Wimbledon 2 Antiques Roadshow


Wimbledon 2

Fiona Bruce and the team make a return to Wimbledon's All England Tennis Club, meeting Londoners bringing their precious heirlooms for appraisal.


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Transcript


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For two weeks every year, the eyes of the world are on the championships here

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at the All England Lawn Tennis Club in South London, and even though there are no matches on today,

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we've attracted some pretty impressive crowds of our own.

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So much so, that we would like to welcome you to

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a second service of the Antiques Roadshow at Wimbledon.

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The Wimbledon Championships have become almost bigger

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than the club itself, but for most of the year,

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the All England Lawn Tennis Club is just that - a tennis club,

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famous for its distinguished sporting history

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and its love of tradition.

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So it's a rare privilege to be invited here,

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to grounds that are normally reserved for serious sportsmen and women only.

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All England Club members use these courts and club house all year round.

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And today, instead of having tea and strawberries,

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overlooking the tennis, they're getting a grandstand view

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of the cream of British antiques specialists,

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valuing items for the Roadshow.

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I know you're a member of the club here

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and you've brought along something to be valued later.

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You've also got a family tradition stretching back

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-here at Wimbledon, haven't you?

-I certainly have.

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My grandmother played at Wimbledon, and this is a picture of her.

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Look at her.

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She was one of the first ladies to serve overarm in the championships.

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-Oh, gosh! So, until then, it was all underarm.

-Yes, yes.

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-So she was a bit of a pioneer, then.

-She certainly was.

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And you've got other photographs. Who have you got there?

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This is my father. He played here for 11 years

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and my mother also played, but sadly I haven't got a picture of her.

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-Did you play?

-I played Junior Wimbledon, yes.

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Well, that's pretty good.

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And this is my son, who played here.

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-Oh, I should have guessed. Tim Henman.

-Absolutely.

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So, you're Tim Henman's mother, Jane. Look at him there.

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Well, you must have been a very -

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-and still are, I'm sure - a very proud mum.

-I am.

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And spent many agonising afternoons here at Wimbledon.

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-Lots of nail-biting.

-I bet.

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-Well, let's hope... He's got two daughters, hasn't he?

-Three.

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Three daughters.

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Let's hope they carry on in the Wimbledon tradition.

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-And I hope you have a good valuation later on.

-Thank you very much.

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Well, let's see

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if there are any more surprises awaiting our experts at the tables.

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This is a really fabulous quality case.

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I always hope, when I see something of this quality,

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there's something inside that's going to match the outside.

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Have a look inside.

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"Phew, what a stunner!" as the tabloids would say.

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That's absolutely wonderful. Do you know what it is?

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Yes, I understand that it's a coffee cup, which was presented

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to a Captain Langlands by the Pasha,

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who was the brother of the Khedive of Egypt.

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I think he reigned in Egypt around about the 1870s, 1880s -

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some time in that period, so, I guess that's what it is.

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Right, well, you've got it

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absolutely right. The name that it's normally called is a zarf

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and it's for holding Turkish coffee.

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Right.

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But they're nearly always made in one place - not Turkey,

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but in Switzerland.

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-Ah.

-And this one is absolutely fabulous, it's made in blue enamel.

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These are all real, these are diamonds.

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And do you know what it's actually made of, underneath the enamel?

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Well, I believe it's gold, but I'm not certain of that.

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It doesn't look like it, it looks more like copper, but...

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It's a coppery-coloured gold. It is gold.

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But it's got these beautiful enamel plaques on

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and absolutely laden with diamonds, and it's a really fabulous thing.

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It does have a little bit of damage on it,

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and I notice that one of the panels here has got a chip out of it.

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-Yes, right.

-So, you've got, though, a really super thing.

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And it dates from a little earlier than you say.

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-It dates from about 1830.

-Oh, right.

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And it's one of the prettiest ones I've seen in a long, long time.

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Oh, right.

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So, a gold zarf of about 1830 is quite a valuable thing.

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And I think, you know, if it was put into auction,

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you would get, comfortably, between £6,000 and £8,000.

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-Good heavens!

-Oh, wow!

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That is astonishing, I'd never have thought of that. Wow.

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-I mean, it would be even more if it wasn't for the damage.

-Really?

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-But it's an absolute little gem, I love it.

-Right.

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These, to me, are usually piano dolls, they're put on a piano

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and when someone plays the piano, they dance, so it's very unusual

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to have them in a box like this with a musical movement.

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Tell me, have you played with them yourself?

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-They originally belonged to my husband's grandmother.

-Yes.

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And...she used to play them to her grandchildren

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and visitors who came to their house.

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Eventually, they went to my mother-in-law

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and it was a treat for her grandchildren - our children,

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and other visiting children - for her to bring them out and play them.

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I think that's absolutely lovely

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because that's why they're in such good condition.

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-They haven't been allowed to be played with.

-No, definitely.

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So, it's like a Sunday toy.

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-So, they are French and they're made of papier-mache.

-Are they?

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-And they're on little tiny metal rungs, if you like.

-Yes.

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-Tiny little... almost like little pins.

-Yes.

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And they are attached to a musical movement, and it's a joy to watch.

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I particularly like the one that's on the swing at the top.

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On the swing at the top, absolutely. They date to the 1820s, so early.

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-Oh, really? As early as that?

-Very early, yes, yes.

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And absolutely enchanting.

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-I hope to bring them out for my grandchildren as a treat.

-Good.

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I suppose you don't really want to know what they're worth, do you?

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THEY LAUGH

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It's interesting, but we're not... I'm not planning to get rid of them.

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-No.

-No way.

-So, well, maybe you should insure them,

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and I think you should insure them for £2,000.

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-For 2,000, really?

-Yes, yes.

-They are lovely.

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So, shall we get them going?

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So, shall I do it? I think this is the music.

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And this is the movement.

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GENTLE TUNE PLAYS

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Well, a glorious piece of art glass, but do you know where it's from?

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No, and I suspect you're probably going to say it's from Woolworths.

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But I know where I got it from. I was given it by my husband's aunt,

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and I don't know where she got it from.

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If only it were Woolworths!

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We have to go slightly more highbrow than that,

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and actually what I'm going to do is take us back to the early part

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of the 20th century, to France, and I'm going to take us to Nancy.

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Because what we're looking at is a wonderful example

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of French Art Nouveau

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into Art Deco glass.

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Made by a great factory, made by a great maker,

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and what we're looking at is a piece of Schneider -

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Le Verre Francais.

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Oh, my mother was French, so she'd have been thrilled.

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-Oh, this is all tying in beautifully.

