Wimbledon 1 Antiques Roadshow


Wimbledon 1

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Over the last 34 years, the Antiques Roadshow has visited

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some of the most prestigious locations in the British Isles.

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High on the list must come some of our greatest sporting venues.

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We took the show to the heart of Test Match cricket, at Lord's.

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Then, we celebrated the sport of kings,

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at the Queen's favourite racecourse, Royal Ascot.

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But now, for the grand slam.

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We're at the most famous tennis club in the world.

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Welcome to the All England Lawn Tennis Club, at Wimbledon.

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BELL RINGS

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MUSIC: "In The Summertime" by Mungo Jerry

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To get the authentic Wimbledon experience,

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there's only one time to visit,

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and that's during Championship Fortnight.

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People have been coming here since 1877,

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to watch the most talented players in the world

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compete for the coveted Wimbledon trophies.

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'15-all.'

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Even as long ago as the 1930s,

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more than 200,000 people turned up to watch the matches.

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Of course, things were very different then.

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Men were still playing in flannel trousers

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and women had not long since discarded long skirts and petticoats

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but many Wimbledon traditions established then

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are still in force today.

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It's the only grand slam tournament in the world which is still played on grass

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and where it's compulsory to wear predominantly white clothing.

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This is Centre Court, the heart of Wimbledon,

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where the world's best players have competed.

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Who can forget when a young John McEnroe burst onto our screens

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with his brilliant volleys and sometimes colourful outbursts?

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Well, we think we may have unearthed an antique he might recognise.

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I caught up with him and Sue Barker on Centre Court.

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Yeah...

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That looks vaguely familiar.

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I think this has the ring of authenticity

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smashed in a moment of anger.

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That's a setup. Your show... That's not mine.

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This was brought along by a young chap to an Antiques Roadshow a few years back,

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who said that when you stayed with his mum in digs

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when you were playing, his mum was called Linda...

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-Ring any bells? You gave her this racket.

-Which one? No, I'm kidding.

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Does this look familiar?

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-Yes, that was definitely a racket I played with.

-Same size grip? Yep.

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What happened here?

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Well, I know this is hard to believe,

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but there were times when I got a little upset out there.

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We remember them well. Now...

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-Yes?

-Would you sign it?

-Sign it?

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OK, all right, sure, absolutely.

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That would make it something really fantastic.

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Something very quick.

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"Thanks for the memories."

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THEY LAUGH

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OK, so I don't know if this will increase or decrease the value

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but there you go.

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I think we can safely say that makes it an antique of the future, John.

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-Thanks very much.

-You're welcome.

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We'll find out if John's signature

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has increased the value of that racket shortly.

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Time to transform some of the outer courts in front of the clubhouse

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as we prepare for our own slightly smaller championship event

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called the Antiques Roadshow.

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Well, this is a wonderful bronze of a ballet dancer.

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-Is it a family piece?

-It is. It belongs to my father.

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It was bought by my grandfather in Paris in 1925

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and then given to my father after he got married.

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And not only have you brought along a bronze

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but also the original receipt.

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-Yes.

-And here it is,

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dated 19th December 1925, obviously in Paris.

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And we see that he paid 1,200 old francs for it,

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which I think was about £110 in those days,

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-so quite a lot of money.

-Yes, yes.

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And here we can see, "La mort du cygne (La Pavlova)."

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"The Dying Swan," and that gives us an indication of what the bronze is.

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Yes, Anna Pavlova, very famous Russian ballet dancer.

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Famous for The Dying Swan.

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Some people think it's connected with Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake

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but it comes from The Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saens,

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-The Dying Swan.

-Yes, yes.

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Anna Pavlova, as you probably know,

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worked with Diaghilev, of course, at Les Ballets Russes

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and then she was the first person, I think, to take her own ballet tour

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throughout the world.

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And she was extremely well-known in London and in America.

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It's a wonderfully expressive bronze and if we look at it,

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she's in the typical pose that she performed during The Dying Swan

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and wonderful the way the casting

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has got her dress flowing out like this.

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It's spectacular, great movement in it.

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-It's a beautiful piece.

-It's got a liveliness to it.

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And if we look down towards the base,

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we can see that it's signed, "P de Boulongne".

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Pierre de Boulongne was a reasonably well-known bronze sculptor

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working in France in the 19th and 20th century.

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We can see the "7 25" indicates it's a limited edition

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of just 25 cast from the mould and this was number seven.

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So, quite rare. Do you have it on display at home or have your parents got it?

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My parents have it, yes,

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it's very proudly displayed on my father's piano.

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-Are they ballet enthusiasts?

-My mother was a ballerina.

-Was she?

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-She was, yes.

-But perhaps not as well-known as Pavlova.

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-Not quite as well-known as Pavlova.

-I think it's a glorious bronze.

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We have to look at prices

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and because only 25 of this edition were produced, I would think

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if this appeared on the market today at auction, it would probably

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fetch £6,000-£8,000.

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-Ah!

-And on a good day, it might even make 10.

-Wow. Wow!

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Gosh. My parents will be very, very pleased to hear that, I should think.

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But it'll go back on my father's piano.

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Thank you very much.

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Well, as you can imagine, this makes me very excited.

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What we've got here, these pages, all handwritten,

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and this is a memorandum,

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"By William Westenburg,

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"assistant surgeon on the Victory,"

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Nelson's flagship,

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"between 19th and 22nd October, 1805."

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The Battle of Trafalgar. Absolutely tremendous.

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Here we are, "HMS Victory off Cadiz." Tell me about it,

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-where did it come from?

-We've had it in the family for over a century and a half.

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-Yes.

-Just wanted to know a bit more about it.

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Over a century and a half, that means...

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This...he is related to you?

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-No idea how we got it in the family.

-It's absolutely wonderful.

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And we see here, "England expects every man to do his duty,"

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which is, obviously, the famous one, but he goes on down here and we get to

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"The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Nelson, commander-in-chief,

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"was wounded in the left shoulder by a musket ball

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"out of the Redoubtable."

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The idea this was actually written in the battle

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or somewhere very near it, you know,

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obviously when he wasn't staunching blood flows

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or stopping musket holes or anything like that,

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it's quite incredible, really.

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And what else? This goes on about...

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it goes on about manoeuvres and manoeuvring.

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The preparation for the battle was remarkable

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and Nelson left nothing to any chance.

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What's clear in this is that there was something that Nelson did -

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he swerved down to the rear of the French line

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and then swerved back in again,

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and that has not been properly recorded, and it's in this letter.

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So, it's in this letter?

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-So the Antiques Roadshow has another first?

-I'd like to think so.

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Well, so would I. I think that's absolutely incredible.

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So, a family item, this lovely piece of history under my hands.

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It's got to be worth a lot of money.

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-What do you think?

-I have no idea.

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Well, I think because you have actually pointed out

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the bit about the manoeuvre,

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which is not in most of the history books,

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I would say you've got something here that's worth about £5,000.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're very welcome. Thank you.

-Thank you.

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These were both found in a tin box in a bank vault

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when my grandfather died and we believe they belonged to his father.

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As far as I know, this one is the oldest one.

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My brother-in-law dated it about 1606-1607

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but I don't know much more than that.

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What I find interesting is he's quite right. That is the older one.

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This one is known as an apostle's spoon

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because it's got an apostle's body cast onto the top of it.

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Which is a slightly earlier form than this type,

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which is known as a seal-top

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-because this looks to all the world a bit like a seal.

-Yes.

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This one is a genuine early 17th-century spoon.

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-I've dated it to 1634 in fact.

-OK.

-But we won't argue over 30 years.

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This one is fascinating.

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-This is...a fake.

-Is it?

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-It is.

-Excellent.

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SHE LAUGHS I had no idea.

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This spoon would have been made at the end of the 19th century

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to satisfy the demand

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which was very, very strong at that time for antique spoons.

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It's been made out of a tablespoon of 1761.

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They've clipped off the end, cast an apostle

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and stuck the apostle on,

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changed the shape of the bowl, so probably made about 1870-1880.

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OK.

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-So a lot later than one would have thought?

-It's hard to tell

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and it was made to deceive.

