Pembroke Castle 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Pembroke Castle 2

A return visit for Fiona Bruce and the experts to Pembroke Castle in West Wales. Objects featured include a rare sapphire ring and Pope Pius XII's papal hat.


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For this week's Antiques Roadshow,

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we make a return visit to Pembroke Castle in Wales,

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a medieval treasure in south Pembrokeshire.

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Since its beginnings in 1093,

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Pembroke Castle was an impregnable fortress, never conquered.

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Until 600 years later and the Civil War,

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when a two-month siege

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by Oliver Cromwell and his troops took its toll.

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The castle was devastated.

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Before long, the castle fell into rapid decline.

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The townspeople plundered its stone for their homes and farmsteads

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and the walls became completely overgrown.

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Eventually, the castle attracted the attention

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of some of Britain's leading Romantic painters,

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including Richard Wilson, Paul Sandby and Turner.

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They found beauty in its decay.

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But what the castle really needed was someone to save it.

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That man came along in 1928.

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General Sir Ivor Phillips had served in the Indian Army

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and had fought in the First World War.

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A man who relished a challenge,

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he decided to buy the castle and save it.

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And this is the original receipt.

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So, how much for a castle?

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£3,000.

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In today's money that's about £160,000,

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which I think is a pretty good buy!

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Though the repair bill I, imagine, would have been horrendous.

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Under Sir Ivor's direction,

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the walls and towers of the castle were rebuilt.

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The overgrowth was removed from its walls.

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It took ten years.

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The Second World War stopped work on the castle in 1939

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and, sadly, Sir Ivor died a year later

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and never saw the completion of his project.

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But his family carried on his work,

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and created a private trust that still looks after the castle today.

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Pembroke Castle attracts tens of thousands of visitors.

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Let's see how many have gathered down in the outer ward

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for this week's Antiques Roadshow.

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I can't help thinking that this is not always intended

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to be covered like this.

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It's a slightly unusual presentation. What's going on?

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Well, granddaughter Agatha,

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when we used to have Christmas dinner in the dining room,

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was rather upset by having a naked lady sharing the meal with us,

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so I had to crochet a shawl to cover her up.

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-And you crocheted the shawl?

-Oh, yes.

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Well, that's absolutely brilliant.

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But I think we need to unveil, don't you?

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-Are you ready for this?

-Ready for this, OK.

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So...

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Well, here we are. And it's the most fantastic Virgin and Child,

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very reminiscent of the work of a man called Eric Gill,

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who I'll come on to in a minute.

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But tell me, who is it by?

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As far as we know, it's by a man called Walter Ritchie,

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who was a pupil of Eric Gill.

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And she was owned by my mother-in-law,

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and I'm not sure how she came across it,

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but mother-in-law also liked Eric Gill drawings.

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-Right.

-And there are several that look vaguely like this.

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OK. Well, Eric Gill, particularly for the BBC,

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is very well known, because on the front of Broadcasting House

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is a carved-stone figure of Ariel, and it's this kind of stone.

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And I don't know for sure what this stone is,

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but it'll be a Hopton stone, I expect, from the Midlands.

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And although Gill did work in Wales in the '20s,

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he went back to Warwickshire.

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And Ritchie lived in Warwickshire,

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and they worked together for a period of time.

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And Ritchie's a most extraordinary man,

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because he doesn't appear to have actually ever really had exhibitions

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until right at the end of his life.

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And he worked in a completely different style to this,

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which is what's so interesting about this.

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This is clearly influenced by his master.

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He normally worked in brickwork.

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He did... He laid bricks which he then carved,

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and there's a wonderful piece,

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Len Hutton, at the Oval, for instance, by him.

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But this is a much more deep piece, I think.

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And, of course, it's a ubiquitous subject,

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the virgin mother and child.

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It covers all periods and all faiths, really.

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So, it doesn't specifically have to be a Christian thing.

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-No.

-Although it probably is.

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She didn't come out of a church, then?

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No, she's never been in a church.

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I think this particular virgin may well not have been in a church.

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No, I think definitely not!

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And particularly if you go round behind,

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it's, you know, naked virgins...

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-She's got a very nice bum!

-She has.

-She has.

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LAUGHTER

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So, having covered all the subjects, erm...

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Ritchie dies in 1997 and has absolutely no form at auction.

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So, as a piece of domestic sculpture like this, it's a really rare thing.

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And I think it's a very beautiful thing.

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I also think it's probably worth quite a bit of money.

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Probably would make somewhere between 2,000-3,000 at auction,

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and possibly even as much as 4,000.