-Absolutely.

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But Schneider, Charles Schneider, actually learned his craft

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very early on, at the beginning of the 20th century,

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at the factory of Daum.

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But, by 1909, he had spread his wings, he had grown and established

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his own factory, but it was 1918 that was a pivotal moment for them.

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Because around Nancy there are many, many factories producing

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beautiful glass, and a name we often hear - Emile Galle.

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-Yes.

-A very famous name.

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Well, in 1918, there was a fire - a terrible fire - at Galle's factory,

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which suddenly found a whole number of workers out of employment.

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So what they did - they upped their tools

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and moved across to the Schneider factory, and it was at that point

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that Schneider started to learn some of the wonderful techniques

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in French cameo glass,

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and he literally went rocketing up the scale.

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He became such a huge force

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and developed a range that we see here, which is the Le Verre Francais.

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He was a great experimenter, and if we look at the body,

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you see all these lovely powdered colours,

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and these would have been picked up on the body of the glass

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to then be cut through to give all this wonderful texture.

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Now, this is an early one, because if we look to the underside,

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all we've got is a little cane there,

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a little signature cane that's been let into the base.

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Oh, I was looking for a signature.

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-I didn't realise the significance of that.

-There it is.

-Great.

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Now, later pieces, he did actually engrave his name -

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Schneider, Le Verre Francais,

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but this is an early piece, and it's going to be 1920-25.

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And these pieces were sold in the greatest establishments.

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Shall we just say that Les Galeries Lafayette

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is maybe a little bit smarter than Woolworths.

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LAUGHTER

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Yeah, not nowadays, not a lot, but...it used to be, yeah.

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-Well, that's where this probably would have come from.

-Right.

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So, today, it's a desired piece, it's a beautiful example,

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it's quite a famous pattern for Le Verre Francais,

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but it sums up everything that they were doing, so nicely.

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And as such, at auction,

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this would comfortably realise in excess of £800 to £1,200.

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Lovely. I'll dust it with greater care on the few occasions when I do!

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# Into each life Some rain must fall

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# But too much, too much Is fallin' in mine... #

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We have a very venerable-looking Victorian gentleman,

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we have a bracelet and we have a lady. What's the connection

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and, more importantly, what's the connection to you?

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With me, well, the pictures were given to me by an old family friend,

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and the gentleman was his great grandfather -

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Senator of Minnesota, Morton Smith Wilkinson and his wife, Sarah.

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So, what sort of time period are we talking about?

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-Mid-Victorian, late-Victorian?

-Yes, 1860s.

-1860s.

-Yeah.

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What do you know about him?

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Well, he was the first senator of Minnesota

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and he was responsible for the criminal code,

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which I think was 1858,

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and these two pictures were painted

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when they were invited to Lincoln's inaugural ball.

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-So, he was a major player at that particular time.

-Yes.

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He would have been a close confidant, friend

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and political colleague of Lincoln.

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-And his wife - we don't know a great deal more about her.

-Sarah.

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-Sarah.

-No.

-So this is... Right.

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-There's a slight suggestion there.

-Yes, there is a slight suggestion

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and that is a bracelet that he bought her...

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-Right.

-..to wear at Lincoln's inaugural ball. And this is it.

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So, this is the bracelet that would have been worn at this time,

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so from a perspective of the American history...

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-Yes.

-..it's really rather significant, isn't it?

-It's really very special.

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-Yes, it is.

-OK. Let me talk to you about the bracelet.

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It is a gold mesh - very, very fine mesh.

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-It has a centre piece set with a line of five natural pearls.

-Yes.

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It's in a gold scallop-style frame.

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It has black enamel sort of highlights on the frame.

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-I hadn't noticed that.

-And we have... Did you see that little black edging there?

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-I can see now, yes, indeed, yes.

-You know the feature of this.

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-They expand.

-Yes.

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They're flexible, they're on slide pieces

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and we have a name for jewellery like that, it's called Milanese pattern.

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-Milanese.

-And it's typical of the mid-19th century.

-Yes.

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Now, on the down side, the condition is very, very worn.

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Do you wear it?

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-I do. Yes.

-The problem with Milanese is that it often deteriorates.

-Right.

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-And you've got the beginnings of little bits of defect...

-Yes.

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..to the edges of the bracelet.

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If a bracelet like this were to be put into auction,

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without the provenance that it's got, then the value of it

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would, frankly, not be that dramatic.

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-Why? Because it's damaged.

-Right.

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Because of the fact that the style is very sturdy and Victorian,

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and there is another feature.

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-Can you see here at the end of the box?

-Yes.

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There's a gap, there's a space.

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I think the reason is that originally there would have been a fringe.

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-Yes, I understood that.

-And the fringe has gone.

-Yes.

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-So, it's less than perfect because of that.

-Yeah.

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-But then you run into the fact of provenance.

-Yeah.

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-In the AMERICAN market...

-Yes.

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..oh, my goodness me,

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anything connected with Lincoln, the particular time,

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with the man who made laws in Minnesota - going back to that time.

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-Yeah.

-In this country, this bracelet's worth £1,500 to £2,000.

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-Right.

-In America, how much shall we say?

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I have no idea.

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-£7,500 to £10,000.

-Really? Wow!

-Or more.

-That is unbelievable.

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-Because over there, you're buying a national treasure.

-Gosh.

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Wow!

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Sicilian cart panels - I've never seen so many.

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-There are 14 of them.

-14?

-14.

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-Well, these are very close to my heart, these things.

-Why?

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Well, I'll tell you, once you've told me

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how they came to be in your possession.

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I found them in my attic.

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They were just floorboards in the attic,

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they were turned upside down, and I could see holes in the side,

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and I just went up to one of the sides, saw that it was carved,

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turned it over and I saw these painted panels.

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So, how long had they been in your attic before you discovered them?

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-Well, we bought the house in 1986.

-Yeah.

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But the house was built in the 1930s.

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No idea where these panels came from.

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Amazing. So, you don't know how they arrived there

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-and you don't know the history of the house?

-No clue, no clue.

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Why I said, "Wow!"

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is I've never seen so many, and why they're close to my heart

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is because one of the first things I ever bought as an antique dealer

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was a Sicilian cart panel, and I kept it for years.

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-Just one?

-Just one.

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I've never seen this number! I mean, it's extraordinary.

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They're 19th century, these panels, late-19th century, I would think,

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and they're depicting scenes from the history of Sicily

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and were painted by local artisans in a sort of naive kind of way.

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You know, they're always painted in these very bright colours

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and originally they were painted so that illiterate people

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could know the history that shaped the island they lived on.