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At the end of the 19th century, believe it or not,

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there were no published hallmarks at all available to anybody.

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The Goldsmiths Company thought that if they published hallmarks,

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-it would be a faker's charter.

-Absolutely.

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And people would copy them and use them to make up old silver

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and sell it as old silver. Well, that didn't help

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the person that originally bought this

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because if we turn it over...

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-the marks on the back...

-Aha.

-..are for London.

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-Right.

-1761.

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Mm-hm.

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The person that bought it from the faker

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would have been unable to check.

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He'd have seen hallmarks on the back of it and thought,

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"A silver spoon in the form of an apostle's spoon,

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"that must be right.

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"That must be early 17th century, therefore it's a good spoon."

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-"I'll have it."

-There's nothing much he could do to check it.

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-But it is a complete fake.

-That's fantastic.

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I mean, you know, it's disappointing in some ways,

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but in other ways, it's fascinating to know that somebody went

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to all that trouble to produce something

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that isn't real. It's a fake.

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-They would have sold it for a lot of money at the time.

-Yes.

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And then we come down to the difference in value

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which is now remarkable.

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Ah.

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Your original seal-top spoon of 1630s these days worth about...

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-£1,200-£1,400.

-Aha. Wow.

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Your apostle's spoon, which should be worth about £2,000-£3,000...

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-Yes.

-..is actually more or less worth its weight in metal.

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It's worth about £50-£60,

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but because it's been converted

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so substantially from its original form,

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it's actually technically illegal.

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-Goodness me. I had no idea.

-There you are.

-Thank you very much.

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-That's fantastic.

-Not at all.

-Fascinating.

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-Do you know what this is?

-I think it's...

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..a pen holder, a Chinese pen holder, like a quill holder.

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Do the Chinese either use a pen or a quill?

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From my memory, it's like a pen, like a wooden dowel pen. No?

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-They use brushes.

-Of course they do.

-They write with a brush.

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So that hole...

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..is too small.

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We'll come back to that.

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-Where did you get it from?

-I bought it in Malaysia.

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-We lived in Malaysia for a little while.

-Oh, really?

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And we lived in Kuala Lumpur.

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And I saw it in an antique dealer's shop

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so I waited for him one morning till he came, so I got a good deal.

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You are in common with today's Chinese taste.

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For objects, they like this clear, clean, white jade.

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It looks it from a distance as if it's sort of randomly

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chopped about, but when you get close to it,

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you can see what's going on there.

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-Do you know what it is?

-I think it's the Zodiac.

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It is indeed the Chinese zodiac.

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And some of the objects are readily identifiable.

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We've got a tiger up here.

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We've got... I think that's a pig. Yes.

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Then we've got a horse down here, tiny little horse.

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We've got a snake who comes up here, and various other ones.

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I would guess that there would be 12.

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What I think this is for is for the tools used to organise

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the ash in an incense burner.

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And they're very tiny rake, spade sort of thing and a pinprick.

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And they would fit very nicely into there.

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So this is an object for the scholar's table.

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-Right.

-Date?

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I think it's probably late 18th, early 19th century.

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May I ask what you paid for it?

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It would be between £100-£120.

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-Oh, you were quite brave, weren't you?

-I liked it.

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Even if I told you it was worth 60-80?

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Still like it.

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Well, it's not 60-80.

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I think it's 1,500-2,000.

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OK.

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-Thank you very much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

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You might remember this tennis racket we showed at the beginning of the programme

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belonged to John McEnroe. Who else, because it's broken in half.

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-Now, Sam, this has become your racket.

-Yeah.

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You brought it along to the Children's Antiques Roadshow a few years back.

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Do you remember what it was valued at then?

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I think it was £5,000-£8,000.

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And that was with a bunch of other things as well?

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Yeah, with a shirt and a headband.

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Right, so the question is now, Sam,

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now that McEnroe's actually signed it,

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is it going to be worth more? John Baddeley,

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you're the man to tell us. I'm going to leave you to it.

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It's quite a thing. Have fun.

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A broken tennis racket? John McEnroe's?

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How do we know it is his apart from him signing it?

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Well, my mum ran some residence where he stayed for a while.

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So she had quite a lot of contact with him,

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helped sew on some sponsorship badges on shirts and things like that.

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And, eventually, after he left,

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-this was handed to her.

-As a parting gift?

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-As a sort of thank you.

-What's interesting about this

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is it's one of the very last wooden framed rackets ever used

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and McEnroe was one of the people who used it really to the very end,

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then he went into fibreglass and all those other modern materials.

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We can date this quite closely

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because in 1981,

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he signed a contract with Dunlop to just use their rackets, going forward.

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As you can see, this one is Wilson

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and this is the one he would have used

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right up towards that deadline of 1981.

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But he was still an up and coming young man at that stage, wasn't he?

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It's really important we know when he used it

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because if it was in the final, that amazing final, the 1980 final

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against Bjorn Borg, it's considered one of the all-time great matches.

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And should this be the one from that final

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rather than the lead-up games,

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then you've got something of extreme value.

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Bjorn Borg's racket used in the final

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-recently changed hands for 25,000.

-Wow.

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So, going back to Fiona's original question does the signature

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make any difference, of course it does. You've got the history,

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you've got the provenance, and now John's actually signed it,

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although retrospectively,

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you've probably added another £2,000-£3,000 to it.

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So, certainly well worth getting something signed by the star himself. Thanks for bringing it back

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-for the second time.

-Thank YOU very much.

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-I can't resist making these nod. Shall we do that?

-Yes, please.

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-Let's get the hands going and the heads.

-And the tongues.

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-And there they go together.

-Yes.

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I find people either find them fun or find them horrific.

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-What's your view?

-I've grown up with them, I love them.

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Yeah.

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-They're just part of the family.

-Always been in the family?

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Always been in the family.

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They were my grandfather's and they've come down to my mother

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-and now to me.

-Was he a collector or...?

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-No, my great-grandfather owned a pawn shop.

-Oh, right.

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And they have come down through the family.

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So, maybe these were unredeemed pledges,

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perhaps the original owner didn't want them back.

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Possibly, we don't know.

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I've always loved them, so the whole idea of making these figures

0:17:340:17:39

with nodding heads, I think, is great fun.

0:17:390:17:42

I mean, I suppose they're meant to be Chinamen or a Chinese...

0:17:420:17:47

well, this is a Chinaman.

0:17:470:17:48

And that's the Chinese woman, the pair of them.

0:17:480:17:51

But they didn't really come from China.

0:17:510:17:54

These were made in Germany.

0:17:540:17:56

The idea of these nodding figures originated in Dresden

0:17:560:17:59

at the great Meissen factory

0:17:590:18:01

when Kandler produced the first one of these in the 1730s

0:18:010:18:05

and since then many, many factories in Dresden

0:18:050:18:08

-have produced versions of these in all sizes.

-OK.

0:18:080:18:11

You get little ones and big ones.

0:18:110:18:13

But these are the really full-size and I think they're splendid

0:18:130:18:17

when you get the big ones with so much detail.

0:18:170:18:20

-I notice inside the tongues move.

-Yes, they do.

0:18:200:18:23

They have counterweights inside that force the springs inside

0:18:230:18:28

to make the little tongues come out.

0:18:280:18:29

I mean, how more bizarre can it be?

0:18:290:18:33

So, totally pointless, totally unfunctional

0:18:330:18:36

but just made to amuse

0:18:360:18:38

and I think people have laughed at them for a long time.

0:18:380:18:42

But lovely big ones.

0:18:420:18:44

So, these are...

0:18:440:18:46

I suppose, in date we're looking at about...1870-1880.

0:18:460:18:50

-Got a fair bit of age.

-Yep.

-They've had a bit of...

0:18:500:18:53

he's had a bit of a problem with cracking there, hasn't he?

0:18:530:18:56

I don't think the damage is going to affect the value too much.

0:18:560:19:00

-I mean, these are surprisingly valuable.

-Are they?

0:19:000:19:03

-Because of there... everybody wants a pair of this size.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:19:030:19:08

So, even by the smaller Dresden factories, a pair are going to be...

0:19:080:19:13

-Oh...£2,000?

-Wow, as much as that?

