Shakespeare Special Antiques Roadshow


Shakespeare Special

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Today, we've brought our team of experts to the heart of rural England,

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just down the river from Shakespeare's home town of Stratford-upon-Avon.

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This is Charlecote Park,

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a perfect backdrop for this Roadshow special,

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as the BBC celebrates Shakespeare.

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But did England's greatest playwright

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ever visit these grounds, with their beautiful deer?

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Well, apparently he did - but not by invitation.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Warwickshire.

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Many distinguished visitors have been welcomed

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here at Charlecote Park, including Elizabeth I.

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But a visit by Shakespeare in the 1580s was rather less auspicious.

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The story goes that he was caught red-handed poaching deer

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belonging to the local landowner, Sir Thomas Lucy.

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Herds of fallow deer still graze on land which has been

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the seat of the Lucy family since at least the 12th century.

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And while Shakespeare was living down river,

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Sir Thomas was building one of the first great Elizabethan houses of the age.

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The turrets and gatehouse and heraldic stained glass

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all proclaimed his pride in his ancient lineage.

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It was in this Great Hall that Sir Thomas was knighted

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and where he proudly greeted Queen Elizabeth in 1572

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when she visited Charlecote.

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11 years later, in this same room,

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Shakespeare was brought before Sir Thomas -

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then a resident magistrate - to answer for his poaching crime.

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Although there's no official record of what happened,

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it's likely he was fined, possibly flogged,

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and threatened with banishment.

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And it wasn't long afterwards that Shakespeare left Warwickshire

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and headed for London to seek his fortune.

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And the rest is history.

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But years later, he took his revenge

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by portraying Sir Thomas as the pompous buffoon Justice Shallow

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in The Merry Wives Of Windsor.

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Shallow says to Falstaff, "Knight, you have beaten my men,

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"killed my deer and broke open my lodge,"

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just as Shakespeare had been accused of doing.

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He pokes fun at Shallow's pride in his ancestors

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and in his coat of arms - three pikes,

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the same as the arms of the Lucy family.

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Despite their shaky start, the Lucy family and Shakespeare

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enjoyed a close connection down the years, with descendants of Sir Thomas

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happily retelling the story of the poaching incident ever since.

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Did it really happen?

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You'll have to make your own minds up.

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Shortly, some of our experts will reveal their favourite objects

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from the era of Elizabethan England.

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But let's get our own bit of theatre under way

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with the Antiques Roadshow.

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This vibrant watercolour

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by the great Victorian painter Robert Walker Macbeth

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is titled A Fen Flood

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and reminds me of all the great floods perhaps two years ago

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where people were desperately trying to get out of their lovely village houses,

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getting away from all the water.

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But, of course, it's painted in about 1880,

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so it's over 130 years ago.

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Tell me a little bit about the painting, some history.

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It belonged to an aunt and I was given it a couple of years ago

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and I just always remember it being on her wall,

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and over the years the lady that you see here

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-I used to find quite sinister, actually, as a child.

-Yes.

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And it was only as I got older

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that I've kind of really appreciated the picture.

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But I used to spend many sort of Sunday tea-times sitting on the sofa

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and actually looking up at it,

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because it's got so much depth and vibrancy to it,

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you see something new every time you look at it.

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Well, it's very illustrative

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and it's lovely that it's lived with the family for so long,

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-and you now have it.

-Yes, yes.

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Erm, do you know much about Robert Walker Macbeth?

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I know that he was a Royal Academician,

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sort of late-19th century, but I don't really know any more.

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He was a Scottish watercolourist as well.

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That's right, so he was born in Scotland,

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but he's not really that well known as a Scottish artist.

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He, really, was better known as a London painter,

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but one of the great watercolourists of his time.

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But also a fabulous oil painter too, and he was really known

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as one of the sort of fabulous ruralist painters.

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Whereas a lot of artists painted great industrial scenes,

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he was out there painting the beautiful countryside

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that we still see on a lovely summer's day.

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This is very vibrant and crisp in colour

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and it's a great example of his work.

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And of course you can see the ferry on the left-hand side,

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who's about to come and pick them up and I'm sure you can almost sense

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he anxiety on their faces, that they want to get away from the floods.

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Yes, the two children just there, definitely, clinging onto...

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-I assume it's their mother.

-Yes, absolutely.

-Yes.

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Now, he exhibited so many pictures, he was a busy artist,

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he exhibited over 120 pictures at the Royal Academy,

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became very, very wealthy, he had a house in Carlton Hill in London.

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But also in about 1880, 1870-1880, he moves to Lincolnshire,

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where this is probably painted.

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And paintings were done on a vast scale,

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so this is probably a watercolour study for a great oil painting.

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Right.

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-So we come to value.

-Yes.

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Like I say, this is an artist I certainly admire - I have a little print at home,

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but an original watercolour is very rare to see.

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This is certainly going to be worth £3,000 to £5,000.

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Excellent. Oh, fantastic.

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Yes, we'll have to make sure that it has pride of place now,

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and make sure we have a big enough hook on the wall to hang it up, so thank you very much.

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It's a great pleasure.

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Well, a slightly odd question, but I have to ask you -

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have you ever gone picking mushrooms?

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No, no, I haven't.

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Then I have to ask you, what made you pick this?

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Well, it was part of my nan's estate when she passed away,

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my mother gave us the option of choosing an item from that estate,

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and I chose the vase simply because it's very pretty

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and it reminds me of my nan every time I look at it.

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Really? So was there any discussions about it at the time, who, what, why, or...

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No, nothing whatsoever,

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it was just literally a case of looking round the house

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and seeing which took our fancy, really.

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Well, I think to those looking,

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it will come as no great surprise that what we're holding,

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or what I'm holding, is a fantastic piece of work

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by none other than William Moorcroft,

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and it's obviously, through the tube lining

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and through the decoration and through the form and everything,

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just sings about what he's doing, and what he does so well.

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But this is for me slightly more than just that,

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it's just that little bit more special,

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because it's a combination of factors -

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its pattern, its colour, and actually, underneath,

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we've got a fantastic mark there which says, "Made for Liberty & Co.

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"W. Moorcroft Design."

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And what we're looking at really is a combination of all these

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that pull together to a really good example of Moorcroft's work.

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The pattern is actually called Claremont, but one step

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further than that, it's actually celadon Claremont,

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which dates from sort of 1915-1920 sort of period,

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it's that latter part of that era.

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It's a very distinctive colourway

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that was manufactured specifically for Liberty.

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So all of this adds up to something really quite special.

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-And where does it live in the home?

-It sits on a bureau,

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in a rather modern-decorated house

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and it just goes really well.

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And do you know, where did Gran acquire it?

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She was passed it by her sister when she passed away,

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and, actually, she never actually liked it,

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but it was just something that she kept obviously

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to remind her of her sister as well.

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Well, I don't suppose mushrooms and fungi and all that kind of thing are everybody's cup of tea,

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but I tell you what though, it is actually the cup of tea for quite a few people,

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and that brings me to the point of this, which is, if we were to go and replace it, where would we be?

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Well, you're going to have to go out

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with at least the best part of £4,000 in your pocket.

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Right. OK, thank you very much. That's very very nice to know.

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-Hopefully it will remind you of this day as well, it's been a real treat to see. Thank you.

-Thank you.

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It almost seems a shame that, looking at this clock

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in this magnificent sunlight today,

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and the gilt ormolu glinting off the sun, it seems a shame

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that it spends most of its life sitting on a mantelpiece

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or on a sideboard.

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-Or in a cupboard.

-Or in a cupboard?

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-Yes.

-That's a disgrace! That's dreadful!

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Are you a fan of it?

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Because I know an awful lot of people that just simply think it's too brash.

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I love it, my wife doesn't,

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that's why it gets in the cupboard I think, yes.

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-That's dreadful. Are you into flash cars as well?

-Yes.

-Are you?

-Yes.

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Do you know, I thought so. What do you know about it?

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My parents bought it in the '70s,

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paid about £400 for it, so it's a family heirloom.

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And do you remember where it sat in the house?

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-It used to sit on a chest in the house, prime place.

-Prime place.

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-Yes, yes it was.

-Pride and joy?

-It was, yes.

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You can just imagine their pride and joy. What do you know of him?

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-I believe he's Archimedes and that's his bath.

-Yes.

-I guess.

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-And this interesting plaque down the bottom?

-I don't know anything about that.

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So I can tell you something about it.

