Burton Constable 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Burton Constable 1

Fiona Bruce and the Antiques Roadshow team head to Burton Constable Hall near Hull. Objects brought in by visitors include a ship's anchor found in a garden pond.


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The Constable family, who built this fine Elizabethan hall,

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were serious interior designers and prodigious collectors

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who amassed incredible treasures,

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so the Antiques Roadshow has come to the right place -

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to Burton Constable Hall in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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The Constables have been here for 700 years,

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and successive generations have added their own collections

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from Greek antiquities to Chippendale furniture,

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and flamboyance seems to have been written into their DNA.

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Take, for instance, the 18th-century grand tourist William,

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he was simply pazzo - crazy - about Ancient Rome, collecting sculptures,

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paintings and antiquities,

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and without even a hint of modesty, he had himself painted

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as a Roman orator and statesman.

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Not content with Rome, he was drawn to France, too,

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fancying himself as the great French man

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of culture and literature, Rousseau.

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The great drawing room has more than a whiff of French 18th-century bling

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about it. This brilliantly bonkers palm tree ottoman,

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the whole suite of furniture.

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The mirrors, the window pelmets cost, in today's money,

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a staggering £165,000.

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Typical of wealthy men of the age,

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he created a cabinet of collecting curiosities,

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but William took it to the next level.

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The quantity, range and quality of this

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for the 18th century is astonishing.

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It's like a chamber of horrors in here.

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There's a claw of a giant lobster,

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an armadillo tail,

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desiccated leg of an elk.

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This is a mammoth tooth.

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My favourite - a bezoar.

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Between you and me, that's a hairball from a cow!

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He also amassed collections of rocks, fossils

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and scientific instruments.

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William Constable is a man we'd like to see at today's roadshow.

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You never know, one of his descendants may turn up today

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with an ancient trinket or two. Over to our experts,

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looking for the latest treasures

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from the East Riding of Yorkshire and beyond.

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One of the reasons I love this job is because it lets me play with the

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ultimate boy's toy.

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And what more could you get than this

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wonderful, Edwardian vis-a-vis tin plate car?

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It dates from around about 1903-1904, that sort of period,

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and would have been contemporary with a steam car that you could see

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out on the road, so you can imagine a nipper seeing one of these

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on the road, a full-size one, and saying, "Dad, buy me one!"

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-And at Christmas time, hopefully this would have arrived.

-Yeah, yeah.

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So, 1903... Has it been in the family forever?

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As far as I'm aware.

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I don't know any more than that.

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My father used it as a child.

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Beyond that, I can't really give you any more of an answer.

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And so maybe your father was born in the 1920s?

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-1924, yeah.

-So he probably inherited it from his father.

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From his father, yeah.

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-And when was he born?

-In 1892, something like that.

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'92, so you add on a few years. I said this was 1902...

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So he'd have been a ten or 11-year-old?

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-Yeah, yeah.

-Ideal.

-Yeah, absolutely, yeah, yeah.

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Another exciting thing about this,

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it's a steam car that actually worked from steam, not clockwork.

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In the back here would have been a little spirit burner and there would

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have been a boiler above it, with some water in it,

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and that would have actually powered the rear wheels.

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Extremely dangerous.

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Absolutely, and very exciting!

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Very exciting, and what I love about it,

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it's in its truly original paintwork.

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So this was made in Nuremberg by Gebruder Bing,

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and I'll just twist it around here because it is a sculptural piece,

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and you can see it from all sides.

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On the back is the maker's mark and it's got upholstered seats.

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It's called a vis-a-vis because the driver would have sat one side and

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your have passengers opposite, so vis-a-vis -

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you're looking at your passenger rather than having them behind,

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so exactly like the full-sized car, wouldn't have gone very fast.

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THEY CHUCKLE

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But can you imagine seeing that out on the road as a full-size one?

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-Absolutely.

-One you can still see on the Brighton run.

-Yeah!

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It would have been an expensive toy to buy at the time,

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so it was a special treat, obviously, for your grandfather.

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It would have been several pounds, which is hundreds of pounds today.

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-Yeah, yeah.

-On the downside, the tyres are deflated.

-Mm-hm.

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-It's missing some of the stanchions around the back there.

-Yep.

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It's been in the family since 1903.

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What's going to happen to it after you've finished with it?

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Well, obviously, I've got two sons and a daughter.

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-Any of them here today?

-My daughter's with us today, yeah.

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-Do you like the toy?

-It's great.

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OK. Well, maybe you'll like it a bit more when you know about the value!

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LAUGHTER

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It is original. It's in... not the greatest condition,

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-but it's what every collector wants to find.

-Right.

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If it had been boxed, even better,

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-but you can't have everything in life.

-No, no, no.

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At auction, I would suggest a figure of between £8,000-12,000.

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Oh!

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LAUGHTER

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Now do you like it better?

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-Love it!

-You love it!

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So, I think where we know where it's going to go in the future.

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-Lovely, thank you ever so much, thank you.

-Thank you.

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You've brought me this lovely little box.

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Before I tell you what I can about it, perhaps you'd like to tell me,

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if you would, how come it came into your possession?

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Well, my grandfather gave it to me and it was, I presume,

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my grandparents', and it was given to them at their wedding in 1912.

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Oh, OK. And your grandfather used it to keep stamps in, is that right?

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Well, yes, he did in latter years, but I did know if it was

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used for anything else before that is.

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-Any guesses?

-Well, for snuff.

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Snuff, yeah, I suppose that was very popular back then, wasn't it?

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-It's actually a bit older than your grandparents' wedding.

-Oh, really?

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Yeah, it dates to 1839.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-Oh, my goodness.

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-And if we open it up...

-Yeah.

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..inside, there's a little lid within the lid that's pierced.

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-Yes.

-And that also opens up to reveal

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-where your grandfather kept his stamps.

-Yes.

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It isn't a stamp box.

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-No.

-It's not a snuff box either.

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-Right, OK.

-This box is what's known

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-as a vinaigrette.

-Mm-hm.

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And, originally,

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where the stamps are now would have been a sponge drenched in scent.

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Oh, right, OK.

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And when you were walking through the vile streets of...

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-Wherever.

-..London or Birmingham, in the days of yore -

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when people were less fussy about

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how they dealt with their household waste, shall we say politely? -

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you might have wanted to hold that under your nose,

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-to protect yourself from the vile smells.

-Yes, absolutely.

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Vinaigrettes are a big collectors' area.

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There are various things people go for. They like exotic grills,

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they like them big and grand and gilded and what have you.

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The two things they really like are a good maker, that's very important,

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and there is a group of vinaigrettes that have castle tops on them,

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which are the real prizes, cos they're terribly rare.

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Now this one... Actually, oddly enough, it is by a good maker.

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It's by a fella called Nathaniel Mills,

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who's probably the best box maker of his generation.

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He's very sought after and people collect Nathaniel Mills for his

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own account - people collect boxes just because

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they're made by Nathaniel Mills. And also...

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..on the front, there is a relief of Windsor Castle,

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otherwise known as a castle top vinaigrette,

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which is what all the vinaigrette collectors want.

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-Really?

-So it's neither a snuffbox,

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nor is it a stamp box, it is a vinaigrette,

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but it's a very, very nice vinaigrette.

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It's in remarkably good condition.

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It looks almost as if it's been put in a box on the day it was received

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and hasn't really been got out since then.

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It certainly hasn't been polished very much,

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cos there's hardly any wear on the top.

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I've never polished it and I just keep it in...

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-I've always kept it in the dark.

-In the dark!

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LAUGHTER

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Best place to keep it, really!

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OK. That's obviously done it some good.

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I've never heard of that as a strategy

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for keeping silver in good condition!

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Normally a box of that sort of size and type would be worth about...

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er, you know, on a good day, £300-400,

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but it helps being Nathaniel Mills and it helps being a castle top.

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And, you know, if you went into a shop to buy that,

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it's going to cost you somewhere in the region of £1,200-1,400.

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Really?! Oh, my goodness!

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That is great!

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So, here we are with two beautiful, vintage baby carriages

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from the late 19th century,

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and perfectly at home with a house like this,

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because to afford a pram in 1870, 1880,

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-you would have had to be very wealthy.

-You would, yes, very.

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-Why do you have them?

-I just absolutely have a passion for them.

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I fell in love with them when I took my neighbour's grandson out in his

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pram, and it started from there at the age of eight or nine.

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I just absolutely adore them.

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And how many have you got?