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So, they would be confronted daily with these carts passing to and fro,

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with historic events on them, and they're amazing, and what a story.

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-Do you know how much these things are worth?

-No clue.

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They're plentiful, I must be honest.

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Well, a small piece is £50, £60, £70,

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so, panels of this size...

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I mean...

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£200 - £300 each.

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-Each?

-Times 14.

-£4,200.

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I can't do the maths. Oh, you've just done it.

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Very expensive floorboards.

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Well, with the London Olympics being so much in the news,

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it seems entirely appropriate that you've brought along this

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wonderful print of the Olympic champions

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the first time the Games

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were held in London in 1908.

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-And it was in the White City, wasn't it?

-It was in the White City, yes.

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Yes, and if we look at this print, we can see all the Olympic champions

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and one or two sports that we don't have these days,

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such as the tug-of-war, and here you have tandem cyclists.

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I don't think we have tandems any more these days,

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do we, in the velodrome? And look at this, terrific -

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a man hurling himself horizontally over the pole vault.

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And all the champions displayed, and I believe you're related to one of these people in the photograph.

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Yes, the gentleman here with the megaphone

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was my great-grandfather, William Knight Smith, and it was his job

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to report on what was going on, and to give the results as well.

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Of course, no PA system in those days.

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-No, no PA system, no.

-No, no.

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And here we have the same megaphone that is featured in this print.

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-The very one.

-Gosh! So, that's come down through the family.

-It has.

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And also, you've brought along something quite incredible -

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a gold medal won at these Olympics.

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Yes.

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And if we have a look at it here, in its original leather case -

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"Olympic Games Winner five miles run, London 1908".

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Five miles - they don't do that any more cos it's in metres

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and I suppose five miles is about between 5,000 and 10,000 metres,

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-isn't it? I think.

-Yeah.

-That sort of distance.

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And there we have inside, the gold medal. Made of nine-carat gold.

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On this side, you can see a picture of St George and the dragon,

0:18:240:18:29

and if we turn it over, on the other side we have an athlete

0:18:290:18:35

being crowned with a wreath of laurel leaves by two maidens.

0:18:350:18:39

-And who won it?

-It was won by this man called Voigt...

0:18:390:18:43

-Here we are, number 29, yes.

-..who was British.

-Glad to hear it.

0:18:430:18:48

His parents were emigrated from Germany and he lived in Manchester.

0:18:480:18:52

So, how did the medal come here today?

0:18:520:18:55

It's owned by a friend of mine and he asked me if I'd like to bring it.

0:18:550:19:00

Well, I'm delighted that he did.

0:19:000:19:01

Well, Olympic memorabilia is enormously sought-after

0:19:010:19:05

and there are a lot of collectors and to see these three pieces together are absolutely wonderful.

0:19:050:19:10

Now, I think the print - because it's so unusual, that print -

0:19:100:19:15

and not many examples of its type come up,

0:19:150:19:17

it would probably fetch £400 or £500 at auction.

0:19:170:19:20

Brilliant.

0:19:200:19:22

Yes. The megaphone, well, that's something entirely different.

0:19:220:19:26

It's wonderful, and I believe you've got its original cane case, as well.

0:19:260:19:29

-Yes, I have, yes, yes.

-If it did come up at auction,

0:19:290:19:32

-I could see that fetching £1,500 - £2,000.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:19:320:19:36

And then, of course,

0:19:360:19:37

we come to the gold medal that belongs to your friend.

0:19:370:19:41

Olympic gold medals do not often appear on the market

0:19:410:19:44

and there are a lot of collectors.

0:19:440:19:46

I suspect if that came up at auction, it would probably fetch

0:19:460:19:49

somewhere between £6,000 and £8,000,

0:19:490:19:51

and on a good day might even make £10,000.

0:19:510:19:55

Absolutely terrific.

0:19:550:19:57

Three carriage clocks.

0:20:040:20:06

Lots of us have carriage clocks - maybe you've got one at home -

0:20:060:20:10

but I bet you haven't got one quite as expensive as one of these.

0:20:100:20:14

You know how this works by now - this week, our expert, Ben Wright,

0:20:140:20:17

has brought these three carriage clocks along.

0:20:170:20:19

The basic one is worth about £1,500.

0:20:190:20:23

The better one, worth £3,000.

0:20:230:20:26

The best - £30,000.

0:20:260:20:29

Now, I'm going to ask our visitors what they think,

0:20:290:20:31

but I also thought I'd put some of our experts to the test to see if they know their onions.

0:20:310:20:35

I've got no idea about carriage clocks.

0:20:370:20:39

-That's why I've asked you.

-That's why you've asked me!

0:20:390:20:42

-So one of these clocks is worth 30,000?

-Yes, so be very careful.

-OK.

0:20:420:20:46

Now, it's all about movement - watches usually is about movements.

0:20:460:20:49

Here we have father and son, Philip Mould, our art expert of course,

0:20:490:20:53

-and Oliver.

-That's right.

-Welcome to the Roadshow.

0:20:530:20:55

Come on, then, put your money where your mouth is.

0:20:550:20:57

-All right, I think I'm going to go for this one.

-OK.

0:20:570:21:00

I'm going go to better and then I'm going to go to best.

0:21:000:21:03

-And why do you think this is the best one?

-Because it's the simplest.

0:21:030:21:07

I think that the most expensive is the one on the right here.

0:21:070:21:12

I think a close second is this one over here

0:21:120:21:15

and the least expensive - which, curiously, I like the most.

0:21:150:21:19

Is the most elaborate and beautiful. Basic? Right.

0:21:190:21:22

-That, I think, is too obvious to be the best one, that's the basic.

-OK.

0:21:220:21:27

That one has two buttons to the top. Yes - basic, better, best.

0:21:270:21:35

I reckon the best is probably this one

0:21:350:21:38

-and probably the medium expensive.

-The better one.

-Better one, yes, I reckon probably that one.

0:21:380:21:42

-This is the basic?

-That's the complete opposite of me.

0:21:420:21:46

Yeah, 'fraid so.

0:21:460:21:48

And if I'm really, really wrong, please can I come back and have me job next year?

0:21:480:21:52

No.

0:21:530:21:54

You are, of course, well known here at Wimbledon

0:21:580:22:01

and I gather you've already been speaking with Fiona.

0:22:010:22:03

And what you've brought me is not tennis related,

0:22:030:22:07

it's a wonderful fruit service. Tell me about it.

0:22:070:22:10

Well, it was left me by my grandmother's cousin.