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-Yes you can, yes, yeah.

-At least, I can say something about it.

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Archimedes - mathematician, astronomer,

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scientist extraordinaire, and this scene here is,

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he's sitting at his desk in Syracuse as the Romans invade

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and Cicero has specifically said to the centurions,

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"Do not harm Archimedes."

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-And one Roman ran in and immediately executed him, sitting at his table.

-Oh, right.

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Or at least that's how the mythology goes.

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And with it, one of the greatest minds of all time.

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This is a clock that is absolutely typical of the Empire period

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from about 1820.

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The peak of the French glitz,

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and it was highly desirable both in France and in England.

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And, stylistically, you have this bold foliate moulding

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and bold anthemion feet

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and a similar design all the way round the pedestal case

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-with a white enamel dial.

-Yeah.

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And Roman and Arabic numerals,

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and the signature in the centre -

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"Ledure, Bronzier A' Paris" - this is him, this is the bronzier -

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-because the most important part of this clock is the bronze.

-Sure.

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And the marble and the effect that it's giving, not the clockmaker.

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A French-made clock, obviously,

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and the movement is of no particular note.

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What we're looking at here

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is a wonderful, wonderful piece of sculpture,

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magnificent in anyone's drawing room.

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Overpowering to most people, I suspect,

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and my wife wouldn't have it in the house, I can tell you that,

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but I would love to own it myself.

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But now we have to talk about its value.

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At auction, it's got to be worth between £4,000 and £6,000.

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That's great, it's slightly more than I thought,

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but, yeah, nice to know the value.

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Fantastic.

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This plain little volume

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contains something of Charlecote interest I do believe.

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It does, it does. It's a lovely little strip cartoon.

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Now, if we open it up, we can have a little look at what we've got here.

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Yes.

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We can see that it tells a tale.

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And it tells a tale of Shakespeare's exploits here at Charlecote.

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If we take this panel in particular, we have the young Shakespeare

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with his crossbow shooting the deer on Lord Lucy's land at Charlecote.

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Now this is a Shakespeare legend, is it not?

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It's one of the very earliest legends relating to Shakespeare's life.

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And there is some evidence that it may actually be true

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because it comes from several different accounts in the 18th century.

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-Right.

-So it may just be true.

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Well, this item - this panorama - was published mid-19th century,

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round about the 1850 mark,

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so we can go back that far, as far as the legend is concerned.

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-Yeah.

-Let's have a closer look at it, and try and work out the wording,

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-which is sort of Victorian-Elizabethan speak, isn't it?

-Yes.

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I'll do my best.

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Then it goes on, "Hys apprehension, therefore..."

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-But he gets his own back, doesn't he, Shakespeare?

-Yes.

-Before he gets cast off the land,

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he writes a little ditty on the gates of Charlecote.

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"Hys Disgust thereat, and no less wayward revenge..."

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"..of my Lord Lucy an Epistle

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"the which is not complimentary."

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It's a lovely little strip cartoon, isn't it?

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You own this item?

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-Yes, this is part of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust's library.

-Ah.

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And we bought it about 12 years ago as a complete mystery item.

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We didn't know what it was, who made it, when it was made,

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but we just loved it because it's such a lovely little item.

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Little item. Well it's typical of the period, it's, as I say,

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mid-Victorian, mid-19th century, bit of publishing nonsense really.

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It's a panorama that goes some four or five feet in length,

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-it has no publishing details on it at all.

-No.

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Not an artist, not a publisher, not a date.

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But if we go back to the front cover,

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if we can fold it up very carefully...

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-That one goes there, if we go back to the front cover.

-Mm.

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-You see round the edges, this is fading.

-Yes.

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I think that would have had a complete printed label on it,

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I think that would have told us everything about the item we need to know.

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-Mm.

-But it's, as I say, fairly typical, I've seen this sort of thing before.

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-Value's not great, £150-£200 in auction perhaps, something like that.

-Yes, yes.

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But it's a real delight to see it today in the place of reference, really.

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-Yes. Thank you.

-Thanks for coming along today.

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Thank you very much.

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Confirmation, then, of some truth to our opening story.

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We thought it fitting, on the outskirts of Stratford,

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to ask some of our team to select a favourite object from Shakespearean days.

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We can always rely on jewellery man Geoffrey Munn to find something.

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Well, sometimes on the Antiques Roadshow, I say that I'm raising ghosts

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and by bringing this little object today, I think it is a ghost.

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And I've chosen something that I think is enormously evocative of Shakespearean England.

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It's not only a memento mori, but it's also a pomander,

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it's to be loaded with scent.

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It's there as a talisman against the plague

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and it was normal for people to carry these around

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as the only protection they had

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from the most terrifying spectacle of death.

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William Shakespeare's period was absolutely dogged by plague

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and in 1608, there was this simply terrible plague

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ripping through London, and people left in fear of their lives.

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It's a tiny box,

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if you like, you open it up and it reveals four compartments

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which are labelled on the other side with initials. We can only guess what those initials mean.

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Having bought them from the alchemist,

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you put little waxy pellets into there

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and it's like a cocktail of magic, really.

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Inside here would be a sponge soaked in rose-water

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and the scent would come through the front.

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When you held it to your nose, like this,

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you would not only have a way of covering unpleasant odours

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associated with disease,

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but you'd have a reminder of the fact that you were alive.

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Death is everywhere in his dramas,

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there are 15 mentions of skulls

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that he uses to bring out the plot

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in some of his most famous tragedies.

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In a sense, it says everything about the human condition,

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it says everything about William Shakespeare too,

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who brilliantly articulated where we are in life in The Tempest

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when he said that, "We are such stuff as dreams are made on,

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"and our little life is rounded with a sleep."

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Our very own poet, Geoffrey Munn,

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with a spooky reminder from Shakespeare's England.

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More Elizabethan remnants later, but back now to the Roadshow.

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Well, this is a great moment for me, actually holding an Olympic torch.

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How did it come into your possession?

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It came into my possession

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because my father carried it from Bletchley to Dorking in 1948.

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-So, for the London Olympics.

-For the London Olympics. I was five years old at the side of the road.

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-Do you remember it?

-Not very well, no.

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Just vaguely, but I've seen this all my life in my father's house

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and then, eventually, it came to me.

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Well, if we look at it, it says,

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-"XIV Olympiad 1948, Olympia, with thanks to the bearer."

-Yes.

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So he must have been a very good athlete.

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He was a very good athlete, he was a Surrey quarter-mile champion.

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Here he is, holding the torch just before it was lit

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and obviously we treasure this photograph very much indeed.

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So you should, and it's wonderful to have this Olympic torch here,

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-and you have it on display at home?

-We do have it at home, yes.

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Well, it's a wonderful piece of sporting memorabilia.

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There would be a number of keen collectors for a piece such as this

0:18:040:18:07

and I think if it came up at auction,

0:18:070:18:09

it would probably fetch somewhere between £2,000 and £3,000.

0:18:090:18:14

I think we'd better take very, very great care of it.

0:18:140:18:17

So you should, but hopefully it will stay in the family.

0:18:170:18:21

-It definitely will stay in the family.

-Yes.

0:18:210:18:23

And we have it, because we have two sons.

0:18:230:18:25

-Well, can I just dream for a moment longer?

-Absolutely!

0:18:250:18:29

Thank you very much for bringing it in, wonderful.

0:18:290:18:31

Absolutely.

0:18:310:18:34

There's two things that get me excited

0:18:400:18:42

when I see a piece of jewellery - if it has a fitted box,

0:18:420:18:45

and the other is when I see the person wearing beautiful jewels,

0:18:450:18:48

so you obviously appreciate jewellery.

0:18:480:18:50

I love jewellery, yes, yes.

0:18:500:18:53

And so can you tell me how you got this?

0:18:530:18:55

Well I found it at an antiques fair, a little local one.

0:18:550:18:59

It was in amongst a load of, you know, ordinary costume jewellery.

0:19:000:19:04

-Costume jewellery.

-Yes, yes.

0:19:040:19:05

And how much was the ticket on it?

0:19:050:19:07

I can't remember exactly, but it wouldn't have been very much,

0:19:070:19:12

£2 or £3, less than a fiver.

0:19:120:19:15

Less than £5, and when was this?

0:19:150:19:17

Within the last year or so, yes.

0:19:170:19:19

-Within the last year.

-Yes, yes.

0:19:190:19:21

Well, fantastic. So what did you do, then?