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I've got 95 at the minute.

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-95 prams?

-95, yes.

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Where do you keep your prams?

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I've got them in storage at the moment,

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but they do come out and they do go to local events in the area.

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And how long has it taken you to collect 95 prams?

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-About six years.

-So you've got 95 prams in the last six years?

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-Yes, yes.

-So where do you find them?

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Er, auctions, internet sites.

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I've had people donate them to me because they know that they will be

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looked after and cared for and taken to local shows.

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And how much do you tend to pay?

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The most I've ever paid is for this one here, and that was 500.

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This is a particularly fine example.

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I mean, there's double-handled,

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which people often talk about for two babies.

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-They do, yeah.

-But they also say that it's because

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it's nice and narrow, so it could go down alleyways.

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-Yes.

-But we do have to remember that this was a

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very, very expensive thing in its day,

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and this beautiful little detail of this is that, of course,

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you can take the hood and bring it the other way.

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-Yeah.

-This is a rare pram, which I'm sure you know.

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Thank you. I do, yeah, thank you.

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Beautiful. So this one is sort of 1880-1890,

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and where did this one come from?

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It originally came from a London department store.

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Well, it's certainly the quality that would be sold

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-in a very top department store.

-Yes, it is, yeah.

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I mean, these were made by top cabinet-makers, furniture-makers,

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-carriage-makers.

-Yes.

-This was not a simple thing.

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That's why they're so beautifully decorated.

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There have always been baby carriages,

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but I suppose the Duke of Devonshire, in the 1730s,

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got someone to design a baby carriage

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-that was to be pulled by a goat or a small pony.

-He did, yes.

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-So quite an eccentric thing, too...

-It is.

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..if you imagine being pulled along, but these, of course,

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would have been probably used by nannies...

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-Yes.

-..for the wealthy households of the day.

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-Yes.

-In terms of value,

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you're a collector so you've got a pretty good idea,

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but for this one, I could easily see this for sale,

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in this condition, and being an unusual pram,

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I could easily see it at £700-800.

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-Right, OK.

-This one, less.

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-Yes.

-Sort of 200, but if you count up your collection,

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you've invested quite a bit of money.

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I have, yes, it soon adds up.

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-It's beautiful.

-Thank you, thank you.

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There's a well-known store, which is known throughout the world,

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who specialise in flat pack furniture, which we all know,

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but when I look at a table like this...

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it was being done long, long before that company ever existed.

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So, let's put this table together and see what it looks like

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when it's fully set up. Could you help us, please?

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So, what's your story about this table?

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This table, I know very little about it other than it's been in my family

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all of my lifetime, so it has some age.

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-Right.

-And, erm...

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..I've always described as

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the original piece of flat pack furniture.

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The only place I have seen anything like was at Cotehele House.

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-Where's that?

-In Cornwall.

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-Right.

-And they suggested that they thought theirs

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-came from a Spanish galleon.

-Ah!

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-It wasn't as fancy as that.

-Right.

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-Very simple.

-Yeah.

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I was in Audley House a couple of weeks ago

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and the lady there suggested that it was a refractory table

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that they would bring into the dining room in

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the days before dining tables were invented.

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So what date are you thinking of?

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I'm hoping it's 17th-century.

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I've always argued it was 17th-century.

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OK. So it's possibly Spanish, 17th-century...

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Is that what you're hoping for?

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LAUGHTER

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-I'll make that commitment, yeah!

-Make that commitment? OK!

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I think we can agree that it's not English.

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It is a continental piece and it's made of oak.

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When I look at the ends and we see these balusters,

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and the way it's executed...

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If it was Spanish, I would expect to see some metal down there.

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And being that it's all in oak,

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to me, it says it's Dutch.

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It is controversial, but that's my opinion.

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It just reminds me of lots of Dutch furniture,

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which I've seen and handled over the years.

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So, yes, I like the idea. It's a metamorphic piece of furniture.

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It's to be closed down, then set up.

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Did you notice the hinges underneath?

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-Yes.

-These lovely hinges, what we call butterfly-shaped hinges.

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Nice little feature to see.

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The date of it, I'd say late 17th, early 18th-century.

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So, it's a transportable dining table.

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-That's it, yes.

-It's a nice piece of furniture.

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-People look at... brown furniture and say, "It's not fashionable."

-Hm.

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When you get something in good taste, which I say this is,

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-it's understated elegance.

-Mm-hm.

0:15:410:15:43

And this works in a modern household,

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it works in an antique household.

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It doesn't argue with anything.

0:15:500:15:52

-It's simplicity in itself.

-Yeah.

-Less is more.

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And, to me, this ticks the boxes.

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I would put a value on this around £2,000.

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-Thank you. Interesting.

-Does that make you smile?

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It's bound to make you smile, isn't it?

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It's a surprise. I've just had a text from my son saying,

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"How much is the table worth? £10?"

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LAUGHTER

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That's what kids know!

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Well, some visitors to the Antiques Roadshow

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love to blow their own trumpet,

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and, indeed, you have every reason to blow yours.

0:16:260:16:29

-Tell us why.

-Well, I represent the Kirkbymoorside Town Brass Band.

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-OK.

-We have a very proud history, going back over 200 years,

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and before us we have an artefact of that history

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that we're very proud of.

0:16:410:16:42

Yeah, and the rather clumsily named ophicleide.

0:16:420:16:45

-Yes.

-Yeah, and what an extraordinary thing.

0:16:450:16:48

I mean, a queueing visitor said,

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"Hey, up, you've got a ship's foghorn!"

0:16:500:16:52

-Yes.

-I mean, it's enormous, isn't it?

0:16:520:16:55

And it has this huge, single tube or bend,

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but it's sculptural quality is quite magnificent.

0:16:590:17:03

Why does this belong to you?

0:17:030:17:06

Well, it was donated to us by a lady by the name of Jane Russell,

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whose ancestors played in the band back in the 19th century.

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This instrument was hung for many years

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on the back of a joiner's workshop door,

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because the joiner in question was Jane's father.

0:17:170:17:20

Grandfather and her great-grandfather

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played in the band in the 1850s.

0:17:220:17:24

Fantastic! So, I'm looking at a photograph here,

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which depicts a gentleman, Mr J Frank...

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-Yes.

-..holding this very instrument.

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We think so. We're not entirely sure of that.

0:17:340:17:37

We're about 95% sure this is the same instrument

0:17:370:17:40

as in that old photograph.

0:17:400:17:41

Incredible, because this type of instrument,

0:17:410:17:43

invented in the early 19th century to take over from the serpent,

0:17:430:17:48

which was, as its name suggests, a great, sort of, coily thing.

0:17:480:17:52

And the modern-day instrument which replaced this is the euphonium,

0:17:520:17:56

-or perhaps even the tuba.

-Tuba.

0:17:560:17:57

It's sort of in between the euphonium and the tuba.

0:17:570:17:59

-What do you play?

-I play the trombone.

0:17:590:18:01

-I have played the euphonium, but...

-OK. Can you play this for us?

0:18:010:18:05

Well, it'll sound like I'm playing a drainpipe,

0:18:050:18:07

but I'll give it a go!

0:18:070:18:08

-We have got a tonal home open, haven't we, with no key?

-Yes.

0:18:080:18:12

-Give it a go.

-You'll be very impressed.

0:18:120:18:15

LAUGHTER

0:18:150:18:16

LOW HONKING SOUND

0:18:170:18:20

-Wow!

-That's about as much as I can do with it, I'm afraid!

0:18:200:18:23

What a treat, to see such a fantastic thing,

0:18:240:18:26

but you want to know, presumably, what it's worth.

0:18:260:18:29

Well, we're not thinking it's worth very much,

0:18:290:18:31

but you tell us differently, that'd be great, yes!

0:18:310:18:33

It's funny - just before the record opened,

0:18:330:18:35

we spotted that it is actually signed by Metzler and Co of London,

0:18:350:18:40

-but, you know, they're quite rare.

-Mm-hm.

0:18:400:18:42

So, at auction, I think you'd see,

0:18:420:18:45

with the provenance, a price of around £1,200.

0:18:450:18:48

Really? Goodness me!

0:18:480:18:50

That is a surprise - I thought it would be worth scrap value!

0:18:500:18:53

LAUGHTER

0:18:530:18:54

This is like an anxious...

0:19:010:19:03

CROWD GROAN

0:19:030:19:05

-Aaah!

-..visitor.

0:19:050:19:07

Does anybody want some tea?