0:22:100:22:15

I admired it as a child, and she left it to me

0:22:150:22:18

and I really would love to know a little about it.

0:22:180:22:20

Yes, it does look so splendid when you set out a full dessert service

0:22:200:22:25

like this, as every grand Victorian home did.

0:22:250:22:28

They tended to vie with themselves to get the best

0:22:280:22:31

and most impressive set

0:22:310:22:32

to show off to their guests, and I think in this case,

0:22:320:22:35

your family did extremely well in choosing

0:22:350:22:39

something that sums up everything about Victorian taste.

0:22:390:22:41

What do you think of the design?

0:22:410:22:43

Oh, I love it. I've always had a soft spot for butterflies

0:22:430:22:46

and every one's different, and they even have butterflies on the back.

0:22:460:22:51

-Oh, it's right underneath there, as well, isn't it?

-So, I just love it.

0:22:510:22:55

These are three great Victorian obsessions

0:22:550:22:58

here, on a plate,

0:22:580:23:00

with the collecting of butterflies was such a popular pastime

0:23:000:23:03

and these are real specimens

0:23:030:23:05

and I suppose the painter at Royal Worcester who made this set

0:23:050:23:08

has just copied a collection of butterflies

0:23:080:23:10

to make them look as real as possible,

0:23:100:23:12

and they do look real on these plates, don't they?

0:23:120:23:16

But also, you've got the other Victorian love of ferns,

0:23:160:23:19

ferns and grasses.

0:23:190:23:21

Do you remember they used to stick specimens of ferns

0:23:210:23:24

and plants into albums

0:23:240:23:25

and it was a great fad to collect nature from the fields around.

0:23:250:23:29

And here, the painters at Worcester

0:23:290:23:31

have put a different flower on each piece.

0:23:310:23:34

What a background, isn't it?

0:23:340:23:36

With these little symbols. They're not tennis balls, are they?

0:23:360:23:41

These are Japanese symbols, little emblems.

0:23:410:23:44

They're family mons, crests, badges from ancient Japan.

0:23:440:23:48

And in 1876, when this was made, that was the taste of the time.

0:23:480:23:54

Not only are all the butterflies different, they're all superbly painted.

0:23:540:23:58

They might be by James Sheriff,

0:23:580:24:00

he was perhaps the best butterfly painter of Royal Worcester then, in the 1870s.

0:24:000:24:03

Do you have it on display?

0:24:030:24:05

No, sadly, it's been in the attic for many years, wrapped up safely,

0:24:050:24:09

but, having got it out for this event,

0:24:090:24:11

I've fallen in love with it again,

0:24:110:24:12

and I'm going to try and find somewhere

0:24:120:24:15

where I can display it at home.

0:24:150:24:16

It deserves to be seen, doesn't it?

0:24:160:24:19

I mean, you daren't use it because the painting is too delicate.

0:24:190:24:22

I mean, a typical full Victorian set were 12 plates,

0:24:220:24:25

with six of the comports or cake stands.

0:24:250:24:28

But to show off the impact of the whole design together,

0:24:280:24:32

you couldn't imagine a better site

0:24:320:24:34

and it's not inconsiderable value too.

0:24:340:24:37

-I suppose a set like this is today £3,000.

-Really? Thank you.

0:24:370:24:42

What an impact it makes.

0:24:420:24:45

From what I understand, your great-grandfather,

0:24:460:24:50

in the world of magic and illusion, was someone quite special.

0:24:500:24:55

-Can you just tell me a bit about him?

-Yes, sure.

0:24:550:24:58

From an early age, I think he realised that he could

0:24:580:25:02

entertain people by using magic and illusions.

0:25:020:25:05

And, after a career in the navy, he started, in the 1860s,

0:25:050:25:13

to perform illusions and magic generally, as a living.

0:25:130:25:17

Right.

0:25:170:25:18

He travelled all over the world,

0:25:180:25:20

so he was a globetrotter in the 19th century.

0:25:200:25:24

And when he was in America,

0:25:240:25:26

somebody came to one of his shows

0:25:260:25:29

and was inspired.

0:25:290:25:31

-Absolutely right, yes. He was doing a show in Milwaukee...

-Right.

0:25:310:25:37

..where one of the illusions was that he seemed to

0:25:370:25:40

cut a man into small pieces and then put him together again.

0:25:400:25:44

Right.

0:25:440:25:45

And in the audience was a young lad of five years old,

0:25:450:25:49

who later became Houdini.

0:25:490:25:52

And this young boy was found by his parents at the end of the show,

0:25:520:25:56

on the stage, at the foot of my great-grandfather...

0:25:560:26:01

Right.

0:26:010:26:02

..who was producing eggs out of his mouth, and fascinating the young boy.

0:26:020:26:07

And it's sort of in the family, isn't it?

0:26:070:26:10

Not only was your great-grandfather an illusionist

0:26:100:26:13

but also his son was then someone special.

0:26:130:26:16

-Yes, he was an illusionist, as well...

-OK.

0:26:160:26:19

..who also performed under the title of Dr Lynn.

0:26:190:26:23

-You see here, we've got my grandfather with Houdini.

-Right.

0:26:230:26:27

And this is the calling card that Houdini produced,

0:26:270:26:30

"Harry Handcuffs Houdini", when he visited my grandfather in the UK.

0:26:300:26:37

-In 1914, it's dated.

-In 1914.

-Right.

-That's right.

0:26:370:26:41

But I suppose that my grandfather never hit the dizzy heights

0:26:410:26:45

of my great-grandfather...

0:26:450:26:48

-Yes.

-..who, for example, performed for people like Victor Hugo.

0:26:480:26:51

Absolutely. We've got a little translation,

0:26:510:26:54

a transcript of everything that he says - he's absolutely gushing

0:26:540:26:57

with enthusiasm about how wonderful he is at performing

0:26:570:27:01

and, you know, wants him to come again and do other tricks as well,

0:27:010:27:05

-doesn't he?

-Yes.

0:27:050:27:06

It is a fantastic sort of archive of material you've got here,

0:27:060:27:10

you know, the fact that he inspired Houdini,

0:27:100:27:13

the greatest illusionist that one can think of.

0:27:130:27:16

I think if you add up the whole lot - you showed me some other material that you have.

0:27:160:27:21

-Yes.

-Letters from your grandfather to Houdini.

-To Houdini.

0:27:210:27:23

I think you're looking at a collection that could easily

0:27:230:27:27

-be worth £10,000.

-Really?

0:27:270:27:28

Absolutely, it's a really, really staggering collection of material.