0:19:140:19:17

Goodness me.

0:19:170:19:18

A lot of odd sized items brought onto the Roadshow.

0:19:220:19:26

For militaria, they're quite often fairly small.

0:19:260:19:29

This, I think, has got to be the biggest thing we've ever had.

0:19:290:19:32

-Really?

-And it has an intriguing tale, doesn't it?

0:19:320:19:34

-It certainly has.

-Do tell me about it.

0:19:340:19:37

Very briefly, the Japanese captured it at the fall of Singapore

0:19:370:19:43

on 15th February, 1942.

0:19:430:19:44

Right.

0:19:440:19:46

And, so, Sergeant Major Uchiyama of the Japanese army,

0:19:460:19:51

who captured it, decided that he'd like it as his trophy of war.

0:19:510:19:56

-You know what's written on it, don't you?

-Indeed I do.

-Please tell us.

0:19:560:19:59

Well, without going into the minutiae of it, what it says is

0:19:590:20:04

"commemorating the fall of Singapore,

0:20:040:20:08

"15 February 1942,

0:20:080:20:12

"Sergeant Major Uchiyama." Simple as that.

0:20:120:20:16

And at this point, what unit were you in charge of?

0:20:160:20:20

I was the intelligence officer

0:20:200:20:23

of the Tanganyika Battalion of the King's African Rifles.

0:20:230:20:27

How did this end up with you?

0:20:270:20:30

Well, after a number of battles and skirmishes

0:20:300:20:34

and unpleasant incidents in Burma,

0:20:340:20:38

we launched a serious attack

0:20:380:20:41

on 3rd November 1944.

0:20:410:20:47

Many of my comrades, British and African,

0:20:470:20:51

were killed in that attack, charging machine guns, which is no fun.

0:20:510:20:57

And fortunately, we won the battle.

0:20:570:21:01

And because my task included

0:21:010:21:03

searching the bodies of Japanese to find intelligence material,

0:21:030:21:11

I found the body of Sergeant Major Uchiyama

0:21:110:21:16

and beside him was his pack.

0:21:160:21:19

So naturally, I opened the pack,

0:21:190:21:22

and there, to my absolute amazement, I found this flag.

0:21:220:21:26

I couldn't believe it.

0:21:260:21:28

I thought, "It may have been his trophy of war, but it's certainly mine."

0:21:280:21:32

You want to do something quite special with it, don't you?

0:21:320:21:35

Well, I do. You see, so far as I am concerned, the African soldiers

0:21:350:21:38

I served with were unsung heroes of World War II -

0:21:380:21:43

they fought the Italians in the Abyssinian campaign,

0:21:430:21:46

they fought the Vichy French in Madagascar,

0:21:460:21:50

and they fought the Japanese in Burma.

0:21:500:21:53

These are pastoral tribesman serving our King and country.

0:21:530:21:59

And I would like to think that I would let this flag be sold

0:21:590:22:04

and the proceeds donated to military charities.

0:22:040:22:09

That would be far more satisfying from my point of view,

0:22:090:22:12

and I think it would honour my former comrades.

0:22:120:22:16

The difficulty with something of this type is putting a value on it.

0:22:160:22:19

Normally, souvenir flags, because they're difficult to display,

0:22:190:22:24

fetch perhaps around £200.

0:22:240:22:27

Because of the history of this, that it came from Singapore,

0:22:270:22:30

I think it would raise £400-£500, possibly more in auction.

0:22:300:22:35

And even that's a slight guess, because it's absolutely unique.

0:22:350:22:38

Thank you very much for bringing an unique item into the roadshow.

0:22:380:22:42

-Thank you.

-Aren't I lucky?

-You are.

0:22:420:22:44

Where's Cliff Richard when you need him?

0:22:520:22:54

We're at Wimbledon, and guess what? It's raining.

0:22:540:22:57

I guess we could have expected it - it's traditional.

0:22:570:23:00

Still, we've had to move some of our experts inside,

0:23:000:23:03

but many others are out here queuing undeterred.

0:23:030:23:07

So I can safely announce rain will not stop play.

0:23:070:23:11

# I got lucky in the rain

0:23:110:23:18

# One day when I had nothing to do for an hour... #

0:23:180:23:24

We've got a bit of father-daughter rivalry going on here at the Roadshow.

0:23:240:23:28

You both brought along items, and each of you believes that you have the more valuable item.

0:23:280:23:33

Of course! Of course I do. Mine is old, antique.

0:23:330:23:36

-Mine's new and modern.

-That condemns it.

0:23:360:23:39

-You've brought along what you think is an Old Master.

-Yes, I have, yes.

0:23:390:23:43

-And it's been in your family a long time?

-A long time.

0:23:430:23:46

At least 100 years.

0:23:460:23:47

And her stuff's all modern.

0:23:470:23:50

-You brought along some photographs by Lord Snowdon.

-Lord Snowdon.

0:23:500:23:54

-Who was of course married to Princess Margaret.

-Yes.

0:23:540:23:56

-Now, how did Snowdon come into the family?

-My father was his solicitor.

0:23:560:24:00

-For over 50 years.

-So during the divorce from Princess Margaret as well, then?

0:24:000:24:05

I did all that, and a lot more. And his second divorce, and everything else.

0:24:050:24:10

-That must have been pretty interesting.

-Yes.

0:24:100:24:13

And you ended up working with Lord Snowdon as his PA, effectively.

0:24:130:24:17

For 20 years, on and off.

0:24:170:24:19

And then he became a very good friend

0:24:190:24:21

and he's godfather to my daughter now.

0:24:210:24:23

Tell me about these photographs, then.

0:24:230:24:24

There are of the Royal family,

0:24:240:24:26

and especially of Diana and Prince Charles and the boys.

0:24:260:24:28

-How wonderful.

-And he signed them.

0:24:280:24:30

So you think these photographs aren't up to much?

0:24:300:24:33

Well, I've lived with them all my life, of course,

0:24:330:24:35

and been responsible for selling them, looking after them,

0:24:350:24:39

making sure that there's no more litigation.

0:24:390:24:41

So they're not a great source of joy to me.

0:24:410:24:43

Well, I'm in no position to judge.

0:24:430:24:46

But I have to say, your Old Master is going to have to be a humdinger,

0:24:460:24:50

I would humbly suggest, to trounce these photographs.

0:24:500:24:53

-Oh, I'm sure it is!

-All will be revealed. We'll find out.

0:24:530:24:56

It's a fair battle.

0:24:560:24:57

This is a completely surreal experience.

0:24:590:25:03

It's pouring with rain,

0:25:030:25:05

we're standing next to a bed on the green grass of Wimbledon.

0:25:050:25:09

-It is strange.

-I quite agree, yes.

0:25:090:25:11

-Is this your marital bed, then?

-It's our bed, oh yes.

0:25:110:25:14

I see this tapestry here is dated 1974, so that's not very old.

0:25:140:25:19

We can date that with accuracy. What's the history behind that?

0:25:190:25:22

Well, we bought it in 1970, in the Portobello Road,

0:25:220:25:27

when we were getting married,

0:25:270:25:29

and it had a rather disagreeable bit of fabric in the space there,

0:25:290:25:34

so I designed what's there now, and my mother embroidered it.

0:25:340:25:39

-So these are her initials, presumably, on the bottom.

-Yes.

0:25:390:25:42

-And the R and P, is that you?

-That's us, yes.

-That's my wife and myself.

0:25:420:25:48

Right. That's rather lovely. I can remember in that

0:25:480:25:50

late '60s, early '70s period

0:25:500:25:52

how popular this type of Gothic decoration was.

0:25:520:25:55

So what do you know about the age of the bed?

0:25:550:25:58

I've made various attempts at research,

0:25:580:26:02

and it seems to me to be designed by somebody who had looked at

0:26:020:26:06

Pugin's engravings for Gothic furniture,

0:26:060:26:10

but the armorial is not British.

0:26:100:26:14

Well, my initial reaction when you see the fleur-de-lis

0:26:140:26:16

is a French bed, but then you've got a sort of shamrock here,

0:26:160:26:21

so you begin to wonder. It's very eclectic.