0:19:120:19:13

CROWD GASP AND GROAN

0:19:170:19:19

Burton Constable is a splendid house there behind us,

0:19:240:19:27

but, of course, what we're looking at is, in a way, rather more exotic.

0:19:270:19:31

I mean, I can see here portraits of two Maori chiefs.

0:19:310:19:36

-Yep.

-Not something usually associated with Yorkshire, but...

0:19:360:19:40

-No.

-Who are they? Why have you got them?

0:19:400:19:42

Well, my father went out to New Zealand in about 1924.

0:19:420:19:48

For the first time. He went out twice altogether.

0:19:480:19:50

And the last time, he came back in '31.

0:19:500:19:53

We believe he brought these back after his first trip

0:19:530:19:56

and know nothing about them, apart from the fact they were always

0:19:560:20:01

hung up at home when I was a kid.

0:20:010:20:04

Absolutely terrified us, my sister and myself!

0:20:040:20:07

And since then, since my mother died,

0:20:070:20:09

they've been on top of a wardrobe at home.

0:20:090:20:12

So, they've never had... They've been popular, let us say.

0:20:120:20:15

-No, no.

-So, what was your father?

0:20:150:20:18

Father, well, he served his time as an apprentice toolmaker with GEC,

0:20:180:20:24

and he went out, we believe, with GEC, or on contract from GEC,

0:20:240:20:31

to do sort of civil engineering-type works in New Zealand and Australia.

0:20:310:20:36

So, what he brought back, as far as we know,

0:20:360:20:39

are hand-painted portraits of Maori chiefs.

0:20:390:20:42

We assume them to be actual people.

0:20:420:20:45

Of course, in the 1920s,

0:20:450:20:47

there was an increasing awareness of what Maori culture represented.

0:20:470:20:52

In the 19th century, they were, sort of, alien tribes,

0:20:520:20:56

almost kept at a distance.

0:20:560:20:58

Very warlike. By the '20s, in the 20th century,

0:20:580:21:01

we were beginning to think,

0:21:010:21:02

"Actually, there's an interesting history there."

0:21:020:21:05

More and more people were going to New Zealand

0:21:050:21:07

and, therefore, Maori culture was very much on the up.

0:21:070:21:10

And so pieces like this, which...

0:21:100:21:12

Don't take this wrong, but these are, frankly, tourist pieces.

0:21:120:21:14

Yes, we thought so.

0:21:140:21:16

..would have been available, readily available,

0:21:160:21:20

for visitors like your father, who thought,

0:21:200:21:22

"What can I take back that tells the story of this extraordinary race,

0:21:220:21:26

"that essentially were New Zealand?"

0:21:260:21:28

-Uh-huh.

-Now, of course, the Maori culture is very familiar

0:21:280:21:31

to most of us, but these do highlight certain aspects.

0:21:310:21:35

The body decoration - the tattooing, and so on - is very, very important.

0:21:350:21:40

It is tribal marking that identifies where they're from.

0:21:400:21:45

And, there is a cloak made of bird feathers.

0:21:450:21:49

Again, absolutely classic Pacific, South Pacific and Maori culture.

0:21:490:21:54

He's wearing probably pendant jade earrings,

0:21:540:21:58

or jadeite or something like that,

0:21:580:22:00

and everything about the detail, although typical,

0:22:000:22:05

throws an insight into what the Maoris looked like.

0:22:050:22:08

This again reflects that increasing interest in, who are these people?

0:22:080:22:12

-Yes.

-We'll never know who the artist is.

0:22:120:22:15

They're hand-painted on black velvet.

0:22:150:22:18

It's actually art projecting a culture into a tourist market.

0:22:180:22:24

And similarly this. This is something...

0:22:240:22:25

I've read the plaque. It says,

0:22:250:22:27

"Frank, from Auckland friends, February 1931."

0:22:270:22:31

So, do you think that's when he was actually leaving to come back?

0:22:310:22:33

That was the last time, yeah, when he came home the last time. Yes.

0:22:330:22:36

And this, again, typical Maori carving,

0:22:360:22:39

-but very much as a tourist piece.

-A tourist piece. It looks it, yes.

0:22:390:22:42

It's based on much more significant 19th - or even 18th -

0:22:420:22:46

century pieces in style, but, by this time,

0:22:460:22:49

these were being hand-carved in a sort of semi-mechanical way

0:22:490:22:54

for an ever burgeoning tourist market.

0:22:540:22:56

-Yeah.

-Two Maori portraits, a Maori carving...

0:22:560:22:59

frankly, £100 for the lot.

0:22:590:23:02

-Ah.

-But, it's the story.

0:23:020:23:06

-Yeah. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:23:060:23:08

We get visitors from all over the place to the Antiques Roadshow,

0:23:090:23:13

and you're here with your jewellery.

0:23:130:23:15

How have you ended up bringing it to us?

0:23:150:23:18

Well, I was home, back in New Zealand,

0:23:180:23:21

and my mum has just gone into a rest home,

0:23:210:23:23

so my sisters and I were going through her drawers

0:23:230:23:27

and we came across these.

0:23:270:23:31

We asked Mum where she got them from

0:23:310:23:33

and she said that her grandmother had given them to my grandmother -

0:23:330:23:38

-her mother.

-Well, beautiful jewellery!

0:23:380:23:41

If we start over here, this is a really delicate, pretty - as I say,

0:23:410:23:45

glinting in the sunlight - necklace and brooch,

0:23:450:23:48

which dates from round about the late '20s, early '30s.

0:23:480:23:52

Could even be just a little bit later,

0:23:520:23:54

as costume jewellery was really becoming very popular

0:23:540:23:58

during this period.

0:23:580:24:00

This is made of marcasite, which is basically iron pyrites,

0:24:000:24:04

which, when cut, gives off a fantastic sparkle,

0:24:040:24:08

as we're seeing here, and was used to imitate diamonds.

0:24:080:24:12

And, of course, this style of jewellery has developed as well from

0:24:120:24:15

the 18th-century, when cut steel was used again to imitate diamonds

0:24:150:24:19

as well, and in the low candlelight that you would have,

0:24:190:24:22

lots of people wouldn't really notice.

0:24:220:24:24

Contrasting, of course, we've got lots of colour going on here,

0:24:240:24:27

-isn't it? It's good.

-Yeah.

0:24:270:24:29

Quite a confusing set of colours, in some ways,

0:24:290:24:33

but really very pleasing to the eye as well, isn't it?

0:24:330:24:36

-Beautiful.

-So, what we're looking at here is a revival set of jewellery,

0:24:360:24:40

based on very much the Renaissance Revival,

0:24:400:24:44

and looking back at the strong colours that were being used through

0:24:440:24:47

the Tudor period. So, in the centre, we've got the banded agate stone,

0:24:470:24:51

which is also in the pendant drop down here.

0:24:510:24:55

Around the edge, we have beautiful amethysts...

0:24:550:24:58

..all centred around, and then some lovely, natural pearls,

0:24:590:25:03

and also a little amethyst in the top here,

0:25:030:25:06

and then all of this beautiful,

0:25:060:25:08

turquoise green, white and red enamelling

0:25:080:25:11

that we see around the mount, all set in yellow gold.

0:25:110:25:16

The pendant, if we look at the back, we can turn that over.

0:25:160:25:20

And, of course, there's a locket in there as well.

0:25:200:25:22

Now, that might have had a portrait locket in it, or some hair,

0:25:220:25:25

depending on what the owner really wanted to do.

0:25:250:25:29

Set in probably 18-carat gold.

0:25:290:25:31

Yeah, lovely, isn't it?

0:25:320:25:34

So, all in all, I really like both pieces of jewellery.

0:25:340:25:38

And I'm just wondering what our surrounding audience are thinking.

0:25:380:25:42

Who likes this one here? The marcasite one.

0:25:420:25:45

-The marcasite's good.

-I like marcasite.

0:25:450:25:46

OK? OK, yeah, yeah. Hmm. No.

0:25:460:25:50

Hands up for this one over here.

0:25:500:25:52

Oh, OK.

0:25:520:25:53

-You said you didn't prefer them. You liked both of them.

-No.

0:25:540:25:57

-Well, they're my mother's!

-LAUGHTER

0:25:570:25:59

-They're not mine!

-Oh, but they might eventually become yours.

0:25:590:26:02

-Well, my sisters and I, yes.

-Brilliant. That's wonderful.

0:26:020:26:05

Well, we do have two very differing pieces of jewellery.