0:19:210:19:24

Well, I didn't think it was anything very exciting

0:19:260:19:29

until one day I put it on the side,

0:19:290:19:32

and I saw the sun catching the back.

0:19:320:19:36

-Right.

-And I ...

-Like today.

0:19:360:19:38

Yes, like today,

0:19:380:19:39

-and I thought it might be something better.

-OK.

0:19:390:19:42

So I took it back to an antiques fair to ask a jeweller,

0:19:420:19:46

I told her the story and she said,

0:19:460:19:48

"Would you like me to test it for you?

0:19:480:19:51

"I've got a machine," so I said, "Oh, yes, please."

0:19:520:19:56

-A machine to test what?

-To test the diamonds.

-OK, OK.

0:19:560:19:59

And it went "ping" and then it went "ping" and she was getting...

0:19:590:20:04

Is that what happens at these stone testings?

0:20:040:20:06

-I must get one.

-Musical diamonds.

0:20:060:20:08

Musical diamonds, yes.

0:20:100:20:12

And everybody, you know, they were all agog

0:20:140:20:17

because she said, you know, it was perhaps worth quite a bit.

0:20:170:20:21

But I've come to you to tell me what the metal is

0:20:210:20:24

and what period it is and all the information about it.

0:20:240:20:27

Excellent, right. Well, I mean to tell you all I can.

0:20:270:20:30

It is 1905.

0:20:300:20:34

Really?

0:20:340:20:35

It is platinum.

0:20:350:20:36

-Ah, ah.

-Ah, ah, now why did you go, "Ah?"

0:20:360:20:41

Because they weren't sure what white metal it was.

0:20:410:20:46

Right, well, you see, white gold came out a lot later.

0:20:460:20:49

Ah, I didn't know that.

0:20:490:20:50

And also, what is really indicative of this period

0:20:500:20:54

is this millegrain setting, and if you look around -

0:20:540:20:57

-and these are diamonds - the musical detector was right.

-Yes, yes.

0:20:570:21:02

They are all diamonds and you've got this millegrain setting

0:21:020:21:06

around each of the stones, tiny little bobbles.

0:21:060:21:09

I'd noticed that, but I didn't know what it was.

0:21:090:21:12

-Ah, no, well that's very typical of the Edwardian period.

-Oh.

0:21:120:21:15

Because platinum, you were able to pierce it all out and you could just get, you know,

0:21:150:21:19

-the diamonds look like they're suspended in lace.

-Yes, that's right.

0:21:190:21:22

You know, it's so delicate, because before then it was silver

0:21:220:21:25

and it was quite heavy and chunky, and silver tarnished, and it was soft,

0:21:250:21:30

whereas platinum is a much harder material

0:21:300:21:33

and so they didn't need so much metal around to hold the diamonds.

0:21:330:21:36

So that's why it's so light.

0:21:360:21:38

That's why it's so light, because also the dresses were light.

0:21:380:21:40

-Yes.

-The materials were lighter in the Edwardian period than in the end of the Victorian era.

0:21:400:21:44

And if I turn over here,

0:21:440:21:47

what is lovely is that you've got these hexagonal settings

0:21:470:21:51

and you can see that each one has been pierced out by hand in a hexagonal shape,

0:21:510:21:56

and that is a sign of quality as well, and it's absolutely lovely.

0:21:560:22:01

I think it's so stunning.

0:22:010:22:03

So, I mean value, £2-£3?

0:22:030:22:07

Mm, less than a fiver.

0:22:070:22:09

Oh, less than a fiver.

0:22:090:22:10

Well, I would like to say that you would probably, at auction,

0:22:120:22:17

you're looking at around about £2,000.

0:22:170:22:19

Oh, dear.

0:22:190:22:21

Oh, dear?

0:22:210:22:24

-I shall be frightened to wear it, won't I?

-I mean, it's absolutely beautiful

0:22:240:22:27

and it's so quintessentially Edwardian period and it's lovely.

0:22:270:22:32

-Oh that's wonderful.

-So do enjoy it.

0:22:320:22:34

-Thank you, thank you very much.

-Thank you for coming.

0:22:340:22:37

This has to be the ultimate in trench art.

0:22:390:22:44

It's a model of a First World War tank,

0:22:440:22:46

one of the very first tanks that served in the Somme in 1916,

0:22:460:22:51

but why have you got it?

0:22:510:22:52

Well, it was made by our grandfather -

0:22:520:22:55

because we're sisters -

0:22:550:22:57

and he made it while he was serving in the Royal Tank Corps

0:22:570:23:01

in northern France and so that's how we came by it. Yes.

0:23:010:23:06

-So it was passed down to you from your grandfather?

-Yes.

0:23:060:23:09

And he served in one of these tanks,

0:23:090:23:11

in a full-sized version of one of these?

0:23:110:23:13

-Yes.

-It's probably one of the best examples I've ever seen.

0:23:130:23:16

-Oh.

-So I guess he must have been an engineer.

0:23:160:23:18

Yes, he was an engineer, yes, he had to keep the tanks operating,

0:23:180:23:24

so he would be there on the front line,

0:23:240:23:26

but he made this from bits of metal

0:23:260:23:29

that he would have picked up as he was working on the tanks

0:23:290:23:33

and he made it as his souvenir of his experience in the war.

0:23:330:23:37

Well, he was a fantastic model maker, I can certainly say that.

0:23:370:23:41

The real one, of course, is considerably bigger,

0:23:410:23:45

it weighs about 28 tons, it's a huge beast,

0:23:450:23:48

and do you know what life was like inside these tanks?

0:23:480:23:51

I can't imagine. I can imagine it was horrendous.

0:23:510:23:53

It was horrible, you know, the carbon monoxide,

0:23:530:23:57

all the fumes from the engine,

0:23:570:24:00

the poor soldiers would be inhaling them for hours on end

0:24:000:24:05

and they'd be sick, they'd be ill, they'd be passing out.

0:24:050:24:08

It was the most appalling way to serve your army career.

0:24:080:24:12

But, you know, these tanks really helped the British war effort.

0:24:130:24:17

They instilled terrifying fear into the Germans

0:24:170:24:21

the first time they saw them. And tanks were male and female.

0:24:210:24:26

-Did you know that?

-No.

0:24:260:24:27

The female tank had machine guns

0:24:270:24:30

and the male tank had six-pounder naval guns

0:24:300:24:33

and this has got two six-pounder naval guns,

0:24:330:24:36

so it's known as a male tank.

0:24:360:24:38

But as an object of trench art,

0:24:380:24:41

it's actually quite desirable.

0:24:410:24:43

It does have a value.

0:24:440:24:45

People collect trench art

0:24:450:24:47

and that really is an extreme version of trench art.

0:24:470:24:50

I guess the fact you've got a beautiful object,

0:24:500:24:53

you've got a photograph of him, the man who made it,

0:24:530:24:57

I should think anyone who collects it

0:24:570:25:00

would probably pay certainly £300 to £400 for it.

0:25:000:25:04

It's a wonderful, wonderful object.

0:25:040:25:06

That's marvellous. It's something that we shall keep,

0:25:060:25:08

I mean, it's something that we would like to keep in the family, you know. Very special.

0:25:080:25:12

-Fantastic.

-Yes, very special, yes.

0:25:120:25:14

-Thank you so much, it's really a beautiful object.

-Thank you, thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:25:140:25:19

You know, it's extraordinary.

0:25:190:25:22

As soon as we put this table down on the grass, look at the crowd,

0:25:220:25:25

look at the number of people who've come to admire it.

0:25:250:25:29

-Isn't that amazing?

-That's wonderful.

0:25:290:25:31

And they feel... Obviously, they love it, and how do you feel about it?

0:25:310:25:34

Well, I love it, I cherish and polish it every now and again

0:25:340:25:38

and we've had dinner parties round it,

0:25:380:25:41

but very careful dinner parties.

0:25:410:25:43

Well, I don't think you need to be, it's certainly a lovely old top,

0:25:430:25:47

I mean, it's an Elizabethan top,

0:25:470:25:49

16th-century top, and it extends, right?

0:25:490:25:52

Yes, it does, yeah.

0:25:520:25:53

They were very, very clever in those days.

0:25:530:25:55

There's nothing new in the world, is there?

0:25:550:25:57

To think that in the 1550s they had tables they could make bigger

0:25:570:26:00

in case extra people came for dinner.

