Yorkshire Museum 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Yorkshire Museum 2

A second visit to York, where the team discovers more family gems as hundreds descend on the Yorkshire Museum.


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We're always searching for treasure,

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so we've come to an apt location - the Yorkshire Museum and Gardens.

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You see, it's a place that already boasts pretty incredible discoveries

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that have been literally unearthed from beneath the ground here.

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So let's hope we find a few more,

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as we return for a second visit to York.

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BELL DINGS

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The great minds of the York Philosophical Society

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were hard at work in the 1820s,

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planning a home for the new discoveries exciting scientific thinkers of the day.

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And this was the result -

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the museum in the heart of York.

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It opened in 1830 and it was something of a pioneer.

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Set in its own botanical gardens,

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it's one of the first purpose-built museums in the country.

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Not that it made much difference to most of the people of York,

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because this place was an exclusive club.

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When the museum first opened,

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I wouldn't have been able to get through those doors quite so easily,

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because women were not allowed to be members of the York Philosophical Society.

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And when non-members were finally admitted to the museum,

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it was for a very steep shilling.

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The working classes were only admitted in 1838 -

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and even then it was just once a year, at Whitsun.

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Fortunately, times have changed.

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Some of the rather grand founders of the museum might be shocked

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to learn that many of the most talked about recent acquisitions

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have not been found by archaeologists

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but by...local people using these -

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metal detectors.

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The Yorkshire Museum encourages anyone who's found an antiquity

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to bring it here, to their Finds Officer,

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and they've had quite a few in recent years.

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Like this stash of Viking silver

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known as the "Vale of York Hoard".

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Look at this - it's another amazing find here in the museum.

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It's called the "Middleham Jewel"

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and it was discovered near the medieval castle of Middleham

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by an amateur detecting enthusiast.

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Whoever wore this, almost certainly a woman,

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had significant status and wealth because it's solid gold

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with this huge sapphire here.

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But more importantly than that,

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it is a charm, if you like, designed to protect

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from the dangers of childbirth.

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All this was designed to house the most precious thing of all -

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some tiny fragments of soil from a shrine or some kind of holy site.

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So whatever 15th-century woman wore this round her neck...

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was taking no chances.

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We'll see more excavated treasures later in the show.

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In the meantime, let's see what our experts are digging up.

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You know, everywhere you go in York, you fall over pieces of stone.

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Here we are, in the Museum Gardens -

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the place is absolutely covered in bits of antiquity

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and you bring in these. Where did you get them from?

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Various places.

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This one here from a dealer, it was languishing in a garden in Kent.

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-Yes.

-I just saw it on the website and the photo didn't do it justice,

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and when I saw it, I had to have it.

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OK, I think we ought to go back and decide why you wanted

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to collect these pieces of stone.

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Because quite often they are neglected

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-and they end up in people's gardens or used as doorstops.

-Yes.

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Various people have told me they're not worth anything

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and I don't care, because they're early works of art

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and sooner or later, there's not going to be much left.

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I think you hit the nail on the head there

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when you say they are early works of art.

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-This is quite the most stunning one, isn't it?

-Yes.

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I don't think it's medieval.

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I think it's a bit later than that. 1500-1600, something like that.

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-Yeah, later.

-What a piece!

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And you can imagine him on the side of a building -

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on the side of Hogwarts, perhaps! I don't know, something like that.

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The other one - over here - this little lion over here,

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if you look at the face on the lion, it's much more a Neo-Classical face.

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Yes, yeah.

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I think it's more secular

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and I would have thought dated from the 18th century,

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or possibly even the 17th century.

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And then the two down here... tell me about this one here.

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This was in a salvage yard in Worcestershire

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and the guy said it was Victorian, so I took a punt on it,

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because I thought it was older.

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-It had been re-used in a 19th-century wall.

-Yes.

-And turned around.

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That's why he thought it was Victorian?

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I said, "Maybe that's why it's NOT Victorian".

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Well, I think you're absolutely right.

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I don't think it is Victorian

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and obviously they did use, or re-use,

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sensible pieces of stone like this for their work.

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And again, it's just that spirit, and the ear's in the wrong place

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and the hair, and it's kind of that grotesqueness that I liked.

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I like you using the word spirit

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because these all have spirit, don't they?

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-Yes.

-There is something in them that actually comes through.

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-This lion, I would put at about 17th or 18th century.

-Yeah.

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I think about the people that carved them.

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Well, I think about them too because they would have ended up very high on buildings, wouldn't they?

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And you would look up at them, if you could actually see them at all.

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-Yes.

-And this one here, which is very sharp - you know -

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I can see why he thought it might have been Victorian.

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-Yeah.

-But I would have thought it was earlier.

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I think the thing about this whole collection is it has spirit.

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How much did you pay?

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Um, moving round...

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-I paid 500 for that.

-Right.

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-I paid 200 for this, delivered. I think this was about 400.

-Yes.

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I think this was more because

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I'd had a little bit to drink and it was in an auction,

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and I paid 1,500 for that but I just thought it was sweet.

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Well, I have to say, you've done incredibly well.

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I think the prices are really neither here nor there,

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as far as these pieces were works of art.

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Nothing, I think, medieval here,

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but all good sort of 16th, 17th, 18th century here.

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My favourite, of course - the one that is strongest, I suppose -

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the most secular probably, is this one here

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and I would say that that's your - £500, you said -

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let's add a nought and say £5,000.

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-Wow!

-I can't see that that...

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I didn't think that, I really didn't.

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I would have been happy with anything around 500, you know?

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-Undoubtedly.

-That's wonderful!

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Prices on the others, you know, the prices you paid are very little.

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-Except that one.

-As you say - except that one possibly.

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-The wine, I assume, was very good?

-It was, a good day.

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-Good, excellent.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks.

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Now, they say all the nice girls love a sailor.

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Do you love your sailors?

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That would be giving the game away, wouldn't it, really?

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-I love this one.

-What, just that one there? Not his two mates?

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Well, the whole thing.

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I love it too. It is... It's just very, very stylish.

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So is this something you bought?

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No, this actually belongs to my mother,

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and it was given to her when she was in her late teens.

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It was a gift from a family who lived in the same village as she did,

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in Cockthorpe, Norfolk, as they were leaving

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to go to... I think it was South Africa.

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They were going to go and set up as a farm over there.

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-It was a parting gift from them.

-So they were sailing off?

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-They were indeed.

-And they left their sailors behind.

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-Yes.

-It was made in France, in Paris.

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It's by a firm who has a peculiar name,

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so I'll spell it and say it - it's R-O-B-J -

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which was from the man who founded it, Jean Born, in 1908.

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He took the first initials of his name - B-O-R -

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reversed them and added the J.

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So I suppose in French it would be Robj,

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but most collectors call it Rob-J.