0:26:050:26:09

The marcasite, although it glistens, it looks fantastic,

0:26:090:26:13

it's a popular, market costume jewellery,

0:26:130:26:16

we're looking at maybe £20-30 for the set.

0:26:160:26:19

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:26:190:26:21

When we come to this piece here,

0:26:250:26:28

there is some enamel damage on the piece,

0:26:280:26:31

-which is a shame.

-Yeah.

0:26:310:26:33

But it shows it's been worn.

0:26:330:26:34

Jewellery's there to be worn.

0:26:340:26:36

So if this came on the open market, went into auction,

0:26:360:26:40

we'd be looking at a saleroom estimate

0:26:400:26:43

of between £5,000-7,000.

0:26:430:26:45

-CROWD GASP

-Wow!

0:26:450:26:48

Really?!

0:26:490:26:50

Mum'll be thrilled!

0:26:520:26:53

Wow! I...I just can't believe it.

0:26:550:26:57

I thought it was costume jewellery.

0:26:570:27:00

I'm mightily impressed by the size of your anchor,

0:27:010:27:03

but you're going to impress me even more if you tell me

0:27:030:27:06

-you own the yacht that goes with it.

-Oh, unfortunately not!

0:27:060:27:09

No, I wish we did, yeah!

0:27:090:27:11

So, um, how come you've got it?

0:27:120:27:15

Well, we moved into our house in Hull only a couple of years ago

0:27:150:27:18

and it was just left behind, in the garden,

0:27:180:27:20

but it was kind of buried in the old pond that was there.

0:27:200:27:23

We only saw the top half of it.

0:27:230:27:26

When we dug up the pond and excavated it,

0:27:260:27:28

it was quite a lot bigger than we thought.

0:27:280:27:30

I mean, it's a strange thing to leave behind.

0:27:300:27:32

Normally, things are left in the attic,

0:27:320:27:34

but, this is the first time I've ever known somebody leave an anchor

0:27:340:27:37

-in the garden.

-Yeah, yeah!

0:27:370:27:39

I don't know how it would have ended up there.

0:27:390:27:42

-We're not far from the sea.

-Yeah.

-And, erm, you know,

0:27:420:27:44

Hull was a great shipping port back in the 19th century

0:27:440:27:47

and later, so there would have been many of these around.

0:27:470:27:50

Maybe this is a souvenir. Where does it live now?

0:27:500:27:52

Still in our garden! It's like a feature now.

0:27:520:27:55

This is what is termed an Admiralty pattern anchor,

0:27:550:28:01

and, probably, going back until 300-400 years,

0:28:010:28:05

they are all the same design.

0:28:050:28:07

Clever design, because, obviously,

0:28:070:28:09

this was at the front of your man-of-war, or whatever it was,

0:28:090:28:13

merchant ship, so, the order would have gone out -

0:28:130:28:15

"anchors aweigh" or "anchor away!" -

0:28:150:28:17

and this would have been thrown overboard,

0:28:170:28:19

attached to a chain, obviously,

0:28:190:28:21

and it would have hit the seabed as you see it now.

0:28:210:28:24

Then, as the chain became taut, it would have flipped over, like so...

0:28:240:28:29

..and it starts to grab the seabed.

0:28:310:28:34

And that would actually make the whole ship secure

0:28:340:28:37

until you wanted to leave.

0:28:370:28:39

And then you would have gone over the anchor.

0:28:390:28:42

Hopefully, it would then flip back this way

0:28:420:28:45

and you could pull it up on to the ship.

0:28:450:28:48

Very simple, but very practical, because the last thing

0:28:480:28:52

-you wanted, to be drifting with a very expensive ship.

-Yeah.

0:28:520:28:56

I'm a scuba diver and I probably see many of these on the seabed,

0:28:560:28:59

because often they get fouled and they cannot get them up,

0:28:590:29:03

and sometimes they just have to cut the chain and leave them behind,

0:29:030:29:06

-so, sadly, it's your buried treasure...

-Yeah!

0:29:060:29:11

..but there were many thousands made over many hundreds of years,

0:29:110:29:14

-so, not a rare piece.

-Aw!

0:29:140:29:17

THEY CHUCKLE

0:29:170:29:18

-But a great garden ornament.

-Yeah.

0:29:180:29:20

Talking about values, we're probably thinking of,

0:29:200:29:24

as a decorative item, somewhere in the region of maybe £300-400.

0:29:240:29:28

Great! That's quite a lot more than we expected, isn't it? Yeah!

0:29:280:29:33

Even though it's a gorgeous day out there, the sun's really shining,

0:29:360:29:39

it's rather breezy.

0:29:390:29:41

And although this game blows me away, I think it's so fantastic,

0:29:420:29:45

I don't want the pieces to get blown away,

0:29:450:29:47

so, we've come in here, into the tea tent, to film it.

0:29:470:29:50

If someone had given me this game when I was a kid,

0:29:510:29:55

I'd have been in seventh heaven. Is it something you've played with?

0:29:550:29:57

We did, yes. When we were younger,

0:29:570:30:01

we were allowed to play with these under supervision.

0:30:010:30:03

My dad was born in 1927, and they were his when he was a small lad,

0:30:040:30:10

so, yes, we did play with them, occasionally.

0:30:100:30:14

Cos they were obviously from the late 1920s, early '30s.

0:30:140:30:17

-I believe so.

-And they're all different characters.

0:30:170:30:19

And it's like early identikit or Photofit

0:30:190:30:23

the police subsequently used to identify criminals

0:30:230:30:26

-and put up a Photofit image of them.

-Yeah.

-But this is much more fun.

0:30:260:30:30

When I was a kid, I loved faces and drawing.

0:30:300:30:33

This would have been right up my street.

0:30:330:30:36

I've made up a couple of faces here. This one is like...

0:30:360:30:38

..the surprised visitor to the Antiques Roadshow

0:30:400:30:43

when given the valuation. That's the sceptical face -

0:30:430:30:46

"I'm not sure that you're right."

0:30:460:30:48

And that was the dead chuffed one.

0:30:480:30:49

One face that I'd really like to make up is this one...

0:30:490:30:53

..which is the very angry visitor to the Antiques Roadshow.

0:30:540:30:59

He thinks we've got the valuation wrong.

0:31:000:31:03

But it's the sort of games you can play with these things.

0:31:030:31:06

It's clear they're from that period but there's no brand names on them

0:31:060:31:10

or anything, no box, so we can't possibly know,

0:31:100:31:12

and I find it hard to value, cos I've never seen one before...

0:31:120:31:16

-Yes.

-..but I know that it is something that you could even enjoy

0:31:160:31:20

today, and, if you were careful, still play with it,

0:31:200:31:22

so, I'm going to value this game...

0:31:220:31:24

I'm going to make it up, but I would probably give £100 for this...

0:31:240:31:29

-Right, yes.

-..not knowing anything about it.

-What it is, yeah.

0:31:290:31:33

That's great.

0:31:340:31:35

The Antiques Roadshow team have been scouring the local museums this week

0:31:490:31:52

in search of something weird and wonderful.

0:31:520:31:54

And, Will Farmer, you're normally talking to us about ceramics...

0:31:540:31:57

-Yep.

-You've brought this object along from a local museum...

0:31:570:32:01

..and we have to guess what it's used for.

0:32:020:32:04

Absolutely. And it's a curious, little object and, thankfully,

0:32:040:32:07

it's been very kindly loaned to us

0:32:070:32:09

by the East Riding's museum collections.

0:32:090:32:11

And it looks like a little, miniature gas lamp,

0:32:110:32:13

but then with this dish on top.

0:32:130:32:14

It's a curious thing, isn't it?

0:32:140:32:16

When you think about the era it came from -

0:32:160:32:18

we're talking towards the end of the 19th century -

0:32:180:32:20

and it falls into that, you know,

0:32:200:32:21

"Necessity is the mother of all invention."

0:32:210:32:23

And they came up with the most weird and wonderful things to, you know,

0:32:230:32:28

combat problems and issues that they felt were important.

0:32:280:32:31

So, what are those issues?

0:32:310:32:32

Well, there are three I'm going to throw to you.

0:32:320:32:35

Number one, this is a vaporiser,

0:32:350:32:39

and it's used in medical terms,

0:32:390:32:41

so, you would fill it with coal tar,

0:32:410:32:43

the scent would fill the room,

0:32:430:32:45

and it was claimed would cure all manner of ills,

0:32:450:32:47

whether it was bronchitis or whooping cough, or even asthma.

