170:41:20

Not for bringing the children down for early morning breakfast?

0:41:200:41:23

No, no, not even that.

0:41:230:41:25

-You've been to China, I guess.

-Yes, I have, yes.

0:41:250:41:28

-And you've seen these in China?

-In temples, yes.

0:41:280:41:31

-In temples.

-Temples, yes.

0:41:310:41:33

They're usually tucked away

0:41:330:41:35

-either in the corner of a room or right next to the door.

-OK.

0:41:350:41:38

And they strike them and they usually bring people to prayer.

0:41:380:41:42

-Right.

-Just as bells do all over the world.

0:41:420:41:45

-Right.

-Now, without the cushion,

0:41:450:41:47

-I'm afraid we're not going to make a great noise, are we?

-OK.

0:41:470:41:51

-Let's have a go, shall we?

-Sure.

0:41:510:41:53

THE GONG RESONATES

0:41:530:41:56

Huge resonance, it's still going.

0:41:580:42:01

Get a cushion and your children will have fun with this,

0:42:010:42:05

waking you up on a Sunday morning.

0:42:050:42:07

-It's a purely decorative object.

-Yeah.

0:42:070:42:10

It has no collector's value.

0:42:100:42:12

-This is - the value of this lies in what it looks like.

-OK.

0:42:120:42:16

To buy one of these,

0:42:160:42:17

I think you would spend...

0:42:170:42:20

-somewhere between £1,000 and maybe £2,000.

-OK.

0:42:200:42:23

Yeah, interesting to know, yes.

0:42:250:42:28

When I saw this, this morning, the phrase that came to mind was

0:42:310:42:34

"hiding your light under a bushel".

0:42:340:42:36

Because out of this plain box, we have this rather magnificent plaque.

0:42:360:42:41

-And this is just the back side of it, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:42:420:42:45

Here it is here, and I don't need to tell you what it is.

0:42:470:42:52

You know what it is - what is it?

0:42:520:42:53

It's a Royal Lancastrian pottery plate.

0:42:530:42:57

It is indeed,

0:42:570:42:59

and this has been in your family or something you've bought?

0:42:590:43:02

It's from my great grandfather.

0:43:020:43:04

He was given it by a member of the Pilkington factory

0:43:040:43:07

who he was friendly with at the time.

0:43:070:43:10

Right, so was he in the pottery business as well?

0:43:100:43:12

No, he was a director of an engineering company in Swinton

0:43:120:43:15

and they became friends and this was given to him as a gift.

0:43:150:43:19

Well, what a gift it is. I mean, it's magnificent.

0:43:190:43:23

I think there's no...

0:43:230:43:24

I think highly appropriate, you know, in the Gothic surroundings

0:43:240:43:27

of Manchester Town Hall, we have here not a Gothic piece,

0:43:270:43:31

but an Arts and Crafts piece, which was a movement

0:43:310:43:34

which ran at the same time, and a little bit beyond

0:43:340:43:37

and, I mean, what a plate -

0:43:370:43:38

we've got St George and the dragon here,

0:43:380:43:40

dragons around the outside and you notice how this side is black,

0:43:400:43:45

this side is much more lustrous.

0:43:450:43:47

These lustre colours were fired at very high temperatures

0:43:470:43:51

to get the red and the lustre,

0:43:510:43:52

they almost had to burn the pattern off

0:43:520:43:55

and if they didn't control the kiln...

0:43:550:43:56

-These were coal-fired kilns - no switching a button on.

-Yes.

0:43:560:44:00

Coal-fired kiln, the whole of this design could be destroyed.

0:44:000:44:04

-It is, it's magnificent.

-Yeah.

0:44:040:44:06

And look at the back, I mean the back is as beautiful as it is.

0:44:060:44:11

And I mean even the way that the colours have sort of run

0:44:110:44:14

and given this lovely sort of bloom to it.

0:44:140:44:16

Here we've got the mark, here, the P and the bees for Pilkingtons,

0:44:160:44:20

the Royal Lancastrian Pottery.

0:44:200:44:21

And we've also got... Have you noticed here?

0:44:210:44:24

There's another mark there as well.

0:44:240:44:26

-Have you seen that before?

-I have, yes, I can't remember what it is.

0:44:280:44:31

Well that's the mark of Richard Joyce,

0:44:310:44:34

-who was one of the artists at the factory.

-Right.

0:44:340:44:37

And whether it was a presentation piece

0:44:370:44:39

particularly for your great grandfather...

0:44:390:44:41

I'd like to think it was, because it is...