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Yes, I'm sure Agatha wouldn't part with her.

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-Thank you.

-With or without the shawl!

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With or without the shawl! Yes.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Thank you.

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Well, what a fantastic parquetry box.

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It's almost like a patchwork quilt in box form.

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-Yes.

-What's its history to you?

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Well, the history to us, my wife and I,

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is that we bought it on our 40th wedding anniversary.

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We were out for the day

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and found it in a dealer's shop,

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and just fell in love with it.

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We think it's very beautiful, but also it has a Welsh history.

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Did you buy it as an anniversary gift?

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-Yes.

-That's quite interesting,

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because undoubtedly it's actually a marriage box.

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You see, we have the little hearts on the lid and on the sides of it,

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and we have a date on the front.

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And of course, you know, the Welsh have a tradition

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of making gifts for weddings and anniversaries,

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you think of sort of the tradition of lovespoons and so on.

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-Yes.

-That sort of folk tradition.

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And this is, I think, very much in the same spirit, really.

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And it's a fabulous example of vernacular furniture.

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The top is all inlaid with all different types of woods,

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I think this is oak which has been stained.

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We have this lighter colour here, is almost definitely sycamore,

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and then these are various different fruit woods.

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But what's really interesting, obviously,

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-is you've got all this little sort of peg decoration.

-Yes.

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I think he didn't trust his glue!

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It could be that!

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But it's almost like dominoes on the top of the box.

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-Yes.

-And I have to admit, I've never seen anything quite like it.

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Well, we love it.

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You love it, and you obviously still love it now.

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Yes, indeed. Yes, we have a number of boxes, but this is special.

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It's part of our married life.

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Yes, yeah. Well, I think it's gorgeous.

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I just would like to have a quick look at the inside as well,

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because what's really nice

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is it's got this original Victorian hand-blocked wallpaper...

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-Yes, it is lovely, yes.

-..which is almost sort of Puginesque in style.

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-It is, yeah.

-Lovely.

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And it's nice that it still has that original lining to it as well.

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Can I ask what you paid for it at the time?

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If it's not being too impolite!

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It was rather expensive.

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We didn't have a lot of money, so we had to write one cheque each.

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So we gave it to each other.

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Oh, right, I see!

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-Well, that's a nice way of doing it.

-It was £1,300.

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Right, OK, which 20 years ago was...

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-It was a lot of money, yes.

-It was a lot of money, yes.

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-But we just felt it was special.

-Well, now, 20 years later,

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I would think you're probably looking somewhere in the region

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of maybe 2,000 - 2,500, simply because it is rather a unique piece.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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So, you two ladies have both brought me a chicken!

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Or a cockerel, in fact.

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And, forgive the pun, but I'm wondering

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if you'd thought which came first -

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your chicken or your chicken?

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-Any ideas?

-I don't know.

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I think this one came first.

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You think that one's the earliest?

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OK. Well, I think you're right.

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Cos this one, this one is the later one.

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And this is Llanelly Pottery, but I think you knew that, didn't you?

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-Yes.

-Yes. Do you know anything else about it?

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I believe all the outer border work was done by children.

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-Right.

-At the pottery.

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-Right.

-And there was a well-known artist

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who used to be called Auntie Sal.

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That's right. Aunt Sal.

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Her proper name was Sarah Jane Roberts.

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But what this is

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is an absolutely classic piece of Llanelly Pottery

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from the later period.

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So it dates from about 1910, that kind of date.

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And if you had to imagine a piece of Llanelly, this is it.

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So this is local pottery.

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Could this be a Welsh chicken, or a Welsh cockerel?

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Well, I've got to be perfectly honest, I know very little about it.

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-Right.

-All I know is that it belonged to my husband's grandfather

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and has been handed down through the family.

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My husband and I went to the Victoria and Albert Museum

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a good few years ago

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and we actually saw one similar to this.

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So it's because of that that we've brought it today.

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You brought it here today. Well, you're absolutely right,

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cos this is the chicken that came first.

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And this chicken came first in about 1800 or 1810,

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about 100 years before the Llanelly chicken.

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And rather than being Welsh, it's probably a Yorkshire chicken.

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And the colours here, these colours which we call Pratt colours,

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they're associated with the Yorkshire potteries.

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It's a wonderful thing. I mean, it's not just the colouring,

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I noticed here in the sunlight

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how the feathers are delicately incised on the surface of the beast.

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So there's a big contrast between these two.

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Although this looks naive, it's actually quite sophisticated.

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How beautifully the feathers are done.