0:32:470:32:51

To clear the chest. Are you listening, ladies and gentlemen?

0:32:510:32:54

Carefully? Cos I'm going to be asking questions afterwards...

0:32:540:32:57

LAUGHTER

0:32:570:32:58

..if only for help in trying to work it out!

0:32:580:33:00

-OK.

-Second option...

0:33:000:33:02

It is actually an insect repellent.

0:33:020:33:06

What, in the late 1800s?

0:33:060:33:07

Absolutely! The ladies did not want these things flying around their

0:33:070:33:11

heads, did they? So, you would fill it with either tansy oil

0:33:110:33:14

or Osage orange oil, and burn it gently away where they were sitting,

0:33:140:33:18

and it would keep those awful little bugs at bay

0:33:180:33:21

and not disturb their calm peace on a Sunday afternoon.

0:33:210:33:24

-Midgies and what have you?

-Absolutely.

0:33:240:33:26

Possible, possible.

0:33:280:33:30

-Next?

-And the last one I'm going to offer you is that this was a

0:33:300:33:33

creation brought about for the gentleman

0:33:330:33:36

in the fact that, of course, smoking was, you know, a habit.

0:33:360:33:39

It was a very social event for gentlemen

0:33:390:33:42

at that time and they would have their smoking rooms,

0:33:420:33:45

where they would all depart together and sit and talk with their whisky

0:33:450:33:49

or their brandy, but, actually, smoking was such on the rise

0:33:490:33:52

and so important that, actually,

0:33:520:33:53

it was very important for a smoking room to have that

0:33:530:33:56

atmosphere, have that smell.

0:33:560:33:58

-What, even before they'd started?

-Oh, yes. Absolutely.

0:33:580:34:02

It was actually advertised

0:34:020:34:04

that you would burn away a tobacco-scented oil,

0:34:040:34:07

and the tag line for it would be,

0:34:070:34:09

"To avoid that embarrassing, smokeless scent."

0:34:090:34:13

So, as you walked into the room...

0:34:130:34:14

You are having me on! LAUGHTER

0:34:140:34:16

..the aroma was already there in the room.

0:34:160:34:19

That's so preposterous. I'm not sure...

0:34:190:34:22

Maybe you couldn't make that up!

0:34:220:34:24

OK, let's have a hands up for that chesty cough!

0:34:240:34:27

Possible, it's possible.

0:34:270:34:29

Chesty cough?

0:34:290:34:30

Not that many.

0:34:300:34:31

OK. That embarrassing smokeless odour.

0:34:320:34:36

I wouldn't be surprised if it is that.

0:34:360:34:38

You wouldn't be surprised if it is that?

0:34:380:34:39

And then the insect repellent.

0:34:390:34:41

-Definitely.

-Oh!

0:34:410:34:43

Hang on. That's what they're going for, Will.

0:34:430:34:45

The only thing is, from what I know of that period,

0:34:460:34:49

I don't really associate it with women sitting outdoors.

0:34:490:34:53

It doesn't really do it for me.

0:34:530:34:54

I think it's the first one. It sounds more plausible.

0:34:540:34:56

-Which is which one?

-The tar.

0:34:560:34:59

You think it's putting the tar in?

0:34:590:35:01

-SCOUSE ACCENT: Where are you from with your accent?

-Liverpool.

0:35:010:35:04

Yeah, I thought you might be!

0:35:040:35:05

But also, for the ladies, you've got to think about the fact,

0:35:050:35:08

early evenings, they're in their conservatories,

0:35:080:35:10

they're in their parlours.

0:35:100:35:12

I'm going to go with the voice of reason - the voice of Liverpool -

0:35:120:35:15

and, er...

0:35:150:35:16

..with the coal tar to cure a chesty complaint of some variety.

0:35:170:35:24

That's what the going for, isn't it? Yeah. That's the one.

0:35:240:35:27

You and I have done a few of these over the years, haven't we?

0:35:270:35:30

-And you love it when I get it wrong!

-And I've won every time, haven't I?

0:35:300:35:32

-Not this time!

-You got it right.

0:35:340:35:36

CHEERING

0:35:360:35:38

-I bow gracefully to you. You got it!

-Oh, brilliant.

0:35:440:35:47

Yeah, that smokeless, embarrassing thing.

0:35:470:35:50

It was a good line though!

0:35:500:35:51

It was brilliant! Well, I think we've done rather well there.

0:35:510:35:55

-I think we have.

-Will, we caught you out.

-Well done.

0:35:550:35:57

-Me and my new friend.

-Well done!

0:35:570:36:00

You appear to have brought a pogo stick to the Antiques Roadshow,

0:36:060:36:09

but it isn't, is it?

0:36:090:36:11

-Do you know what is?

-Well, I didn't until 18 months ago...

0:36:110:36:14

-Right.

-..when one very similar popped up

0:36:140:36:19

on another antiques programme...

0:36:190:36:20

-Right.

-..and I think it's called a fencing musket,

0:36:200:36:23

but I don't know much about it from there.

0:36:230:36:25

You're absolutely right.

0:36:250:36:26

This preposterous-looking device was for training troops in

0:36:260:36:31

bayonet fighting, so it's a better idea to give them this, which has,

0:36:310:36:36

as we've demonstrated, the end that goes in and out,

0:36:360:36:38

as opposed to giving them a real bayonet, which,

0:36:380:36:40

if you're practising, you do tend to push through your fellow troops.

0:36:400:36:43

-Absolutely!

-Not a good idea.

0:36:430:36:44

So, it's a fencing musket,

0:36:440:36:46

and they would train with these things.

0:36:460:36:49

It's...terribly old-fashioned style,

0:36:490:36:53

but all it's doing, it's just a great big tube

0:36:530:36:56

and they would practise bayonet fighting.

0:36:560:36:58

Superb!

0:36:590:37:00

I've had it, must be, what, 47 years now.

0:37:020:37:04

I actually found it in the loft of my dad's house.

0:37:060:37:10

I was only ten years old.

0:37:100:37:12

We'd just moved in. He said, "Go up and have a look what's in the loft."

0:37:120:37:15

So, he put me on the shoulders, up I went, and I found it.

0:37:150:37:18

I found it behind the chimney in the loft when we'd moved in.

0:37:180:37:21

And it's just been propping my garage door open ever since then.

0:37:220:37:26

It's just been...

0:37:260:37:27

It doesn't do anything. I notice it's got a 1915...

0:37:280:37:33

thing on there. But what does the X underneath mean, sir?

0:37:330:37:36

You've got 1915 and the broad arrow stamp.

0:37:370:37:40

Then the cross means it's released from service.

0:37:420:37:46

-Released from service?

-Yep.

0:37:460:37:48

How can I put this? Released from service legitimately,

0:37:480:37:51

as opposed to somebody nicking it.

0:37:510:37:53

And you've also got the maker there, Webley and Scott,

0:37:530:37:56

-London and Birmingham.

-Wow!

0:37:560:37:57

Goodness me. And it needs quite a bit of force to push it in as well.

0:38:010:38:05

Yeah. When you were fighting, you would be padded up,

0:38:050:38:08

but it's still...

0:38:080:38:10

It's not going to be a lot of fun in your chest.

0:38:110:38:14

We're talking First World War. They were convinced that the bayonet was

0:38:140:38:17

the thing, the bayonet charge.

0:38:170:38:19

It was...terrible tactics against modern weapons.

0:38:190:38:23

It's not massively valuable,

0:38:230:38:27

but if something like this came up, I would think £200-300.

0:38:270:38:31

It could be £2-3 million, to be fair -

0:38:310:38:34

it's priceless to me.

0:38:340:38:35

-Fantastic.

-I've had such a long time, I'm not going to part with it.

0:38:350:38:38

Good.

0:38:380:38:39

This is a very pretty, little oil sketch.

0:38:410:38:43

It's so swiftly painted. Where did you get it?

0:38:430:38:46

I got it from the local boot sale about two years ago

0:38:460:38:50

and it cost me 75p.

0:38:500:38:52

Good Lord!

0:38:530:38:54

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:38:540:38:55

All right. Do you know who it's by?

0:38:550:38:58

It's by W Kay Blacklock.

0:38:580:39:00

You can tell that, cos it's signed clearly, can't you?

0:39:000:39:03

-Yeah.

-Did you ever look him up or try to find out anything about him?

0:39:030:39:06

-No, I didn't.

-William Kay Blacklock.