0:27:280:27:33

Well, that's interesting, because I wouldn't have thought

0:27:330:27:35

it would have amounted to as much as that.

0:27:350:27:38

Ben Wright, you set us

0:27:410:27:42

a fiendish task with these three carriage clocks.

0:27:420:27:45

One is basic, worth £1,500.

0:27:450:27:48

The better one is worth £3,000 and the best one - a whopping £30,000.

0:27:480:27:53

Now, I asked our visitors, I also asked some of our experts,

0:27:530:27:57

-all of whom came to different conclusions.

-Excellent.

0:27:570:27:59

The one conclusion we all came to is, none of us really knew what we were looking for.

0:27:590:28:03

So, where should we start?

0:28:030:28:04

This is a battle of the French against the English, essentially.

0:28:040:28:09

All three carriage clocks signed by the same maker - Charles Frodsham.

0:28:090:28:13

-Yes, that didn't help at all.

-No, it doesn't, does it? I'm really sorry about that.

0:28:130:28:17

I often come across carriage clocks on the Roadshow

0:28:170:28:20

that are signed by an English maker, sometimes a jeweller/retailer, that are, in fact, French.

0:28:200:28:24

-And why does that matter?

-That's a very good question.

0:28:240:28:27

The French made around - between 1850 and 1900 -

0:28:270:28:30

about 50,000 carriage clocks a year.

0:28:300:28:33

The English made about 20 a year.

0:28:330:28:36

The English carriage clocks were made by two or three main English carriage clockmakers,

0:28:360:28:41

and they were predominantly precision clockmakers.

0:28:410:28:44

They made marine chronometers and precision clocks for observatories.

0:28:440:28:47

And Charles Frodsham was the foremost amongst them, but he also retailed

0:28:470:28:52

French carriage clocks because he saw a market for more decorative ones.

0:28:520:28:56

What, he bought clocks from France and sold them under his own name?

0:28:560:29:00

Yes.

0:29:000:29:01

As did a myriad of English clockmakers and English jewellers.

0:29:010:29:05

OK, so, it's French versus English. So, which is the more valuable then?

0:29:050:29:08

The English is the rarer, and the English is the more valuable,

0:29:080:29:11

but the problem we've got is, all of them are signed Charles Frodsham.

0:29:110:29:14

So the question is - which one's English?

0:29:140:29:16

So, the closest to you - French.

0:29:160:29:20

This one - French.

0:29:200:29:22

This is your English one - signed on the dial, "London".

0:29:220:29:26

These two are signed "Charles Frodsham, Paris" actually.

0:29:260:29:30

-You may have missed that.

-I did.

-Yeah.

0:29:300:29:32

-And is that all... That's it?

-That's not quite all there is to it, no.

-Right. OK.

0:29:320:29:35

This looks as though it's going to be the better one,

0:29:350:29:38

-because it's an engraved case.

-I thought it was originally, yes.

0:29:380:29:41

It looks the part, beautifully engraved, but the movement's relatively simple,

0:29:410:29:44

it has a plain spring barrel on either side, one to tell the time,

0:29:440:29:48

one to strike the hours. It's very simple. If this didn't have the porcelain panels,

0:29:480:29:52

you'd see inside, the movement exactly the same. On this one, we've got lovely porcelain panels.

0:29:520:29:56

-These are lovely, absolutely beautiful.

-Aren't they beautiful?

-Mm.

-And so this is a cut above.

0:29:560:30:01

This, on the other hand, is your English carriage clock with extreme complexity inside.

0:30:010:30:07

You've got this slightly strange conical-shaped wheel,

0:30:070:30:10

and that's called the fusee. Only English carriage clocks used fusees,

0:30:100:30:14

and then it has two repeat buttons, which is most unusual, even for Frodsham -

0:30:140:30:17

I think it's a one-off. When you press this one, it strikes the hours,

0:30:170:30:21

and when you press this one, it repeats the quarter hours back to you.

0:30:210:30:25

It's an anomaly - I've no idea why.

0:30:250:30:27

The other thing is that this case is beautiful and refined. If you're a carriage clock collector,

0:30:270:30:33

this is the ultimate English carriage clock.

0:30:330:30:36

Hang on a minute. I thought this was basic,

0:30:360:30:38

this was better and this was best, just because it's so beautiful.

0:30:380:30:42

-Right.

-But in actual fact... I've got it completely wrong.

0:30:420:30:46

-So, this is basic.

-That's the basic.

0:30:460:30:48

This is better - these are the two French ones.

0:30:480:30:51

-Absolutely right.

-And the best...

-Is the plainest of all.

0:30:510:30:54

-..is the plainest.

-Sorry, bit of a swine, that one.

-And £30,000.

0:30:540:30:57

-£30,000.

-Why such a high figure?

0:30:570:31:00

It's cheap at £30,000.

0:31:000:31:01

In my opinion, it's worth £30,000 to £40,000

0:31:010:31:04

and it might even make £50,000 at auction for all the complexity,

0:31:040:31:07

the size, the maker's name, quality of the movement, everything about it.

0:31:070:31:10

-It's delightful.

-And I thought it was basic. What do I know?

0:31:100:31:14

At least you might have some tips if you have a carriage clock at home, you know what to look for now.

0:31:140:31:18

Or if you want to bring one along to the Roadshow -

0:31:180:31:20

to Ben or to our other clock experts - have a look at our locations -

0:31:200:31:23

you can check out where we're going to be coming to, on our website.

0:31:230:31:26

Vibrant, bold, colourful, modern.

0:31:380:31:41

You've brought in three fabulous lino cuts

0:31:410:31:44

which must be from the Grosvenor School of Art.

0:31:440:31:48

Yes, we think so, but we're not sure, because my elderly maiden aunt -

0:31:480:31:54

who lived in a very remote part of North Norfolk -

0:31:540:31:58

whose only interests were, as far as we knew as a family,

0:31:580:32:01

cats and ornithology.

0:32:010:32:03

And it wasn't until she died that we knew that she had this vibrant past.

0:32:030:32:08

-Absolutely.

-She didn't want us to know about it.

0:32:080:32:13

Well, I see one's signed U Fookes - that must be Ursula Fookes.

0:32:130:32:18

Yes, yes.

0:32:180:32:19

And, of course, she did go to the Grosvenor School of Art and studied

0:32:190:32:22

under Claude Flight in the late 1920s

0:32:220:32:25

and these are very rare lino cuts.

0:32:250:32:29

Have you got a whole group of them?

0:32:290:32:31

Well, I'll tell you how we came to have them,

0:32:310:32:34

because she didn't actually leave them to us.