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It is marked on the bottom and they were a firm that never made anything

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but they commissioned the very best designers to make pieces.

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Little trinkets and ceramics, little objects de luxe,

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and it was really continuing a tradition of Parisian galleries

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and shops that only sold the very best pieces.

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In the 18th and early 19th century you went to the Palais-Royal

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to buy jewellery and little boxes and things

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and Jean Born continued that tradition.

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He died in 1922 in a car crash

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but his business partner continued the tradition and introduced

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this line of decanters in 1928 and they were very successful.

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And I think you can see why because it just says, late '20s,

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early '30s, it screams Art Deco.

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The hands are sort of square,

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their faces have this slightly diabolic look.

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Even the idea of three sailors back to back - there's a certain,

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there's a joie de vivre about it.

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If we take the hats off,

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there is the bit inside,

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and I suppose also it's well designed

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because each head becomes a pouring part,

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so no matter where you pour it from, it won't dribble.

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I think it's a very smart piece

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and it's something that in, you know,

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in a very smart gallery in Paris

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would sell for a smart price,

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and I think that price would be £2,000.

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Ooh!

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Several more, if it was in euros.

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LAUGHTER Well, I'll pass that on to my mother,

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she'll be delighted to hear about that.

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Well, I think she'll have to fill it

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with a rather expensive bottle of liqueur.

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Thank you.

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Most people would probably look at it and think,

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what an extraordinary looking clock,

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because it doesn't fit that sort of grandfather clock look.

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That's partly why I like it, because it is different.

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So how did it come to you?

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Well, actually my late grandfather, in his later years,

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turned quite eccentric

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and he used to go to the local auctions every week

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and the understanding I have -

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he used to fall asleep on the front of all the sofas and things

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and he used to nod off, and if the auctioneer couldn't sell anything -

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he seemed to know my grandfather - and would strike it down to him.

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My parents used to dread him coming home!

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At one stage in his room he had five grandfather clocks,

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all striking at different hours, but he seemed to love it.

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And so he didn't pay, I understand,

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more than about ten shillings for anything,

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-so in Yorkshire terms, it's ten bob.

-Wonderful image of an auction house.

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Yes, and my eccentric grandad.

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This business of taking bids off the wall and that sort of thing.

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In this instance, something wasn't selling

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-and he knew your grandfather would have it.

-It was a large farmhouse.

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-There he was, slumbering at the front.

-Yes. Exactly.

-That's fantastic.

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Would you like to hear where it comes from?

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-Oh, please, there's no markings on it.

-I had a look at it earlier

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and I couldn't find any markings on it either

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but I do know that the movement is German.

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-Oh, really?

-And the case is almost certainly French.

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-Gosh, well, you do surprise me.

-Does it surprise you?

-It does.

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It's very typically French

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and it has this lovely organic quality about it.

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Yes, lovely, because it's got a dandelion on the face, which I think is rather nice.

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And everything else is to do with flowers, leaves,

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and it has that lovely organic shape

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that starts at the bottom and works up to the branches at the top.

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-Yes.

-And it works, and it's very typical of the 1910-1920 period,

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that Art Nouveau period.

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-So that clock's about 100 years old?

-Round about that.

-Yes, yes.

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It is just possible that it's got a bit of German blood in it.

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-Gosh!

-These grilles here are slightly Germanic.

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If you can imagine the grilles on a radio, on a wireless set.

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-Oh, yes.

-Do you know what I mean? It has that feel about it.

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It's possible that this is French-German border

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but I'm almost certain that the case is French and the dial and movement are German.

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It's not everyone's cup of tea.

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At auction it has to be worth

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between £1,000 and £1,500.

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Goodness me, I was thinking somewhere about £600-£800.

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-Well, I think it's £1,000-£1,500.

-Gosh, that's fabulous!

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Well, it's not for sale. I love it. It's going back in my dining room.

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Well, you've done a beautiful job of restoration too.

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Oh, very kind, thank you very much.

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Demand for various antiques changes according to vagaries of fashion

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but one of the categories that's really performed well over the years

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have been wine bottles.

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They really have proved to be very popular amongst collectors

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and what they really like is sealed examples.

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So you start with a bottle like that and it's nothing special.

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But when you add THAT to it, that changes the game.

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A sealed example of an early bottle from 1770 is a good thing.

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Have you known it from new?

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No, no. Maybe about ten years!

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And how did it come into yours?

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Well, when I left the Army, I got a job moving furniture

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and we were down in London, moving a lady up to Yorkshire

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and she was going to throw it out.

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I asked her if I could have it, and she said yes, so I took it.

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Bloomin' great! Well, I think that's really nice.

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1770. What are we, 240-250 years ago?

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Do you know anything about James Oakes Bury?

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-No.

-I do.

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-Do you?

-I do.

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-Ooh!

-I know something about him

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because I think his name

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was James Oakes and he lived in Bury St Edmunds.

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Not Bury itself?

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Not Bury, Lancashire, but Bury St Edmunds,

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because I've had a little word with somebody

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and I found that he was a wool merchant in Bury St Edmunds,

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a prosperous man, and you can trace him.

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His diaries are published,

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you can actually buy his diaries and follow his life.

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-Good heavens!

-And that makes a difference to value.

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-So you start with a bottle like that and it's £100.

-Yes.

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You add a seal to it like that, that makes it £700,

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and you add the actual individual who owned this

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and you can add a few more quid to that,

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-which is not bad for something you blagged as a removal man!

-Yeah.

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-Pretty good, eh?

-Yeah, so what's it worth?

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-£800 and some more.

-No!

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-It is.

-I was going to say 20 or 30.

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-Hold on a minute!

-BOTH LAUGH

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-It belonged to one of my ancestors.

-Right.

0:14:470:14:52

-Rear Admiral John Manley, I believe.

-Fantastic!

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Who was born, I think, at the beginning of the 1700s

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and died somewhere in the late 1700s

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but I'm not quite sure exactly of the date.

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-OK. And so he could well have used this.

-Yes.

0:15:040:15:08

Had it in his pocket, maybe to show people where he'd been,

0:15:080:15:12

the battles he had partaken in. It does show a lot of wear and tear.

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I refer to the date, and it's down there, 1754.

0:15:160:15:20

"A new terrestrial globe by Nath" - that's Nathaniel - "Hill",

0:15:200:15:26

a very well known

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scientific instrument maker. You don't get a better name than that.

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-Right.

-1754. That's before Captain Cook had done his exploratory...

0:15:310:15:35

Yes, we had worked that out from the...

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-Australia is sort of, obviously, the bit there that's missing.

-Yes.

0:15:380:15:41

Look at that, Australia is only partly delineated.

0:15:410:15:44

I can just see Van Diemen's Land there.

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And look, New Zealand just gets a little...

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-sort of dot in the middle of the ocean.

-That's right.