0:44:410:44:43

-It's not a run-of-the-mill piece, it's a special piece.

-Yeah.

0:44:430:44:47

And, you know, as a consequence, it's worth a special price.

0:44:470:44:50

I think if this was to come to auction,

0:44:500:44:53

there would be no problem at it getting £10,000 to £12,000.

0:44:530:44:58

-Right.

-So maybe it should go back in its box.

-Yes.

0:45:000:45:02

-And back to the bank for your great grandchildren.

-Definitely, yeah.

0:45:020:45:06

We've had so many people here today.

0:45:120:45:14

Do you know, by lunchtime, we'd had 3,000 people come along

0:45:140:45:17

to Manchester Town Hall, all queuing, very patiently...

0:45:170:45:20

Thank you.

0:45:200:45:22

..and all their own little boxes and bags and things.

0:45:220:45:26

Hello - pouncing on you - what have you got in there?

0:45:260:45:29

Beatles autographs.

0:45:290:45:30

Beatles autographs? Oh, can I have a look?

0:45:300:45:33

Just a few.

0:45:340:45:36

And how did you come by these?

0:45:360:45:37

I used to work in the fan club in the '60s

0:45:370:45:40

and when I left school we used to just go up there,

0:45:400:45:42

just like for an hour, you know, just after school.

0:45:420:45:45

That is a great Scouse accent, I can tell you!

0:45:450:45:48

Yes, so we just ended up getting friendly

0:45:480:45:51

and in the end we got working there

0:45:510:45:53

just like, you know, school holidays, we got a guinea a week.

0:45:530:45:57

What and you - so you were working at the Beatles' fan club?

0:45:570:46:00

Yeah, just helping out, just cutting labels off the actual letters

0:46:000:46:04

and sending people photographs.

0:46:040:46:07

So show me these autographs, then.

0:46:070:46:10

-John Lennon.

-John Lennon.

0:46:100:46:12

Ringo Starr, George Harrison

0:46:120:46:15

and Paul McCartney.

0:46:150:46:17

-"This is from us Beatles"

-This is from us Beatles.

0:46:170:46:21

So who's written that then?

0:46:210:46:22

I think that looks like John Lennon's writing, that one.

0:46:220:46:25

Fantastic, and what else have you got in here?

0:46:250:46:28

Just a few - got a Christmas card

0:46:280:46:31

and actually similar type of things.

0:46:310:46:35

-And this is to you?

-Yes.

0:46:350:46:37

-So a Christmas card to you from the Beatles?

-Yes.

0:46:370:46:40

Hang on, hang on, let's have a look.

0:46:400:46:42

"To June, best wishes, Ringo Starr" with a little star.

0:46:420:46:45

"George Harrison, John Lennon and Paul McCartney".

0:46:450:46:48

How fantastic!

0:46:480:46:50

Now, has anyone valued this for you yet?

0:46:500:46:53

No, no, I haven't had it valued yet. I'm just waiting.

0:46:530:46:56

Brilliant, well we might have to go and find someone to have a look.

0:46:560:47:00

Great.

0:47:000:47:01

When I was in Manchester back in the 1970s and an undergraduate,

0:47:010:47:05

certainly we didn't have anything like this

0:47:050:47:07

to get to university and back, it was the boring bus.

0:47:070:47:11

This is what's termed as an apprentice piece,

0:47:110:47:14

but I've seen lots of apprentice pieces but this is the real McCoy.

0:47:140:47:19

Yes, it is, we know that this is the actual model

0:47:190:47:21

that the apprentices at the factory and the works

0:47:210:47:23

where they actually made these trams,

0:47:230:47:25

the apprentices made this just to prove that they could do the job.

0:47:250:47:31

And then having proved that they could do it,

0:47:310:47:33

presumably they were then allowed to go on

0:47:330:47:35

and actually be part of building the full-size ones.

0:47:350:47:38

Yes, and we have the only remaining full-size one left

0:47:380:47:42

out of the 515 that they actually made.

0:47:420:47:45

You personally or...? No, you're the Chairman of the Tramway Museum.

0:47:450:47:48

Yes, the Tramway Museum have it, it took 25 years to restore it,

0:47:480:47:53

but it is in full operating condition,

0:47:530:47:55

we have occasionally run it in Heaton Park

0:47:550:47:58

and we take it to other places to actually operate it

0:47:580:48:01

but it costs a lot of money to hire suitable horses to run it.

0:48:010:48:05

-So we have one full-size.

-Mm.

0:48:050:48:07

-And one apprentice model and that's it.

-Yes.

0:48:070:48:10

And what makes this one so unusual?

