Aberystwyth University 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Aberystwyth University 1

Fiona Bruce and the team of experts visit Aberystwyth Arts Centre in Wales.


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This week, the Roadshow comes from a town on the edge of Cardigan Bay.

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It was known in the 1920s as the "Biarritz of Wales".

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Aberystwyth.

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Bringing the Antiques Roadshow team here to Aberystwyth has been

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a pretty long journey for all those involved and, in fact,

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Aberystwyth's remoteness was often a problem in the past, particularly

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for the Victorians who liked to come here and dip their toes in the sea.

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And, in fact, promenades like this were constructed so they could

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show off their fashionable clothes, and take the air.

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'But, if the town was to become a top holiday destination,

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'it needed one thing in particular - a good public transport system.'

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TRAIN WHISTLES

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In 1861, the Aberystwyth and Welsh Coast Railway Company was formed,

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and awarded the contract of forging a rail link to Aberystwyth.

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Well, it was quite an event,

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the day the town celebrated the official opening of its new railway line.

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On 22nd July 1864, there was a large procession through the town

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and then a train with 35 coaches, carrying nearly 2,000 passengers,

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pulled up to Aberystwyth station.

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Now, before I go, there's one thing I've got to do, which is...

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..kick the bar.

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Because I'm reliably informed that, for years, visitors have ended their walk along the promenade

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by coming here and kicking the bar.

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I don't know why. It seems a funny thing to do.

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But I've seen people do it and, apparently, it brings good luck.

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Let's hope that luck is with us today,

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as we join our experts at Aberystwyth Arts Centre at the university campus.

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When I was coming up on the train yesterday, with my colleague,

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I said to her, "The one thing I would really like to see tomorrow is a spoon rack."

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When you came into reception, she came running over and she said,

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-"I've got somebody you must meet." And here you are!

-Yeah. Here I am.

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How far back can you remember them in your family?

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Well, I remember my father talking about his grandfather using them,

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so that would be my great-great-great grandfather.

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So that takes us almost back to the beginning of the 1800s.

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-Where was that?

-That was in a little village called Llanfihangel ar Arth.

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I'm glad you said that and not me!

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In the north of Carmarthenshire, really, still in Carmarthenshire.

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-And were they in a farmhouse?

-A smallholding.

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What they used to call a longhouse.

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One main room, one bedroom, with a bedroom door leading into the cowshed.

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-And these would have hung on the wall?

-On the kitchen wall.

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And tell me how they were used?

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They were used for what, in the Welsh was called cawl, which is broth.

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Put a big pan on the fire, open fire.

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Potatoes, meat, onions, carrots, parsnips, swedes

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and last, before serving it, the leeks.

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I bet it was one of those dishes that, when you had it the second day, it tasted even better.

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Oh, much, much nicer, much nicer.

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But what I love about this is that it is a design, a shape, that has never changed.

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It could have been made in 1780,

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it would have been looking just the same in the 1880s.

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Very simply made from local wood,

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the actual rack is pine with a bit of staining, but it's got this

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sort of lovely blackness over it, which must have been from the smoke.

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-Smoke, most probably.

-And all the spoons are, you know, wiggly waggly

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and they would have just been simply carved, wouldn't they?

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-Whittled away in the evening.

-Front of the fire.

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Front of the fire. This piece speaks family - family life,

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children round a table, they just are a dream.

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-You can picture it, can't you?

-So how long ago were they last used?

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I think they were last used in 1986.

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-I think Health and Safety might have something to say about it now.

-Yes!

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I can't tell you how thrilled I am to see them, and so many spoons.

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So, now to value.

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I mean, to me, they are as rare as hen's teeth these days.

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-Families have kept them, they were passed down...

-They will be passed down.

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..generation to generation. So how often do they come to market?

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Why would anybody want to sell them?

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But I have to put a price on because that's what we're about,

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and I would say somewhere in the region of

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-£400 or £500...

-What!?

-..is a gentle price.

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Oh...

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Surprised, really surprised.

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-A group of tiny toys.

-Very tiny.

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Now, whose are they?

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They belong to me now. They were my father's.

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He had them from a very early age.

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I presume they came from his father.

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I really don't know and they'd just been wrapped up in tissue paper

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in a little case for ages.

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Well, that's lovely that they're family things.

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I hope you can understand what I'm saying, I've got a terrible voice - I'm losing it.

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-Anyway, do you know what they're called?

-Haven't got a clue.

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-They're called penny toys.

-Right.

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They were called penny toys because they tended to be sold

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-by street vendors, with a tray out, for a penny a go.

-Oh, right.

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And these street vendors were buying them for about eight shillings,

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that's 96 old pennies,

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for a gross, which is 144 items.

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-So, you know, it was a good little money earner.

-Yes.

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And they had no overheads other than their tray.

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So penny toys are perhaps the toys that

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a lot of children would have seen

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as their first introduction to tin plate toys.

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They were made in Germany

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and there is nothing on these to indicate where they were made.

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No, you wouldn't know.

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A couple of them have got the clue, which is "Ges Gesch",

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which means that that particular design

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has been registered in Germany, so if you

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knew that, you'd be able to put two and two together and make it work.

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But the other thing is that they were very clever

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about making things for particular markets, and so the little bus

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here - for instance - is a London bus with London destinations on it.

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And the ambulance, similarly - you know -

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this is a London ambulance, and so the German manufacturing

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-companies were making things to appeal to particular markets.

-Right.

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Well, there were three big makers.

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One was a company called Distler,

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one was a company called Fischer and the other one was Meier.

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All three companies are represented here, I'm sure.

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The absolute heyday for producing

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and selling these penny toys was between about 1895 and 1914,

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-so that fits in well with your father's father.

-Yes.

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And I have to say, that even though they're tiny,

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an awful lot of work went into these.

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Some of them are clockwork - none of these are -

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-but they do have movement, don't they?

-They do, yes, yes.

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This here, has got a little flywheel underneath it,

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there it is,

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and if you spin that axle,

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the wheels then rub against the turning axle and move it forward.

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I mean, it's so simple.

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I wonder if your father's father - your grandfather -

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-actually bought them from one of those street vendors for a penny a go.

-Possible, very possible.

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When was he born?

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Oh, I really don't know. Late 1800s.

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-Well, then it could easily be, couldn't it?

-Yes, yes, could be.

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What a great idea, that this has come straight from that street vendor.

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-Well, I have to say that these are sought after today.

-Really?

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They jolly well are, and I think that what you've got here -

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I mean some are worth £100 or so...

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-No!

-..and some are worth considerably more.

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No! No, you're - no, really?

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No.

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No, see I knew you were telling me fibs!

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They're little things - they're not going to be worth much.

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-Oh, they're so fragile and...

-And they're in rubbish condition.

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-Yes, they are!

-I would say what you've got here is going to be worth

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-getting on for £2,000.

-What! Oh, get me a seat.

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THEY LAUGH

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-No!

-So do I say that they're "pennies from heaven"?

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They certainly are! I hope my dad's watching today.

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Do you know, when people bring these pictures into me,

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especially shipping portraits like this,

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I'm very tempted to ask you, "Is someone in your family

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"or has someone in your past, been captain of this boat?"

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Well, yes they have.

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My grandfather's brother was the captain of this ship.

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-And so was your grandfather's brother David Jones?

-Yes, he was.

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Well, I think is a really interesting picture, and it's

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so nice to have the continuity that it was a relation of yours

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that was the captain of this boat, and it's still in the family.

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Now, when we look at this,

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we've got the name of the Brig - the Mary Ann Newett -

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and then David Jones, 1861, so that's when he was being captain.

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So you're captain of the boat and David Jones sails down

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to the Bay of Naples, and that's the ideal place

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to get your boat painted because there were a lot of artists there

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and we can see it's signed Raffaele Corsini who is a very well-known

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Italian painter of boats in the mid 19th century, doing it for captains.

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And he painted them in gouache,

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which is a form of watercolour, thick watercolour.