0:15:500:15:52

And, furthermore, North West America is actually just described as

0:15:520:15:57

"Unknown", so I mean, it's fantastic, isn't it?

0:15:570:16:01

Yeah, absolutely.

0:16:010:16:02

-Your ancestor was sailing the seas, very unknown seas.

-Yes.

0:16:020:16:06

This really does still hold its colours and its detail,

0:16:060:16:11

-and even the little clasps, they're all there.

-Yes.

0:16:110:16:14

-Let's have a look at the fella who this belonged to.

-There he is.

0:16:140:16:17

It's a real treat to put a personality to an object.

0:16:170:16:21

They're so often torn apart and of course...

0:16:210:16:24

This is his ship, yes.

0:16:240:16:26

But this is the same ship -

0:16:260:16:30

-were you aware of that?

-No.

-No, I didn't know that, no, no.

0:16:300:16:33

-Broadside and sternside.

-Oh, no, no.

0:16:330:16:35

So they could show off all the sort of technical detail of the rigging

0:16:350:16:40

and the sort of number of guns.

0:16:400:16:42

This was probably on board that ship for many a decade.

0:16:420:16:46

Right.

0:16:460:16:47

Something completely different, I fear, hiding in this box.

0:16:470:16:51

Those are his buckles, and I know that.

0:16:510:16:53

Wow, that's all I can say, absolutely wow!

0:16:530:16:56

-These are the best shoe buckles I think I've ever seen.

-Really?

0:16:560:16:59

I just found them in the bottom of a drawer when I was clearing out.

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-You lucky thing, you lucky thing.

-ALL LAUGH

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These are not diamonds, I'm sure you know that...

0:17:050:17:08

No, I don't think... They're paste.

0:17:080:17:10

-They're paste...

-Yes, OK.

-..which is English lead glass.

0:17:100:17:13

-Right.

-It was easy to cut - easier to cut than diamonds -

0:17:130:17:17

and one of the great manufacturing skills of the time, making these,

0:17:170:17:23

was done, more often than not, by top quality silversmiths.

0:17:230:17:26

The best ones were always set in silver.

0:17:260:17:29

These have got... I think that's the leftovers of the leather polish from your shoes.

0:17:290:17:33

-Right.

-These would buff... This is probably solid silver.

0:17:330:17:36

Yes, I haven't ever cleaned them or anything.

0:17:360:17:39

No, they don't need cleaning, really.

0:17:390:17:40

And things like this were made... from the sort of 1660s.

0:17:400:17:44

Pepys wore them. Out of fashion by the 1790s. These are enormous.

0:17:440:17:49

This was the age of dandyism really and the bigger, the better.

0:17:490:17:52

So what a potted history!

0:17:520:17:54

We've got the man, the ship, we've got the globe

0:17:540:17:57

that took him to all the various battles he no doubt partook in.

0:17:570:18:01

-Right.

-I've not seen a better pair.

0:18:010:18:03

I think they're worth £1,000 to £1,500.

0:18:030:18:06

-Wow!

-In an auction.

0:18:060:18:08

Gosh, OK.

0:18:080:18:10

The globe. That's a really good one.

0:18:100:18:15

If I was putting that in an auction,

0:18:160:18:17

my estimate would be £5,000 to £7,000.

0:18:170:18:21

It's THAT good, condition is...

0:18:210:18:23

Right, thank you.

0:18:250:18:27

THEY LAUGH

0:18:270:18:29

MUSIC: "Rule, Britannia"

0:18:290:18:32

So anyone familiar with that wonderful mug

0:18:510:18:53

with the alphabet across it by Eric Ravilious

0:18:530:18:57

will recognise the style of this print,

0:18:570:18:59

which is of course by Eric Ravilious and it's signed by him -

0:18:590:19:02

both printed and in pencil, bottom right.

0:19:020:19:06

And it's done in the late 1930s

0:19:060:19:08

and it's of Newhaven Harbour in East Sussex, isn't it?

0:19:080:19:12

-Yes.

-It's not something you see very often. Why is it yours?

0:19:120:19:17

It belonged to my father-in-law and he would have bought it new.

0:19:170:19:21

When he was a young man, he kind of set up his bachelor pad with all modern furniture...

0:19:210:19:26

Oh, he wanted to be modern?

0:19:260:19:28

Oh, very! We've still got some of the modern furniture.

0:19:280:19:30

And this was one of the things he obviously bought then

0:19:300:19:34

and it's been in the family ever since.

0:19:340:19:36

It's also one of the first things Eric Ravilious did

0:19:360:19:39

in the way of prints, in colour,

0:19:390:19:41

because he'd done woodcuts on a smaller scale and monochrome.

0:19:410:19:45

But this, to me, although it's a very sort of muted palette,

0:19:450:19:48

is an explosion of colour

0:19:480:19:50

and into a much bigger size,

0:19:500:19:52

and of course it's a different medium, really, it's a lithograph.

0:19:520:19:56

-He also called it his homage to Seurat.

-Right, I can see why.

0:19:560:20:00

-Yes, you sort of can, can't you?

-Yes.

0:20:000:20:02

-It's got that open light about it, hasn't it?

-Yes.

0:20:020:20:05

There's a sort of strange stillness about it,

0:20:050:20:08

and even the boats steaming into the harbour

0:20:080:20:11

seem sort of frozen in the water

0:20:110:20:12

and there's no people milling around at all.

0:20:120:20:16

It's extraordinarily still

0:20:160:20:18

and even these clouds sort of hang in the sky, statically.

0:20:180:20:22

And the light in it is very extraordinary as well,

0:20:220:20:25

very strongly lit and highly stylised to suggest that light.

0:20:250:20:28

In this way it's extremely modern.

0:20:280:20:31

Yes, yes.

0:20:310:20:32

But a very individual

0:20:320:20:34

and British take on modernism for the late 1930s.

0:20:340:20:38

Anyway, terrific print, and what's going on here?

0:20:380:20:41

-Cos I notice the signature's...

-Well, knowing my father-in-law,

0:20:410:20:44

he would have trimmed it to go into the clip frame he wanted

0:20:440:20:47

but we didn't actually realise until we took it out yesterday that he'd actually left that little bit there.

0:20:470:20:52

-Oh, I see, so he's cut a little bit off and then...

-He'd have cut it.

0:20:520:20:56

He wouldn't have known that it was important,

0:20:560:20:58

it was just a print that he bought as a young man that he really liked.

0:20:580:21:02

Do you think it's important?

0:21:020:21:03

Well, when I was looking it up on the internet, as one does...

0:21:030:21:07

-Yes, of course.

-..it kind of said that this one was elusive,

0:21:070:21:10

that was the word they used.

0:21:100:21:12

So I thought, mm, perhaps we better bring it in and have a look.

0:21:120:21:16

Yes, it is a rare print.

0:21:160:21:17

I'll tell you about the missing bit first.