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And this is simply naive, isn't it?

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And the next question is, out of these two chickens,

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which one do you think is the most valuable one?

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-I think that one.

-You think this one is worth more?

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-Well, I thought that.

-You think that one's worth more!

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OK! You're right.

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-Am I?

-Yes, you are.

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-Yes.

-Because the lovely Pratt chicken

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is going to get people really excited.

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It's quite rare. The Llanelly plate, as I said, it's a standard example.

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So, this is worth £200.

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Thank you.

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And this is worth £800 to £1,000.

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Oh!

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And I'm holding it.

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It's not safe!

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That's one pricey bird, isn't it?

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It certainly is.

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Now, I can see we're here

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right at the very beginning of popular travel.

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Thomas Cook, that great name.

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Back to the 1840s.

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The world's first-ever excursion tour,

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a temperance group,

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I think from Leicester to Loughborough,

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or something like that.

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That was the launch of this great international company.

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Where do you fit in?

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Well, it's the story of Donald White.

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He was my uncle by marriage, he was born in 1876,

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left school at 14,

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trained as a chef.

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While he was waiting for a job,

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he got a short-term commission with Thomas Cook

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to show one of their guests around London.

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and he loved it so much he stayed with them - for 69 years.

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Gosh. So a pure-chance connection?

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-Pure chance.

-And he became a great figure in that history?

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He did indeed, he became their chief uniformed representative,

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based at Victoria Station.

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And, of course, it was there

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that he met everybody who came through Victoria Station.

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What does that job really entail?

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Well, he was the fixer, if you like.

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They expected Thomas Cook representatives

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to organise everything for them when they were in London.

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And he would do that,

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he would organise theatre tickets for them,

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taxis wherever they wanted to go.

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And I suppose some who were regular visitors became friends?

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Oh, absolutely, yes, he knew them very well.

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I think we've got to go back slightly

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to a period in our history which is now long-forgotten.

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A, everyone travelled by train.

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-Indeed.

-And B, train travel was very smart.

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And, of course, visiting royalty and visiting film stars, sports people,

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always arrived in London, from Europe, into Victoria Station.

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-Absolutely.

-So he was there?

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He was there. And I remember him well because, as a boy,

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I went and stayed with him

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and he would take me to Victoria Station.

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And for a boy of seven eight, nine years old, it was absolute magic,

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because I could go on to the platform to see the Golden Arrow

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and the boat train -

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it was wonderful.

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And he was there on duty?

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-On duty.

-Looking, as one can see, magnificent.

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-Absolutely.

-Did he talk about the famous people?

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Yes, he did. He met most royalty from Europe.

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One of his favourite people that he dealt with

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was Sir Winston Churchill,

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and he always said his favourite lady was Lillie Langtry,

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who he met many times.

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Gosh. I think what we forget is how important these people were.

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You know, they were not just the face of Thomas Cook,

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it was about the whole ritual of travel and smart travel.

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I mean, we have a medal here

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awarded to him by the King of Tunisia in 1922.

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Presumably for services to Tunisian -

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or rather French, as it was then - French travel to North Africa.

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-Exactly.

-We have even him as a cigarette card.

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Now, what greater fame can there be than that,

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to be an image in a set of cigarette cards?

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What was the set called?

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In Town Tonight.

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Well, there you are. So he was a great figure in London.

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When it comes to valuations, it's primarily a family story.

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But, of course, there is value - the poster, 1930s,

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is an original Cook poster.

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A rare survival. Not the most exciting,

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but it's still going to be a couple of hundred pounds.

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The medal, very important part of his life, £500 to £700.

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You know, so you're looking at £1,000 or so for the collection.

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Today, we travel all over the place,

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we don't really care who we travel with.

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This was the day when it did matter.

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You went to Thomas Cook's

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and, if you were important, you got Donald White.

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-Exactly.

-Thank you.

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Thank you.

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I love vernacular furniture,

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and it's a real joy to be able to film a chair like this.

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And what's more of a joy is the fact that it's a Welsh chair.

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-Yeah.

-Here it is, at home,

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in Pembroke Castle.

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Tell me something about it.

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It was in my mother and father's house.

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-Right.

-I always remember it being at the bottom of the stairs.

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-Right.

-No-one really sat on it, because it's always at a bit of an angle.

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-Right, yes!

-But it came from my father's house in Milford Haven.

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Right. But you think it's been generationally handed down?

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-Yes.

-Good. OK.

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Well, that's nice to know.

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I don't know how much you know about this type of furniture.