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And this picture is in quite good condition.

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Quite often I see these, they have brown marks down them, which I call

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water staining as captains had them in their cabins, and sometimes water's seeped in

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the back through the pine backing.

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But it's just fantastic because it's so original.

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I feel that, you know, the ship is so serene, and then you've got

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this angry sea under the ship. It's marvellous, actually.

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What is a picture like that worth with that provenance?

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Well, he is collected. And this - even in this condition -

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in a marine auction, it would make at least £2,000 to £3,000.

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Mmh, quite surprised. Very surprised, actually.

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This very elaborate carved wood cover with tiny, tiny lettering

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saying "my travels" must hide a photograph album, I'm guessing.

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Yes, it's the album of my great-grandfather,

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and when he retired from the Indian Army - he was a Major General in the Indian Army.

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When he retired, he went up into the hills with his big box camera

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and he went on a long, long trek up into the Himalayas

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and he never returned to Britain,

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-so he lived out there his whole life actually, and died out there.

-Really? Let's have a look inside.

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Here we have an ownership inscription. "WE Marshall, Major General, September 1887".

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-Now we start with a route map.

-Yes.

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So that explains all, and we've got some fillings in here,

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which I guess was done by your relative.

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Yes, he says he filled it in on the journey. I don't know quite how,

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but maybe he didn't know where he was going to go.

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He started off here and then to Simla - the hill station here,

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then he went all through Ledakh all the way up here to Lei which is just in Southern Tibet.

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This is him here, William Eliot Marshall

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and a photograph of him, taken by himself just after his return.

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Aged 48 years.

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Yeah, one year older than me, and he looks a lot worse!

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I think they must have been some travels.

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Well, that is a nice start. Let's have a little look further through.

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He's captioned all the photographs and most of them are by him.

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Isn't that a wonderful group shot?

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Very artistic in its composition, I do believe,

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but very historical as well.

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Now if we move on.

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In these days, photographs would have required a team to carry

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the equipment. I know that Vaughn and Sheppard developed their photographs

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on the spot, took photographs, developed on the spot and decided

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what they were going to do with them, so this is not just a one-man expedition.

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Did he publish at the end of all this?

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He did write a book later on about his life with a Southern Indian tribe.

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-Right, right, so this was sort of preliminary work.

-Yes. What I like about this,

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and what I find interesting is, for somebody in the army,

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-he seemed to have a real respect for the local people.

-I think that shows

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through the compositions. Lots of studies of local people

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and really nicely taken. Look at those children.

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The whole album is like this throughout,

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captioned from beginning to end,

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which is a really key factor in value.

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Without the captions, we wouldn't know half as much as we do know about it.

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So many albums like this have been split up and destroyed.

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The integrity of this album

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-I think stands for at least half of its value.

-Oh right, right.

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So, what are you going to do with it? Will you keep it, sell it?

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I'm going to keep it - if you tell me it's worth a fortune, maybe not.

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But I'm hoping it isn't.

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Well, this is - this sort of thing is very desirable.

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It's in a fine binding, very intricate,

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and I just love the whole package.

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So I'm going to suggest an auction value of between £5,000 and £7,000.

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-Excellent, lovely. We'll still keep it!

-Fair enough!

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If it wasn't for this, we'd probably all be speaking French now.

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This is the Brown Bess Musket,

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probably the most iconic weapon the British Army's ever had.

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Brown Bess - do you know why it's called the Brown Bess?

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I'm sorry, I don't.

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That's really disappointing because I was hoping you'd tell me,

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because nobody really knows.

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This one marked "Tower GR",

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which is the military stamp.

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We've got something interesting on the stock.

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Now, that's R Cracroft. Now, that's quite unusual

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on a military weapon, because if Private Cracroft

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had carved this into his stock,

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Private Cracroft would still be doing guard duty in 2011.

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So I think this is a militia one.

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Wow! That's amazing.

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Of course, the most iconic battle this was fought with was Waterloo.

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-Do you think it would be in Waterloo?

-This one unfortunately wouldn't have been.

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This is a militia one, but exact similar weapons,

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that's what the army were issued with, and that was Waterloo.

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It throws about a three-quarter-inch lead ball,

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which you really don't want to collect on the other end of it.

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Flintlock, as we can see here, operates like that.

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Full cock - we don't fire it because we tend to break the cock -

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if we did, this comes forward, strikes a spark,

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ignites the powder in the pan, burns through into the touch hole.

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Everything loads from the muzzle end.

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A good man can get three shots off in a minute with one of these.

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The Brown Bess served for a long time,

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but this one is probably about 1800.

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Where did you obtain it from?

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It's always been on the mantel in my house - my mum's house.

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My mum thinks that she - her father got it in a flea market

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in Nottinghamshire in the 1950s somewhere.

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Excellent buy. I'm glad it's on display - they should be.

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Markings are all crisp.

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I would think if you had to go and buy it now,

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you wouldn't get it at your flea market.

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You'd have to get it at a reasonably good dealer

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-and that's going to cost you £1,000.

-Gosh!

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It's very nice and I hope it goes back on the mantelpiece.

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It belongs to my one-year-old son, so it's his heirloom.

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What a very lucky little lad.

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I wish somebody had given me a Brown Bess when I was one.

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-Thanks for bringing it in, it's great.

-Thank you very much.

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It doesn't look like your most prized possession.

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-Unfortunately not.

-It hasn't had a lot of care and attention.

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No, it's been in the garage for the past 20 years.

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Do you know where it comes from? Any ideas at all?

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Not really. I knew it used to belong to my grandparents

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and that's all the history I know actually.

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Well, I'm pleased to tell you

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-that it's a Welsh chair.

-Oh right.

-No, I correct myself.

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-It's half a Welsh chair.

-Half a Welsh chair?

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Because somebody - your grandfather, your great grandfather,

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yourself as a child - has cut one, two, three, four, five,

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six of the six splats off.

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It would have stood up like that with a nice combed back on the top.

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-Oh right.

-So you could lean back and relax.

-Oh.

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That's gone. So you might have devalued it a bit, I think.

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-It wasn't you?

-Not me, no.

-Promise?

-Promise.

-OK, right.

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I just want to point out one thing, You can see the way this is made,

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this wonderful "C" shape,

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-it is actually in three pieces, that's typical of Wales.

-Oh right.

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There's something fascinating, and I have to get this over,

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-because it is only half a chair and it's filthy dirty.

-Yes.

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You see how high the arms are? Yes.

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That is typical of the Celtic tradition.

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-Oh, right.

-Scotland, Wales and even the West Country, Cornwall.

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-All the Celtic-speaking areas.

-Right.

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Had these... Seemed to have these high arm chairs.

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Now, if you imagine you're sitting

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in an old, dusty little cottage by the fire,

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why do you need the arms high?

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Probably to keep them out of the soot.

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Well you're reading your Bible, or your book, or you're eating

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and you've got very little light at night,

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and that helps you see what you're doing or reading.

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-Oh, right, oh.

-So I'm sure that's why.

0:18:590:19:02

I could actually talk for a long time about this,

0:19:020:19:05

but I won't because I think it's fascinating.

0:19:050:19:08

-But what I'd like to do is have your permission to do something.

-Go on.

0:19:080:19:11

-It's not worth a lot like this, but can I polish?

-Yes, yes, please do.

0:19:110:19:14

-Because I just happen to have some with me.

-Oh.

0:19:140:19:18

Whoops. So here we go.

0:19:190:19:22

You realise you're going to have to finish this now?

0:19:260:19:29

In July 1981, like millions of others, I was watching

0:19:320:19:35

the Royal Wedding of Charles and Diana on television.

0:19:350:19:40

But you have a very different experience.

0:19:400:19:42

Clearly you were part of it.

0:19:420:19:44

I missed the wedding because we were in Gibraltar

0:19:440:19:47

waiting for them to arrive on board the Royal Yacht

0:19:470:19:50

and take them on their honeymoon. When they arrived on board,

0:19:500:19:53

we didn't know where we were going to go on honeymoon.