0:21:170:21:19

It's probably worth about 2,000 quid.

0:21:190:21:21

ONLOOKERS GASP AND LAUGH

0:21:210:21:23

-Serious?

-Yes.

0:21:230:21:25

Well, I thought the whole picture, if we were lucky, it would be worth 1,000.

0:21:270:21:30

No, it's worth about £4,000 as it is.

0:21:300:21:33

That's fantastic! Well, it's still going up in the clip.

0:21:330:21:37

-No, I think we'll frame it properly when we get home.

-Yeah!

0:21:370:21:40

It's still going up on the wall.

0:21:400:21:41

-Well, quite right.

-That's wonderful!

0:21:410:21:43

But it is a really, really wonderful image, I just love it.

0:21:430:21:46

Yes, oh, yes.

0:21:460:21:47

So here, we're standing in front of the Yorkshire Museum

0:21:490:21:51

with a treasure from Yorkshire, aren't we?

0:21:510:21:54

And what a joy to see a piece of jewellery gleaming in the sun,

0:21:540:21:57

set with sapphires and coloured glass,

0:21:570:21:59

and in a way, it's an object of national importance.

0:21:590:22:03

Tell me all about it and what your relationship is with it.

0:22:030:22:07

Well, I actually was the lucky person who found the ring,

0:22:070:22:12

metal detecting, and it's been through all the treasure process

0:22:120:22:15

and it's been declared treasure

0:22:150:22:17

and it's recently been acquired by the Yorkshire Museum.

0:22:170:22:19

And of course everybody's itching to know where and how you found it.

0:22:190:22:25

And I'm jealous already.

0:22:250:22:26

Well, it was found in fields near York,

0:22:260:22:29

with the permission of the landowner,

0:22:290:22:31

with a metal detector on a York club outing.

0:22:310:22:35

What did it feel like, when you first saw it? What was it, to you?

0:22:350:22:38

Well, when I first dug down and saw the glint of gold,

0:22:380:22:42

I knew it was special...

0:22:420:22:43

Didn't know how old it was at the time

0:22:450:22:46

and then, obviously, I showed it to the members of the club

0:22:460:22:50

to try and get an opinion

0:22:500:22:52

and we thought medieval but then when the British Museum examined it,

0:22:520:22:56

they've come back with 10th or 11th century.

0:22:560:22:59

10th or 11th century, my goodness me!

0:22:590:23:02

I mean, thousands of years in the ground and untouched,

0:23:020:23:05

and precious stones are untouched by that, gold is untouched by it.

0:23:050:23:07

Glass is touched a little bit, it alters its character a little,

0:23:070:23:11

but glass is a perfectly respectable and ancient...material

0:23:110:23:16

to use in jewellery.

0:23:160:23:17

And I have a feeling that this might be glass simulating garnet work

0:23:170:23:21

and I think that might be a key to the age of it, mightn't it?

0:23:210:23:24

That's what the British Museum said,

0:23:240:23:27

that's why they came up with the later date.

0:23:270:23:29

Garnet was used more in the 6th and 7th century,

0:23:290:23:32

so there's a little bit of mismatch with the dates at the moment.

0:23:320:23:36

We still need to do more research.

0:23:360:23:38

What I'd really love to hope is that this is a Viking ring

0:23:380:23:41

because York is the great Viking centre, isn't it?

0:23:410:23:44

It's the most marvellous connection if one could make that.

0:23:440:23:46

-I think without a shadow of doubt, it's a man's ring.

-I think so.

0:23:460:23:50

I'd like to think of that as a Viking warrior using that,

0:23:500:23:53

an emblem of his status -

0:23:530:23:55

that he could afford pure gold, he could afford to have sapphires,

0:23:550:23:59

and the sapphire is critical too, isn't it? Tell me about that one.

0:23:590:24:01

It is, apparently, it's the second oldest sapphire

0:24:010:24:04

that's been found in the country,

0:24:040:24:06

which is quite mind-blowing.

0:24:060:24:09

-The oldest was a Roman one, 5th century.

-Yes.

0:24:090:24:12

Yesterday and today is the first time I've seen it in the flesh for two years...

0:24:120:24:15

-And still exciting?

-Still exciting, yeah.

0:24:150:24:17

The light is falling on it. You made light fall on it.

0:24:170:24:20

It had been in the darkness for possibly a thousand years.

0:24:200:24:23

It's not yours any more, is it?

0:24:230:24:25

No, it's been acquired by the Yorkshire Museum,

0:24:250:24:27

which I'm very proud to be associated with,

0:24:270:24:30

because it's in such good company with the artefacts already there.

0:24:300:24:34

Yes, exactly. And I suppose everybody wants to know,

0:24:340:24:36

it's a lottery win in an emotional sense,

0:24:360:24:39

but it's a lottery win in another sense in that, of course,

0:24:390:24:42

the museum has bought it from you,

0:24:420:24:44

-and that figure is public, isn't it?

-It is, yes, £35,000.

0:24:440:24:48

£35,000 for a dream.

0:24:480:24:50

Basically, the monetary reward

0:24:500:24:52

that the Treasure Valuation Committee put on it

0:24:520:24:55

gets shared between the finder and the landowner.

0:24:550:24:58

So there'll be a happy farmer in Yorkshire now.

0:24:580:25:01

Well, I think a very happy farmer, but content in the concept

0:25:010:25:05

that he's actually sold something of really national importance

0:25:050:25:09

and it's now safe, and that's critical, isn't it?

0:25:090:25:11

It's been marvellous to talk to you about it, thank you very much.

0:25:110:25:15

Thank you very much.

0:25:150:25:16

Well, they say there's nothing new invented under the sun

0:25:160:25:19

but every now and again, a designer comes along

0:25:190:25:22

to have a tweak and improve.

0:25:220:25:24

And we've been sitting for thousands of years but I love chairs

0:25:240:25:27

and I love to see chairs,

0:25:270:25:29

and this is a beautiful chair but tell me, where did it come from?

0:25:290:25:33

Well, we bought a new house about two years ago,

0:25:330:25:36

a 1930s house,

0:25:360:25:38

and it was in with the package.

0:25:380:25:40

So when we went around the house it was in there,

0:25:400:25:43

and then when we moved in, we found it, and it was still in the house.

0:25:430:25:46

Wow, so just one of these left behind.

0:25:460:25:48

-Yeah, two, left behind.

-Two?

0:25:480:25:49

So we've two of these. We couldn't bring them both down with us today.

0:25:490:25:52

So what did you think when you saw them? Did you like them?

0:25:520:25:56

Well, we love them, the style of them's absolutely gorgeous

0:25:560:25:59

and the low seats are really, really nice, aren't they?