0:26:000:26:02

So this is a family piece, presumably?

0:26:020:26:05

No. I bought it at an auction.

0:26:050:26:08

I was in a long-term relationship

0:26:090:26:11

and received an ultimatum that I had to buy a place for us to live in.

0:26:110:26:17

-Right.

-And I duly saved up the deposit for somewhere

0:26:170:26:21

but ended up blowing it on the table at an auction.

0:26:210:26:26

How did the relationship go?

0:26:290:26:30

Well, I ended up being married to the table

0:26:300:26:33

rather than the young lady.

0:26:330:26:35

But then again, it had better legs.

0:26:350:26:37

LAUGHTER

0:26:370:26:39

Ooh! Ooh!

0:26:390:26:41

Well, follow that for a story.

0:26:410:26:47

It is, as I say, a marvellous walnut top

0:26:480:26:51

which started life as a table top in the Elizabethan period,

0:26:510:26:56

there's no question of that, it's a fantastic thing.

0:26:560:26:59

Well, I'm just not absolutely confident

0:26:590:27:02

about certain bits of the table and whether or not it's all right.

0:27:020:27:06

OK, let's start with the legs.

0:27:060:27:08

They're wonderful, it's called a cup-and-cover turning,

0:27:080:27:12

and it, again, is an Elizabethan pattern. It reflected -

0:27:120:27:17

if you look at the table - it reflected the costume of the time.

0:27:170:27:20

-Right.

-The pantaloons, the puff sleeves with slits in.

0:27:200:27:23

Yes.

0:27:230:27:24

But the lobes are slightly offset and they're all sort of misshapen.

0:27:240:27:28

-Yes.

-Now, imagine when this was new, it cost probably,

0:27:280:27:32

the original would have cost in the region of £30,000 or £40,000 in the Elizabethan times.

0:27:320:27:38

-Right.

-A man making that had to be precise.

0:27:380:27:41

It had to be immaculate

0:27:410:27:43

and that's how old furniture, Elizabethan furniture, should look.

0:27:430:27:46

But the Victorians thought, to make it look old, it had to look primitive.

0:27:460:27:50

-If it was smart, it would look new.

-Yes.

0:27:500:27:53

And this is a frame from the latter part of the 19th century,

0:27:530:27:57

and when you start to look at it, it doesn't quite tie together.

0:27:570:28:02

Imagine this is oak,

0:28:020:28:03

the number of hobnail boots would have to have

0:28:030:28:05

scraped on that rail to make it look like that.

0:28:050:28:08

-It never happened that way.

-No.

0:28:080:28:10

I mean there aren't enough feet in history to have done that

0:28:100:28:13

to a table rail, OK? And then we come round,

0:28:130:28:16

and if we look at the side here,

0:28:160:28:18

the chequerboard inlay -

0:28:180:28:20

the chevron inlays - they did that in the 16th century,

0:28:200:28:24

but it wouldn't have got grubby like that,

0:28:240:28:27

because there's no reason for it to have got dirty, so what you've got

0:28:270:28:31

is a very expensive reproduction frame for a fabulous top.

0:28:310:28:36

Can I ask you, then, how much you paid for it?

0:28:360:28:39

Oh, I dread to say now.

0:28:390:28:41

THEY LAUGH

0:28:410:28:43

My girlfriend will have her revenge, I think, now.

0:28:430:28:46

No, no.

0:28:460:28:47

It was 16,000.

0:28:470:28:48

-£16,000.

-Mm.

0:28:480:28:51

If you could find an old one...

0:28:510:28:53

There isn't an old one like this really on the market.

0:28:530:28:56

There may be one or two,

0:28:560:28:57

-but they are in the region of a 100,000.

-Yeah.

0:28:570:29:00

If they turn up.

0:29:000:29:01

The table is worth £16,000 to £20,000 anyway,

0:29:010:29:04

so you paid a fair price,

0:29:040:29:07

exactly what the table was worth, and it's a good partnership -

0:29:070:29:13

the fact that the table is a marriage is nothing to do with it.

0:29:130:29:16

Did it have...? May I ask you, did it have a romantic happy ending?

0:29:170:29:22

Well, it did eventually, because by virtue of buying this table,

0:29:220:29:26

I met my current wife and we've got two beautiful daughters, so...

0:29:260:29:30

Oh, wonderful, wonderful.

0:29:300:29:32

Well, I wish you many very happy meals on it.

0:29:320:29:35

Thank you very much.

0:29:350:29:37

'That table top was created in Shakespeare's lifetime.

0:29:390:29:43

'Curiously, perhaps, Roadshow veteran John Bly

0:29:430:29:46

'rarely sees pieces of such antiquity.'

0:29:460:29:49

It is surprising to most people that we don't see

0:29:500:29:53

a lot of pure, authentic Elizabethan furniture.

0:29:530:29:56

But we don't - it's very scarce, it's very rare.

0:29:560:29:58

What we do see on nearly every programme in 34 years

0:29:580:30:02

is this type of furniture, which is the 19th-century version.

0:30:020:30:05

This is the Victorians' idea of Elizabethan furniture.

0:30:050:30:09

This is a family piece, presumably?

0:30:140:30:17

'That piece was a perfect example of an old top on a later base.

0:30:170:30:21

'That was the Victorians' idea'

0:30:210:30:23

of an Elizabethan table.

0:30:230:30:25

Now, Elizabethan furniture of that type was so expensive,

0:30:250:30:28

it had to look immaculate.

0:30:280:30:30

They used seasoned timber

0:30:300:30:32

and the most expensive craftsmen to produce it.

0:30:320:30:35

No cracks in the timber, and no irregularities in the carving,

0:30:350:30:38

it just didn't work.

0:30:380:30:40

When you start to look at it, it doesn't quite tie together.

0:30:400:30:43

But, of course, people of Shakespeare's class

0:30:430:30:46

wouldn't have got anywhere near that quality table.

0:30:460:30:48

They would have had fine furniture -

0:30:480:30:50

good, elegant but simpler furniture,

0:30:500:30:52

functional, and it would have been made of fruit wood,

0:30:520:30:55

could have been made of ash or elm, and softer timbers generally,

0:30:550:30:58

and so it hasn't lasted as long,

0:30:580:31:01

and so because of that rarity, it is now collectors' class,

0:31:010:31:05

and equally exciting to me to find anything from that period.

0:31:050:31:10

And John tells us he'd love nothing more

0:31:100:31:13

than to see a genuine example of a fine or rustic

0:31:130:31:16

piece of Elizabethan furniture at a future Roadshow.

0:31:160:31:19

We can help you bring large pieces to the show

0:31:190:31:21

if you contact us in advance.

0:31:210:31:23

These two oil paintings of Venice have the most extraordinary detail.

0:31:230:31:28

Yes.

0:31:280:31:29

They date to about 1870.

0:31:290:31:32

Now, tell me, I'm just amazed by the quality of these little pictures.

0:31:320:31:36

Tell me your history.

0:31:360:31:38

Well, my grandma,

0:31:380:31:40

when she was 19, was taken to Venice by her parents as a treat

0:31:400:31:43

and they evidently bought them for her, as a present,

0:31:430:31:47

so that was 1910-ish.

0:31:470:31:50

They were an industrialist family, created fine linen,

0:31:500:31:55

and they had quite a lot of paintings and things

0:31:550:31:57

and they obviously liked these

0:31:570:31:59

and thought they would be a memento, I think.

0:31:590:32:02

I mean, an extraordinary gift for 1910 -

0:32:020:32:04

that was quite a grown-up gift at the time.

0:32:040:32:06

I'm amazed by the detail of these pictures -

0:32:060:32:09

all the figures, all the architecture and, of course,

0:32:090:32:12

Venice is one of my favourite places that I've travelled to.

0:32:120:32:15

Have you been there too?

0:32:150:32:17

My parents took me when I was... Well, in 1994.

0:32:170:32:21

Yes, it's lovely, it is very nice.

0:32:210:32:24

It's the most unbelievable place.

0:32:240:32:27

Now, certainly the picture at the top is unsigned.

0:32:270:32:29

But there is an indistinct signature

0:32:290:32:31

lower right on the St Mark's Square picture.

0:32:310:32:36

I've never been able to decipher that.

0:32:360:32:39

I don't know whether you can do any better.

0:32:390:32:41

-Have you heard of a family called the Grubacs Family?

-No.

-No?