0:19:530:19:56

As soon as Prince Charles said left or right

0:19:560:19:59

coming out of Gibraltar, that's when we knew where we were going.

0:19:590:20:02

So you were serving on board the Royal Yacht Britannia?

0:20:020:20:05

I was.

0:20:050:20:06

And here you are with Charles and Diana,

0:20:060:20:10

their honeymoon. It was actually

0:20:100:20:12

a very private affair in many ways, where they could escape almost.

0:20:120:20:16

Well, that's what the yacht was about.

0:20:160:20:19

It gave the Royal Family some privacy.

0:20:190:20:21

They could get away

0:20:210:20:24

from the media and paparazzi

0:20:240:20:27

and they could relax. It was nice to see them

0:20:270:20:30

on board in normal clothing like ourselves, you know.

0:20:300:20:33

Just a sloppy jumper and a pair of jeans.

0:20:330:20:36

I mean, relaxed is clearly what comes across

0:20:360:20:39

in this incredible collection of photographs.

0:20:390:20:42

You were responsible for what on board?

0:20:420:20:44

I was, as they used to call in the navy, the club swinger,

0:20:440:20:48

I was a PTI, the physical training instructor.

0:20:480:20:52

So I was basically keeping everybody fit.

0:20:520:20:55

I arranged all the sports and activities,

0:20:550:20:58

some of the entertainment and a little bit of security.

0:20:580:21:01

I can see a head of Diana

0:21:010:21:03

and a head of Charles watching a show over here.

0:21:030:21:07

-Are you in that?

-Yeah, I'm the Scotsman with the braces on

0:21:070:21:11

It was a tug of war scene.

0:21:110:21:14

There's a wonderful photograph here. I think you're serving drinks.

0:21:140:21:18

Yes, I had the honour, yes.

0:21:180:21:20

And Diana's clearly sort of...

0:21:200:21:22

You're asking her what she wants to drink. What did she drink?

0:21:220:21:26

Well, actually she had a shandy.

0:21:260:21:28

A great '80s girl!

0:21:280:21:30

Yes, she was, and Charles had his boring orange.

0:21:300:21:33

-But he wasn't boring on board?

-No, no. Far from it,

0:21:360:21:39

He was always involved in activities. He was a bit of a sportsman.

0:21:390:21:43

We used to call him "Crazy Horse"

0:21:430:21:45

because he was like a bull in a china shop.

0:21:450:21:48

If he was playing hockey, you got out the way.

0:21:480:21:51

Oh. And they went swimming?

0:21:510:21:53

Yes. We stopped in the Med.

0:21:530:21:55

Ourselves and the Royal party all plunged in,

0:21:550:21:58

enjoyed ourselves in the Mediterranean,

0:21:580:22:01

and she was also one of those in the water.

0:22:010:22:04

You didn't take these photographs,

0:22:040:22:06

but they're obviously very personal, intimate photographs.

0:22:060:22:09

How did you get them?

0:22:090:22:12

The Royal Yacht has its own photographer

0:22:120:22:14

and he takes all photographs

0:22:140:22:17

of any events, you know, on board

0:22:170:22:20

-and then you're allowed to purchase some of them.

-Right.

0:22:200:22:24

I think it's a very personal touching series of images

0:22:240:22:27

which comes across here and the idea of seeing them

0:22:270:22:30

in a very natural way, puts a different perspective

0:22:300:22:34

on the way we look back at that marriage now.

0:22:340:22:37

-Sure, yeah.

-In terms of value,

0:22:370:22:39

perhaps as a collection they would be worth

0:22:390:22:42

£700 or £800 as an album.

0:22:420:22:44

But I didn't get them to sell them anyway,

0:22:440:22:48

so we'll be keeping them.

0:22:480:22:50

You got them to have the best honeymoon ever.

0:22:500:22:53

Well, we did indeed.

0:22:530:22:54

See how well this is coming up. This lovely red paint underneath.

0:22:580:23:02

I can't resist having a go at these little rings,

0:23:020:23:04

which are simulated to bamboo. This helps me date it,

0:23:040:23:07

but it's not bamboo. It's difficult to tell,

0:23:070:23:10

-but almost certainly the seat will be elm.

-Right.

0:23:100:23:12

And underneath the arms I suspect it's oak,

0:23:120:23:15

which would be more typical of a Welsh chair.

0:23:150:23:17

But it's been made by quite a sophisticated person. He's a man who's access to a lathe

0:23:170:23:21

to turn these spindles

0:23:210:23:24

and these front ones with the bamboo and legs.

0:23:240:23:26

He's a farmer, a cabinet maker,

0:23:260:23:28

he might have been the local coffin maker,

0:23:280:23:31

making for somebody within probably very near to Aberystwyth.

0:23:310:23:34

We just don't know, we don't know who it was.

0:23:340:23:36

When was he making this?

0:23:360:23:38

-I would have thought the end of the 18th century?

-Really? Wow!

0:23:380:23:42

Slightly older than I thought.

0:23:420:23:46

So your chair, your half chair from Aberystwyth, is 1780,

0:23:460:23:50

something like that. 230 0r 240 years old.

0:23:500:23:54

What's it worth?

0:23:540:23:56

That is the question.

0:23:560:23:59

Very little, I'm afraid. I'd probably pay you £200 for it anyway.

0:23:590:24:04

Oh right, it's interesting knowing the age and the value.

0:24:040:24:09

If you'd clean it up. Finish the job.

0:24:090:24:11

One of the exciting things about a Roadshow is when an object is brought along

0:24:220:24:26

and it looks pretty ordinary, similar to countless others we see every week,

0:24:260:24:30

but there's something special about it that sets it apart

0:24:300:24:34

and makes it significant and valuable.

0:24:340:24:36

The thing is, how do you tell?

0:24:360:24:38

As you know, in this series our experts are setting us

0:24:380:24:41

a bit of a challenge - basic, better, best.

0:24:410:24:44

This week is the turn of our arms and militaria expert, Graham Lay.

0:24:440:24:48

So we have here a set of medals. One is a basic set worth about £80,

0:24:480:24:53

the other is a rather better set worth £500 to £600

0:24:530:24:56

and then there's the best, worth £4,000 to £5,000.

0:24:560:25:01

I have to say, medals are not my speciality

0:25:010:25:03

but Graham is going to reveal all later on.

0:25:030:25:06

First it's time for our visitors and you to see if you can work out which is which.

0:25:060:25:10

-Have you any idea what you're looking for?

-No.

0:25:120:25:15

This is a trick question. The smallest one will be most valuable.

0:25:150:25:19

-Mm...

-What about the age?

0:25:190:25:22

What do you think? Basic, better, best.

0:25:220:25:25

Here would be basic that one would be better, that would be the best.

0:25:250:25:29

-Maybe, mm...

-That one and that one look very similar, don't they?

0:25:290:25:34

OK, I'm going say better and best.

0:25:340:25:36

Crosses there, and crosses generally say more important.

0:25:360:25:40

-Um...

-Tricky.

0:25:400:25:42

-That could be the best.

-Why do you think that?

-There's two crosses.

0:25:420:25:45

Er...

0:25:450:25:47

These ones are the most important ones.

0:25:470:25:49

Basic, better, best.

0:25:490:25:51

Hold on, switch those around.

0:25:510:25:53

Basic, better, best.

0:25:530:25:55

-Sure?

-Sure as I can be.

0:25:550:25:58

Now this is a striking bit of human anatomy.

0:26:060:26:09

How did it come into your life?

0:26:090:26:11

Well, it's quite a story.

0:26:110:26:14

I visited an old friend of mine

0:26:140:26:16

that does house clearances

0:26:160:26:19

and from time to time he gets a painting,

0:26:190:26:22

he gets in touch with me and he says, "Are you interested in buying?"

0:26:220:26:26

And this is my hobby, so he brings it down to me

0:26:260:26:29

and it was in a terrible state. I saw the ticket on the back,

0:26:290:26:33

Francis Bacon and recognised the signature and we did a deal.