0:25:590:26:02

They did have a cover over the top,

0:26:020:26:04

so for a while they had pots of paint balanced on while we decorated

0:26:040:26:08

and then once we finished that and took the dust cover off,

0:26:080:26:12

we realised how nice they were.

0:26:120:26:14

So, basically, you've had pots of paint balancing on

0:26:140:26:20

what I'm going to say to you is a British design classic.

0:26:200:26:23

It was designed in 1946 by a gentleman called Eric Lyons.

0:26:230:26:27

Oh, right.

0:26:270:26:29

Eric Lyons was an architect, first and foremost,

0:26:290:26:32

but after the war, he got into product design

0:26:320:26:34

and he actually developed a range of furniture called the Tecta -

0:26:340:26:38

which is this - for the Packet Furniture Company in Great Yarmouth.

0:26:380:26:42

-Right.

-Now, this chair actually has the most brilliant name,

0:26:420:26:46

-it's called the "demountable easy chair".

-Brilliant!

0:26:460:26:49

I'm sure you found it very easy to demount yourself out of it.

0:26:490:26:53

-Yes, definitely, yes.

-Absolutely.

0:26:530:26:55

It is comfort but the thing is

0:26:550:26:57

that it actually sums up everything about product design,

0:26:570:27:01

just after the war. It's bent plywood, this one's covered in oak.

0:27:010:27:05

It's all about the new ideas that they were coming up with,

0:27:050:27:08

that came out of the war effort.

0:27:080:27:10

They were having to think on their feet

0:27:100:27:12

and new products and new ways of manufacturing were developed and this is one of these products.

0:27:120:27:16

I mean, we've got a fantastic label just underneath - there it is -

0:27:160:27:21

the "Tecta", actually there with the "E Kahn & Co",

0:27:210:27:24

who were a subsidiary company that worked with Packet Furniture.

0:27:240:27:29

But, you know, it's a fantastic piece of furniture.

0:27:290:27:32

I have to ask, what do you think of the fabric and all this covering as well?

0:27:320:27:36

Well, we're not a big fan. When we took the sheets off it,

0:27:360:27:39

we were going to get it reupholstered and change the fabric.

0:27:390:27:42

What you've got is the original fabric and not only that,

0:27:420:27:45

the fabric is also designed by somebody really important.

0:27:450:27:48

-Oh, right.

-It was actually designed by a lady called Marianne Straub.

0:27:480:27:52

-Right.

-Who in the 1940s to 1960s was probably one of the leading

0:27:520:27:55

commercial textile designers of her day.

0:27:550:27:58

You've got a chair that is in many museums...

0:27:580:28:00

is considered an absolute classic,

0:28:000:28:02

and it got left behind in your house.

0:28:020:28:05

And we stood on it to paint the ceiling.

0:28:050:28:08

Well, why not? You've got to use these things for something.

0:28:080:28:12

I'd probably say maybe stop standing on it.

0:28:120:28:14

-Right.

-I'd also say don't re-cover it.

0:28:140:28:16

-Yes.

-Live with it.

0:28:160:28:18

It's had a life and the life tells a story of what it is, as a chair.

0:28:180:28:22

It's a beautiful shape, it's a beautiful form,

0:28:220:28:24

it's by a great designer.

0:28:240:28:25

You've got two of them

0:28:250:28:27

and if you had to go out and replace them,

0:28:270:28:30

you'd need about £1,000-£1,500 to buy them again.

0:28:300:28:32

-Wow, interesting!

-Surprise.

0:28:320:28:36

That's very surprising!

0:28:360:28:38

This was donated to Fairfax House about 15 years ago and it's come with no information whatsoever.

0:28:380:28:43

Now, this is the lovely Fairfax House here in York, fantastic townhouse museum.

0:28:430:28:47

Yes, we have a fantastic furniture collection

0:28:470:28:50

-but this isn't something we specialise in.

-OK, how flattering!

0:28:500:28:54

A museum has come to the Roadshow to find out about it.

0:28:540:28:57

-Of course!

-What have you found out about it?

0:28:570:29:00

We know it came to England in the 1940s with a family that was escaping persecution during the war,

0:29:000:29:04

a German Jewish family.

0:29:040:29:06

But other than that there's nothing really to give us

0:29:060:29:10

any idea about provenance or where it's come from.

0:29:100:29:13

OK, but being a rather good museum, I know you'll have done...

0:29:130:29:16

you'll have picked up on some of the clues. It says here, "Hubertusburg",

0:29:160:29:20

which is indeed the name of this palace,

0:29:200:29:23

and also here on the date, in Latin,

0:29:230:29:26

the equivalent of 1763.

0:29:260:29:30

You've got a little figure here of Victory,

0:29:310:29:34

or Fame, blowing her trumpet and peace being declared,

0:29:340:29:38

and in fact 1763 was the year in which the Treaty of Paris

0:29:380:29:43

marked the end of the Seven Years' War.

0:29:430:29:45

This was a complicated war and I won't go into the complexity.

0:29:450:29:48

-No.

-But part of it was that Prussia was also at war with Austria

0:29:480:29:52

and their part of the Treaty was settled at Hubertusburg,

0:29:520:29:56

at this very palace.

0:29:560:29:58

So this actually commemorates the end of the Seven Years' War,

0:29:580:30:02

as far as the Prussians and the Austrians were concerned.

0:30:020:30:05

And if we look inside... let's see, here we go,

0:30:050:30:09

there is more sort of declaration of peace.

0:30:090:30:12

We've got down here it says, "Germania Pacata".

0:30:120:30:15

I guess that means, more or less, "Germany at peace".

0:30:150:30:18

So everything about this tells us it's peace.

0:30:180:30:22

Hubertusburg was actually built by Augustus I -

0:30:220:30:25

otherwise known as Augustus the Strong -

0:30:250:30:28

the man we constantly refer to when we talk about Meissen porcelain,

0:30:280:30:31

-the very first European porcelain factory.

-I see.

0:30:310:30:34

And by the time peace was signed at Hubertusburg, it was his son

0:30:340:30:37

Augustus III who was in charge.

0:30:370:30:40

Now this is the thing that really -

0:30:400:30:42

I think this is where you're going to learn a little bit, I hope.

0:30:420:30:45

Here you have a tantalising little paper label.

0:30:450:30:48

It's a collector's label and it's sadly ripped off here and there.

0:30:480:30:52

But what I can make out here is the German word for...

0:30:520:30:57

Well, a silver cabinet...of the prince and it says "Albrechtsb..."

0:30:570:31:04

Well, Albrechtsburg is where the Meissen factory was

0:31:040:31:08

and, my guess is, possibly where Augustus the Strong

0:31:080:31:12

had his cabinet of curiosities.

0:31:120:31:14

And then you've got a very neatly written number,

0:31:140:31:17

which is a category number.

0:31:170:31:19

So I believe this was in the collection of Augustus III

0:31:190:31:23

and that it went into his collection at the Albrechtsburg,

0:31:230:31:27

back at HQ.