0:32:340:32:36

What happened was that we were phoned by the auctioneer,

0:32:360:32:40

in Melton Constable - near where she lived -

0:32:400:32:42

to say, A, that she'd died, and B, were we interested in anything

0:32:420:32:46

that was coming up in a forthcoming auction.

0:32:460:32:50

And we said, "Well, if we let you have a ceiling of £200 to spend,

0:32:500:32:55

"could you please get some memorabilia,"

0:32:550:32:58

so we could remember her, really, because we did like her very much.

0:32:580:33:02

And then about a month later in the post, came a bundle.

0:33:020:33:07

And in the bundle was a range of these lino cuts

0:33:070:33:11

and we suddenly realised that she had this very creative side.

0:33:110:33:16

What an interesting life.

0:33:160:33:18

The Grosvenor School lasted till about 1939,

0:33:180:33:21

and in the last great show of these modern prints at Birmingham,

0:33:210:33:25

she was represented. Claude Flight asked her to give him a few pictures

0:33:250:33:30

for that show, so he obviously rated her.

0:33:300:33:32

And it's rare to see her work, actually,

0:33:320:33:36

at auction - she's not that well represented

0:33:360:33:38

and I think, from 1939 onwards, she moved into other things.

0:33:380:33:42

She moved away from her artist work.

0:33:420:33:44

But, you know, this liner is kind of carving

0:33:440:33:46

right the way through the water.

0:33:460:33:49

It's a great, powerful design, simple in its colour

0:33:490:33:53

but particularly powerful. And then the figures with their umbrellas,

0:33:530:33:56

you feel they're really fighting against the wind...

0:33:560:33:59

-Yes.

-..and the rain, but what I particularly like - and my favourite - is the rugby players,

0:33:590:34:03

this great piece of colour and design beneath,

0:34:030:34:06

and the figures look very futuristic, almost machine-like.

0:34:060:34:10

These are very rare lino cuts, very strong,

0:34:100:34:13

and very sought-after in the present market.

0:34:130:34:16

The one at the top is signed and it's numbered "6 out of 50"

0:34:160:34:20

which means an edition, 6 out of 50.

0:34:200:34:23

That's worth at least £1,000 to £1,500 at auction.

0:34:230:34:26

Wow. Wow.

0:34:260:34:29

The umbrellas beneath is not signed and numbered

0:34:290:34:32

but still it's a great, great design, that,

0:34:320:34:34

and I think it's worth just as much as the other one - at least £1,000 to £1,500.

0:34:340:34:39

The rugby players - my favourite - I think that's really quite special

0:34:390:34:43

and I think that could make at least £1,500 to £2,500.

0:34:430:34:47

So, collectively, your folio is going to be worth many thousands of pounds.

0:34:480:34:55

Right...

0:34:550:34:56

What a...

0:34:560:34:57

LAUGHTER

0:34:570:34:59

What an amazing aunt!

0:34:590:35:01

What an amazing aunt.

0:35:010:35:03

So, I'm looking at a late-18th century Bohemian beaker.

0:35:050:35:08

It's a classic form, there's no question.

0:35:080:35:12

But this is a version with a difference,

0:35:120:35:15

because there's a wonderful Catholic bishop's armorial on here

0:35:150:35:20

and you know all about it, don't you?

0:35:200:35:23

It was in the household of Pope Pius VII

0:35:230:35:27

and the reason I know that

0:35:270:35:29

is because my grandma - who gave it to me -

0:35:290:35:33

went to the V&A 40 years ago

0:35:330:35:35

to see an expert, see, what is this?

0:35:350:35:37

-And they wrote her a letter, so, do you want to...

-OK.

0:35:370:35:42

So, it's from a keeper of the library at the V&A and he's saying,

0:35:420:35:46

"I've now identified the coats of arms engraved and painted onto

0:35:460:35:50

"the glasses belonging to Gregorio Barbara Chiaromonti,

0:35:500:35:53

"successively Bishop of Tivoli and Bishop of Imola,

0:35:530:35:56

"then Pope Pius VII, 1800-1823".

0:35:560:36:00

So, that fits in with the date.

0:36:000:36:02

So, this belonged to Pope Pius VII

0:36:020:36:07

and there's a great story about Pope Pius, isn't there?

0:36:070:36:10

Well, he's well known for the coronation of Napoleon,

0:36:100:36:15

because there was controversy over

0:36:150:36:17

the fact that the Pope was supposed to put the crown on his head.

0:36:170:36:20

Napoleon took the crown, put it on his head.

0:36:200:36:23

And what an explosive story that is.

0:36:230:36:26

Here is the crown heading towards him, and he grabs it out of the Pope's hands.

0:36:260:36:31

And whacks onto his own head, usurping the power of the church,

0:36:310:36:35

asserting the power of the state over the church.

0:36:350:36:38

And here you have a little artefact that tumbles out of history to us,

0:36:380:36:42

and ends up in our hands today - it's brilliant.

0:36:420:36:45

Where did it come from? I mean, was this...?

0:36:450:36:47

So, my grandmother got it in a junk shop 40 years ago,

0:36:470:36:51

and gave it to me, so...

0:36:510:36:54

-How fab is that?

-Yeah.

-This all holds water.

0:36:540:36:57

-This seems to me to be right.

-Yes.

0:36:570:36:59

And that's great documentary evidence,

0:36:590:37:01

because you can have a coat of arms which means absolutely nothing.

0:37:010:37:04

-Yes.

-Or you have a coat of arms that means a lot.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:37:040:37:08

-So... And that's value adjusting.

-Yeah.

0:37:080:37:12

Because if you have an enamelled armorial on a glass of this date,

0:37:120:37:18

that just came without the story...

0:37:180:37:21

-Yes.

-..then you're £250 to £300.

-Right.

0:37:210:37:25

But you add the story,

0:37:250:37:28

-and you triple the value...

-Right.

0:37:280:37:31

..turning your £200-£300 glass into one that,

0:37:310:37:34

if it were to sell for less than £1,000, I'd eat a bishop's hat.

0:37:340:37:39

SHE LAUGHS Thank you very much.

0:37:390:37:42

Well, I hope most people looking at this portrait,

0:37:440:37:47

would recognise it as being Admiral Lord Nelson

0:37:470:37:51

and I see from looking at the labels near to

0:37:510:37:55

the other little objects you've brought along as well,

0:37:550:37:57

that they're also supposed to be related to Nelson.

0:37:570:38:00

-So, are you a descendant of Nelson's?

-No, I'm not a descendant.