0:32:410:32:46

There's two artists, there's an artist -

0:32:460:32:48

an Italian artist, of course - Carlo Grubacs and Giovanni Grubacs.

0:32:480:32:52

Giovanni was born in 1829 and lived up to about 1919

0:32:520:32:58

so that ties in perfectly with your trip you were discussing.

0:32:580:33:02

And they're incredibly sought-after.

0:33:030:33:06

I mean, little pictures like this -

0:33:060:33:07

such incredible detail, lovely original condition -

0:33:070:33:11

I mean, a real treat for me to see these, actually.

0:33:110:33:13

And highly, highly commercial.

0:33:130:33:16

Good. I'm not going to sell them,

0:33:160:33:17

they've been in the family a long time

0:33:170:33:19

and they would stay in the family.

0:33:190:33:21

£10,000 to £15,000.

0:33:210:33:23

Wow!

0:33:230:33:25

Well, we value them...

0:33:250:33:27

-Yes, that's a lot of money!

-Isn't it?

0:33:270:33:29

-You've done your research?

-I think I have. I hope so.

0:33:320:33:35

"Dear Sir, thank you for your letter of June 19th.

0:33:350:33:38

"Your vase is a unique piece painted in 1900 by CF Liisberg..."

0:33:380:33:43

There is Liisberg's signature right there.

0:33:430:33:46

"..one of our best artists, and sent to the world exhibition in Paris

0:33:460:33:51

"the same year, where it was sold for 2,000 Danish crowns."

0:33:510:33:56

Well, first of all, I have to declare an interest -

0:33:560:33:59

it comes from my home city.

0:33:590:34:01

-Good.

-So I'm disposed towards it.

-Good.

0:34:010:34:04

-What about you?

-We are very disposed to it as a family.

0:34:040:34:08

The family found a premises in Sheep Street, in Stratford -

0:34:080:34:11

and then what does the family do? It goes to the broom cupboard

0:34:110:34:15

and believe it or not,

0:34:150:34:17

a very, very dirty, beautiful piece of porcelain.

0:34:170:34:21

So we scrubbed it up and just couldn't believe our eyes,

0:34:210:34:24

and that was 1964.

0:34:240:34:26

So it's a real discovery.

0:34:260:34:27

-A real discovery.

-The classic broom cupboard.

-Really, yes.

0:34:270:34:31

Now from that letter - which was written to you by the curator

0:34:310:34:35

of the Royal Copenhagen Archive - we've established that it was made

0:34:350:34:38

-for the Great Paris Exhibition in the year 1900.

-1900.

0:34:380:34:41

I'm going to look at this as a piece of design.

0:34:410:34:44

First of all, swans -

0:34:440:34:46

well, which other bird would you associate with Scandinavia?

0:34:460:34:49

-Exactly.

-Other than swans? I mean, Hans Christian Andersen...

0:34:490:34:53

-I know.

-..has the story about the swans,

0:34:530:34:55

and the swans represent each of the countries of Scandinavia today.

0:34:550:34:59

Here, we've got nine swans crossing what I would say

0:34:590:35:02

is a highly recognisable Danish coastline

0:35:020:35:05

with all those granite rocks in the foreground

0:35:050:35:07

and this rather stormy sky.

0:35:070:35:10

But if you just rotate this vase,

0:35:100:35:12

you'll see how skilful the design is.

0:35:120:35:15

It really does have that wonderful, wonderful movement.

0:35:150:35:19

And these fabulous pigments, these underglaze pigments -

0:35:190:35:22

in other words, when you rub your hand across the vase,

0:35:220:35:26

-you can't actually feel the pigments.

-No, no, you can't.

0:35:260:35:28

-This is something that Copenhagen is famous for.

-Mm.

0:35:280:35:32

And a designer called Arnold Krog

0:35:320:35:33

-was head of the workshops in Copenhagen in the 1870s-1880s.

-Yes.

0:35:330:35:40

And at this stage, Japanese design is flooding into Europe

0:35:400:35:45

and is having a huge effect on all the artists,

0:35:450:35:48

including people like Van Gogh, who start using Japanese motifs.

0:35:480:35:51

-Yes.

-And what do we see here?

0:35:510:35:54

We see Copenhagen using - at the very bottom -

0:35:540:35:56

this wonderful, very, very Japanese wave style.

0:35:560:36:01

These great international exhibitions,

0:36:010:36:04

which started off, of course, in London

0:36:040:36:06

-with the Great Exhibition of 1851...

-Yes.

0:36:060:36:08

..and were held regularly thereafter, these were the moments when the world got to know itself.

0:36:080:36:13

And it's when the Japanese came along with their pottery

0:36:150:36:18

to show Europeans what they were doing, and it's when the Danes

0:36:180:36:22

went along with their porcelain to show the rest of the world as well,

0:36:220:36:25

and they showed them just what could be done

0:36:250:36:28

with all of these underglaze pigments.

0:36:280:36:30

But what would you get for it if you sold it?

0:36:300:36:33

That's the question. It's an exhibition piece.

0:36:330:36:36

Yes.

0:36:360:36:37

I think you would certainly get somewhere between £8,000

0:36:370:36:41

and maybe £12,000.

0:36:410:36:43

Thank you very much indeed.

0:36:430:36:45

But we're not going to - it's in the family.

0:36:450:36:47

What else was in the broom cupboard?

0:36:470:36:49

LAUGHTER

0:36:490:36:52

This gorgeous rose bowl is an example of silver

0:36:520:36:55

that doesn't really exist these days,

0:36:550:36:57

or is extremely rare these days,

0:36:570:36:59

which is a private commission where somebody goes to the silversmith

0:36:590:37:03

and has something made up, absolutely to their order.

0:37:030:37:07

The coat of arms on the front - somebody's...

0:37:070:37:09

-perhaps somebody related to you?

-My great-uncle.

-Your great-uncle.

0:37:090:37:12

Your great-uncle who was - by looking at the coat of arms I can tell -

0:37:120:37:16

-a baron.

-He was indeed, yes.

0:37:160:37:17

And his baron's coronet.

0:37:170:37:21

He's gone to see the silversmith,

0:37:210:37:23

one Mr Omar Ramsden,

0:37:230:37:25

and he's made up a special order

0:37:250:37:26

-with various other emblems on it that relate to your ancestor.

-Yes.

0:37:260:37:31

It would have been a very expensive piece of silver at the time.

0:37:310:37:35

Omar Ramsden has engraved on the bottom "Omar Ramsden me fecit",

0:37:350:37:39

which means "Omar Ramsden made me", which he didn't.

0:37:390:37:44

Omar Ramsden was a silversmith

0:37:440:37:46

but was also a brilliant salesman,

0:37:460:37:48

-fantastic salesman.

-Really?

0:37:480:37:49

And evidence of his salesmanship, I think, can be seen

0:37:490:37:53

-from the paperwork in front of us here.

-Yes.

0:37:530:37:56

We've got a photograph of the almost-finished article.

0:37:560:37:59

It hasn't got its grille in the top to take the flowers.

0:37:590:38:01

And he said on the card that goes with it, "With the compliments

0:38:010:38:04

"of Omar Ramsden. The actual work will be finished next week."

0:38:040:38:10

Now, I might be wrong, but it's quite possible that the reason

0:38:100:38:13

he sent this along was to get a pre-payment, perhaps.

0:38:130:38:16

-Right.

-For the finished work.

0:38:160:38:19

This sort of silver doesn't get made in any sort of quantity these days

0:38:190:38:23

because it's simply too expensive

0:38:230:38:25

and there aren't sufficient silversmiths working

0:38:250:38:28

to bring the price down to a reasonable level,

0:38:280:38:32

so private commissions are rare.

0:38:320:38:34

Omar Ramsden made this in 1935, just four or five years before he died,

0:38:340:38:39

and it's the end of an era, really, for private commissions.

0:38:390:38:45

Bits of Omar Ramsden silver this size

0:38:450:38:47

are quite scarce and there is an enormous collectors' market for it.

0:38:470:38:51

Although he's not made the work himself necessarily,

0:38:510:38:53

the people working for him were very, very good

0:38:530:38:56

and there are some quite famous names in the silversmithing world

0:38:560:38:59

who were his apprentices at the time.

0:38:590:39:02

As a consequence, it's really quite a valuable piece of silver.

0:39:020:39:05

I don't know if you've ever thought about what the value might be.

0:39:050:39:09

Never. Sentimental.