0:31:270:31:30

So the question is, how did it get from there to Fairfax House?

0:31:300:31:36

And the clue you gave is this family that was fleeing from Germany.

0:31:360:31:40

-Yes, yes.

-Yeah.

-That's remarkable.

0:31:400:31:42

And I do know that some of the porcelains

0:31:420:31:45

were actually de-accessioned - that's the polite word -

0:31:450:31:48

were sold out of the Albrechtsburg,

0:31:480:31:50

I think it was in the late 1890s or the early 20th century.

0:31:500:31:54

It's just possible that this is a perfectly bona fide sale.

0:31:540:31:58

If that hadn't been the case,

0:31:580:32:00

then one would have to think about the possibility of this having been...what's the word?

0:32:000:32:04

Liberated.

0:32:040:32:06

LAUGHTER

0:32:060:32:08

It's a lovely thing.

0:32:080:32:09

And an irony for a piece that went into the Albrechtsburg -

0:32:090:32:12

famous for its Meissen porcelain is, contrary to appearances -

0:32:120:32:15

it's not made of porcelain.

0:32:150:32:17

Is it enamel?

0:32:170:32:19

It's enamel, it's enamelled copper.

0:32:190:32:20

An amazingly important moment in European history

0:32:200:32:23

and so beautifully captured.

0:32:230:32:25

It's a lovely, lovely thing.

0:32:250:32:27

So lucky old Fairfax House, I'd say.

0:32:270:32:29

-Indeed.

-And Fairfax House have no intention of knowing its worth.

0:32:290:32:32

None whatsoever but if you happen to tell us, we wouldn't mind!

0:32:320:32:36

You need to know for insurance.

0:32:360:32:38

I guess that if you were selling it on the open market,

0:32:380:32:40

you might get somewhere in the region of £4,000 or £5,000 for it,

0:32:400:32:43

so maybe insure it for a little bit more than that.

0:32:430:32:46

Lovely. That's very helpful, thank you.

0:32:460:32:48

I have watched this

0:32:480:32:51

wending its way through the queue

0:32:510:32:53

for hours and hours and hours.

0:32:530:32:54

And finally it got to my desk

0:32:540:32:57

and I'm so pleased to see it! I mean, you can sort of...

0:32:570:33:00

It's beautiful.

0:33:000:33:01

It does have a certain charm to it.

0:33:010:33:04

-OK, so it's a wooden leg.

-Yes.

-How did you get it?

0:33:040:33:09

-Because I can see you are not legless.

-Yet.

-Yet!

0:33:090:33:13

Hopefully soon. It was just... It was a birthday present off somebody.

0:33:130:33:18

Yeah.

0:33:180:33:19

That said they thought I would appreciate it.

0:33:190:33:21

And I was quite shocked cos when I opened the door,

0:33:210:33:24

the person was holding it like a bat and I thought...

0:33:240:33:28

I kind of saw my life flash across my eyes and then I thought,

0:33:280:33:31

actually, no, that's not a bat, it's a wooden leg!

0:33:310:33:35

And actually, yeah, I really do appreciate it, I love it.

0:33:350:33:38

It's a great object, you know.

0:33:380:33:40

It's a rather strange birthday gift

0:33:400:33:42

but, you know, I don't know what happens in York.

0:33:420:33:46

If the leg fits.

0:33:460:33:47

If a leg fits, wear it, I say.

0:33:470:33:49

It is an early one. I would say it's early 19th century,

0:33:490:33:52

so it could even be Napoleonic.

0:33:520:33:55

I know! When I say "Napoleonic"

0:33:560:33:59

I look at you, and you're going "Kerching! Kerching! Kerching!"

0:33:590:34:03

Well, it is a bit of a kerching - I would say it is £500-£700.

0:34:030:34:09

-Really?

-No! No way!

-Got it, exactly.

0:34:090:34:13

Now you did think that when you came in earlier on today?

0:34:130:34:16

-No! I just thought...

-So why did you...?

-I hate it, I really hate it.

0:34:160:34:20

I've had to carry it around all day long.

0:34:200:34:23

He won't allow it in our tent, we're tenting.

0:34:230:34:26

We've come from Merseyside in a tent

0:34:260:34:28

and he won't let it in the tent because he's scared of it.

0:34:280:34:31

-I like it a lot more now, I have to say.

-How mercenary!

0:34:310:34:36

So you hate it. Why did you bring it? Why did you come along today?

0:34:360:34:39

Well, Lily just mentioned the Antiques Roadshow

0:34:390:34:42

and I've watched it every week, all my life,

0:34:420:34:45

and the fact that like made it to this point and met you -

0:34:450:34:50

because I just, I love you.

0:34:500:34:52

And I feel like you've brought me up, in a way. I really do!

0:34:520:34:56

That's made my day! How fantastic!

0:34:560:34:59

-You've made my day.

-It's made ours. £500-£700! Who wants to buy a leg?

0:34:590:35:05

This is a stunning piece of furniture, how long have you had it?

0:35:090:35:12

I inherited it from my mother

0:35:120:35:14

and it's been in my house ever since.

0:35:140:35:18

She inherited it from her father

0:35:180:35:21

and we have a letter at home,

0:35:210:35:24

relating to the transfer from my grandfather back in 1939.

0:35:240:35:30

-It's going down the female line.

-Yes, it will go to my daughter.

0:35:300:35:33

So that's a trend you'll continue.

0:35:330:35:35

As long as there are daughters to pass it on to.

0:35:350:35:38

It's beautifully inlaid. Do you know where it's from?

0:35:380:35:41

All we know is that... it is known within the family,

0:35:410:35:45

and in this original letter, as an Italian travelling desk.

0:35:450:35:49

Well, Italian is right. Both pieces of furniture are Italian.

0:35:490:35:53

-It is made of rosewood, as is the chair.

-Right.

0:35:530:35:56

Rosewood, ivory inlaid with ebony sort of borders.

0:35:560:36:01

-Yes, yes.

-Although these are both 19th century pieces of furniture,

0:36:010:36:06

made around 1890 in Italy, they both relate

0:36:060:36:09

-to pieces of furniture from different centuries.

-Ah, OK.

0:36:090:36:13

The desk itself is of a form known as a bureau Mazarin.

0:36:130:36:18

These two pedestals,

0:36:180:36:20

each with three drawers, four feet and then a central X stretcher,

0:36:200:36:24

-is pure bureau Mazarin form.

-Right.

0:36:240:36:29

One thing that strongly points to this being 19th century,

0:36:290:36:32

rather than the 17th century,

0:36:320:36:35

is this superstructure here.

0:36:350:36:37

You don't normally get these superstructures on bureaux Mazarins.

0:36:370:36:40

-Right.