0:26:210:26:24

-It's a pastiche in that way.

-Yeah. It is French, I think.

0:26:240:26:28

-Really?

-It appears to be made of oak, which again you'd expect

0:26:280:26:32

in a French bed, but it's clearly got a Catholic feeling about it.

0:26:320:26:35

I would have thought there would have been a cross there,

0:26:350:26:37

-I imagine, on this shelf.

-I think so, yeah.

0:26:370:26:39

Presumably you put a reading light or something there now.

0:26:390:26:42

-Yeah.

-And then you've got the little shelves here.

-Only one.

0:26:420:26:45

-It's maybe for a single person.

-Possibly.

0:26:450:26:47

But I love these angels giving you a nice, quiet, peaceful night.

0:26:470:26:50

Yes, yes, they watch over us.

0:26:500:26:52

It's quite difficult to date a bed like this.

0:26:520:26:55

I don't think it's as old as it seems.

0:26:550:26:56

-It's clearly not Gothic, I think you realise that.

-Oh, yes.

0:26:560:26:59

My suspicion is that it's probably the early part of the 20th century.

0:26:590:27:03

-Really, yes?

-1900, even as late as 1920. But I think what's wonderful

0:27:030:27:07

is to think that you actually sleep in this every night.

0:27:070:27:10

You bought it 40-something years ago, and you're still enjoying it.

0:27:100:27:13

I think it's a wonderful thing. I think it's long enough ago

0:27:130:27:16

to risk asking you how much you paid for it.

0:27:160:27:19

-Was it a lot of money?

-Well, it was at the time. It was £170.

0:27:190:27:25

-Right.

-Which I remember so clearly

0:27:250:27:31

because it was the money that I got when I gave up my job,

0:27:310:27:36

I took the pension fund out.

0:27:360:27:38

-So you're sleeping on your pension fund?

-Exactly! Yes, yes.

0:27:380:27:42

I'd have thought that to go to Portobello Road now

0:27:420:27:45

and buy something like this,

0:27:450:27:47

certainly £2,500, and possibly a little bit more.

0:27:470:27:52

But to you it's a precious object, the nuptial bed of 40 years.

0:27:520:27:55

I think it's wonderful. It's a lovely story.

0:27:550:27:58

Sorry we got you out of bed,

0:27:580:27:59

and go back home and have a good night's sleep tonight!

0:27:590:28:02

Ever since I've been a child,

0:28:060:28:08

I've been really drawn to pictures that tell stories,

0:28:080:28:11

and this is a picture that's all about teaching you about something.

0:28:110:28:16

-Can you tell me about it?

-Yes.

0:28:160:28:18

This is, of course, a historical painting, it's Catherine de Medici

0:28:180:28:22

instructing her son Charles IX to sign the order

0:28:220:28:27

which meant that the next morning

0:28:270:28:29

they were going to slaughter all the Protestants. Of France.

0:28:290:28:34

It was a very, very tense moment in history,

0:28:340:28:36

and I loved it as a historian,

0:28:360:28:37

because you see the King is resisting his mother's pressure.

0:28:370:28:41

His foot is pressing down, he's saying, "No, I don't want to do it,"

0:28:410:28:45

and she's pointing, saying, "Do it. Do it. Do it."

0:28:450:28:48

So this painting, it looks to me mid-19th century.

0:28:480:28:52

It looks to me to be continental,

0:28:520:28:54

possibly painted by a Flemish artist or even a French one.

0:28:540:28:59

-It's all about detail and symbolism.

-It is.

-It's all about message.

0:28:590:29:03

I mean, we forget these days with photography just the power

0:29:030:29:07

-and the importance that art had.

-Yes.

-In telling you stories.

0:29:070:29:11

One's eye, as it rolls over it,

0:29:110:29:13

can actually see that everything is geared towards the document,

0:29:130:29:17

which had catastrophic effects.

0:29:170:29:20

This was to be the biggest slaughter of Protestants in Europe.

0:29:200:29:24

And he knew that this is what he had to sign for.

0:29:240:29:27

It was an appalling decision to make.

0:29:270:29:29

-This is cinema of the mid-19th century, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

0:29:290:29:34

Do you know anything about the history of the picture?

0:29:340:29:36

I know is that we've had 100 years and I've always loved it,

0:29:360:29:40

and there's a remarkable story about it.

0:29:400:29:42

My mother went up to Scotland once with a friend, in the 1930s.

0:29:420:29:47

And a fortune-teller told her

0:29:470:29:49

that this picture was immensely important and probably very valuable.

0:29:490:29:52

The fortune-teller had never been to London.

0:29:520:29:55

-Mother wasn't even thinking about it.

-So let's get this right.

0:29:550:29:58

The picture was not in the room.

0:29:580:30:00

-No, no.

-But the fortune teller...

-Described it in detail.

0:30:000:30:04

So the question is, has she foretold a great fortune in your life?

0:30:040:30:07

Well, it would be nice if she has! That's for you to tell me.

0:30:070:30:11

Well, it's a picture of age, it's a picture of some quality,

0:30:110:30:15

not the best quality, but reasonable quality,

0:30:150:30:18

but ultimately, this is not what the market really wants.

0:30:180:30:23

I mean, if it were by a great known artist...

0:30:230:30:26

-and I'm afraid I can't come up with an artist for this...

-No.

0:30:260:30:29

Perhaps, who knows, after this, we may be able to,

0:30:290:30:32

so therefore I think we have to value this

0:30:320:30:35

as an anonymous painter of a subject that we know,

0:30:350:30:38

but of a type of subject which,

0:30:380:30:40

when you consider the onslaughts of modern art,

0:30:400:30:43

is not fashionable any more.

0:30:430:30:45

No. No.

0:30:450:30:46

So, as far as valuation is concerned,

0:30:460:30:49

I suspect the fortune teller was not a professional picture dealer.

0:30:490:30:53

It's worth about £1,000-£1,500.

0:30:530:30:57

Well, I shall treasure it, all the same.

0:30:570:31:00

And, who knows, one day it might suddenly prove to be quite different!

0:31:000:31:05

One can only hope.

0:31:050:31:07

Thank you very much.

0:31:070:31:08

Well, a spinning wheel!

0:31:100:31:12

What specifically do you want to know about it?

0:31:120:31:15

Well, I'd love to know why it's the shape it is,

0:31:150:31:18

because every other spinning wheel I've ever seen

0:31:180:31:21

has been low-level with a big wheel and sometimes a smaller wheel,

0:31:210:31:27

and this looks as if maybe it's just for decor rather than use.

0:31:270:31:32

Well, it certainly is highly decorative.

0:31:320:31:34

I think when you say the word "spinning",

0:31:340:31:36

instantly, an image comes into your mind

0:31:360:31:39

of a little old lady sitting in a cottage,

0:31:390:31:41

and plainly, a spinning wheel like this

0:31:410:31:44

has never seen the inside of a cottage.

0:31:440:31:46

It's altogether so much more sophisticated.

0:31:460:31:50

It would have been perfectly at home with someone like Jane Austin

0:31:500:31:55

and her sisters in a drawing room.

0:31:550:31:58

It was made around the late 18th, early 19th century

0:31:580:32:03

and really reflects this change from spinning being a task,

0:32:030:32:09

an essential task that had to be undertaken,

0:32:090:32:12

and a move to it being, really, a sophisticated pastime.

0:32:120:32:18

This spinning wheel completely reflects furniture

0:32:180:32:21

that was made in that late 18th-century period.

0:32:210:32:24

It's made of mahogany,

0:32:240:32:25

and there's all sorts of detail and decoration on it

0:32:250:32:28

that isn't essential at all.

0:32:280:32:30

These wonderfully elegant square tapering spokes

0:32:300:32:35

with boxwood stringing down the sides,

0:32:350:32:38

just like legs on furniture of this late 18th-century period,

0:32:380:32:42

and the quality of this brass mount just takes it to the next level.

0:32:420:32:45

I think it was made by a spinning wheel maker based in Leeds

0:32:450:32:50

called John Planter. Who did it originally belong to?