0:39:060:39:08

Actually, mostly a watercolourist.

0:39:080:39:11

Actually born in Sunderland.

0:39:110:39:13

So, I did wonder whether this might be Staithes.

0:39:130:39:16

You know, there's a fishing village up in the north-east?

0:39:160:39:18

-Yeah, I've heard of that.

-Lots of artists went there.

0:39:180:39:21

But it turns out it isn't Staithes.

0:39:210:39:23

-It's actually Polperro in Cornwall...

-Oh, right.

0:39:230:39:26

..which is a sweet, little Cornish fishing village.

0:39:260:39:28

Lots of artists went there.

0:39:280:39:30

It wasn't quite a colony, but chuck a stick and you'd hit several.

0:39:300:39:34

-It was absolutely seething with artists.

-Right.

0:39:340:39:36

Very nice it is, too, with this washing all hung out here and just

0:39:360:39:39

little dabs of oil paint to suggest the reflection

0:39:390:39:42

-of light on the water.

-Yeah.

0:39:420:39:43

And the fisherfolk going about their daily business.

0:39:430:39:46

No tourists in those days.

0:39:460:39:47

We're talking about 1880, something like that.

0:39:470:39:49

-Yeah.

-A nice thing. And you paid, what, 75p?

0:39:490:39:53

Yeah.

0:39:530:39:54

Hm. Well, I think it's worth £600-800 now.

0:39:540:39:57

-HE GASPS

-Oh! Really?

0:39:570:39:59

That's, er...

0:40:010:40:02

-..that's ridiculous!

-It is a bit!

-Yeah.

0:40:030:40:06

Sitting here, in bright sunshine, this stuff is just bouncing around,

0:40:080:40:13

-isn't it?

-I know. It's gorgeous. I love it.

0:40:130:40:16

How long have you been picking it out?

0:40:160:40:19

About six or seven years.

0:40:190:40:21

I just saw one piece and just fell in love with it

0:40:210:40:24

and then got obsessed with it, basically.

0:40:240:40:26

So, how many pieces have you got?

0:40:260:40:28

Erm, about 100, I think.

0:40:280:40:30

I've just gone a bit OTT with it.

0:40:300:40:32

Are they all the marigold colour or have you...?

0:40:320:40:35

They are. I've got a few in the green and the amethyst,

0:40:350:40:37

but this was the one that I started collecting,

0:40:370:40:40

so, it's mainly this, yep.

0:40:400:40:42

So, you know what it is, its name, don't you?

0:40:420:40:45

Yep, it's carnival glass.

0:40:450:40:47

Carnival was actually a British invention in America.

0:40:470:40:50

Weird, but true. John Northwood,

0:40:500:40:52

one of the great legendary glass-makers of Stourbridge

0:40:520:40:55

had two sons - John II and Harry -

0:40:550:40:59

and John inherited the works, Harry got the hump,

0:40:590:41:02

moved to Pennsylvania in the States,

0:41:020:41:05

where he used his experience in fine glass-making

0:41:050:41:08

to develop this technique.

0:41:080:41:11

You get standard pressed glass and you iridise it by

0:41:110:41:17

exposing it to a vapour called dope,

0:41:170:41:20

and that is a chemical vapour, which, when the glass is still hot,

0:41:200:41:26

it turns the glass iridescent, and it's fairly easy to make,

0:41:260:41:30

so what happened was that, 1910, 1912, that kind of...

0:41:300:41:34

Just before the First World War.

0:41:340:41:36

At that date, three Tiffany vases cost the equivalent

0:41:360:41:40

of the first Ford motor car.

0:41:400:41:43

So, huge money.

0:41:430:41:44

Against that, this was sold for cents.

0:41:450:41:48

What happened is, of course, the wealthy ladies, who owned...

0:41:480:41:53

..Tiffany, went downstairs and saw their housekeeper

0:41:540:41:58

owned carnival glass that was almost identical,

0:41:580:42:01

and it completely blew the market in Tiffany glass.

0:42:010:42:04

This stuff was working-class glass.

0:42:040:42:06

It was so easy to make that various manufacturers piled in,

0:42:060:42:10

to a point where overproduction meant it was given away at fairs

0:42:100:42:13

on the hoopla. So, how much are you paying for something like that?

0:42:130:42:17

-Well, my son bought me that...

-That's the best one.

-Yeah.

0:42:180:42:21

..for £60.

0:42:220:42:24

-Ah, yeah.

-And these, I bought separately, for £10-20.

0:42:240:42:28

It is ingenious. The design of this is ingenious, because, of course,

0:42:280:42:31

-you get two vases for the price of one.

-Yeah.

-So, you get...

0:42:310:42:35

There's your standard vases, which is how you bought it.

0:42:350:42:38

-How I bought that.

-But because you recognise it,

0:42:380:42:40

you know that it actually is one of two parts.

0:42:400:42:43

There, you've got the bowl and the vase in one,

0:42:430:42:45

which takes up less space, and it's adaptable. Yeah.

0:42:450:42:49

How much did you pay for it?

0:42:490:42:51

£20 for the bowl and, I think, 10 for the...

0:42:510:42:54

-30 quid.

-And these were just pounds, really.

0:42:540:42:58

-Pounds they are.

-Bought separately.

0:42:580:43:00

You know what it is? This is a taste issue.

0:43:000:43:02

-It really is.

-Nobody likes it in the family, other than me!

0:43:020:43:05

So, look, guys...

0:43:050:43:07

if this was a tenner, or you could walk away with it,

0:43:070:43:11

but the deal is you have to have it out on your sideboard forever,

0:43:110:43:15

how any people actually want it?

0:43:150:43:16

OK. One. Two.

0:43:180:43:21

Well, why does stuff go down in value?

0:43:210:43:23

You know why - cos nobody wants it any more.

0:43:230:43:25

-Nobody wants it, yeah.

-Here's your son's present for 60 quid.

0:43:250:43:28

Well, I think that represents...

0:43:280:43:30

I mean, I think you'd be lucky to get that for the entire table.

0:43:300:43:33

I really do. I think... It's a yesterday's thing,

0:43:330:43:37

but, clearly, it will live to fight another day.

0:43:370:43:39

Now when that is, of course, whether it's this year,

0:43:390:43:42

-next year, some time, never...

-I just love it.

0:43:420:43:45

-Thanks for bringing it in.

-Yep. Thank you.

0:43:450:43:48

Maybe if I rub this often enough,

0:43:540:43:56

a genie's going to pop out and our wishes will come true!

0:43:560:43:59

It's actually made by quite a famous designer.

0:44:010:44:04

Right.

0:44:040:44:06

I don't know if you've heard the name before - Christopher Dresser.

0:44:060:44:09

-Indeed.

-The date is about 1880.

0:44:090:44:10

-Mm-hm.

-And you bought this piece in Beverley market 40 years ago

0:44:100:44:14

-for how much?

-Round about £5, I would think.

0:44:140:44:16

Well, I can tell you, you're comfortably into four figures.

0:44:160:44:19

You're £1,000-1,500.

0:44:190:44:21

Good gracious! Yes.

0:44:210:44:23

Rodrica, we're so enjoying filming in your wonderful home and gardens

0:44:270:44:31

here at Burton Constable. Got a little surprise for you...

0:44:310:44:34

-Ooh.

-..courtesy of these two ladies here.

0:44:340:44:36

Would you like to take up the story?

0:44:360:44:38

Yes, I will. We used to live in Sproatley, in the village,

0:44:380:44:42

and met lots of people, of course, over the years.

0:44:420:44:45

I had a very elderly neighbour, who, when she moved out,

0:44:450:44:49

gave me some of her things.

0:44:490:44:51

One of them was a drawing of Burton Constable Hall,

0:44:510:44:55

which had been done by her late husband,

0:44:550:44:57

when he was 16 years old, in 1898.

0:44:570:45:01

So, here we are. This is the picture.

0:45:010:45:04

And I thought it was just appropriate

0:45:040:45:06

-that it came back to you.

-Oh, that is so precious.

0:45:060:45:09

-How amazing!

-And it's a wonderful record of its time, Rodrica,

0:45:090:45:12

because, of course, this was contemporaneous at the time.

0:45:120:45:15

So, I think you should give this to Rodrica...

0:45:150:45:17

-There you are.

-..since that is your drawing.

0:45:170:45:19

-Thank you very, very much.

-It's our very great pleasure.

0:45:190:45:21

This is accepted with love and gratitude.

0:45:210:45:24

This is wonderful. This has come home today.