0:48:100:48:13

I see it's got... On the front, it's called something patent.

0:48:130:48:16

It's an Eades patent -

0:48:160:48:18

instead of having two staircases and two driving points,

0:48:180:48:21

this only has one staircase and one driving point,

0:48:210:48:24

and when it got to the terminus,

0:48:240:48:26

the driver could lock the brakes onto the truck on it.

0:48:260:48:30

Unlock the body and then the tram would do this.

0:48:300:48:33

-Wow!

-The whole body was designed on a turntable,

0:48:350:48:39

so it could turn round

0:48:390:48:40

and set off back in the direction they'd just come from.

0:48:400:48:43

-So obviously horse-drawn.

-Yes.

-So one, or two horses.

0:48:430:48:46

Usually two horses side by side and when it came to a hilly area,

0:48:460:48:49

they'd keep extra horses at the bottom of the hill

0:48:490:48:52

and they'd put on a trace horse on the front to pull it up the hill.

0:48:520:48:56

That is amazing. I mean, what a lovely bit of engineering.

0:48:560:48:59

Rather than like a train, you had to build a turntable,

0:48:590:49:02

which would have been huge and very expensive.

0:49:020:49:04

Just a little cunning design like this got round the problem.

0:49:040:49:07

And they also didn't have to lay extra track to build turning circles

0:49:070:49:11

and it just saved an awful lot of money.

0:49:110:49:13

Now these, I understand, were introduced in, what, the 1870s?

0:49:130:49:16

It's mid 1870s and they ran through till the...

0:49:160:49:20

last ones operated early in 1903.

0:49:200:49:22

And that was because they were phased out

0:49:220:49:25

because no more horse-drawn?

0:49:250:49:26

Yes, the electric trams came in and they gradually replaced

0:49:260:49:30

the lighter-weight tracks that these ran on

0:49:300:49:32

with heavier-weight tracks for the electric trams

0:49:320:49:35

and all the overhead wiring that was required for the electric ones.

0:49:350:49:39

And I think you've brought along a picture showing Piccadilly.

0:49:390:49:43

Yes, this picture of Piccadilly shows lots and lots of trams in it,

0:49:430:49:47

and every single one of them is one of these trams.

0:49:470:49:50

And you see congestion, even back then.

0:49:500:49:52

Exactly, definitely, it was quite bad then.

0:49:520:49:55

-And the only one left?

-Yeah.

0:49:550:49:57

You can't reproduce it, really historic,

0:49:570:50:01

such an ingenious way of turning it around.

0:50:010:50:04

I really love it and it's part of Manchester's history.

0:50:040:50:07

-Exactly, very much so.

-I would have thought...

0:50:070:50:09

well, if Manchester Corporation didn't buy it back,

0:50:090:50:12

any collector would pay £12,000 to £15,000 for it.

0:50:120:50:15

So a fantastic piece.

0:50:150:50:17

Well, we are delighted to own it and we're even more delighted

0:50:170:50:21

because we actually have the full-size version as well.

0:50:210:50:24

Don't ask me to value that!

0:50:240:50:26

This is really nice - I mean I like wheel engraving,

0:50:260:50:29

it's one of the most delicate forms of glass decoration.

0:50:290:50:32

What you do is that the engraver holds the glass

0:50:320:50:36

against rotating copper discs,

0:50:360:50:39

which they put a kind of abrasive slimy stuff on,

0:50:390:50:44

and scratch the decoration onto the glass,

0:50:440:50:47

and I think that works well, don't you?

0:50:470:50:50

Well, it's come out beautifully,

0:50:500:50:52

I think the engraving is absolutely first class.

0:50:520:50:55

So it's Stourbridge, that's where it was made, the glass.

0:50:550:51:01

And it dates from about 1870-1880 so did you have it as a child?

0:51:010:51:08

No, my sister and I were clearing a friend's house out after she died,

0:51:080:51:13

and it was just lying in a box with some glasses

0:51:130:51:17

and it just caught my eye, I thought how beautiful it was.

0:51:170:51:20

So you said, "I'll have that".

0:51:200:51:22

I said, "Oh, can I have it?" and she said, "Yes".

0:51:220:51:24

-So how long ago's that?

-About 10 or 15 years ago.

0:51:240:51:29

So it's about 130 years old.

0:51:290:51:31

The downer on it is that this isn't silver.

0:51:310:51:34

-Oh.

-If it was silver, it would be worth pots of money,

0:51:340:51:38

but as it is, we're talking about Greek revival,

0:51:380:51:41

Stourbridge made, wheel-engraved claret jug.