0:39:090:39:10

Never, and it would probably never leave the family

0:39:100:39:12

since it's clearly got your family's arms.

0:39:120:39:15

But what I can tell you is that with the enthusiasm

0:39:150:39:17

for Omar Ramsden silver among collectors,

0:39:170:39:20

that if you walked into a shop and tried to buy it,

0:39:200:39:23

you would be charged at least £20,000 for it.

0:39:230:39:26

I won't sell it.

0:39:280:39:29

I'd hang on to it.

0:39:300:39:32

It's probably not going to go down in price any time soon.

0:39:320:39:35

Looks lovely with little carnations in it, super.

0:39:350:39:38

-Lucky you.

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:39:380:39:41

Well, look at all this gold in the sunlight, gleaming away.

0:39:430:39:47

Tell me about its history with you.

0:39:470:39:49

Well, the history is that these objects came from Somalia -

0:39:490:39:53

Somaliland - and it came from our ancestry,

0:39:530:39:56

passed through my father and then my father passed away,

0:39:560:39:59

and since then I've had them,

0:39:590:40:01

but I didn't know where to take them to get the history.

0:40:010:40:04

But all I know is they're 22-carat gold, 280 grams,

0:40:040:40:06

-the bigger one, and the other one is also a 22-carat gold.

-Fabulous.

0:40:060:40:12

And isn't there some relationship between this shard of pottery here?

0:40:120:40:15

Were they found in this pot?

0:40:150:40:17

They were found in the pot with a dagger

0:40:170:40:19

and a few other silver chains, some rings, quite a few items together.

0:40:190:40:23

And sort of buried, literally buried treasure, really, isn't it?

0:40:230:40:27

-It is a buried treasure.

-Marvellous.

0:40:270:40:29

This chain here is made from a technique

0:40:290:40:32

called loop-in-loop chain work,

0:40:320:40:34

which comes from deepest antiquity.

0:40:340:40:36

It's exactly the same technique as used by the ancient Greeks

0:40:360:40:39

-in the 3rd century BC.

-OK.

0:40:390:40:41

And it continues to be used today.

0:40:410:40:44

It's made by making thin gold wires

0:40:440:40:45

and then almost working them up like needlework,

0:40:450:40:48

and there is a sense that this is rather like a textile, isn't it?

0:40:480:40:52

It's very movable. And this is a much more massy and heavy affair,

0:40:520:40:55

-really, with all kinds of small gold links soldered together.

-Yes.

0:40:550:40:59

And so in a way, these are very valuable status symbols.

0:40:590:41:02

The original owner probably had these things to let people know

0:41:020:41:05

that he was a highly successful individual

0:41:050:41:08

and more accurately that his wife

0:41:080:41:09

was a highly successful individual

0:41:090:41:11

and that they could accumulate this gold -

0:41:110:41:13

not only could they afford it, but they could also protect it.

0:41:130:41:16

And it seems to me that protection is part of all of this,

0:41:160:41:19

that somewhere along the line, somebody was in trouble

0:41:190:41:22

and they buried this gold in the ground,

0:41:220:41:24

and wanted to come back for it.

0:41:240:41:26

And this is very much the theme of treasure,

0:41:260:41:30

that it's hidden away, it's a sort of form of banking and the only key

0:41:300:41:33

is try to remember where you buried it, and also to get back to do it.

0:41:330:41:37

-OK.

-And clearly this person who buried those

0:41:370:41:40

didn't succeed in getting back, and I can't - I can only imagine

0:41:400:41:43

your father's surprise and delight to unearth this gold.

0:41:430:41:48

-Gold is absolutely incorruptible - this is nearly pure gold.

-OK.

0:41:480:41:51

And if it had lain in the soil for 20 million years,

0:41:510:41:54

it would come up looking the same, and in a way

0:41:540:41:56

that's part of the magnetism that these sort of objects have,

0:41:560:41:59

that this rich gold alloy has. Well, there's a huge tradition

0:41:590:42:02

-for working gold and for mining gold in Africa.

-Yes.

0:42:020:42:05

And we see it in great splendour in the Benin civilisation

0:42:050:42:08

-and the Ashanti civilisation.

-OK, OK.

-But my instinct is,

0:42:080:42:11

although this is a very ancient technique indeed,

0:42:110:42:14

that it's not a particularly ancient object,

0:42:140:42:16

and I'd be surprised if it dated

0:42:160:42:19

-much before the 18th or 19th century.

-OK.

0:42:190:42:22

And if we're talking only about the gold content -

0:42:220:42:25

which is a travesty really,

0:42:250:42:26

you wouldn't dream of melting them - but if that had happened,

0:42:260:42:29

you could walk away with your treasure, your bullion,

0:42:290:42:32

to a value of £10,000, which astounds me actually,

0:42:320:42:34

and then add a little bit more -

0:42:340:42:36

perhaps not a great deal more for the historical context

0:42:360:42:39

because I'm not sure that that's a huge focus here -

0:42:390:42:43

but it does tell us the extraordinary relationship

0:42:430:42:46

between man and this noble gold, gleaming metal

0:42:460:42:49

that's incorruptible, is the same at the beginning of time

0:42:490:42:51

as at the end, and you're part of it.

0:42:510:42:55

-Excited by it?

-Yes, absolutely,

0:42:550:42:57

I've never got any expert opinion other than first time today.

0:42:570:43:01

Well, I hope this is an expert one, but I'm not sure about it.

0:43:010:43:05

-But it's an opinion.

-I didn't expect this, but thank you.

0:43:050:43:08

It did belong to my husband,

0:43:100:43:13

and he was given it through a gentleman that he worked with,

0:43:130:43:16

and he had it cleaned and he did wear it a couple of times

0:43:160:43:20

because of the history - not that it was German,

0:43:200:43:23

but relating to the Battle of Britain.

0:43:230:43:27

So your husband, how did he acquire it?

0:43:270:43:30

A gentleman at work, one of his colleagues,

0:43:300:43:33

he asked him if he would be interested in an old watch,

0:43:330:43:36

and my husband did like watches and clocks.

0:43:360:43:39

And it was among all the tools. And he'd got it off his father...

0:43:390:43:43

-Right.

-..and it was in the toolbox forever.

0:43:430:43:47

-And he hoiked it out and then he...

-He just passed it over to Ricky.

0:43:470:43:50

It didn't have hands, and Ricky took it to a jeweller in Grantham

0:43:500:43:54

and as soon as the jeweller saw it, he said, "Do you want to sell it?"

0:43:540:43:57

and Ricky said no.

0:43:570:43:59

-Good for him.

-He wanted it to work,

0:43:590:44:01

you see, so he wanted it cleaned and he needed new hands,

0:44:010:44:04

-but the chap said he couldn't get the original hands.

-Yeah.

0:44:040:44:09

And he said, "But I'll get as near as I can."

0:44:090:44:12

And what do you know about it?

0:44:120:44:14

We tried to look up the name, Glashuette.

0:44:140:44:17

-Yeah.

-That's who made it, but we can't find anything else

0:44:170:44:21

because somebody bombed it.

0:44:210:44:23

Us.

0:44:230:44:26

So the factory's gone kaput, so that's all I could find out.

0:44:260:44:31

-Right. Well, let me see if we can shed a bit of light on it.

-OK.

0:44:310:44:35

-It is an aviator's watch.

-OK.

0:44:350:44:37

It's more of a navigator's watch.

0:44:370:44:39

It's German - but you knew that -

0:44:390:44:42

and it dates from around 1942,

0:44:420:44:46

made for the German Luftwaffe,

0:44:460:44:48

so absolutely - I mean, it could well have been worn

0:44:480:44:52

as those bombers came over this country.

0:44:520:44:54

The name on the dial is Glashuette, and Glashuette is a town in Germany.

0:44:540:45:00

It was the centre of the watchmaking industry near Dresden.

0:45:000:45:04

The company that made it was a company called Uhrenfabrik AG.

0:45:040:45:08

Uhren - watch, Fabrik - made, and the company was AG.

0:45:080:45:12

I think now's the time to point out

0:45:120:45:14

that it's not in the best of condition,

0:45:140:45:16

but then it wouldn't be, because it's been worn inside a bomber.

0:45:160:45:20

Very briefly, what we have is a black enamel dial

0:45:200:45:23

with luminous Arabic numerals, and you have the replaced hands,

0:45:230:45:26

but actually they've been so beautifully replaced,

0:45:260:45:29

if you hadn't told me that, I'd have believed they were original hands.