0:38:000:38:04

I work at the Royal Hospital School in Suffolk,

0:38:040:38:08

which is a school that was founded in 1712.

0:38:080:38:12

And how does Nelson relate to the school?

0:38:120:38:15

Nelson actually served on the school's committee

0:38:150:38:18

from 1801 to 1805 and was essentially a governor of the school.

0:38:180:38:23

And all these things, have they been donated to the school?

0:38:230:38:26

Well, we believe so.

0:38:260:38:28

Certainly, the dirk there at the back,

0:38:280:38:33

that was donated, by Vice Admiral Parry, to the school in 1948.

0:38:330:38:38

Well, looking at the piece itself, it certainly is of the period of Nelson.

0:38:380:38:42

This is a naval dirk that would have been carried by...

0:38:420:38:45

perhaps a junior officer, I have to say, at the time.

0:38:450:38:48

But let's look at some of the other objects you've brought in, as well.

0:38:480:38:52

You've brought in a little tiny heart-shaped pendant

0:38:520:38:56

with a letter "N".

0:38:560:38:58

Now, I guess that N is supposed to represent Nelson, is it?

0:38:580:39:01

On the documentation we've got,

0:39:010:39:03

it's referred to as a jewel that Nelson gave to Lady Hamilton.

0:39:030:39:08

And this watch movement - we haven't got the whole watch,

0:39:080:39:11

the watch case isn't here - but if you look on the movement,

0:39:110:39:15

it says,

0:39:150:39:16

"Admiral Nelson, Lord of the Nile, August 1798".

0:39:160:39:22

Now, that, of course, commemorates the Battle of the Nile.

0:39:220:39:26

But just looking further, we've got a pair of little shoe buckles

0:39:260:39:30

and a magnifying glass.

0:39:300:39:31

-Yes.

-Let's actually take a closer look at one or two of these items.

0:39:310:39:36

Looking firstly at the little heart-shaped pendant,

0:39:360:39:39

the capital letter N is very much a block capital.

0:39:390:39:44

Now, that wasn't the sort of style of N - style of letter -

0:39:440:39:49

that was used around 1800-1805,

0:39:490:39:52

it wasn't that style.

0:39:520:39:54

And, in fact, I can date that to about 1870,

0:39:540:39:59

so that could not possibly have been given to Emma Hamilton, I'm afraid.

0:39:590:40:04

-What a shame.

-I know, it is!

0:40:040:40:06

Looking at the watch,

0:40:060:40:09

it's absolutely of that period,

0:40:090:40:12

so the watch, there is a possibility that could be genuine.

0:40:120:40:15

Move on to the shoe buckles - rather than being shoe buckles,

0:40:150:40:18

which is what the label says - I think are breeches buckles,

0:40:180:40:22

which went around the bottom of the leg of the breeches.

0:40:220:40:26

-Right, just here, then?

-Yeah, exactly, just there.

0:40:260:40:30

Certainly, these could date to that period.

0:40:300:40:33

Looking at the eyeglass, there are quite a number of eyeglasses

0:40:330:40:37

in collections all over the world,

0:40:370:40:39

all purporting to have been used by Nelson, and in fact he did have

0:40:390:40:43

quite bad eyesight in his remaining eye, so he did use an eyeglass.

0:40:430:40:47

But the difficulty is in the provenance,

0:40:470:40:51

and unless it can be proved absolutely,

0:40:510:40:55

-to go back from present day...

-Yeah.

-..right back to Nelson,

0:40:550:41:00

then it's impossible to prove that the item is absolutely genuine.

0:41:000:41:04

However, looking at values,

0:41:040:41:06

the dirk is going to be worth

0:41:060:41:09

£200 to £300 in that condition.

0:41:090:41:11

If it can be proven that it belonged to Nelson,

0:41:110:41:15

that could be worth £20,000 to £30,000.

0:41:150:41:19

The heart-shaped pendant, we know,

0:41:190:41:21

could not possibly have been given to Emma Hamilton by Nelson.

0:41:210:41:26

And that's worth £100.

0:41:260:41:28

Looking at the eyeglass,

0:41:280:41:30

and the buckles, £40. £50, perhaps.

0:41:300:41:34

Looking at the watch, now...

0:41:340:41:37

again, if that can be proved,

0:41:370:41:38

that takes the value from a few hundred pounds, which it's worth

0:41:380:41:41

without any provenance,

0:41:410:41:43

to £30,000-£40,000,

0:41:430:41:45

if that can be proved that it belonged to Nelson.

0:41:450:41:49

-But you can't prove it!

-We need to get up in the attic.

-And that's the tragedy.

0:41:490:41:53

Anyway, look, let's go to the value of the picture now.

0:41:530:41:57

This is a wonderful portrait of Nelson. But I can't value it.

0:41:570:42:03

But I know a man who can.

0:42:030:42:05

Philip Mould is one of our picture experts here today and he happens

0:42:050:42:10

to be a specialist in portraits, so I think we should show that to him.

0:42:100:42:14

Thank you very much indeed.

0:42:140:42:15

Do you know, I rarely get to write a cheque these days.

0:42:170:42:20

-The cheque is a dying kind of entity, isn't it?

-Absolutely, yes.

0:42:200:42:23

But, had I had £7,350 in 1969,

0:42:230:42:28

I would have been writing a pretty meaty cheque.

0:42:280:42:31

Now, let's look at the signature,

0:42:310:42:33

because that kind of says why it's for such a lot of money.

0:42:330:42:36

-It's signed "George Harrison", one of The Beatles.

-Absolutely, yes.

0:42:360:42:41

Why have you got one of George Harrison's cancelled cheques?

0:42:410:42:45

Well, we were a small family business specialising in high-performance sports cars

0:42:450:42:51

and quite a lot of celebrities came in to buy cars from us,

0:42:510:42:54

even though we were a small company. George Harrison came in one day

0:42:540:42:58

and he wanted to buy two Jensen Interceptors -

0:42:580:43:01

I'm not quite sure why he wanted two -

0:43:010:43:04

and, at some stage, he must have changed his mind.

0:43:040:43:07

And I think it might have been because, at that time,

0:43:070:43:09

we were selling De Tomaso sports cars

0:43:090:43:11

and I do believe that he bought one of those instead.

0:43:110:43:14

He went for the Italian option, obviously. It's a bit of a shame.

0:43:140:43:17

But maybe... Was that twice the price? I don't know.

0:43:170:43:19

-I think it probably was, yes.

-Yeah, what a fascinating little story.

0:43:190:43:23

-So, obviously the cheque was cancelled.

-It was.

0:43:230:43:26

-I presume he wrote a new cheque...