0:26:330:26:37

I gave him a few hundred pounds

0:26:370:26:40

and when I had a look at it, I thought, well you know, this isn't for me really,

0:26:400:26:45

but the name is.

0:26:450:26:46

Of course the central question is "Is this by Francis Bacon?"

0:26:460:26:50

Francis Bacon, the major towering figure in British art

0:26:500:26:53

in the last 20-30 years, died fairly recently.

0:26:530:26:56

If it's by him, of course, it's a picture of extreme value,

0:26:560:27:00

art historical importance, worth many millions of pounds,

0:27:000:27:03

so it's really worth getting this one right.

0:27:030:27:06

From the front,

0:27:060:27:08

well it's the sort of composition we normally associate

0:27:080:27:11

with Francis Bacon, in as much that you've got that rather sort of bruised and angry flesh,

0:27:110:27:16

almost like a corpse, and you've got that bleary out-of-focus face,

0:27:160:27:20

all the sort of stuff that you associate with Francis Bacon.

0:27:200:27:23

But I think before we go any further on the front,

0:27:230:27:27

as we're trying to establish if this is the real thing or not,

0:27:270:27:30

-Let's have a look at the back, shall we?

-Yes.

0:27:300:27:33

OK, now it's always been my view,

0:27:470:27:50

that whenever you're looking at a picture that could potentially

0:27:500:27:53

be a great treasure or, indeed, a fake, that the back of it

0:27:530:27:58

will tell you more than the front.

0:27:580:28:00

The title of the picture it seems, Ophelia, with a sort of inscription

0:28:000:28:05

we find from time to time on 20th century pictures and earlier,

0:28:050:28:08

"A gift to my sister."

0:28:080:28:10

Now this gets more interesting, we have a label

0:28:100:28:13

at the top here that says "Francis Bacon B29".

0:28:130:28:16

Now I have to say the writing looks quite modern,

0:28:160:28:19

but what do you think the B29 refers to?

0:28:190:28:22

Well, I was thinking

0:28:220:28:24

perhaps it's the Hanover Gallery Exhibition number of 1952.

0:28:240:28:28

Well, you've really done your homework,

0:28:280:28:32

because the Hanover Gallery was the first gallery

0:28:320:28:34

to discover Francis Bacon,

0:28:340:28:36

and if it a label from that exhibition,

0:28:360:28:39

that is immediately exciting.

0:28:390:28:41

It proves that it was at a place

0:28:410:28:43

and at a time which is extremely significant

0:28:430:28:47

in the life of Francis Bacon. You could say we're warming up.

0:28:470:28:50

But then, does that look really old?

0:28:500:28:53

Or does it look like a photocopy of a label?

0:28:530:28:57

And is this B29? Is the paper just a little bit fresh?

0:28:570:29:01

I'm not sure. But let's just ask those questions.

0:29:010:29:04

What do you feel?

0:29:040:29:06

I think it's an old label and the reason I think that is because

0:29:060:29:10

it's bowed slightly with the damp,

0:29:100:29:14

within an attic for years and years

0:29:140:29:17

and the ink is coming off in places

0:29:170:29:21

where it would do, with damp.

0:29:210:29:23

But the signature looks to me to be genuine because it's spontaneous.

0:29:230:29:29

Well, someone...

0:29:290:29:31

And I'm going to just go back to the front.

0:29:310:29:33

Someone has gone to inordinate trouble to get it right.

0:29:330:29:37

And they haven't just tried to paint a picture

0:29:370:29:42

that Francis Bacon might have done.

0:29:420:29:45

And it looks fairly plausible. I have to say

0:29:450:29:49

I don't think I'd be taken in

0:29:490:29:51

and I don't think a lot of 20th century scholars, or dealers,

0:29:510:29:54

or auctioneers would be taken in.

0:29:540:29:57

But the combination of that and the back

0:29:570:30:00

has meant that someone out there...

0:30:000:30:03

Someone around us, who knows?

0:30:030:30:05

-Yes.

-Has actually decided to create not just a fake,

0:30:050:30:09

but a fake history,

0:30:090:30:10

a fake exhibition history, a fake owner probably,

0:30:100:30:14

-and has done it quite well.

-Yes.

0:30:140:30:17

And don't worry, you are not alone.

0:30:170:30:20

I have to say,

0:30:200:30:22

I've even been taken in myself.

0:30:220:30:25

-Yes.

-So join the crowd.

0:30:250:30:29

Yes. It's all part of learning, isn't it?

0:30:290:30:32

Forgive me for saying, but that's an extremely striking design, it really is.

0:30:350:30:39

Beautiful, isn't it? I have a brooch in here for you to have a look at.

0:30:390:30:43

-Let's have a look.

-Wondering if you could tell me anything about it.

-Oh, yes.

0:30:430:30:47

I like the contrast between the studded skull

0:30:470:30:51

and the rather sweet demure little chick here. Would you not agree?

0:30:510:30:54

I would, yes.

0:30:540:30:55

-A good contrast.

-I thought they'd go well together.

-They're seamless.

0:30:550:30:59

-What's the story behind it?

-Well, it was my great aunt's

0:30:590:31:02

and she gave it to my mother

0:31:020:31:05

and she said it was chipped diamond,

0:31:050:31:07

-and that's about all we know about it.

-Well, they are chipped diamonds.

0:31:070:31:11

In fact, it's what we call rose diamonds.

0:31:110:31:14

So rose-cut diamonds were typically used

0:31:140:31:17

in little novelty brooches like this.

0:31:170:31:19

Would you not agree it is novelty through and through?

0:31:190:31:22

Definitely, yes.

0:31:220:31:23

These were popular in around about 1900

0:31:230:31:26

and you'd have little farmyard chicks

0:31:260:31:28

and little cats and dogs and whatever it may be.

0:31:280:31:31

But what makes this rather sweet is that the chick

0:31:310:31:34

is very nicely modelled and there's the egg and the shell.

0:31:340:31:38

It's broken, the top of it's off and there's the chick. Isn't it sweet?

0:31:380:31:42

-I've always loved it.

-Very sweet.

-Very different.

0:31:420:31:45

High carat gold, diamonds. Now the only thing,

0:31:450:31:49

looking through my lens, that I suppose I ought to point out

0:31:490:31:52

is that originally I think there might have been a little ruby

0:31:520:31:55

-or a sapphire in the eye.

-Right.

0:31:550:31:57

-And that's dropped out.

-Yes.

0:31:570:31:59

But it wouldn't cost a fortune, in my opinion to get it replaced,

0:31:590:32:03

so my advice would be to go to a competent jeweller,

0:32:030:32:06

-put a little stone in, just give it that bit of colour contrast.

-Yes.

0:32:060:32:09

-Worth doing, it really is.

-Definitely.

0:32:090:32:11

Wear it?

0:32:110:32:13

I don't. My mother used to and it will be handed down to me and then I will wear it.

0:32:130:32:17

OK, OK. Value. Well, substantial?

0:32:170:32:21

What do you think?

0:32:210:32:22

About £100, I thought?

0:32:220:32:24

No, don't think so. Very popular,

0:32:240:32:28

Wearable novelty.

0:32:280:32:30

-£750.

-Oh, wow!

-Yeah, I think so.

0:32:300:32:33

Mum will be thrilled.

0:32:330:32:36

The joy of working on the Roadshow is when someone

0:32:390:32:41

brings an object that you've never seen before.

0:32:410:32:44

This is one of those objects. When I looked at it,

0:32:440:32:46

I thought, "What is it?" It soon becomes apparent.

0:32:460:32:49

It's a coin sorting device. A sovereign weighing machine.

0:32:490:32:52

We'll go into the intricacies of it in a just a moment,

0:32:520:32:55

but I want you to tell me how you come to have such a unique-looking object.