0:45:290:45:33

They're absolutely spot on. So, great job.

0:45:330:45:35

But somebody said that there was three hands, is that right?

0:45:350:45:38

-There are meant to be three.

-OK.

0:45:380:45:40

Yes. These two buttons are the chronograph buttons,

0:45:400:45:43

and that's the stopwatch.

0:45:430:45:44

Press that to start it, press that to stop it and that to return it.

0:45:440:45:48

But we haven't got a chronograph hand to show that mechanism,

0:45:480:45:51

but I'm sure it would work.

0:45:510:45:52

The chronograph mechanism is there to time,

0:45:520:45:55

presumably from one navigational spot to the next navigational spot.

0:45:550:45:59

Yes, I read that.

0:45:590:46:00

So, out of a toolbox, given away really, isn't it?

0:46:000:46:04

Yes.

0:46:040:46:05

-£2,000.

-OK.

0:46:070:46:09

And let's just imagine, for a minute,

0:46:090:46:12

that this was on the wrist of a German navigator,

0:46:120:46:15

clad in leather, sheepskin-lined jacket

0:46:150:46:18

with this strap over the top of his jacket -

0:46:180:46:21

that's why they're so large -

0:46:210:46:23

whilst cruising over London, Birmingham, Manchester,

0:46:230:46:26

bombing the heck out of us.

0:46:260:46:28

And that is - I mean that's in all likelihood,

0:46:280:46:31

that's where this watch was last practically used.

0:46:310:46:34

It's extraordinary, really, when you think about it.

0:46:340:46:36

-It's spooky.

-It really is spooky.

-That's why I won't sell it.

0:46:360:46:40

Quite right.

0:46:400:46:41

So how fitting, to be in this beautiful Elizabethan garden

0:46:430:46:46

and to see this magnificent Elizabethan portrait.

0:46:460:46:49

Now, are you the Earl of Leicester?

0:46:490:46:52

-No.

-No. So how has this ended up in your possession?

0:46:520:46:56

-I'm the master of a thing called the Lord Leicester Hospital.

-Right.

0:46:560:46:59

Which is an establishment which he set up in 1571

0:46:590:47:03

as a retirement home for old warriors

0:47:030:47:05

disabled in the service of Queen Elizabeth.

0:47:050:47:09

How amazing! And it's been in that establishment ever since?

0:47:090:47:12

It has, and it's still a home for old warriors,

0:47:120:47:16

we're still a retirement home for ex-servicemen

0:47:160:47:19

and this has been on the wall for we don't know how long!

0:47:190:47:22

This is one of the reasons that I'm hoping you're going to help me.

0:47:220:47:25

Ah, well, let's look at it.

0:47:250:47:26

I mean, it is a superb portrait of Robert Dudley,

0:47:260:47:30

the Earl of Leicester.

0:47:300:47:31

And of course he was one of the sons of the Duke of Northumberland,

0:47:310:47:35

and that of course brought him very close to the royal family,

0:47:350:47:41

and it's said that he grew up with Elizabeth I

0:47:410:47:44

and eventually Elizabeth took him into the court

0:47:440:47:47

and he became a huge favourite. But I like this, it's very intimate,

0:47:470:47:50

and I really think it's of the period.

0:47:500:47:53

Oh, I'm very pleased because we weren't sure

0:47:530:47:55

whether it was genuine or a copy, or a late...

0:47:550:47:58

It's certainly of him, he was painted by the greats.

0:47:580:48:00

Great miniature painter Nicholas Hilliard painted him.

0:48:000:48:04

-But look at the quality, have you seen his beard?

-Yes, yes.

0:48:040:48:06

It's incredible, every hair you can see.

0:48:060:48:08

It's a fantastic portrait of an extremely important man.

0:48:080:48:12

Do you know who it's by?

0:48:120:48:14

It's got a label on it, but I'm deeply sceptical of labels.

0:48:140:48:17

Anyone can stick a label on anything.

0:48:170:48:19

It's by an Italian painter, I think. I don't know how to pronounce it -

0:48:190:48:22

-Zucchero?

-I don't think it's by Zucchero at all.

0:48:220:48:25

In style it's rather like a chap called Sir William Segar,

0:48:250:48:29

and I think that it's much more in his style,

0:48:290:48:32

but because... He was iconic, there are many many portraits of him.

0:48:320:48:37

-Have you ever had it valued?

-No, we haven't.

0:48:370:48:40

Well, you know, although there are a number of portraits

0:48:400:48:43

of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester,

0:48:430:48:46

it is quite rare to find things from the Tudor period,

0:48:460:48:50

and assuming this is from the Tudor period,

0:48:500:48:53

which I feel from looking at today, it is, I would say

0:48:530:48:57

it could make between £10,000 and £15,000 at auction.

0:48:570:49:00

-Gosh.

-So, not bad.

0:49:000:49:02

So the great Robert Dudley is still a benefactor of your establishment.

0:49:020:49:07

-Very much so, yes.

-That's wonderful.

0:49:070:49:08

Well, I'm pleased, and I think he was a good man,

0:49:080:49:11

still to look down on you.

0:49:110:49:13

We've been fortunate to see objects from Shakespeare's lifetime

0:49:130:49:16

here at Charlecote Park, particularly such a sumptuous painting.

0:49:160:49:20

Mark Poltimore has chosen a personal favourite from the era.

0:49:210:49:26

In my hand, I have - and that's why I'm wearing these gloves -

0:49:280:49:32

this very precious and incredibly beautiful

0:49:320:49:35

Portrait Of An Unknown Lady by Nicholas Hilliard.

0:49:350:49:38

He was one of the first home-grown English artists,

0:49:380:49:41

but here we have quite a late portrait from 1605

0:49:410:49:46

of this beautiful young lady. If you look at it in detail,

0:49:460:49:51

you will see it is absolutely microscopic

0:49:510:49:55

and that the jewellery shines out and is so intricate and so delicate.

0:49:550:50:01

He often used a weasel or a stoat's tooth,

0:50:010:50:05

mounted on a wooden stick, to burnish, to sort of rub,

0:50:050:50:12

to bring it out, so it's incredibly bright and beautiful.

0:50:120:50:16

He would use very fine brushes made of squirrel's tails.

0:50:160:50:21

They really were treated as jewels.

0:50:210:50:24

Value is always difficult, but I would have thought

0:50:240:50:27

if it came up onto the market,

0:50:270:50:29

it would make at least £50,000 to £70,000.

0:50:290:50:32

And as only the wealthy were painted in Tudor England, it's believed that

0:50:340:50:38

no portrait was painted of Shakespeare in his lifetime.

0:50:380:50:41

But if you know better, bring your picture along to a Roadshow.

0:50:410:50:44

So, Imperial Russia comes to Warwickshire.

0:50:470:50:51

You have a wonderful Russian porcelain cup and saucer.

0:50:510:50:54

-Where did you get it?

-I got it about 35 years ago, I think,

0:50:540:50:59

at a little antique shop that had a tearoom as well.

0:50:590:51:03

-Right.

-Up near Billingshurst in Sussex.

0:51:030:51:05

Right. Do you know anything about it?

0:51:050:51:07

-We knew it was Russian.

-Right.

0:51:070:51:09

And we went to the library and had a look at some of the books,

0:51:090:51:12

and we came up with Kuznetsov

0:51:120:51:15

-and we thought it was the Dulevo factory.

-Right.

0:51:150:51:19

And the book said that the mark was usually done in blue,

0:51:190:51:22

but they did gold for special orders.

0:51:220:51:25

-But that's really all we know about it.

-I'm redundant, aren't I?

0:51:250:51:28

You've done it all. Let's have a look.

0:51:280:51:31

You do have this wonderful painted panel,

0:51:310:51:34

you have wonderful jewelling - for that's what we call it,

0:51:340:51:39

this raised enamel work round the side -

0:51:390:51:41

tooled gold,

0:51:410:51:43

pierced base, all the signs of luxury

0:51:430:51:45

-and indeed of a special order.

-Yes.

0:51:450:51:47

So I think you're probably right there.

0:51:470:51:50

Let's have a look at the mark,

0:51:500:51:51

see whether you're right about Kuznetsov - and you are.

0:51:510:51:54

-It is a gold mark.

-Yes.

0:51:540:51:57

It's likely to be the sign of a special order,

0:51:570:51:59

and it was made in the late 19th century.