0:45:240:45:26

-Thank you so much.

-Indeed.

-Wonderful.

0:45:260:45:28

Well, this has got to be the most superlative collection of

0:45:310:45:34

costume jewellery I think I've seen for a very long time.

0:45:340:45:37

What can you tell me about it?

0:45:380:45:40

-Erm, well, it's at least 50 years old.

-60, or 70, even.

0:45:400:45:44

It belonged to my mother and her nans.

0:45:440:45:47

My aunt had a fabulous dress shop in Doncaster many years ago,

0:45:470:45:50

'50s and '60s, and she used to buy in Paris and London,

0:45:500:45:54

and, in those days, everything was very glamorous.

0:45:540:45:57

And so I guess she wore quite a bit of it.

0:45:570:45:59

Some of it will have been in the shop,

0:45:590:46:01

some of it will have been worn by the models, who used to model it.

0:46:010:46:04

Well, I think you've probably got some of the biggest names here

0:46:040:46:08

in, sort of, mid-20th-century costume jewellery design.

0:46:080:46:11

I don't really know where to start, to be honest with you.

0:46:110:46:14

This bracelet here, for example.

0:46:140:46:17

That's a Boucher bracelet.

0:46:170:46:19

Marcel Boucher, he started by working as a designer

0:46:190:46:23

for Cartier in Paris in the 1920s.

0:46:230:46:26

But, you know, if you look at the quality of it,

0:46:260:46:28

it's set just the same as real Cartier jewellery would be set.

0:46:280:46:33

At a glance, you wouldn't know that that wasn't the real thing.

0:46:330:46:36

Absolutely fabulous.

0:46:360:46:38

That piece dates probably from the mid-19...

0:46:380:46:41

Probably late '40s, early 1950s.

0:46:410:46:44

And this set, equally, is by Bucher.

0:46:440:46:47

They must have been very stylish ladies.

0:46:470:46:49

Well, I've worn this with a plain navy evening dress

0:46:490:46:51

-and it looks fabulous.

-Fantastic.

0:46:510:46:53

You wouldn't know it wasn't a real thing, would you?

0:46:530:46:56

So, even though they're not precious jewels,

0:46:560:46:58

they are made in exactly the same way as real jewels

0:46:580:47:02

would have been made,

0:47:020:47:03

and they wouldn't have been cheap items when they were sold.

0:47:030:47:05

-No.

-But it comes from an era when people were terribly glamorous.

0:47:050:47:09

Exactly, it was a different age.

0:47:090:47:10

Exactly. All the film stars would have been wearing similar things,

0:47:100:47:13

and, of course, a lot of the costume jewellery,

0:47:130:47:16

particularly in the States, was actually originally made

0:47:160:47:18

for the Hollywood stars of the day.

0:47:180:47:20

-Mm-hm.

-Moving on a little bit...

0:47:200:47:22

These are probably 1970s.

0:47:230:47:24

These are Givenchy.

0:47:240:47:26

Beautiful. I love the bull's head there.

0:47:260:47:28

This is very Art Deco in style.

0:47:280:47:31

Obviously, in the 1970s, Art Deco styling was very popular.

0:47:310:47:35

There was a very big look back to the Art Deco period

0:47:350:47:38

and a lot of, sort of, fashions were copying those designs,

0:47:380:47:42

so, it looks Art Deco, but it's 1970s.

0:47:420:47:45

This is an Italian designer, Coppola and Toppo.

0:47:450:47:48

They were very well known for their beaded necklaces.

0:47:480:47:52

Again, that's a fantastic set.

0:47:520:47:54

You've got some other little pieces by them as well.

0:47:540:47:56

I have to say, I couldn't quite resist putting this one on

0:47:560:48:00

because it matches my dress!

0:48:000:48:02

And, um, this is the Panetta ring,

0:48:020:48:04

same as the two we have there. These are actually, again,

0:48:040:48:07

an Italian designer working in New York...

0:48:070:48:10

-Right.

-..in the 1950s onwards.

0:48:100:48:13

These are both silver rings.

0:48:130:48:14

This one is just silver and this one is silver and gold-plated.

0:48:140:48:19

Again, at a glance, you wouldn't know they weren't the real thing.

0:48:190:48:22

-No.

-So, have you considered values on them at all?

0:48:220:48:25

No. I've no idea. Absolutely none.

0:48:250:48:27

Right. OK. Well...

0:48:270:48:30

I'm sure you know there's a huge market

0:48:300:48:32

for good, designer costume jewellery.

0:48:320:48:34

Particularly from, you know, the 1940s onwards.

0:48:340:48:38

We've got a huge span here from 1940s through to 1970s

0:48:380:48:42

and one or two 1980s pieces as well, but, you may be surprised to know

0:48:420:48:47

that I've seen this - just the bangle - for sale, for £1,000.

0:48:470:48:54

-Gosh!

-Just the bangle.

0:48:540:48:55

So, that's a retail price, obviously,

0:48:550:48:57

but, for the set,

0:48:570:48:59

you've got the matching earrings and the matching necklace.

0:48:590:49:01

That's got to be, at auction, £800-1,200.

0:49:010:49:05

Collectively, slightly difficult to quantify -

0:49:070:49:10

particularly as you have more than this -

0:49:100:49:12

but, I would have thought, what we've got here,

0:49:120:49:14

you're probably looking at a minimum of maybe £5,000-8,000.

0:49:140:49:18

Gosh!

0:49:180:49:20

That's amazing for something that's...

0:49:210:49:23

I mean... It's really artificial, basically.

0:49:230:49:25

It's paste, isn't it?

0:49:250:49:26

It is, but, if you look at things like the Boucher pieces,

0:49:260:49:30

you know, he was a trained Cartier jeweller,

0:49:300:49:32

and this is made in exactly the same style,

0:49:320:49:35

but just using base metal rather than the real thing.

0:49:350:49:37

Wonderful. Thank you.

0:49:370:49:39

And they would have been expensive when they were new as well.

0:49:390:49:41

Yes. Thank you very much.

0:49:410:49:43

Songs For The Philologists.

0:49:440:49:46

It's not a title that's going to see a book

0:49:470:49:49

-flying off the shelves, is it?

-No, not really!

0:49:490:49:51

But I'm guessing this word here is why you brought it to me.

0:49:510:49:54

It is indeed, yeah.

0:49:540:49:55

-Tolkien.

-Mm-hm.

-Are you a Tolkien fan?

0:49:550:49:57

Yes, I've been a Tolkien fan for most of my life.

0:49:570:50:01

And these are, really, a series of songs, obviously,

0:50:010:50:05

but they're songs in Old English.

0:50:050:50:08

Old English and I think some in Norse, maybe.

0:50:080:50:11

So this is very much Tolkien territory,

0:50:110:50:14

-isn't it?

-Yes.

-But published in 1936, that's incredibly early,

0:50:140:50:19

-isn't it?

-Yeah.

-That must be one of

0:50:190:50:21

-Tolkien's earliest appearances in print.

-I think so, yeah.

0:50:210:50:25

And I think the story behind it is that he was teaching,

0:50:250:50:27

this is soon after the First World War,

0:50:270:50:29

-he was teaching at the University of Leeds.

-Yes.

0:50:290:50:31

He was teaching at Leeds in the '20s.

0:50:310:50:33

-Yes.

-This wasn't published till a decade later, and in London.

0:50:330:50:37

And the story is that...

0:50:380:50:40

..a student of Tolkien, or a student from the Leeds department,

0:50:410:50:44

ended up in London and gave these poems to his students to print.

0:50:440:50:48

-Yeah.

-It was a printing exercise.

0:50:480:50:51

-So, as we can see, it's quite amateur, if we're honest.

-Yes!

0:50:510:50:54

LAUGHTER

0:50:540:50:55

That's not the finest printing I've ever seen,

0:50:550:50:57

but we have to forgive it, because if we look at the back cover,

0:50:570:51:00

you see this Department of English, University College London,

0:51:000:51:03

this is a hand press,

0:51:030:51:04

so this was printed by students at UCL London with a hand press,

0:51:040:51:08

so...historic printing.

0:51:080:51:11

So, tell me, you're obviously a Tolkien collector,

0:51:110:51:13

you're a Tolkien enthusiast.

0:51:130:51:15

Where did this come from? Where did you get it?

0:51:150:51:17

Well, it was sort of soon after I'd started collecting and a book dealer

0:51:170:51:21

that I bought some things from rang me up and said,

0:51:210:51:24

"I've got one of these."