0:32:550:32:59

Well, my father used to work in the Bank of England in London

0:32:590:33:03

and every now and again, he seemed to bring home things

0:33:030:33:06

that they were presumably getting rid of and this was one of the things.

0:33:060:33:10

And my brother and sisters had sort of nice copper brass scales, you know, and I got this.

0:33:100:33:16

That's interesting in itself, because what you've told me

0:33:160:33:19

is that this was an obsolete item.

0:33:190:33:21

And when did it become obsolete, when did he bring it home?

0:33:210:33:25

Late '60s, '70s sometime. Can't remember exactly.

0:33:250:33:28

That kind of makes sense.

0:33:280:33:30

Certainly what is very obvious about it is the maker's plaque

0:33:300:33:33

on the front here. We can see it says, "D. Napier & Sons,

0:33:330:33:36

"Engineers, Lambeth, London" and it was started,

0:33:360:33:39

I think around about 1820, the company,

0:33:390:33:43

and they specialised in making machines

0:33:430:33:45

for manufacturing armaments, things like the Woolwich Arsenal.

0:33:450:33:49

Very precision coin sorting,

0:33:490:33:53

stamp minting

0:33:530:33:56

and banknote production machines.

0:33:560:33:58

This is the category that this falls into.

0:33:580:34:03

Now, this has got an electro-magnet in it, which I think puts it

0:34:030:34:07

into the mid-1870s. What it does is it allows you to weigh sovereigns

0:34:070:34:12

and half sovereigns, and the reason for that

0:34:120:34:14

is that some of them didn't quite come up to the right weight,

0:34:140:34:18

because they may have been clipped perhaps, or shaved.

0:34:180:34:22

This machine determines whether they weigh the right amount,

0:34:220:34:26

and that electro-magnet, if they don't weight the right amount,

0:34:260:34:29

then shoots them off into the reject tray.

0:34:290:34:31

-Right.

-So we've put 1ps in it

0:34:310:34:34

because they're very close to the half sovereign size.

0:34:340:34:37

So if we send it this way, it's going to pick up

0:34:370:34:42

all of the one pences. Here it comes,

0:34:420:34:45

it's being automatically weighed.

0:34:450:34:47

At this point, it's being weighed,

0:34:470:34:50

There it goes. It's picked up again, off the scale, at which point

0:34:500:34:55

the scale and the electro-magnet determine if it's the right weight

0:34:550:34:59

and it's going to go one way or the other.

0:34:590:35:01

As it's a one pence,

0:35:010:35:02

-let's say that it didn't weigh the right amount.

-No.

0:35:020:35:06

-It's come out of the reject.

-Yes.

0:35:060:35:08

It does a very simple job. But look at it,

0:35:080:35:12

-it's a masterpiece, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:35:120:35:14

-I think this was made for the Royal Mint.

-Well, that's possible.

0:35:140:35:17

My father did do some work for the Royal Mint.

0:35:170:35:20

He sort of got seconded to the Royal Mint or something.

0:35:200:35:24

Let's think about trying to put a price on this. It's a difficult one.

0:35:240:35:27

You brought in at the same time what I call a standard sovereign balance.

0:35:270:35:31

This is the kind of thing that anyone

0:35:310:35:33

would have taken around in their pocket to weigh sovereigns

0:35:330:35:37

and half sovereigns, to see again whether they were clipped or not.

0:35:370:35:41

-Here's the Rolls Royce of sovereign balances.

-Yes.

0:35:410:35:44

What have we got here? £29 or £30 worth.

0:35:440:35:47

What have we got here? I think £700 to £1,000 worth.

0:35:470:35:51

Mm, gosh!

0:35:510:35:54

Didn't realise that at all. I just brought it along.

0:35:540:35:57

I just find it interesting, you know.

0:35:570:35:59

That's what it is. It's a fabulous and interesting piece of machinery

0:35:590:36:03

and a scarce piece of machinery.

0:36:030:36:06

-I saw your lions this morning.

-Yes.

0:36:090:36:12

Then I went for my lunch, and half way through my lunch I was interrupted

0:36:120:36:15

because your lions arrived.

0:36:150:36:17

Did they breed lions in Wales?

0:36:170:36:19

Well, mine decided to go walkies today

0:36:190:36:21

so they walked 15 miles down here and I don't think

0:36:210:36:25

-they've been away from home for the last hundred years.

-This is their first time out?

0:36:250:36:29

-That's correct.

-And what about your lions?

-Oh about the same, yes.

0:36:290:36:32

So bred in Wales, but were they born in Wales? That's the question.

0:36:320:36:36

-I think mine are English.

-What about yours?

0:36:360:36:38

Well, I'd like to think they're Celtic lions.

0:36:380:36:43

Well... Mm... well I think you are absolutely right about yours.

0:36:430:36:46

They are English lions.

0:36:460:36:49

Difficult to say where they were made. Could have been any

0:36:490:36:52

of the country potteries, probably in Staffordshire.

0:36:520:36:55

They'd have lovely, curly tails

0:36:550:36:57

which have gone missing. Someone's tried to pull them

0:36:570:36:59

or grab them by the tail. Dangerous thing to do with a lion!

0:36:590:37:03

They've broken off, but they're still rather magnificent.

0:37:030:37:06

Yours are interesting and magnificent in a different way,

0:37:060:37:11

-and they are Welsh.

-Good God.

0:37:110:37:14

-But that's only happened very recently.

-Yes?

0:37:140:37:17

Had you asked me a year ago, I would have told you these were made

0:37:170:37:21

by the Pill Pottery on the River Avon near Bristol,

0:37:210:37:25

but somebody's researched them and it's not Pill on the Avon,

0:37:250:37:30

-it's actually Pill, which is a suburb of Newport.

-Yes.

0:37:300:37:33

Now I've been trying to study the name of it,

0:37:330:37:37

but I'm going to ask you to read it,

0:37:370:37:39

because I can't pronounce Welsh at all.

0:37:390:37:41

In English it would be Pillgwenelly,

0:37:410:37:44

but how would you pronounce that in Welsh?

0:37:440:37:46

-Well, Pillgwenlly.

-Yeah. Pillgwenlly.

0:37:460:37:50

THEY SPEAK WELSH

0:37:500:37:51

So that's where the Pill comes from,

0:37:510:37:53

so these are the Pill Pottery from Newport in Wales.

0:37:530:37:56

So yours are Welsh, yours are English.

0:37:560:37:58

They're both mid-19th century.

0:37:580:38:01

These are probably 1830-1840.

0:38:010:38:04

These perhaps slightly later.

0:38:040:38:06

And they're both worth a similar amount of money

0:38:060:38:09

for different reasons.

0:38:090:38:10

Our more elegant English lions, they're decorative,

0:38:100:38:13

somebody who collected oak or country furniture

0:38:130:38:16

would have them prized on a table.

0:38:160:38:18

-And these, really...

-More peasant?

0:38:180:38:20

Cottage, cottage lions shall we say?

0:38:200:38:22

But you know, just as interesting.

0:38:220:38:24

The value is because they're Welsh.

0:38:240:38:26

Welsh people are very proud people, they want to collect Welsh things.

0:38:260:38:31

They're both worth £1,200.

0:38:310:38:34

Heavens! You serious?

0:38:340:38:36

Absolutely serious. I bet you're glad you let them out today.

0:38:360:38:40

So it's the Welshness that counts?

0:38:400:38:43

It's the Welshness that counts.

0:38:430:38:45

Graham, it was interesting talking about these -

0:38:510:38:54

they excite a lot of interest

0:38:540:38:55

and it seems invidious to talk about a value for these things,

0:38:550:38:58

when just the fact that you've fought in a war

0:38:580:39:00

and gained a medal should be enough.

0:39:000:39:03

None of us really were quite sure what we were looking for.

0:39:030:39:06

Well, you know, medals are a testament

0:39:060:39:10

to the heroism of the recipients

0:39:100:39:12

and I always feel uncomfortable

0:39:120:39:14

about talking about values of medals,

0:39:140:39:16

but people are interested in them.