0:32:500:32:54

My grandfather bought it in auction in Cork in the 1920s,

0:32:540:32:59

and when he died, it was sold with other items from the family home,

0:32:590:33:05

and my father decided to buy it, because he'd loved it as a child.

0:33:050:33:09

What an extraordinarily thing for a man to buy,

0:33:090:33:12

and it really must have clearly had nostalgic childhood memories.

0:33:120:33:16

-Absolutely.

-What did your father pay for it?

0:33:160:33:20

He paid £50 in 1960.

0:33:200:33:23

Right.

0:33:230:33:25

Well, it's currently worth around £500, so in real terms,

0:33:250:33:32

-that's a pretty static level.

-Absolutely.

0:33:320:33:35

I think the fact that it is purely a decorative piece of furniture

0:33:350:33:41

-indicates why the value hasn't increased greatly.

-Yes.

0:33:410:33:46

Do you know, this is an absolutely wonderful collection of royal photographs.

0:33:460:33:50

I mean, obviously, the Prince and Princess of Wales,

0:33:500:33:53

but they are quite incredible.

0:33:530:33:56

This sitting here, they've got everything.

0:33:560:33:58

They've got far too many grapes. They'd never finish them!

0:33:580:34:00

It's very formal, isn't it?

0:34:000:34:02

That's what I like about Lord Snowdon's work.

0:34:020:34:04

-His ideas come out in the photographs.

-Yes.

0:34:040:34:06

And he wanted a picnic, an old-fashioned picnic.

0:34:060:34:10

-And you've got it signed here, and it's signed to?

-Evelyn.

0:34:100:34:15

Evelyn, there, and Tony signed there. Well, that's wonderful.

0:34:150:34:19

But you know, this one up here, I think is really rather special.

0:34:190:34:22

Tell me when this was taken.

0:34:220:34:24

That was at the end of Prince Harry's christening.

0:34:240:34:27

This is Prince Harry here, and, obviously, the Princess of Wales.

0:34:270:34:30

Looking like a film star, a 1930s film star.

0:34:300:34:33

They'd just finished the sitting,

0:34:330:34:35

and the Princess of Wales just picked up Harry

0:34:350:34:38

and was giving him a cuddle, and Lord Snowdon was walking out

0:34:380:34:41

and he turned round, and as he said, "I snapped it."

0:34:410:34:44

Well, it's the most brilliant snap, because the Princess of Wales,

0:34:440:34:47

-her eyes are always slightly wary, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:34:470:34:50

She's not looking on this one, but it is so spontaneous.

0:34:500:34:54

-It's mother holding baby.

-It is just too good, isn't it?

0:34:540:34:57

It really is absolutely fantastic.

0:34:570:34:59

This one over here, now this is an odd one,

0:34:590:35:01

because the boys are dressed in sort of country casuals,

0:35:010:35:05

and don't have any shoes on,

0:35:050:35:06

and their nanny has not given them any socks,

0:35:060:35:09

as far as I can see,

0:35:090:35:11

and the Princess of Wales is dressed up to kill!

0:35:110:35:13

This was at the end of this sitting.

0:35:130:35:15

The end of this sitting?

0:35:150:35:16

The boys were still dressed,

0:35:160:35:18

and they had gone off, I think to have their supper,

0:35:180:35:21

and Mummy was carrying on with the photographic sitting,

0:35:210:35:23

and the boys literally rushed in to see what Mummy was doing.

0:35:230:35:26

So Mum went out of something casual,

0:35:260:35:29

slipped into something formal and got the boys in.

0:35:290:35:33

-Yes.

-I don't think I've ever seen it before. Is it generally..?

0:35:330:35:36

No, it's never been released.

0:35:360:35:37

I saw them when we were going through them, so I said,

0:35:370:35:41

is it possible I could have a copy, and he actually said yes.

0:35:410:35:44

-Do you think the royal archives have a copy?

-I wouldn't have thought so.

0:35:440:35:48

-First on the BBC?

-I think so, yes.

0:35:480:35:50

Oh, wow!

0:35:500:35:51

I love the hand on Harry, sort of, sit!

0:35:510:35:53

-Yes, sit!

-Sit!

-Yes!

0:35:530:35:54

Now, these other ones here, this one here.

0:35:540:35:58

That was taken when I was 18.

0:35:580:36:01

Oh, this is you here?

0:36:010:36:02

That's me having my hair brushed by my elder sister,

0:36:020:36:05

-and that's my little sister.

-Yes.

0:36:050:36:07

My father did Lord Snowdon's divorce,

0:36:070:36:09

and my father's very old-fashioned and he didn't charge.

0:36:090:36:13

-Good heavens!

-So he happily helped Lord Snowdon out.

-Helped him out?!

0:36:130:36:17

This was a thank you!

0:36:170:36:18

I love this one of you in a boat.

0:36:180:36:21

It's at his old house, and the boat started to sink,

0:36:210:36:25

it was on the lake, and I said to Lord Snowdon, it's sinking,

0:36:250:36:28

and all he came up with was, "Well, you can swim, can't you?"

0:36:280:36:31

And I did end up swimming!

0:36:310:36:32

This "Come and get me look" on your face means, "Get me out of this!"

0:36:320:36:36

It was. It was getting rather wet.

0:36:360:36:37

That's absolutely fantastic. Well, I can't tell you, this is so exciting.

0:36:370:36:43

There are so many of them!

0:36:430:36:46

And you've got the auction catalogue of all the dresses of Diana.

0:36:460:36:50

-Yes, I have.

-Some of them photographed by?

-By Lord Snowdon.

0:36:500:36:53

-And this is inscribed as well.

-Yes.

0:36:530:36:55

Gosh. Not a lot of his stuff comes on the market.

0:36:550:36:59

Very difficult to put a price on them,

0:36:590:37:01

but they are absolutely stunning.

0:37:010:37:04

Now, let's go to the best one. I think this one.

0:37:040:37:08

That one I think on the market

0:37:080:37:09

would certainly make somewhere between £500 and £800.

0:37:090:37:12

Goodness!

0:37:120:37:14

-£500 and £800.

-Whoo!

0:37:140:37:16

This one is terribly posed in a way that this one is just wonderful.

0:37:160:37:23

-This one is £200 or £300.

-Right.

0:37:230:37:26

This one over here, I love the story behind that,

0:37:260:37:30

and that shows how unstuffy she was, I suppose.

0:37:300:37:33

That one at about £400, £500.

0:37:330:37:37

Yours, well, I don't know. What are we going to price those?

0:37:370:37:42

-Not an awful lot of money. They're tremendous fun.

-They're personal.

0:37:420:37:46

£100 each. The catalogue?

0:37:460:37:47

Well, the catalogue is going to be nowadays about £300 or £400.

0:37:470:37:51

Goodness.

0:37:510:37:52

So we're talking about the best part of £2,000 here.

0:37:520:37:55

Whew!

0:37:550:37:57

Wow!

0:37:570:38:00

That rather knocks into cocked hat your father's picture, doesn't it?

0:38:000:38:04

It does rather.

0:38:040:38:05

-Can't wait to tell him!

-Right.

0:38:050:38:08

Thank you.

0:38:080:38:09

What an amazing array

0:38:100:38:12

of characters we've got here.

0:38:120:38:15

Have you played with them yourself?

0:38:150:38:17

No, I've never played with them myself.

0:38:170:38:19

I think to be a puppeteer of this calibre would be very difficult.

0:38:190:38:24

I think they're late 19th century, which for puppets is quite early.

0:38:240:38:28

-We're talking about maybe 1885, 1890.

-Yes.

0:38:280:38:33

These were nine characters that my mother bought in 1936.

0:38:330:38:36

A man called Wanslaw, who was a puppeteer,

0:38:360:38:39

was walking near Southampton one day near a farm and saw a box,

0:38:390:38:43

and saw a leg sticking out of a box, and being a puppeteer,

0:38:430:38:46

he knew exactly what this leg was,

0:38:460:38:48

and so he found who the lady was

0:38:480:38:50

and said, "May I have a look at your box?"

0:38:500:38:52

And she said, "Oh, some junk that's been there since 1916."

0:38:520:38:56

He bought the box with great glee and brought it to his studio in Chiswick,

0:38:560:39:01

and my mother knew Wanslaw and fell in love with him and she was able...