-But whereas the origins for the desk date back

0:36:400:36:44

to the late 17th century,

0:36:440:36:45

around 1680s when these desks were first made,

0:36:450:36:48

this is sort of different altogether.

0:36:480:36:50

-OK, OK.

-The origins for this are 15th century Italy.

0:36:500:36:56

-Right.

-And it's known as a Savonarola chair.

0:36:560:37:00

Yes.

0:37:000:37:02

And Savonarola is here in person.

0:37:020:37:04

-Yes.

-This central medallion is the man himself.

0:37:040:37:07

-Yes.

-He was a 15th century friar, Dominican friar...

-OK.

0:37:070:37:12

..based in Florence, and he had a chair like this in San Marco,

0:37:120:37:18

near Florence, so 15th century origins.

0:37:180:37:22

-Yes.

-17th century origins, but both made in the 19th century.

0:37:220:37:26

Right.

0:37:260:37:28

Now, had they been pieces from their original centuries...

0:37:280:37:32

-Yes.

-..they would have been obviously very high in value.

0:37:320:37:36

-Right.

-As it stands, if you were to sell a chair

0:37:360:37:40

and a desk like this, now,

0:37:400:37:43

at auction, you would get something in the region of £3,000.

0:37:430:37:47

Thank you very much.

0:37:470:37:49

It's a lovely piece of furniture

0:37:490:37:51

and it is a part of the family and...yeah.

0:37:510:37:54

And is the chair comfortable?

0:37:540:37:56

No, it's not. The chair is used in a similar situation as this.

0:37:560:38:00

We have it in the hall, put coats on it, that sort of thing. It's lovely.

0:38:000:38:04

How much do you know about your panel?

0:38:060:38:10

Well, very little, apart from the fact

0:38:100:38:12

that it has been inherited through my mother

0:38:120:38:15

and it came down through her uncle, who came from quite a large family

0:38:150:38:19

that came originally from Liverpool...

0:38:190:38:21

Right.

0:38:210:38:22

..where they founded a company in dyes, originally aniline dyes,

0:38:220:38:27

and then this moved over to chemical dyes.

0:38:270:38:30

Right, and so that - I think we can say -

0:38:300:38:33

was a very successful business, because of course that created

0:38:330:38:37

all sorts of different possibilities with textiles.

0:38:370:38:40

But what it tells me is that they were successful,

0:38:400:38:43

and therefore probably quite well established,

0:38:430:38:46

and we can even say wealthy family.

0:38:460:38:48

Because something like this would be in the ownership of a family

0:38:480:38:52

that had disposable income.

0:38:520:38:54

In the 19th century terms, this is what I would call

0:38:540:38:58

a Grand Tour souvenir.

0:38:580:39:01

Do you know what the technique is here?

0:39:010:39:05

I have no idea, no, I haven't.

0:39:050:39:07

Well, to all intents and purposes, it's a picture

0:39:070:39:11

but it is incredibly cleverly made.

0:39:110:39:14

It is called pietra dura

0:39:140:39:17

and it's a plaque or panel

0:39:170:39:19

that is composed of irregularly cut

0:39:190:39:23

and highly polished stone -

0:39:230:39:26

marble, semi-precious stone and precious stones, intricately laid -

0:39:260:39:31

almost like a jigsaw puzzle -

0:39:310:39:33

to form this amazing picture.

0:39:330:39:36

And the absolute skill of the creator was that he could see

0:39:360:39:42

the intrinsic beauty in the stone,

0:39:420:39:46

so he used its natural qualities to put it in the right place,

0:39:460:39:51

and you can see this just so clearly

0:39:510:39:53

here in the glass and the neck of the wine bottle.

0:39:530:39:57

I think this is probably a slice of chalcedony

0:39:570:40:00

and that gives it the opaqueness.

0:40:000:40:04

You can see the glass is there.

0:40:040:40:07

Something else that I love is the actual subject matter.

0:40:070:40:10

You've got this lovely figure of a child crouching down

0:40:100:40:15

with what would have been a very new fangled object -

0:40:150:40:19

which is a mouse trap -

0:40:190:40:21

and this lovely cat - sitting there.

0:40:210:40:24

She's almost redundant because the mouse trap will take over her work.

0:40:240:40:29

And all of this is being overseen by this old lady who's spinning.

0:40:290:40:34

So, where do you think it might have been bought from?

0:40:340:40:38

Somewhere in Italy, possibly Rome.

0:40:380:40:42

Florence, I think. It's Florentine.

0:40:420:40:44

Florentine, dating from somewhere around 1890, that sort of thing.

0:40:440:40:49

So they would have been established by then, aniline dyes,

0:40:490:40:53

we're talking about the middle of the 19th century,

0:40:530:40:56

and towards the end of the century they would have made their money.

0:40:560:40:59

-So they were able to afford something like this.

-Wonderful.

0:40:590:41:04

I think it's fabulous, really lovely!

0:41:040:41:07

It's so vibrant and colourful.

0:41:070:41:09

-Well, it has a value.

-Aha.

0:41:090:41:12

-And I'm going to give you an auction estimate.

-Right.

0:41:120:41:16

These sort of things do very well at sale

0:41:160:41:19

and a pre-sale estimate, I think,

0:41:190:41:21

would be somewhere in the region of £4,000-£6,000.

0:41:210:41:25

Yes, it's amazing!

0:41:270:41:30

I couldn't believe you brought me such a huge piece of Whitby jet.

0:41:320:41:35

Where on earth did you find it?

0:41:350:41:37

Well, it was my father's.

0:41:370:41:39

He had it about 40 years.

0:41:390:41:40

In his youth and as a young man,

0:41:400:41:42

he used to go round sale rooms quite a lot

0:41:420:41:45

and he bought an awful lot of rubbish

0:41:450:41:48

but he also bought one or two nice things.

0:41:480:41:50

And then that was handed down to me and we've had it about 40 years.

0:41:500:41:54

Well, it's an amazing, huge piece of jet.

0:41:540:41:58

Yes.

0:41:580:42:00

And, of course, jet is fossilized monkey-puzzle tree.

0:42:000:42:04

It's a little bit like coal.

0:42:040:42:05

It was carved and it was a little industry in Whitby,

0:42:050:42:08

of course made highly popular by Queen Victoria with popular mourning jewellery.

0:42:080:42:13

It's signed "John Speedy, Whitby".

0:42:130:42:16

-Yes.

-John Speedy actually won a prize for the best jet carving in 1861.

0:42:160:42:21

-Oh, really?

-And that was for a bunch of flowers.

0:42:210:42:24

But this, I think, is every bit as good.

0:42:240:42:28

-It is the top of the tree of jet carving.

-Amazing.

0:42:280:42:31

I don't think you could probably find a better piece of jet.

0:42:310:42:34

I've shown it to several colleagues.

0:42:340:42:36

Nobody's seen a piece this big or this good.