0:39:160:39:18

During the First and Second World Wars,

0:39:180:39:20

millions and millions of people served their country

0:39:200:39:23

and almost everybody was entitled to a medal.

0:39:230:39:27

During the First World War, for example, the British War Medal,

0:39:270:39:31

this silver medal -

0:39:310:39:32

6.5 million of these issued during the First World War,

0:39:320:39:35

so they were issued in huge numbers.

0:39:350:39:37

And the great thing about First World War medals

0:39:370:39:40

is that they were always named.

0:39:400:39:42

Gosh, so every single one of those millions were individually...?

0:39:420:39:46

Yes. There are lots of websites out there

0:39:460:39:49

that can point you in the right direction for doing the research.

0:39:490:39:53

So campaign medals, therefore, I assume are not that valuable.

0:39:530:39:57

Well, they are.

0:39:570:39:59

They can be, depending on what the campaigns were

0:39:590:40:02

and depending on what the recipient did.

0:40:020:40:05

And that's when we come to the Basic, Better, Best point of view.

0:40:050:40:09

Right. Well, I'll tell you what I suggested.

0:40:090:40:12

I was thinking, "Campaign medals,

0:40:120:40:14

"everyone will have got one, so presumably not that valuable,"

0:40:140:40:18

so I put Basic here.

0:40:180:40:19

I didn't know what to make of these.

0:40:190:40:22

I looked at these and interestingly, cos I read out on the news,

0:40:220:40:26

-time and again, about in Afghanistan or Iraq.

-Yes.

0:40:260:40:29

And maybe about someone who's winning a Victoria Cross

0:40:290:40:32

or a medal for bravery, and so I looked at these and thought...

0:40:320:40:35

I realised I'd never seen one,

0:40:350:40:37

but I'm assuming one of these must be a cross for valour, for bravery,

0:40:370:40:41

and therefore I've put these in the Best category.

0:40:410:40:43

Well, you're absolutely right.

0:40:430:40:46

Well, good, cos it doesn't happen very often!

0:40:460:40:49

But looking at these - let's look at them first.

0:40:490:40:52

This is the Basic group of three First World War medals.

0:40:520:40:56

These are worth somewhere in the region of £60 to £80.

0:40:560:40:59

Better is this group.

0:41:010:41:03

Now, this is also a group that shows heroism of some sort

0:41:030:41:08

because he's got the Military Medal

0:41:080:41:10

and also this means "mentioned in dispatches".

0:41:100:41:13

-This...?

-This oak leaf,

0:41:130:41:15

so he must have performed many acts of bravery.

0:41:150:41:17

But also he served in the Second World War,

0:41:170:41:20

because this is the Defence Medal,

0:41:200:41:22

so he would have probably been too old

0:41:220:41:24

to serve in the Second World War,

0:41:240:41:26

so he took part in some way, perhaps he was a Special Constable.

0:41:260:41:29

And that's going to be worth somewhere in the region of £800.

0:41:290:41:34

Best...

0:41:360:41:37

-you're right.

-I had a vague idea, I thought, "They're crosses."

-Yes.

0:41:370:41:40

-But go on, cos I didn't really know.

-Well, this is the important medal.

0:41:400:41:44

This is the Military Cross, but it's even more important than that,

0:41:440:41:49

because do you see this bar here?

0:41:490:41:51

It means he was awarded it twice.

0:41:510:41:53

so not only did he perform some act of gallantry

0:41:530:41:57

to be awarded the Military Cross,

0:41:570:41:59

but he performed ANOTHER act of heroism,

0:41:590:42:02

-and so he was put up for it again.

-Gosh.

0:42:020:42:04

You can't be awarded the same medal twice, of course,

0:42:040:42:06

so he was awarded the bar to go with it.

0:42:060:42:09

I think we should name him, if he was that courageous.

0:42:090:42:12

"Captain John Williams, 15th Battalion Welsh Regiment."

0:42:120:42:15

A very brave man.

0:42:150:42:16

And I happen to know that he was mainly responsible

0:42:160:42:22

for the capture of Thiepval Ridge

0:42:220:42:24

and Pozieres village in 1918, during the First World War,

0:42:240:42:29

and the capture of many German guns and over 1,000 prisoners.

0:42:290:42:34

And you found this out by researching his background?

0:42:340:42:37

-He was a very, very brave and courageous man.

-Goodness me.

0:42:370:42:40

And this group is going to be worth somewhere in the region of...

0:42:400:42:44

£4,000 or £5,000.

0:42:440:42:47

Gosh. Well, as I say,

0:42:470:42:49

it does seem slightly invidious, really, talking about the value,

0:42:490:42:53

when clearly to have fought with medals like this,

0:42:530:42:55

you have shown bravery by being on the field.

0:42:550:42:58

I hope it's given you some insight, if you have medals at home,

0:42:580:43:01

of relatives, now you have an idea of what to look for, and what value they may have,

0:43:010:43:05

or if you want to bring them along to a Roadshow,

0:43:050:43:08

have a look at our website...

0:43:080:43:09

You can see the locations we're coming to

0:43:110:43:13

and maybe you could pay us a visit.

0:43:130:43:15

This is a first for me -

0:43:190:43:22

an artist's lay figure.

0:43:220:43:25

-Presumably?

-And a horse.

0:43:250:43:29

I have never ever seen an articulated horse before.

0:43:290:43:34

-I must admit, nor have we, ever.

-So tell me your story.

0:43:340:43:38

I've known it all my life, it was at my aunt's house.

0:43:380:43:42

She had it on a bench in the hallway,

0:43:420:43:48

and she died intestate.

0:43:480:43:50

I was asked by my other aunt to go in -

0:43:500:43:53

"Take what you need, what you like,"

0:43:530:43:57

and along with my husband, we took a few things

0:43:570:44:00

and this was one of them,

0:44:000:44:02

cos I love it, and I've been riding all my life.

0:44:020:44:04

I really can't blame you.

0:44:040:44:06

I think it is absolutely fantastic.

0:44:060:44:09

It's got a plaque here that says,

0:44:090:44:12

"J Mayer & A. Fessler, Wien".

0:44:120:44:16

Vienna, so was anybody in your family an artist?

0:44:160:44:20

My aunt, who owned the horse, her father was an artist.

0:44:200:44:24

-Right, well, there you have it.

-So... Yeah.

0:44:240:44:27

I would think this dates from about the turn of the century,

0:44:290:44:32

about 1900, solid walnut, a jointed lay figure,

0:44:320:44:38

an articulated horse,

0:44:380:44:40

to show a student of art perspective, how an arm moves.

0:44:400:44:46

I just love it.

0:44:480:44:49

And, I mean, even his ears move. I mean, it's just fantastic.

0:44:490:44:55

It goes into two categories.

0:44:560:44:58

Obviously, we've spoken about the artistic use of it,

0:44:580:45:02

but these days, to me, it's a sculpture,

0:45:020:45:07

and you know, it would be fantastically popular

0:45:070:45:10

if it was ever to come up for sale.

0:45:100:45:12

Well, I don't think, quite honestly, it will be up for sale.

0:45:130:45:18

It's worth a lot of money.

0:45:180:45:20

I'm going to be quite cautious in my valuation.

0:45:200:45:24

For the moment, I'm going to put £2,000 on it.

0:45:240:45:28

Mm!

0:45:310:45:32

Oh, yes?

0:45:320:45:34

Somewhat more than we thought, quite honestly.

0:45:340:45:38

But I can see it, in a retail shop, with a much bigger price than that.

0:45:380:45:44

Wonderful day like today, that, filled,

0:45:470:45:49

would have been wonderful, wouldn't it?

0:45:490:45:51

-Well, it would have been, but I didn't happen to think about it.

-Ah.

0:45:510:45:55

I would have done so.

0:45:550:45:56

-Yeah, you do get thirsty doing this.

-Yes.

0:45:560:45:58

What you've brought in here is one of the finest tankards

0:45:580:46:01

I've seen in a long while.