-He did.

-..for the De Tomaso.

0:43:260:43:29

It's a really, very interesting little collectable item

0:43:290:43:32

and how did it survive?

0:43:320:43:34

-Was it a conscious decision that was made?

-Not at all, no.

0:43:340:43:38

In fact, it was just among my papers,

0:43:380:43:40

because I was also company secretary, and I lost it.

0:43:400:43:44

I remembered seeing it, and I lost it, and three days ago

0:43:440:43:47

my son was clearing out his bedroom -

0:43:470:43:49

which is very unusual - and he found it.

0:43:490:43:51

I thought, "Well, I'll pop it along and show it to someone

0:43:510:43:54

-"at the Antiques Roadshow."

-Well, that's very fortunate because - and very fortunate that you found it -

0:43:540:43:58

for the simple reason that it's actually worth £1,000.

0:43:580:44:01

-Wow, that's amazing for a piece of paper.

-For a cancelled cheque.

-Yes.

0:44:010:44:05

Yes, but, of course, it has a great little history, it's George Harrison.

0:44:050:44:10

I just think it's a fabulous little object with a great family history.

0:44:100:44:14

-Thank you very much.

-My pleasure.

0:44:140:44:15

I know you've been talking to Graham Lay

0:44:170:44:18

and I gather you've had some rather sort of bad news,

0:44:180:44:21

that your Nelson items are not perhaps exactly what you hoped for.

0:44:210:44:25

Well, I'm going to be working very hard on the provenance

0:44:250:44:28

over the next few months, so I live in hope.

0:44:280:44:30

Right. And head boy and head girl, am I right in thinking?

0:44:300:44:32

-How do you feel about that?

-Bit disappointing that we can't prove it.

0:44:320:44:36

Yeah, I bet. He was - after all, you know -

0:44:360:44:38

the greatest figure associated with your school. But let's go to the face, the body, the portrait.

0:44:380:44:43

The delight about dealing with a painting, or, in this case,

0:44:430:44:47

a drawing, is you can work out if it does have the characteristics

0:44:470:44:50

of an artist who was associated with the great man, in this case, Nelson.

0:44:500:44:55

Now, the characteristics of this picture would suggest

0:44:550:44:59

the work of an artist called Henry Edridge.

0:44:590:45:02

I'm not saying whether it IS by Edridge or not yet,

0:45:020:45:05

but Edridge is a really interesting man, because he goes

0:45:050:45:08

from a miniature painter - and you can look at the quality of that face

0:45:080:45:12

and see that this is the work of someone who's used to working

0:45:120:45:15

with tiny tools in a very minute way - to slightly longer portraits.

0:45:150:45:19

In fact, he developed his own particular type of Edridge look,

0:45:190:45:23

it was a sort of mannequin full length, very much like this.

0:45:230:45:27

Now, the next question is,

0:45:270:45:30

what do you know about the history of this drawing?

0:45:300:45:33

This seems to have been gifted to the school

0:45:330:45:36

in 1854 by a Sir Everard Home

0:45:360:45:42

who apparently acquired it from Earl St Vincent - or his father did -

0:45:420:45:46

in the 1820s.

0:45:460:45:48

So, is it something that has sort of grown to be part of the school?

0:45:480:45:52

I mean, have you guys come across it? Do you see it regularly?

0:45:520:45:55

We have it on the wall as we go into our boarding house

0:45:550:45:57

and it's just there every day, we see it and don't take much notice.

0:45:570:46:00

You don't show it respect?

0:46:000:46:02

Well, ball games have been played around it,

0:46:020:46:04

-and, luckily, it hasn't been hit.

-Right.

0:46:040:46:06

Well, let's look at the face of the guy you play ball games around, OK.

0:46:060:46:10

Because I think this is a peculiarly potent image of the great man.

0:46:100:46:15

I mean he is, after all, you know, the greatest naval hero -

0:46:150:46:18

probably in many ways the greatest hero in English history.

0:46:180:46:21

But the delight about this particular image

0:46:210:46:24

is that there's a lot of the individual man.

0:46:240:46:27

You know, the date of this is going to be late-18th century,

0:46:270:46:32

he's lost his arm. He's lost the sight of one eye.

0:46:320:46:36

We know this man was in great pain, but we also know that

0:46:360:46:39

he was a man of tremendous valour, huge bravery.

0:46:390:46:43

And looking into those eyes, looking into those features,

0:46:430:46:45

I think there's a side of the man that we don't normally encounter

0:46:450:46:49

in those rather brassy oil paintings.

0:46:490:46:52

So, this is about 1798, 1799, 1800.

0:46:520:46:58

He's getting famous.

0:46:580:47:00

The individual that we know as Nelson was becoming recognised,

0:47:000:47:05

but, of course, it's five years away until the Battle of Trafalgar.

0:47:050:47:08

So, I'm now going to come to whether or not it is by Edridge,

0:47:080:47:12

and I have to say, I know his work pretty well

0:47:120:47:15

and there's a very particular type of crosshatching.

0:47:150:47:19

In other words, I think this IS by Edridge,

0:47:190:47:21

so it's getting a little bit more exciting.

0:47:210:47:23

I know that this is just the sort of image of the great Lord Nelson

0:47:230:47:30

that many collectors across the world would almost die for.

0:47:300:47:34

Why?

0:47:340:47:35

Because you have the great man, the hero, the victor of Trafalgar

0:47:350:47:39

who tragically died, with ships behind on one level.

0:47:390:47:43

You've also got the soul of the man, as well.

0:47:430:47:45

You have both aspects of the great hero.

0:47:450:47:48

I think this picture is worth about £100,000.

0:47:480:47:51

Wow! Wow!

0:47:510:47:54

Amazing.

0:47:560:47:57

Well, hopefully we'll make sure that the ball games stop

0:47:570:48:01

and we put it on show

0:48:010:48:04

so that the public can see it, as well as the students, I think.

0:48:040:48:07

-Are you going to show a bit more respect to it in the future?

-Of course!

0:48:070:48:10

Well, isn't that a fantastic antidote to the disappointment of the other Nelson objects?

0:48:100:48:17

And I'm reliably informed now that the school is going to set aside a room as a kind of museum,

0:48:170:48:22

and that sketch will take pride of place within it.

0:48:220:48:26

We've had such a great day here at Wimbledon.

0:48:260:48:28

What a thrill to be at the All England Lawn Tennis Club.

0:48:280:48:32

Do you know, there are days when I love my job.

0:48:320:48:35

Until next time, from the whole Roadshow team, bye-bye.

0:48:350:48:39

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