0:39:010:39:06

-With him or with them?

-No, no, no, with them!

0:39:060:39:08

What springs to mind is there was a famous group called Tiller and Clowes,

0:39:100:39:16

and they were working in Southampton in the late 19th century,

0:39:160:39:19

and they became very well-known as a troop around the country.

0:39:190:39:22

They are indeed. Tiller Clowes Marionettes, yes.

0:39:220:39:26

-Really?

-Yes.

-Because I am pretty certain they are made in England.

0:39:260:39:30

It's always difficult to be totally certain,

0:39:300:39:32

but the faces are like an Old Master painting, basically.

0:39:320:39:37

They've got a base of wood, then there's got a layer of gesso

0:39:370:39:40

and then oil paint over the top,

0:39:400:39:43

and there are two here that have dropped...

0:39:430:39:46

-This one.

-This one.

0:39:460:39:48

And that one, yes.

0:39:480:39:50

This one, these two, and I think they were two of the first puppets

0:39:500:39:56

to have these articulated faces.

0:39:560:40:00

Later on, they became more and more articulated,

0:40:000:40:03

and they've all got these wonderful glass eyes,

0:40:030:40:06

which I think were probably French, hand-blown.

0:40:060:40:09

Anyway, I could go on and on, because I love this sort of thing.

0:40:090:40:14

-And because there's so little of it these days.

-Yes, very little.

0:40:140:40:18

I mean, children's parties are not quite the same as they were.

0:40:180:40:22

-They do need restringing, they need a lot of work on them.

-And clothes.

0:40:220:40:26

And clothes.

0:40:260:40:27

But there are people that still entertain with these,

0:40:270:40:30

and I should imagine that if you were to sell them en masse,

0:40:300:40:34

all nine of them, that it would be a very narrow market,

0:40:340:40:38

but I can see them making somewhere in the region of £2,000-£3,000.

0:40:380:40:43

Really?

0:40:430:40:45

You want 'em?

0:40:480:40:49

Well, in terms of railway tickets,

0:41:030:41:04

this really is the daddy of them all.

0:41:040:41:06

The longest place name in the United Kingdom,

0:41:060:41:09

and if we look at the back of the ticket, we can probably see a date.

0:41:090:41:13

-Yes, here we are. 3rd July, 1965.

-That's right.

-And why did you buy it?

0:41:130:41:17

Just because I was on a walking tour at the time,

0:41:170:41:20

and it seemed a good novelty to get.

0:41:200:41:22

I'll probably never visit it again.

0:41:220:41:25

I have never visited that station again.

0:41:250:41:27

It was a platform ticket, you didn't travel on the train.

0:41:270:41:29

-No, no.

-It cost you thrupence.

-Yes.

-It's a fun, quirky item.

0:41:290:41:33

It's not a great value.

0:41:330:41:35

I could see this fetching perhaps £20 or £30,

0:41:350:41:38

but it's a wonderful memory to have.

0:41:380:41:40

Now, most important thing, can you say the name of the town?

0:41:400:41:43

I cannot, no.

0:41:430:41:45

I've tried, but I've failed.

0:41:450:41:47

Well, I had a Welsh mother, and she taught me the name of this town

0:41:470:41:50

when I was very young, and I think it's lodged in my memory ever since.

0:41:500:41:54

So, with apologies to our Welsh viewers for my accent,

0:41:540:41:57

-shall we give it a go?

-Why not?

0:41:570:41:59

Llanfairpwllgwyn-gyllgogerych- wyrndrobwllllantysilio-gogogoch.

0:41:590:42:04

Well done!

0:42:040:42:06

We've got three monumental bronzes here,

0:42:100:42:12

and I'm just trying to think what they must look like in your home.

0:42:120:42:16

They're pretty imposing. Tell me something about them.

0:42:160:42:19

Well, the two...this one here and this, they are in the family

0:42:190:42:26

many, many years ago, and this one has been purchased.

0:42:260:42:30

We are very, very interested in bronzes, paintings etc,

0:42:300:42:35

but these are very, very close to us, in particular, my daughters.

0:42:350:42:40

They love them.

0:42:400:42:41

But I need you, the expert, to give more information about them.

0:42:410:42:44

-Well, let's hope that I can live up to that.

-OK.

0:42:440:42:48

I think you would call yourself a collector, wouldn't you?

0:42:480:42:51

-I am, actually, yes.

-Right. How many bronzes do you have in the house?

0:42:510:42:55

-A few.

-A few?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:42:550:42:57

Are these the biggest and the best?

0:42:570:42:59

I think they are.

0:42:590:43:00

OK. Well, certainly, it's not very often I get to deal with such large bronzes,

0:43:000:43:03

so let's talk a bit about them.

0:43:030:43:04

We've got some kind of classical themes going on here, haven't we?

0:43:040:43:07

-Yes, we have.

-This of course is Hercules.

-Yes.

-He's strength.

0:43:070:43:13

This is Amalthea and Jupiter's goat.

0:43:130:43:17

Oh, I knew her as the beautiful maiden with the goat.

0:43:170:43:21

Right, well, that's as nice a way of knowing her as any,

0:43:210:43:24

but that's her classical title, so to speak.

0:43:240:43:27

Now, these are both unsigned bronzes, which is quite unusual.

0:43:270:43:30

I would expect big monumental bronzes of this type to have a signature on them,

0:43:300:43:35

but they haven't got a signature on them.

0:43:350:43:37

But what that tells me about them is they're a kind of very generic style of French,

0:43:370:43:42

decorative bronze that was very popular in the 19th century.

0:43:420:43:46

Yes, I knew this one was 19th century.

0:43:460:43:48

Well, they're both 19th century,

0:43:480:43:50

and they both date from around about the 1870s or 1880s.

0:43:500:43:54

Your bronze in the centre here, this warrior, there's more information.

0:43:540:43:59

If we look at him,

0:43:590:44:01

you know already that there's quite a bit of information

0:44:010:44:04

written on the plaque at the front here.

0:44:040:44:06

-Yes.

-It says Corybante. Now, that's him.

0:44:060:44:10

This is Jupiter as a youngster.

0:44:100:44:13

Now, this is by a well-known sculptor called Louis Cugnot.

0:44:130:44:18

He was French, obviously.

0:44:180:44:20

This bronze was cast in around about 1870,

0:44:200:44:24

so actually, they all very much fit the same period.

0:44:240:44:28

And they really fit that kind of feeling

0:44:280:44:31

for classical kind of subjects, and indeed, they are very imposing.

0:44:310:44:36

This gentleman seems to have been quite popular in some ways,

0:44:360:44:39

because he seems to have quite a lot of wear on his pecs.

0:44:390:44:41

-Yes.

-You don't happen to kind of go like this occasionally, do you?

0:44:410:44:45

Well... LAUGHTER

0:44:450:44:46

I'm not saying! LAUGHTER

0:44:460:44:49

Now, what happens is with particularly, I've found,

0:44:490:44:53

bronzes of this nature, is that the market is quite cyclical.

0:44:530:44:57

-They seem to fade in and out of fashion.

-Of course.

0:44:570:45:00

So I think we're going to have to talk about value,

0:45:000:45:02

and I'm going to very much talk about a retail value,

0:45:020:45:05

because I think if you had to buy these two in a retail, current retail situation,

0:45:050:45:11

you would probably pay in the region of about £3,000-£5,000 each.

0:45:110:45:15

-No!

-Retail.

-I had no idea.

0:45:150:45:18

This figure here has more of a track record, in fact,

0:45:190:45:23

and I know that one recently sold, absolutely identical to this,

0:45:230:45:27

-in France, for just under £2,000.

-OK.

0:45:270:45:30

-At auction. So that gives you a fair idea.

-Well, I'm delighted.

0:45:300:45:36

We inherited it from my husband's stepmother,

0:45:400:45:42

and we believe she acquired it or was perhaps given it

0:45:420:45:46

when she worked for antique dealers in the '50s and '60s in London.

0:45:460:45:51

It's from northern Italy, from the area of Lombardy.

0:45:510:45:55

It's 18th-century, about 1760, 1780. It's like a little child's desk.