0:51:240:51:25

I knew of them and that they were rare.

0:51:250:51:27

And they said, "It's £2,000."

0:51:280:51:32

And so I talked to my wife, I thought, "That's a lot of money."

0:51:320:51:35

And we thought, "Well, we've got the money,"

0:51:350:51:37

cos we'd been saving up for a new car - or a new second-hand car!

0:51:370:51:39

LAUGHTER

0:51:390:51:41

And then we said, "Well, the bank will lend us money for a car."

0:51:410:51:45

So we rang them back and said, "Yes, we'll buy it."

0:51:450:51:48

Had you bought the car -

0:51:490:51:50

I'm not sure what sort of car you'd get for £2,000! -

0:51:500:51:52

what would that car be worth today?

0:51:520:51:54

It wouldn't really be worth anything now.

0:51:540:51:56

Absolutely nothing. So what's this worth?

0:51:560:51:59

Now, if you are a serious Tolkien collector, and you understand this,

0:51:590:52:03

you may have a copy of The Hobbit,

0:52:030:52:04

you may have a copy of The Lord Of The Rings.

0:52:040:52:06

Those are expensive books, we know that,

0:52:060:52:09

but they're relatively common in comparison to this.

0:52:090:52:13

Now, if you were a really serious collector,

0:52:130:52:15

you'd want a copy of this.

0:52:150:52:16

If you were a completist, you'd look for a copy of this

0:52:160:52:19

and you would look long and hard, I think.

0:52:190:52:22

£2,000 in '95.

0:52:220:52:24

I think today if the same dealer offered it to you,

0:52:240:52:28

I'd think they'd be phoning you up and asking

0:52:280:52:30

-for £10,000-12,000.

-Wow!

0:52:300:52:33

I've got a group of medals in a case here,

0:52:360:52:38

a very historic group of medals.

0:52:380:52:40

There's one medal in there in particular

0:52:400:52:42

that I'm going to come to in a minute,

0:52:420:52:44

but this is a maritime story, a story about an expedition,

0:52:440:52:48

perhaps one of the greatest maritime and expeditionary stories in the

0:52:480:52:51

history of Great Britain, and you are directly connected with that,

0:52:510:52:56

and I want you to tell me all about this gentleman, Arthur Casement.

0:52:560:53:01

Arthur Casement was my great-grandad.

0:53:020:53:04

Er...

0:53:040:53:06

Lived in Hull all his life. He was a seaman.

0:53:060:53:11

He did what seamen do...

0:53:110:53:12

..and a good job of it.

0:53:140:53:15

And so, why has he got this medal, the Polar Medal?

0:53:160:53:21

Because he was on the supply ship

0:53:210:53:24

that went with Scott to the Antarctic.

0:53:240:53:28

He and a third ship helped to break Scott out of the ice

0:53:280:53:36

when he was frozen in.

0:53:360:53:38

-That's the 1901 Scott expedition to Antarctica.

-Yes.

0:53:380:53:43

I love this picture here of Morning, the ship,

0:53:430:53:47

and also we have a wonderful picture of Arthur on deck.

0:53:470:53:51

It's a great visualisation of those men, who were very brave.

0:53:510:53:57

-That's correct.

-Now, we all know the story of Scott, don't we?

0:53:570:54:00

It's a sad story, it's a story,

0:54:000:54:02

which, in many ways, I find one of the most emotive stories

0:54:020:54:06

-in British history.

-Yeah.

0:54:060:54:07

To read Scott's last letter brings tears to anybody's eyes,

0:54:070:54:11

I have to say, and here we have something directly related to an

0:54:110:54:15

expedition that wasn't the expedition in which Scott died.

0:54:150:54:19

-No.

-But it was the precursor, the 1901 expedition to Antarctica.

0:54:190:54:24

Now, Scott set off on that expedition,

0:54:240:54:27

of course it was a massive expedition,

0:54:270:54:30

but he got locked in the ice for 26 months.

0:54:300:54:33

So I wonder if you can tell me a little bit about the technicalities

0:54:330:54:37

of how he would have been involved

0:54:370:54:39

in trying to release Scott from the ice.

0:54:390:54:41

Do you know much about that?

0:54:410:54:42

No, I think they tried to break it out and couldn't,

0:54:420:54:46

so then they had to send for help.

0:54:460:54:49

Yes, the Terra Nova, of course, was the other famous ship and, in fact,

0:54:490:54:52

people seem to know more about the Terra Nova

0:54:520:54:54

than they do about Morning, in fact.

0:54:540:54:55

-Yeah.

-Maybe it's the name, I don't know.

0:54:550:54:58

And perhaps, in some ways, people like Arthur don't get

0:54:580:55:00

quite as much recognition, being on Morning,

0:55:000:55:04

-as Terra Nova gets.

-Mm.

0:55:040:55:06

Now, he was obviously a really well regarded seaman.

0:55:070:55:09

We have his discharge book here and there are various entries for it.

0:55:090:55:13

What's important also is the entry that we have here, handwritten,

0:55:130:55:18

for Morning, the ship which rescued Scott and his men, essentially,

0:55:180:55:23

the supply ship, and it's dated 09/07/02,

0:55:230:55:28

which, obviously, is incontrovertible evidence.

0:55:280:55:31

Also, an amazing letter over there, which was from a lieutenant

0:55:310:55:35

called Edward Evans in the Royal Navy,

0:55:350:55:38

which was basically a handwritten letter of the period, actually 1904,

0:55:380:55:42

a reference saying that, "He has, on all occasions,

0:55:420:55:45

"shown himself to be a hard-working, zealous and very capable seaman."

0:55:450:55:49

It's a great reference, isn't it?

0:55:490:55:51

So you've got some wonderful paper and original ephemera relating to

0:55:510:55:56

him as well. That medal is an Edward VII medal?

0:55:560:56:00

That's correct.

0:56:000:56:01

And it's with his First World War service medals as well.

0:56:010:56:05

-Yeah.

-Now, the Polar Medal itself is actually a bronze medal.

0:56:050:56:11

It was also issued in silver.

0:56:110:56:13

The office has got the silver medals.

0:56:130:56:15

The bronze medal, in fact,

0:56:150:56:17

about 200 have been issued throughout its history.

0:56:170:56:21

Now, that's not many medals.

0:56:210:56:24

This was given to Arthur Casement

0:56:240:56:26

in recognition of his bravery in service

0:56:260:56:29

in rescuing Scott and helping to rescue Scott.

0:56:290:56:32

I suppose we have to think about putting a value on it, really.

0:56:320:56:35

I think that if this were to come to auction, a collection like this

0:56:350:56:38

in a really good Polar, Antarctica kind of expeditionary sort of sale

0:56:380:56:44

that's related to that sort of material, I think this would make...

0:56:440:56:47

-£10,000-15,000 at auction.

-Wow.

0:56:470:56:50

Oh...

0:56:510:56:52

SHE STUTTERS

0:56:520:56:54

It's difficult to price this sort of material.

0:56:560:56:59

It's so historic that, in fact,

0:56:590:57:02

actually, it's almost priceless in many respects.

0:57:020:57:06

Thank you. Thank you!

0:57:060:57:08

As our day draws to a close here at Burton Constable,

0:57:110:57:13

and if you think back to the very beginning of the programme

0:57:130:57:16

when we saw that wonderful collection inside,

0:57:160:57:18

I would never have guessed that we would be adding to it,

0:57:180:57:20

albeit in a very humble way,

0:57:200:57:22

but a rather touching way with this beautiful drawing done in 1898.

0:57:220:57:27

And I know Rodrica was thrilled to receive it.

0:57:270:57:30

We've had such a lovely day here at Burton Constable.

0:57:300:57:32

The sun has shone upon us. We've been so lucky.

0:57:320:57:36

From all of us here, until next time, bye-bye.

0:57:360:57:38

Fiona Bruce and the Antiques Roadshow team head to Burton Constable Hall near Hull, a property filled with family legends and treasures, including a remarkable cabinet of curiosities. Objects brought in by visitors are just as diverse, including a ship's anchor found in a garden pond and a medal given for heroism to a local sailor who helped break Captain Scott's ship out of Antarctic ice in 1901. There is also a rare example of early flat-pack furniture dating back to the 17th century. And for anyone interested in the wisdom of investing in antiques and collectibles, there is a revelation about how a decision to purchase a flimsy booklet proved a much better investment 30 years ago than buying a second-hand car.