0:51:590:52:01

This mark is in real gold - people often don't appreciate this,

0:52:010:52:05

-this is real gold used to gild this mark.

-Yes, mm.

0:52:050:52:08

-It doesn't actually look Russian, does it?

-No.

0:52:080:52:11

It looks... It could be a piece of Coalport or a piece of Meissen,

0:52:110:52:14

it doesn't look actually distinctively Russian,

0:52:140:52:16

and that might hold it back a bit.

0:52:160:52:19

But even then, I think your cup and saucer, £25 35 years ago,

0:52:190:52:24

is going to be in the region of £500 or maybe £600 today.

0:52:240:52:29

Wow! Lovely, thank you very much.

0:52:290:52:32

-Not at all, it's a pleasure.

-That's great.

0:52:320:52:35

Well, I reckon that these decanters are a pair of sisters.

0:52:370:52:41

What about you guys?

0:52:410:52:43

Well, we are two brothers. And my father

0:52:430:52:47

bought them many years ago, and when he died, he passed them on

0:52:470:52:52

to us separately, so we've had them separately now for about 25 years.

0:52:520:52:58

And what do you know about their past?

0:52:580:53:00

Where did he get them from? Do you know anything further about them?

0:53:000:53:03

He gave us a book - which we've now lost, unfortunately -

0:53:030:53:08

and in there it describes the maker, from Stourbridge,

0:53:080:53:11

and we're now trying to find that out.

0:53:110:53:14

So we will probably find the book one day,

0:53:140:53:16

but in the meantime we've got a pair of beautiful decanters

0:53:160:53:20

which just sit in the cabinet.

0:53:200:53:22

Well, let's have a closer look at what we've got here.

0:53:220:53:24

Now, see, I mean this is where glass comes into play. Look at that.

0:53:240:53:28

Add light and - magic! Absolutely fantastic.

0:53:280:53:32

What I can tell you about them,

0:53:320:53:34

I mean, you know, one of the problems about glass

0:53:340:53:36

is it doesn't say, "Made by so-and-so," written on it,

0:53:360:53:40

and that is inevitably a problem, but I'm pretty sure

0:53:400:53:42

these are the work of Thomas Webb and Sons,

0:53:420:53:45

and these date, I would think,

0:53:450:53:48

to about the glory period of Thomas Webb, about 1870.

0:53:480:53:51

And the work is absolutely fantastic.

0:53:510:53:55

They're wheel-engraved, I mean you used to take the basic blank

0:53:550:53:58

and then the wheel engraver gets to work.

0:53:580:54:01

On the reverse, pretty pedestrian.

0:54:020:54:05

Ferns - the archetypal motif of Victorian engraving.

0:54:050:54:09

So if you like, this is the chalk, but, boy, that's the cheese.

0:54:090:54:14

That is just absolutely fantastic.

0:54:140:54:18

These must be a quarter-inch deep, cut into the body,

0:54:180:54:21

and if you zoom in and look at the feathers,

0:54:210:54:23

straining on the angel's wings,

0:54:230:54:26

I mean, they're just really very, very good indeed.

0:54:260:54:30

-I mean, close to "as good as you get".

-Mm.

0:54:300:54:34

I mean they really are - mwah! - peachy, and I love them.

0:54:340:54:37

I think these are really pretty. So, value.

0:54:370:54:42

I suppose as a pair they're going to be worth a bit more than as singles,

0:54:430:54:46

which is always the trouble about splitting pairs,

0:54:460:54:48

but these would be a proud part of a stock of any posh antique dealer.

0:54:480:54:54

You would certainly not be able to buy them

0:54:540:54:56

for any less than £1,200 to £1,500

0:54:560:54:59

because they're just such fabulous quality.

0:54:590:55:02

-Thank you.

-That sounds very good.

-Very nice, very nice indeed.

0:55:020:55:05

Very interesting to hear of the history.

0:55:050:55:08

When you brought me this box with "National Health Service"

0:55:090:55:12

written on it, I thought you'd brought me your heart pills!

0:55:120:55:16

I open it, and I think we'll just get rid of the box -

0:55:160:55:19

chuck that away - and revealed is this beautiful cameo.

0:55:190:55:24

Tell me, how did you get this?

0:55:240:55:26

My aunt left it to my mother, and my mother gave it to me.

0:55:260:55:32

-Do you know anything about it?

-Not really, no.

0:55:320:55:35

Well, I will tell you something about it.

0:55:350:55:37

What I loved - I mean, coming out of that box, that was just amazing,

0:55:370:55:42

because immediately, it just screams out quality.

0:55:420:55:45

I mean it just screams out like a museum piece,

0:55:450:55:48

it's absolutely gorgeous.

0:55:480:55:51

It's a hardstone cameo of around about 1800.

0:55:510:55:55

Now between 1760 and 1820 there was a real revival of Classicism,

0:55:550:56:01

and that was because of the archaeological sites

0:56:010:56:03

that were being discovered at the time,

0:56:030:56:05

and also Napoleon around that time, he was really, he loved cameos.

0:56:050:56:09

And what is important with cameos

0:56:090:56:12

is the movement and the fineness of the carving.

0:56:120:56:15

What they would have, they would have a drill,

0:56:150:56:18

and at the end of the drill,

0:56:180:56:19

a little lead head would have been impregnated with diamond dust,

0:56:190:56:22

and these are layers in the hardstone,

0:56:220:56:25

and they would actually start drilling away

0:56:250:56:28

to reveal all the different levels

0:56:280:56:30

and it would take months and months and years,

0:56:300:56:33

and the skill in this was absolutely revered

0:56:330:56:37

as the same as an architect or a painter or a sculptor.

0:56:370:56:40

So in fact what is really also interesting is that people would...

0:56:400:56:44

This is of Apollo, and men would wear these cameos with pride.

0:56:440:56:48

It wasn't sort of female adornment, it was really important,

0:56:480:56:52

there was this real sense of place and dignity by wearing one of these.

0:56:520:56:57

You have here, just on the side here, "Constantini" -

0:56:570:56:59

the signature of the engraver, and the stone is sardonyx,

0:56:590:57:03

a hardstone, which means that it has layers of different colours,

0:57:030:57:07

all the same... It's all the same stone.

0:57:070:57:09

The diamonds round the outside are rose-cut diamonds,

0:57:090:57:12

and rose cuts means that it has a flat back

0:57:120:57:16

but it has a faceted top to it.

0:57:160:57:18

Do you have an idea of the value?

0:57:180:57:20

Yes, a little bit, well... I was told something.

0:57:200:57:23

-What were you told?

-About £800 to £1,000.

0:57:230:57:26

-£800 to £1,000.

-Yes.

0:57:260:57:29

I think you should have brought those heart pills.

0:57:290:57:31

Really?

0:57:310:57:33

Because I would say that it would be around about £6,000 to £8,000.

0:57:350:57:39

Ooh, well. That is a surprise.

0:57:390:57:44

I mean, it's absolutely stunning, it's fantastic, really beautiful,

0:57:450:57:48

and so lovely to see the quality of the piece.

0:57:480:57:51

What would have happened if I'd let it go to the auction?

0:57:510:57:54

You wouldn't be sitting here feeling so happy.

0:57:540:57:57

-Well, thank you very much.

-Gosh, right, that's exciting, thank you.

0:58:000:58:04

Do you remember I mentioned at the beginning of this programme

0:58:080:58:11

that Shakespeare was apparently caught red-handed poaching deer here?

0:58:110:58:14

Talking of Shakespeare, when I arrived this morning

0:58:140:58:17

and there were only six people waiting to see our experts,

0:58:170:58:19

I thought today might be Much Ado About Nothing, but what can I say?

0:58:190:58:22

We've had 2,000, 3,000 people turn up - it's been a wonderful day,

0:58:220:58:25

and All's Well That Ends Well.

0:58:250:58:28

From the Antiques Roadshow in Warwickshire, bye-bye.

0:58:280:58:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:510:58:54

Fiona Bruce presents a special edition of Antiques Roadshow, as the team head off to Stratford-upon-Avon in search of more family treasures at nearby Charlecote Park. With Shakespeare's home so close by, they make a particular search for objects from the days of Elizabethan England.

Objects from the era under scrutiny include a handsome dining table; a portrait of the First Earl of Leicester, Robert Dudley, an important patron for theatre in the court of Elizabeth I; and a spooky jewel which claims to have magical powers.


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