0:45:550:46:01

We wondered whether it was a piece of child's furniture, yes.

0:46:010:46:04

-Or somebody suggested it might be an apprentice piece.

-Right.

0:46:040:46:08

I like the idea, you've got this little...what we call a well,

0:46:080:46:12

this slides back and forwards, for putting papers in.

0:46:120:46:15

-A child wouldn't have something like that, would they?

-Secret papers?

0:46:150:46:19

-Maybe.

-But, let me look at the front. Look at that.

0:46:190:46:23

Walnut. The colour is absolutely fantastic, isn't it?

0:46:240:46:28

It's a lovely patina, I think.

0:46:280:46:29

Because when I saw you carry this in, and I saw this colour of the walnut,

0:46:290:46:33

I thought, "Wow, that is really, really exciting."

0:46:330:46:35

When you look at the handles, the handles are all original.

0:46:350:46:38

And if you look, they're like little balusters.

0:46:380:46:41

If you imagine a balustrade on the front of a property,

0:46:410:46:44

that's what's being echoed here. Lovely, really, really nice.

0:46:440:46:49

More often than not, these have been replaced, so to find

0:46:490:46:52

the originals, the feet are original,

0:46:520:46:54

the locks are original, all the boxes are ticked there for an avid collector.

0:46:540:46:58

Great.

0:46:580:47:00

-It isn't a child's piece.

-No? Right.

0:47:000:47:03

THEY LAUGH

0:47:030:47:05

-Apprentice piece?

-It's not an apprentice piece either.

0:47:050:47:08

It made us wonder whether it was perhaps a prie-dieu,

0:47:080:47:13

but then it doesn't go with the desk, does it?

0:47:130:47:15

-Well, that's what it is. Exactly what it is.

-Oh, right.

0:47:150:47:17

This would have been, say, in a merchant's property, and, being Catholic,

0:47:170:47:23

after you've done your work, you'd actually kneel and pray.

0:47:230:47:27

-I must try it some time.

-Yeah! And maybe your prayers will be answered!

0:47:270:47:32

So you knew roughly what it was.

0:47:320:47:35

We were puzzled by it, because it seemed a bit of a combination.

0:47:350:47:38

It's rather small and it's a combination. Yes.

0:47:380:47:41

No, it's a fine little piece of furniture. I think it's exquisite.

0:47:410:47:45

-I would place a value on this of around £1,500.

-Yeah. That's fine.

0:47:450:47:50

We're not planning to sell it, but we just wanted to know more about it.

0:47:500:47:54

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:47:540:47:55

What a pretty little tea set. Royal Worcester, of course,

0:47:570:48:01

and painted with Highland cattle by Harry Stinton.

0:48:010:48:04

Absolutely idyllic. How come you have it?

0:48:040:48:07

Well, I got it as a gift at my christening from my grandmother,

0:48:070:48:11

and I remember Mum used to walk in on me playing with it when I was younger.

0:48:110:48:16

She caught me, but now I know to take care of it.

0:48:160:48:19

-What, play with dolls, having tea?

-Yes.

0:48:190:48:22

HE LAUGHS

0:48:220:48:25

But how marvellous that you had this as a gift at a christening.

0:48:250:48:29

Marvellous. You love it, do you?

0:48:290:48:31

-I love it a lot. It's so beautiful.

-Royal Worcester, made in the 1920s.

0:48:310:48:37

And Granny would have bought it, do you think?

0:48:370:48:41

Possibly her mother, I would have thought.

0:48:410:48:46

So going back generations now, three generations through the family. Lovely.

0:48:460:48:49

It's a super little set, complete with the spoons and everything,

0:48:490:48:54

absolutely gorgeous, and go on enjoying this,

0:48:540:48:57

because, do you know, it's a rather valuable set.

0:48:570:49:01

I think in value, about £3,000.

0:49:010:49:05

Oh, OK. Well, thank you, Granny!

0:49:050:49:08

Everyone loves a Giles cartoon. What's the story behind this one?

0:49:130:49:18

Well, after the war, my great aunt worked at Middlesex Hospital,

0:49:180:49:22

and Giles came into A&E with a septic toe.

0:49:220:49:25

-Ooh! Must've been painful!

-Yeah!

0:49:250:49:26

And while he was waiting, he drew it and gave it to my aunt.

0:49:260:49:29

He gave it to your aunt? I love what's happening here.

0:49:290:49:32

They're tossing a coin, these two, to see which patient they get,

0:49:320:49:35

the luscious woman here or the old drunk, by the looks of things.

0:49:350:49:39

-And she knew it was Giles when he came in, did she?

-Yeah, she'd always been a great fan.

0:49:390:49:43

It was just amazing timing, really, for her to be there when he came in.

0:49:430:49:47

So he just sat there, passed the time,

0:49:470:49:50

and distracting himself from the pain of his septic toe, presumably,

0:49:500:49:53

and just, what, handed it over to your great aunt at the end?

0:49:530:49:56

And so, what happened to it then, did you have it in pride of place in the home?

0:49:560:49:59

Yeah. It was framed and put up in the lounge, yeah.

0:49:590:50:02

-And so where do you have it?

-It was in the loft until last night.

0:50:020:50:05

-Oh, gosh, so it's not on display any more?

-No. It might be now, though!

0:50:050:50:09

Well, I spoke to a couple of our paintings guys,

0:50:090:50:12

who said they reckon this is probably worth certainly a few hundred pounds.

0:50:120:50:15

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

-Gosh. That's a surprise. Genuinely, I didn't think it was worth anything.

0:50:150:50:20

So where are you going to put it now?

0:50:200:50:22

If I'm honest, I think it might go in my downstairs toilet.

0:50:220:50:25

-In the downstairs loo?!

-Yeah!

0:50:250:50:27

Doesn't it deserve a more dignified location than the downstairs loo?!

0:50:270:50:31

I'm trying very hard to date this. Can you help me?

0:50:320:50:35

-Do you know anything about it?

-I don't know a lot.

0:50:350:50:37

We bought it in Singapore about ten years ago, maybe eight or nine years ago,

0:50:370:50:42

and we bought it in a shop which does mainly reproduction furniture,

0:50:420:50:46

but it's a sort of warren, it's got five or six little hutches linked together,

0:50:460:50:51

and we found this under a bunch of carpet or something,

0:50:510:50:54

and I'm not sure that it was actually for sale, but it looked rather nice,

0:50:540:50:57

it looked not reproduction, it looked like it may be a genuine antique,

0:50:570:51:01

and so I sort of picked it up and we went to the little lady who was selling,

0:51:010:51:06

had reasonably good English, and we agreed a price.

0:51:060:51:09

I can't remember the price, but it was not a lot of money.

0:51:090:51:11

It was in Singapore dollars, and not a lot of money.

0:51:110:51:14

And I think as we were walking out of the shop,

0:51:140:51:16

there was a very animated discussion between the little lady and her husband,

0:51:160:51:22

and at that stage we sort of beat a rapid retreat

0:51:220:51:24

in case somebody was suggesting that we pay a little bit more than we did for it.

0:51:240:51:29

-So it could be a reproduction or a fake chair.

-It could, absolutely.

0:51:290:51:33

And that's one of the reasons why we're interested in finding out exactly what it is.

0:51:330:51:36

It's clearly Chinese, I think it's Chinese provincial.

0:51:360:51:40

Where in that vast country it was actually made I don't know.

0:51:400:51:43

There's not enough research yet being done, or done,

0:51:430:51:46

but it is being done as we speak.

0:51:460:51:48

Firstly, just let me show what I love about it,

0:51:480:51:50

it's typical of many Chinese pieces of furniture, it folds.

0:51:500:51:54

Oh, gosh, isn't that glorious?

0:51:540:51:56

It's the equivalent of a handmade six-inch nail holding it together.

0:51:560:52:00

Very, very crude, so very provincial,

0:52:000:52:02

in some sort of fruit wood which has been stained a red colour

0:52:020:52:05

to look like that Chinese cinnabar lacquer of the 19th century.