0:42:360:42:38

And, as a consequence, it's worth a reasonable amount of money.

0:42:380:42:42

Oh, even more interesting!

0:42:420:42:43

Well, I think you'd be interested to hear that,

0:42:430:42:47

to the right collector, they would pay £2,000 for this.

0:42:470:42:50

Oh, excellent, delighted!

0:42:500:42:53

Well, I'm delighted you've brought it in, thank you so much,

0:42:530:42:57

it's an amazing thing.

0:42:570:42:58

-And how great to be here in York, just down the road.

-That's true.

0:42:580:43:01

-A bit of Yorkshire.

-Indeed.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:010:43:04

Now, York and chocolate,

0:43:070:43:09

it's like Norwich and mustard,

0:43:090:43:12

and of course we should be looking at a tin of cocoa

0:43:120:43:16

but it's slightly battered.

0:43:160:43:18

What makes it worthy of sitting on a plinth here?

0:43:180:43:23

-It's travelled a long way.

-OK, where from?

0:43:230:43:26

Antarctica. This was in the tent

0:43:260:43:28

with Scott of the Antarctic when he died.

0:43:280:43:31

This was one of a couple of tins of cocoa that were left,

0:43:310:43:33

as part of his Terra Nova Expedition.

0:43:330:43:37

And he took it with him, he ran out of fuel,

0:43:370:43:40

he couldn't melt down any more snow to mix with the cocoa to drink,

0:43:400:43:44

and he and his fellows died.

0:43:440:43:46

And in 1912, eight months after he died,

0:43:460:43:49

an expedition went out to rescue him,

0:43:490:43:51

and found his body, buried his comrades, and rescued this tin

0:43:510:43:55

and his diaries and brought it back and it was given to the company.

0:43:550:43:59

Extraordinary, extraordinary story.

0:43:590:44:01

I mean, let's talk a little bit about Scott.

0:44:030:44:06

This extraordinary hero who was beaten to the South Pole.

0:44:060:44:13

The disappointment that Scott felt in January,

0:44:130:44:17

when he realised that he'd been beaten to the pole.

0:44:170:44:21

He turned round, he set off back towards what he hoped was safety.

0:44:210:44:26

29th March, it was the end.

0:44:260:44:29

I mean, that was the last entry in his diary.

0:44:290:44:32

The last entry read, "For God's sake look after our people".

0:44:320:44:38

An object of huge power. It shared those last moments with Scott.

0:44:380:44:42

And...I don't want to handle it.

0:44:440:44:46

I mean, I know there are white gloves available.

0:44:460:44:49

But I feel actually by putting my hand on this object,

0:44:490:44:54

I will be shaking hands with Scott,

0:44:540:44:57

which is an extraordinary powerful emotion for me, personally.

0:44:570:45:01

It came back. It went to the manufacturers, to Rowntree's,

0:45:010:45:05

who I think sponsored in some way, the trip.

0:45:050:45:09

-Then what happened?

-It was kept in our archive for a very long time.

0:45:090:45:13

We know that it was with my predecessor Joe Burr in the 1970s.

0:45:130:45:17

I have a photograph of him holding it.

0:45:170:45:20

Then, probably about 16 years ago, it went missing.

0:45:200:45:23

And then I got the job as archivist quite a few years ago,

0:45:230:45:27

and I decided I really want to find this. I'm going to search for it.

0:45:270:45:31

And one day, when I was collecting something else from another factory,

0:45:310:45:35

I found this anonymous looking tin, in amongst some other tins.

0:45:350:45:38

It was getting quite battered

0:45:380:45:40

and I recognised the very distinctive rust markings

0:45:400:45:43

on the label from that photograph with my other colleague

0:45:430:45:45

and thought, "I think that might be the tin".

0:45:450:45:48

I didn't believe it for a while, so I didn't tell anyone for a few weeks.

0:45:480:45:52

And I eventually said, "I think I've found that tin".

0:45:520:45:54

And my colleagues all said, "Oh, well done".

0:45:540:45:58

So there was your eureka moment, your find, the find of your career.

0:45:580:46:02

I mean, Scott is still regarded by many as the ultimate British hero.

0:46:040:46:09

By some, latterly,

0:46:090:46:12

his actions have been looked at, re-examined.

0:46:120:46:17

Was he culpable for the loss of life of that entire expedition?

0:46:170:46:22

Who knows?

0:46:220:46:23

What I do know is that there is an extraordinary passion

0:46:230:46:28

for anything to do with Scott.

0:46:280:46:30

The Scott Polar Research Institute for instance, in Cambridge,

0:46:300:46:35

has a wonderful museum with lots of Scott memorabilia there.

0:46:350:46:39

It's an object which, in a way, is completely worthless.

0:46:390:46:44

It's a tin of cocoa! Probably not much good to drink.

0:46:440:46:49

But you look at it in another way and it is utterly priceless.

0:46:510:46:56

It's worth a lot to us.

0:46:560:46:58

We know that as far as value goes, it's only worth about £800.

0:46:580:47:01

We've seen another Scott plate that appeared on the Roadshow

0:47:010:47:04

and that was the value but to us it's worth a lot because we,

0:47:040:47:08

as a company and as employees,

0:47:080:47:10

put so much into that expedition and so this is our remembrance of that.

0:47:100:47:16

Exactly, exactly.

0:47:160:47:17

Well, I think whether we say that it's something

0:47:170:47:21

that shouldn't be put a price on...

0:47:210:47:24

All I can say is that I think an insurance figure of £800

0:47:240:47:28

does not compensate you for an object of this power

0:47:280:47:33

and I think that, certainly for an insurance point of view,

0:47:330:47:37

you should be putting more like £5,000 on it.

0:47:370:47:39

So it's...it's something I don't really want to value

0:47:390:47:45

because the idea of it ever being an insurance claim

0:47:450:47:49

fills me with dark, dark dread.

0:47:490:47:51

But it's an object which, as I say,

0:47:510:47:54

sitting here, and if I put my hands round it,

0:47:540:47:57

my hands would be in the same place as Scott of the Antarctic

0:47:570:48:00

and there aren't many objects you can say that about. Thank you.

0:48:000:48:05

A vivid example of how

0:48:070:48:09

the most humble of objects can prove extraordinarily moving.

0:48:090:48:14

Remember this ring - discovered by a metal detectorist -

0:48:140:48:17

that Geoffrey Munn looked at earlier?

0:48:170:48:19

Well, here it is now, in pride of place in the Yorkshire Museum

0:48:190:48:24

and it's just one of hundreds of fascinating objects

0:48:240:48:27

that these days, anyone can see.

0:48:270:48:29

Our thanks to our hosts for making us so welcome.

0:48:290:48:31

From the Antiques Roadshow team and the Yorkshire Museum, bye-bye.

0:48:310:48:36