0:51:410:51:43

Claret jug that's worth £500, which is not bad value, eh?

0:51:430:51:49

Very good, and how much would it be worth with the claret in it?

0:51:490:51:53

Oh, let's go and find out, shall we?

0:51:530:51:55

Right, we'll meet after the show.

0:51:550:51:57

Ah, here you are.

0:52:000:52:01

-Can I interrupt? I saw this lady earlier on.

-Yes.

0:52:010:52:05

Have you spoken about what this is worth yet?

0:52:050:52:07

Not quite, we were just about to do that.

0:52:070:52:09

Well, come on then, put me out of my misery,

0:52:090:52:11

and put you out of your misery, as well.

0:52:110:52:14

It's a wonderfully personal little collection,

0:52:140:52:17

very, very pertinent, I love it

0:52:170:52:19

and I think this is going to make between £3,000 - £5,000 at auction.

0:52:190:52:24

-You're joking.

-Absolutely not.

-Oh, that's wonderful.

0:52:240:52:27

-Is that a surprise?

-Very much so - didn't think...

0:52:270:52:31

Didn't think that much at all.

0:52:310:52:33

Thank you, John, Paul and Ringo.

0:52:330:52:35

It is, yeah, that's lovely.

0:52:350:52:38

It's years since I've seen any of these on a Roadshow,

0:52:410:52:44

they're really sweet little things. Where did you get them?

0:52:440:52:47

My mother left them to me.

0:52:470:52:49

And you know what they are, or...?

0:52:490:52:51

Very little, I think are they Royal Worcester?

0:52:510:52:54

Absolutely, they're Royal Worcester

0:52:540:52:56

and it'll say so on the bottoms.

0:52:560:52:57

Let's have a look.

0:52:570:52:58

This one here, yeah, we've got a Royal Worcester mark just there

0:52:580:53:03

and there's a date code and it will date them

0:53:030:53:05

to around about the end of the 19th century.

0:53:050:53:08

Right.

0:53:080:53:10

They'll be about 1898, somewhere around there,

0:53:100:53:13

but what's important about these ones is the decoration

0:53:130:53:16

and who they're painted by - have you had a look at this closely?

0:53:160:53:20

-Not really, no.

-Because if you look at either of them,

0:53:200:53:23

-you see there - the signature?

-Oh, yes.

0:53:230:53:27

It says "Baldwin" - Charles Baldwin was the son of a piano tuner

0:53:270:53:32

but he went into painting

0:53:320:53:34

and he painted on Royal Worcester porcelain.

0:53:340:53:37

At the beginning of the 20th century he went into...

0:53:370:53:39

I think he gave up and went into watercolours,

0:53:390:53:42

he exhibited at the RA, but Royal Worcester collectors,

0:53:420:53:45

-when they see things by Baldwin, they get excited.

-Oh, right.

0:53:450:53:48

This particular shape of vase comes in two sizes

0:53:480:53:51

because I looked at them and I thought...

0:53:510:53:54

and then I remembered, it's only the large ones

0:53:540:53:56

-which should have covers.

-Right.

0:53:560:53:58

These ones are almost exactly the same

0:53:580:54:00

but the large ones came with covers.

0:54:000:54:02

These small ones were made and sold without covers.

0:54:020:54:05

So, all is looking pretty sunny about them.

0:54:050:54:08

Fantastic.

0:54:080:54:10

I don't suppose you know this one's cracked?

0:54:100:54:13

I thought there was a little hairline crack on one of them, yes.

0:54:130:54:17

Yeah, it looks little, but it runs all the way round the outside here.

0:54:170:54:21

-Round up there and up into the rim.

-Oh, what a shame.

0:54:210:54:25

So effectively you've got a couple of vases,

0:54:250:54:28

you've got one in really good order, one with a crack,

0:54:280:54:30

-almost invisible but it's still there.

-Yeah.

0:54:300:54:33

And that makes a huge difference to the price.

0:54:330:54:35

But if you put them into auction they would make £3,500 or £4,000.

0:54:350:54:38

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Wow.

0:54:380:54:41

They're that sought after, even in that condition.

0:54:410:54:44

Fantastic, I'll make sure I get them insured now.

0:54:440:54:47

Earlier on, Fiona and Rupert were having a conversation about fakes,

0:54:470:54:52

and fake Lowrys, and here we have a wonderful Lowry

0:54:520:54:57

with a covering letter,

0:54:570:54:59

which gives really good provenance to the picture.

0:54:590:55:02

The picture really speaks for itself

0:55:020:55:04

because it is just typical Lowry and beautifully painted.