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It's made, essentially, of elm and ash.

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In fact, I mean, look at it.

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It's very basic, isn't it?

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It looks like a child could have made it.

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And, in fact, actually, that's really part of its attraction,

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because what this is is kind of forest-made furniture.

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Greenwood, wood-turner's furniture, made with the most basic of tools,

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out of the most basic

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of bits of wood that were available, in essence.

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Have you ever wondered about this hole here?

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I did, and then someone told me it was a three-legged chair.

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You're absolutely right.

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It has four legs now,

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but originally it started off with three legs.

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Do you know why pieces of furniture had three legs?

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I did, yeah, it's uneven ground.

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Absolutely. They stand up far better on uneven ground

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than four-legged chairs do.

0:16:460:16:48

I think this chair dates from the early 19th century.

0:16:480:16:52

We can see that it's got some damage, obviously,

0:16:520:16:54

and we've got this bentwood back

0:16:540:16:55

which has broken and become disconnected.

0:16:550:16:57

Quite an unusual design, that.

0:16:570:16:59

Again very, very basic.

0:16:590:17:01

-Do you like it?

-Yeah, it's sort of quirky.

0:17:010:17:04

It is quirky, isn't it?

0:17:040:17:05

It's in the window of the house, the bay window,

0:17:050:17:09

it's usually got a couple of cushions sitting on it.

0:17:090:17:11

I love it.

0:17:110:17:12

Given it's got a little bit of damage

0:17:130:17:15

and it needs a little bit of work on it,

0:17:150:17:17

let's think about a value.

0:17:170:17:18

If this were to come up for sale at a really good vernacular auction,

0:17:180:17:22

this would sell for £2,000.

0:17:220:17:24

Really?

0:17:240:17:26

-Honestly?

-Yeah. Absolutely.

0:17:260:17:29

Well, no, I didn't expect that.

0:17:290:17:30

A bit of a cliche, but I didn't!

0:17:300:17:32

It's a really glorious little item.

0:17:320:17:34

It really is.

0:17:340:17:35

At the Antiques Roadshow we like to put a value on things,

0:17:380:17:41

but there are many people who would look at this

0:17:410:17:44

and think that was just a sacrilege.

0:17:440:17:46

And you've come along today

0:17:460:17:49

with what you say is the zucchetto or skullcap.

0:17:490:17:52

-Zucchetto.

-Zucchetto, worn by a Pope?

0:17:520:17:55

Yeah, Pope Pius XII.

0:17:550:17:57

Who was a Pope during the Second World War?

0:17:570:17:59

During the Second World War.

0:17:590:18:00

Now, how do you come to have such a thing?

0:18:000:18:02

Well, my wife's aunt's husband

0:18:020:18:07

became a Roman Catholic.

0:18:070:18:09

And he worked for

0:18:090:18:12

the Guild of Our Lady of Ransom in London.

0:18:120:18:15

And what was his name?

0:18:150:18:17

John Silverlock.

0:18:170:18:19

And the Master of the Guild was Monsignor Filmer,

0:18:190:18:24

and they started the Million Pound Club for poor parishes.

0:18:240:18:28

And this was raising money for poor parishes?

0:18:280:18:31

Raising money for poor parishes.

0:18:310:18:33

And for all that he'd done,

0:18:330:18:36

he was made a Knight of St Gregory.

0:18:360:18:38

-This is your Uncle John?

-My Uncle John.

0:18:380:18:40

And, in due course, the Monsignor went to Rome,

0:18:400:18:45

and, while there, he was in the refectory with the Mother Superior,

0:18:450:18:50

and in walked Pope Pius XII.

0:18:500:18:52

So, this was at the Vatican?

0:18:520:18:53

Yes, at the Vatican itself, yes.

0:18:530:18:55

And he came in, and spoke to the Mother Superior,

0:18:550:19:01

and asked, "Have you got my zucchetto ready?"

0:19:010:19:04

and she said, "Yes."

0:19:040:19:06

And he took that one off,

0:19:060:19:08

was given a new one, and out he went,

0:19:080:19:11

and the Monsignor looked at it,

0:19:110:19:13

and picked it up, and the Mother Superior said, "Do you like it?"

0:19:130:19:18

And he said, "Can I have it?"

0:19:180:19:21

"Yes," she said, "take it."

0:19:210:19:23

And then, at a dinner in London, because of Uncle John,

0:19:230:19:26

all the work he'd done,

0:19:260:19:28

and was being made a Knight of Saint Gregory,

0:19:280:19:30

he presented it to him.