0:52:050:52:09

And this is absolutely typical. You've got this lovely, lovely splat

0:52:100:52:13

with bats' heads, leading down to this lotus in the centre,

0:52:130:52:18

and then the bottom more or less repeats the top motif.

0:52:180:52:22

What I love is this wonderful ming shape here,

0:52:220:52:26

late 17th-century shape of this yoke-shaped top brow,

0:52:260:52:29

reminding of a Chinese peasant with the yoke over the oxen,

0:52:290:52:33

pulling the cart, and that's what that represents.

0:52:330:52:36

It's a super, super thing.

0:52:360:52:38

If it's a fake, it's a jolly good one,

0:52:380:52:40

and I don't think ten years ago they were making fakes to this standard.

0:52:400:52:43

Oh, right.

0:52:430:52:44

It's almost certainly about 100 years old, if not a bit older.

0:52:440:52:48

And I think they really, probably regret selling it to you.

0:52:480:52:51

I have to value it. You can't remember the price. It doesn't really matter.

0:52:510:52:55

-I'm going to put a figure of £500 on it now.

-All right.

0:52:550:52:59

That's a lot more than we paid for it, I know that.

0:52:590:53:01

I don't know the exact amount,

0:53:010:53:03

but I know it's a lot more than we paid for it.

0:53:030:53:05

It's a wait-and-see. This market is beginning to explode.

0:53:050:53:08

You know, it's a funny thing with this roadshow, because sometimes

0:53:120:53:17

I think we daydream, and yesterday I was talking to a colleague

0:53:170:53:20

who said, "What would you most like to see brought in at Wimbledon?"

0:53:200:53:23

I said, "A really, really important looking brooch."

0:53:230:53:26

"Really? What sort of brooch would that be?"

0:53:260:53:28

"Oh, I don't know, turn of the century, something like that."

0:53:280:53:32

And I had in my mind that it would be wonderful to see

0:53:320:53:35

a really spectacular...

0:53:350:53:38

butterfly brooch.

0:53:380:53:40

And then lo and behold, you sit down at my table and you bring this out.

0:53:420:53:49

Can you imagine how I felt?

0:53:490:53:50

-THEY LAUGH Surprised!

-Very pleased.

0:53:500:53:55

Now, I'd like you to tell me whatever you can about its history.

0:53:550:53:59

It was given to me after my uncle died.

0:53:590:54:02

It was part of his estate, he'd bought it for his wife.

0:54:020:54:06

So what sort of timeframe would that have been? Is this the 1940s or 50s?

0:54:060:54:10

Yes, that was the time, 1940s.

0:54:100:54:12

And then he died, '58-59, something like that. And then it came to me.

0:54:120:54:18

So there it is in the family. Then it's come down to you?

0:54:180:54:21

-It's passed on to my daughter, yes.

-What do you think about it?

0:54:210:54:25

I think it's amazing, it's really lovely.

0:54:250:54:28

-I've never worn it, unfortunately.

-Is it because it's such a statement?

0:54:280:54:34

-Well, yes.

-Because it is, isn't it?

-Yes!

0:54:340:54:38

Now, the thing about it that makes it so impressive for me

0:54:380:54:42

is that you've got this wonderful combination of stones.

0:54:420:54:46

Now, look at the stones themselves. They're diamonds, of course.

0:54:460:54:49

You've got in the wings near-colourless diamonds,

0:54:500:54:55

that's the main fabric of the piece.

0:54:550:54:57

But here and here and here and here and here and here

0:54:570:55:02

we have fancy brown diamonds.

0:55:020:55:05

Now, the brooch itself was made in about 1900.

0:55:050:55:10

I think it's turn-of-the-century.

0:55:100:55:11

But from my perspective, why do I like these brown diamonds so much?

0:55:110:55:16

Apart from the setting, is that these two principal ones,

0:55:160:55:20

they go back to round about 1750.

0:55:200:55:23

-Really?

-Really.

-Really?

0:55:230:55:27

-So they've been in something else?

-Exactly.

0:55:270:55:31

They're old diamonds that have been extracted from some antique piece.

0:55:310:55:35

Now, the diamonds themselves, when you get these old stones

0:55:350:55:38

like this, do you know where they used to come from?

0:55:380:55:41

-I've got no idea.

-Around the Taj Mahal.

-Really?

0:55:410:55:45

They're old diamonds that sometimes were traded in places like Calcutta,

0:55:450:55:49

-and that's where those diamonds come from.

-Wow.

0:55:490:55:53

Do you see, you've got a medley of stones, different sources,

0:55:530:55:56

all planted together in this wonderful butterfly.

0:55:560:56:02

I'm going to go out on a limb, because I like it.

0:56:020:56:04

It's got all this material packed into it.

0:56:040:56:07

I would like to think that if this ever came up for auction, you know,

0:56:070:56:12

so its market value, not insurance value, market value would be...

0:56:120:56:16

What shall we say? £25,000-£30,000.

0:56:170:56:21

Probably £30,000-£40,000.

0:56:210:56:25

-That's a lot.

-Which means an equivalent insurance valuation

0:56:250:56:29

in the top London market would be something in the region of £60,000.

0:56:290:56:35

ASTONISHED LAUGHTER

0:56:370:56:40

Oh, my God. Oh, wow. I wasn't expecting... Oh, my God.

0:56:400:56:46

In other words, get it back in the safe deposit from whence it comes.

0:56:490:56:54

It is a very, very spectacular brooch. How wonderful.

0:56:540:56:58

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much. Thank you.

-Wow.

0:56:580:57:02

It's been wonderful to be here at Wimbledon today,

0:57:050:57:08

the great home of Britain's tennis, and so many people

0:57:080:57:11

have come along with items connected with tennis or connected with Wimbledon.

0:57:110:57:15

One thing that's just come in, John Bradley, you're a big tennis fan,

0:57:150:57:18

and you're very excited about this.

0:57:180:57:19

It's one of the very earliest tennis rackets,

0:57:190:57:22

made just when Wimbledon was starting back in the 1870s.

0:57:220:57:25

So well over 100 years old. And look at the shape.

0:57:250:57:27

It's such a funny shape. Why would it be that shape?

0:57:270:57:30

Well, I think they didn't do much overhead shots,

0:57:300:57:32

it was more sweeps from below,

0:57:320:57:34

so it fits in with that sort of

0:57:340:57:36

more genteel sort of tennis in those days.

0:57:360:57:38

And who's this chap here?

0:57:380:57:39

-He's the actual owner.

-Oh!

-Mr Bryant, sitting outside his shop.

0:57:390:57:44

He was a very keen tennis player, and this is his actual racket,

0:57:440:57:47

dating back to the 1870s.

0:57:470:57:48

-Isn't it wonderful? Presumably quite valuable?

-Very.

0:57:480:57:52

I mean, to replace it today you're going to have to think about

0:57:520:57:55

a figure of maybe between £3,000 and £4,000.

0:57:550:57:57

Wow. Well, I can see why you're excited.

0:57:570:58:00

From the very old, though, come over here, to the new.

0:58:000:58:03

This has just been donated to the museum here at Wimbledon.

0:58:030:58:07

It is a 1950s tennis skirt, look, it's a Fred Perry one,

0:58:070:58:13

you can see Fred Perry on every single pleat here.

0:58:130:58:17

So from one of the oldest items here, the tennis racket,

0:58:170:58:19

to one of the most modern, well, the '50s, anyway,

0:58:190:58:22

this lovely skirt. We've had such a great day here at Wimbledon.

0:58:220:58:25

It's been a thrill to be here.

0:58:250:58:27

I hope you've enjoyed it half as much as we have.

0:58:270:58:29

Until next time, bye-bye.

0:58:290:58:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:530:58:56

A Roadshow first as the team descends on one of the UK's most famous sporting institutions, Wimbledon's All England Lawn Tennis Club. Perhaps predictably, heavy showers welcome a huge crowd of visitors bringing their family treasures to see Fiona Bruce and the experts, but rain does not stop play.

Objects featured include a spectacular diamond brooch with a breathtaking value, one of John McEnroe's tennis racquets smashed during one of his earliest matches at Wimbledon, and a remarkable handwritten account from the surgeon on board HMS Victory of the events surrounding the Battle of Trafalgar.


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