0:55:040:55:08

So how come you have the painting and the letter?

0:55:080:55:11

Well, my father was an amateur artist in Manchester,

0:55:110:55:13

something of a junior contemporary of Lowry

0:55:130:55:17

and a very big fan of Lowry, and he collected several scrapbooks

0:55:170:55:21

of art gallery catalogues, newspaper cuttings,

0:55:210:55:24

anything he could lay his hands on, to do with Lowry

0:55:240:55:27

and he did use to meet up with Lowry occasionally

0:55:270:55:30

and at some point told Lowry about the scrapbooks.

0:55:300:55:33

Lowry was interested, wanted to borrow them,

0:55:330:55:36

ended up keeping them far too long, really,

0:55:360:55:38

and so when he returned them,

0:55:380:55:40

he was a bit embarrassed about how long he'd had them,

0:55:400:55:43

and he gave this little picture as a present.

0:55:430:55:45

It's explained in the covering letter.

0:55:450:55:47

And I've got a transcript of the letter here

0:55:470:55:50

and I think it's just absolutely fantastic.

0:55:500:55:53

"Dear Mr Kay, I have this day left your book in Bloom Street

0:55:530:55:58

"and offer you my sincerest apologies for the delay.

0:55:580:56:01

"I do hope you will forgive me.

0:56:010:56:03

"Do try and forgive me, please, yours sincerely, LS Lowry."

0:56:030:56:07

And then we have,

0:56:070:56:08

"PS - I have put inside the parcel a very tiny oil sketch

0:56:080:56:14

"which I hope you will like".

0:56:140:56:15

It's interesting that we have this letter,

0:56:150:56:18

because it's dated 1955 so we can actually put a date on the painting

0:56:180:56:24

and do you know - I have seen big Lowrys, I've seen a lot recently -

0:56:240:56:30

when I look at that, if I wanted a Lowry, that is what I would like.

0:56:300:56:33

Why? We've got here a street scene in Manchester,

0:56:330:56:39

Salford with the factory buildings,

0:56:390:56:42

we've got the smoke coming out of the chimney,

0:56:420:56:45

we've got these children -

0:56:450:56:46

and I do get annoyed when people start talking about

0:56:460:56:49

"matchstick men and matchstick dogs,"

0:56:490:56:51

because, in fact, he was much more than that.

0:56:510:56:55

It was the way the flicks of paint - the legs, the boots

0:56:550:56:59

on the children walking up the street there - it's just fantastic.

0:56:590:57:04

And where are the albums, the scrapbooks?

0:57:040:57:07

The albums are now in the Lowry Centre

0:57:070:57:10

as part of the Lowry Collection.

0:57:100:57:11

They were donated after he died about ten years ago.

0:57:110:57:14

That is fantastic.

0:57:140:57:17

And did Lowry and your father have tea together or...?

0:57:170:57:19

-Well, they used to meet at parties.

-Really?

0:57:190:57:22

And my father visited Lowry's house several times.

0:57:220:57:25

So they did know each other, although not well.

0:57:250:57:27

I think he must have really liked him,

0:57:270:57:30

to give something like that, it's so personal.

0:57:300:57:33

And, you know, it's a small picture.

0:57:330:57:37

What would something like that be worth today,

0:57:370:57:39

with this information as well?

0:57:390:57:42

Well, and I'm saying this conservatively,

0:57:420:57:45

I think that that would make

0:57:450:57:47

in the region of £30,000 to £50,000 at auction.

0:57:470:57:52

Quite amazing! Not that we've any intention of getting rid of it.

0:57:520:57:55

No, but I just think it's wonderful.

0:57:550:57:58

It's everything in a big picture, in a small picture,

0:57:580:58:01

and it ticks every box, absolutely beautiful.

0:58:010:58:04

What are the chances of that?

0:58:080:58:10

One minute I'm talking about fake Lowrys with Rupert Maas

0:58:100:58:13

and the next minute, the real deal comes along!

0:58:130:58:16

Mind you, Lowry was a local lad, so maybe we could have expected it.

0:58:160:58:20

Anyway, we had a great day here at Manchester Town Hall.

0:58:200:58:23

I hope you've enjoyed it. Until next time, bye-bye.

0:58:230:58:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:480:58:52

Fiona Bruce and the team return to Manchester Town Hall where a big crowd awaits with their family treasures.

Objects appearing on camera include a magnificent painted panel found in a disused biscuit factory and a single plate with a five figure valuation, plus a small picture by LS Lowry, gifted by the artist, brings good news to the owner.


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