0:46:010:46:05

-Is that so?

-It is superb.

-Yes.

0:46:050:46:08

There are so many wonderful features to it.

0:46:080:46:10

If you look for, example, at the thumb piece,

0:46:100:46:14

just that simple scroll and the chunkiness of it -

0:46:140:46:20

brilliant!

0:46:200:46:22

It's not the standard thumb piece.

0:46:220:46:24

The way the hinge is arranged is pretty standard

0:46:240:46:27

but the way the handle is designed - wonderful.

0:46:270:46:32

That extra little kick at the bottom,

0:46:320:46:34

not just a straight forward "S", but the scroll there

0:46:340:46:37

and then another scroll starting up

0:46:370:46:40

and this lovely faceting on the handle.

0:46:400:46:43

-It all shrieks quality.

-Goodness me.

0:46:440:46:47

Of course, when we look at the maker's mark,

0:46:470:46:51

-we've got the mark of one of my favourite goldsmiths.

-Really?

0:46:510:46:56

So one of the greatest of all time, a certain Mr David Willaume.

0:46:560:47:02

And interesting, tankards by Huguenot goldsmiths -

0:47:020:47:07

of course, the recently-arrived French refugees -

0:47:070:47:10

tankards are things that they rarely made.

0:47:100:47:14

-Is that so?

-But boy, when they made a tankard, did they make a tankard.

0:47:140:47:19

Oh, I'm so pleased about that.

0:47:190:47:21

Wonderful. And the engraving.

0:47:210:47:23

The engraving is OK?

0:47:230:47:25

Absolutely super, and that cipher is just right for the date.

0:47:250:47:29

-But, of course, what is the date?

-Yes.

0:47:300:47:33

1723 with that "H",

0:47:330:47:38

and, again, a sign of the quality,

0:47:380:47:41

that David Willaume has made this out of Britannia Standard Silver,

0:47:410:47:46

the 958 standard rather than the 925 standard.

0:47:460:47:49

So it's better than sterling silver?

0:47:490:47:51

It is indeed, it's the higher standard,

0:47:510:47:54

which, at the time this was made, he didn't have to use,

0:47:540:47:57

but because he was so good, he did.

0:47:570:48:00

My word, I'm pleased to hear that.

0:48:000:48:02

Now, is it a family piece?

0:48:020:48:04

No, no, no. I bought it about two years ago.

0:48:040:48:07

So what did you pay for it?

0:48:070:48:11

Well, so long as my wife isn't listening...

0:48:110:48:14

-£2,000.

-Well, I have to say, I think you did very well.

0:48:140:48:19

Oh, I'm pleased to hear that!

0:48:190:48:21

A tankard of this quality, by such an important maker,

0:48:210:48:26

£3,000, £4,000, I think, quite easily.

0:48:260:48:29

My word. Why, that's delightful to hear.

0:48:290:48:33

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:48:330:48:36

How does a lady wearing a jacket as fantastic as that,

0:48:380:48:41

come to own a piece like this?

0:48:410:48:44

My father bought it for my mother about 40 years ago.

0:48:440:48:48

My mother's died now, so my daughter's inherited it,

0:48:480:48:51

so I brought it up for her tonight.

0:48:510:48:53

So why did he buy it for her? Was she particularly attracted to birds?

0:48:530:48:57

-It was the sort of thing she really liked, yes.

-OK.

0:48:570:49:00

I don't know where he bought it.

0:49:000:49:02

It's been in the family about 30 or 40 years now, I should imagine.

0:49:020:49:05

OK, you don't have any idea what he paid for it?

0:49:050:49:08

-Or where he might have bought it?

-No, no, I don't.

0:49:080:49:10

OK. Well, actually, if you don't know that,

0:49:100:49:13

you can add a little bit of revenue out of it, too.

0:49:130:49:16

-And he starts moving his head and singing.

-Yes, yes.

0:49:160:49:18

He's a quiet one, he's quite silent.

0:49:180:49:20

-It's gone quiet.

-It's late in the day.

0:49:200:49:22

My mum used to put the penny in and he used to make more noise.

0:49:220:49:25

So he loved your mother?

0:49:250:49:27

Yeah, he did love my mum, I think.

0:49:270:49:29

-He was happy when she was around.

-Yes, I think so. Yeah.

0:49:290:49:32

He needs restoring again,

0:49:320:49:34

-as I'm sure he'll love your daughter as well.

-Yes.

0:49:340:49:37

These are real feathers, but obviously the bird

0:49:370:49:40

is covered inside, and I think he'll come up wonderfully bright.

0:49:400:49:43

And quite snazzy, actually, when he's had a good bit of a clean.

0:49:430:49:46

-Yeah.

-And his bellows, too.

0:49:460:49:48

You'll hear him, he'll sing sweetly again.

0:49:480:49:50

What's interesting is that these were made

0:49:500:49:53

for parlours in the 19th century

0:49:530:49:55

-and they were effectively a rich person's toy.

-Yes.

0:49:550:49:57

They were for entertainment, you'd have them in a corner.

0:49:570:50:00

-Like a cylinder music box.

-Yes, yes.

0:50:000:50:02

Wind it up, play a tune, and ha ha, everybody had a lovely time.

0:50:020:50:06

They were made in France, often with Swiss movements.

0:50:060:50:08

This was made probably in the late 19th century,

0:50:080:50:11

-so probably the 1880s.

-Yeah.

0:50:110:50:12

-This wonderful decorative panel.

-Gorgeous.

0:50:120:50:15

-He's quite magnificent.

-Yeah.

-They're very sought-after pieces.

0:50:150:50:19

-Ah! There we are, then.

-He's quite large.

-Yes.

0:50:190:50:22

-In need of a bit of repair.

-Yes.

0:50:220:50:24

And I still think you're looking at around £2,000.

0:50:240:50:27

Gosh, that's great.

0:50:270:50:29

So make sure that when he's spick-and-span again,

0:50:290:50:31

and ready to go, he takes pride of place in the living room

0:50:310:50:34

-and he can sing once again with joy.

-Great.

0:50:340:50:38

BIRD WHISTLES FAINTLY

0:50:380:50:40

Here's a picture that really does tell a story.

0:50:460:50:48

I look at this, I see barrage balloons.

0:50:480:50:51

The lovely old boy here with his fork and spade, holding a pipe,

0:50:510:50:55

and people digging in the background.

0:50:550:50:58

It's done in watercolour and it makes me think,

0:50:580:51:01

Second World War and digging for victory.

0:51:010:51:04

Does it have a title?

0:51:040:51:05

-Yes, yes, it is called Dig For Victory, yes.

-Is it?

-Yes, yes.

0:51:050:51:09

-And how did you get it?

-My grandfather bought four paintings

0:51:090:51:14

from the artist in Birmingham,

0:51:140:51:17

two oil paintings, two watercolours.

0:51:170:51:19

I have an oil painting as well and my brother has an oil and a watercolour.

0:51:190:51:26

And it's signed down here, A C Shorthouse,

0:51:260:51:28

which is Arthur Charles Shorthouse.

0:51:280:51:31

I've hardly ever seen any work by him.

0:51:310:51:33

-No, no, yes.

-He was born in Birmingham in 1870

0:51:330:51:36

and he lived up to the 1950s.

0:51:360:51:38

-Ah, right.

-And he exhibited a few times at the Royal Academy

0:51:380:51:41

and also in Birmingham.

0:51:410:51:43

-Yes.

-So he was a member of the Society of Birmingham Artists,

0:51:430:51:46

but I don't care that I don't really know this artist.

0:51:460:51:50

-No.

-Because it's such fantastic quality.

0:51:500:51:52

I look at his face and I think -

0:51:520:51:54

well here's a man who's probably gone through the First World War

0:51:540:51:57

and is facing the Second World War,

0:51:570:51:59

and you know, it's almost as though it was done for a poster.

0:51:590:52:04

Because there have been posters for digging for victory.

0:52:040:52:06

-Yes, of course.

-Because in the Second World War

0:52:060:52:09

people had to dig up their gardens and grow things because of shortage.

0:52:090:52:12

-Yes, right.

-But he's got such character,

0:52:120:52:14

and I love the blueness in his eyes,

0:52:140:52:18

with age, people go like that, and it's just - you know -

0:52:180:52:21

it sort of tells a story.

0:52:210:52:23

And the blues in the background are

0:52:230:52:26

so well defined, but then we see flecks around here

0:52:260:52:30

and are they - I wonder whether these are brushes off his...

0:52:300:52:33

They look like, yes, hairs off his brushes.

0:52:330:52:36

-Hairs off his paintbrushes, that's right.

-Definitely, yes.

0:52:360:52:39

Well, I think he's an artist that is not hugely valuable.

0:52:390:52:44

No.

0:52:440:52:45

-But I look at this and I think the subject matter makes it valuable.

-Yes.

0:52:450:52:49

And to me, if I was collecting -

0:52:490:52:51

you know - Second World War pictures, I'd really want this in my collection

0:52:510:52:57

and I think this would probably make - in auction - £1,000 to £1,500.

0:52:570:53:02

Oh right, yes. Lovely, yes, thank you very much.

0:53:020:53:05

I suppose what I expected least to see in West Wales is this

0:53:080:53:11

wonderful array of Native North American beadwork.

0:53:110:53:14

I am actually overcome by the sort of diversity, the richness of it.

0:53:140:53:18

Tell me the background, why have you got it?

0:53:180:53:21

I inherited it from my nana,

0:53:210:53:23

it was my nana's Uncle Tommy who went over to British Columbia

0:53:230:53:27

in the early 1900s and he went there to work - he was a missionary.

0:53:270:53:30

-Right.

-He went over to work in a school over there.

0:53:300:53:33

-Yeah.

-And she inherited it down then to her,

0:53:330:53:35

and then obviously I inherited it then.

0:53:350:53:37

So working as a missionary,

0:53:370:53:39

-he was in contact obviously with various tribes.

-Yes.

0:53:390:53:42

-And so these are things he brought back.

-Yes.

0:53:420:53:45

-To show how it had been.

-Yes, they gifted these items to him,

0:53:450:53:49

and also you can see some of them have been worn as well, by him.

0:53:490:53:51

Often we see things like this, but it's very rare

0:53:510:53:55

-that you can actually precisely time the event.

-Yeah.

0:53:550:53:58

-What have you got there?

-Well, what I've got here is...

0:53:580:54:00

-Is that a picture?

-Yeah, that's Uncle Tommy.

0:54:000:54:03

So here we have this intrepid man in his fur coat.

0:54:030:54:06

-Yes.

-In the snow.

-Over there, yes, at the time.

-Do you know much about him?

0:54:060:54:10

Not an awful lot, no. Unfortunately, my nana's passed away, so I don't... I obviously never met him.

0:54:100:54:14

-No, no.

-So I don't know an awful lot about him as a person, no.

-And this is what?

0:54:140:54:19

This is a letter then, the date there, August 20th.

0:54:190:54:22

OK, well this is, yes, August 20th 1909,

0:54:220:54:24

now this is crucial.

0:54:240:54:26

-I mean obviously writing letters home.

-Yeah.

-I won't read it all

0:54:260:54:29

-but I'm sure it's full of interesting facts.

-Yes.

-But the point to establish is,

0:54:290:54:33

he was miles away from everywhere, and therefore leading a very, very remote life.

0:54:330:54:38

Now the first thing I'm going to tell you

0:54:380:54:40

is obviously, by and large, these are things of that period.

0:54:400:54:43

And a lot of this material can go back to much earlier dates.

0:54:430:54:47

-Right.

-The only thing that may well be earlier here are the gauntlets.

-OK.

0:54:470:54:53

-Those could go back into the 19th century.

-Oh gosh, right, OK.

0:54:530:54:56

We've got typical beadwork styles.

0:54:560:55:00

What we've also got to acknowledge is - by now, while these are tribal pieces,

0:55:000:55:05

a lot of them were being made for people like him.

0:55:050:55:08

-Right.

-We've got - in a sense - the tourist element, the visitor element.

-OK.

0:55:080:55:13

So the famous pieces like the slippers, the gloves

0:55:130:55:18

and so on, the purses, the bags,

0:55:180:55:20

were very much tourist minded by the makers.

0:55:200:55:24

-OK, yes.

-And so on that basis,

0:55:240:55:26

it's not that surprising that they did move out from Canada

0:55:260:55:29

into places like Wales.

0:55:290:55:31

We've got pipes - traditional cut from stone type pipes.

0:55:310:55:36

But the things that excite me most of all are these.

0:55:360:55:40

-OK.

-Now why do you think those are different?

0:55:400:55:43

-They're incredible pieces of...

-I'm glad you say that.

-Yes.

0:55:430:55:45

They're made from a material called argillite which is a stone

0:55:450:55:50

that only occurs in a certain region of Western Canada.

0:55:500:55:53

-Oh, right.

-And they are totally the product of one tribe, the Haida tribe.

0:55:530:55:58

-Oh right, OK.

-The Haidas actually sit on the world's resources of argillite.

0:55:580:56:03

It's slightly related to slate and when it comes out of the ground,

0:56:030:56:07

it's quite soft and it can be carved,

0:56:070:56:10

and then it becomes harder and harder and harder,

0:56:100:56:13

and it was used from the early 19th century

0:56:130:56:16

for carving things like miniature totem poles and figures that relate

0:56:160:56:22

to all the creatures and animals

0:56:220:56:25

that are significant to the tribe.

0:56:250:56:28

-Yes.

-So a piece like this is a wonderful piece of story-telling.

0:56:280:56:31

-All the figures are symbolic and it is this smooth stone-like material.

-Yes.

0:56:310:56:37

There's nothing like it in the world anywhere else.

0:56:370:56:39

This is excellent, but fairly typical,

0:56:390:56:42

this is just completely exceptional.

0:56:420:56:45

-Oh right, OK.

-So to see that is just sort of blowing my mind out.

0:56:450:56:50

You're sitting on, here, a remarkable collection,

0:56:500:56:53

-and I have to say, quite a valuable collection.

-OK.

0:56:530:56:56

A pair of gauntlets like that is probably £500, £600, £700.

0:56:560:57:00

OK.

0:57:000:57:01

The slippers are £200 to £400.

0:57:010:57:06

All the smaller pieces are £100 to £200 and sometimes more,

0:57:060:57:11

so you've got probably £2,000 or £3,000 worth in the beadwork.

0:57:110:57:18

-OK.

-Come on to the argillite.

0:57:180:57:21

-That's going to be £1,500 - £2,000.

-Oh, my gosh.

0:57:210:57:27

This is going to be - it's such a fantastic piece -

0:57:270:57:29

it's going to be...

0:57:290:57:31

oh, between £2,000 and £3,000 - or even £4,000.

0:57:310:57:36

Oh, my gosh, I never...

0:57:360:57:38

So put it all together, you're getting towards £8,000 or £10,000.

0:57:380:57:42

-Wow, how incredible.

-So, he did you proud.

0:57:420:57:44

Yes, he did. And my nana, yes, for keeping all the stuff.

0:57:440:57:47

I've dreamed for years

0:57:470:57:48

to have a really great piece of argillite on the Roadshow.

0:57:480:57:51

-Oh, right.

-You've done it for me.

0:57:510:57:53

-OK, oh, thank you.

-So thank you very much.

-Oh, no problem.

0:57:530:57:56

What a great end to the day for Paul. Our experts never know

0:57:570:58:01

whether they're going to see collections from halfway around the globe or just around the corner.

0:58:010:58:05

It's been wonderful here at Aberystwyth Arts Centre.

0:58:070:58:10

From all of the Roadshow team, until next time, bye-bye.

0:58:100:58:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:360:58:38

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:380:58:41