0:19:300:19:33

And, sadly, in due course,

0:19:330:19:36

he died, and this was left to my wife and I.

0:19:360:19:40

Sadly, my wife has died, I've got it now.

0:19:400:19:42

And you've got a note here, which is written by the Monsignor.

0:19:430:19:46

That's correct.

0:19:460:19:47

Saying "this zucchetto was worn by his Holiness Pope Pius XII,

0:19:470:19:51

"and given to him by the Reverend Mother General."

0:19:510:19:54

-Are you a Catholic yourself, Frank?

-Yes, I am, yes, yeah.

0:19:540:19:56

So, what does this mean to you?

0:19:560:19:58

Well, you know, I felt honoured to have it,

0:19:580:20:03

but if anything happened to me, I would give it to the church.

0:20:030:20:07

I have to say, in all the time I've been on the Roadshow,

0:20:070:20:10

which is not that long, nine years,

0:20:100:20:12

compared to the enormous time we've been on air, I don't think...

0:20:120:20:15

I can't think of another time when we've had something from a Pope.

0:20:150:20:18

Thank you, Frank, thanks for bringing it in.

0:20:180:20:20

You're very welcome.

0:20:200:20:21

Do you know what this is?

0:20:260:20:27

As far as I know, it's Satsuma,

0:20:290:20:32

and I thought it was some sort of incense burner.

0:20:320:20:36

And how did you work it, if it was incense?

0:20:360:20:39

Well, thinking about it, it's glazed inside, so it probably isn't.

0:20:390:20:43

Yeah, you're right, it's an incense burner.

0:20:450:20:47

-OK.

-It's a koro, in Japanese - because it is Japanese.

0:20:470:20:53

Satsuma, yeah, it would have been called Satsuma.

0:20:530:20:58

And we've got...

0:20:580:21:00

a maker's mark in gilding,

0:21:000:21:03

which is Kinzan,

0:21:030:21:06

which means gold mountain.

0:21:060:21:10

That's the man's name.

0:21:100:21:12

In the early 20th century, you have Taisho.

0:21:130:21:16

One of the characteristics of his reign

0:21:160:21:20

is the obsession with dots.

0:21:200:21:24

Oh, OK.

0:21:240:21:26

If you can put a dot somewhere, why not do it?

0:21:260:21:29

And you can see it particularly on these roundels.

0:21:290:21:33

-Yeah, he went a bit crazy!

-Yeah.

0:21:330:21:35

So I would put this around Taisho, the beginning of the 20th century.

0:21:350:21:40

This was made for export.

0:21:400:21:42

This was not made for domestic use.

0:21:430:21:46

This is western taste.

0:21:460:21:48

The westerners are impressed by meticulous little detailing.

0:21:490:21:55

-Yes.

-But the thing that grabbed my attention on this one,

0:21:550:21:59

not something I've ever seen before,

0:21:590:22:02

are three figures...

0:22:020:22:05

who are taller than the rest.

0:22:050:22:09

-OK.

-And they have beards.

0:22:090:22:12

-OK.

-Do Japanese have beards?

0:22:120:22:15

-No.

-Nope.

0:22:150:22:17

And their hats are a different shape.

0:22:170:22:19

These are a throwback.

0:22:210:22:23

I don't know why they're here,

0:22:230:22:25

but Dutchmen have been depicted on Japanese works of art

0:22:250:22:29

since they arrived in Japan in the 17th century.

0:22:290:22:33

And when they arrived, the Japanese thought they were hallucinating.

0:22:340:22:40

What were these immensely tall figures

0:22:400:22:43

with their ginger beards and this weird clothing?

0:22:430:22:46

What were they? Some sort of god?

0:22:460:22:49

I've never seen them done on a bit of Satsuma before.

0:22:490:22:53

And I don't know, it just makes it stand out

0:22:540:22:58

above the usual run-of-the-mill koro.

0:22:580:23:01

Well, if it didn't have those plus features...

0:23:010:23:06

Right...

0:23:060:23:07

..with a market which is slightly down a bit now,

0:23:070:23:11

I would think probably 400 to 600.

0:23:110:23:14

-OK.

-But because it's got a raft of specials,

0:23:140:23:20

as my cats call the little biscuits,

0:23:200:23:23

I would think you're probably looking more like 1,000 to 1,500.

0:23:230:23:28

-Very good.

-OK?

0:23:290:23:31

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:23:320:23:34

Well, this is a turn up for the books -

0:23:390:23:41

it's not often you see works by Austin Osman Spare.

0:23:410:23:44

And, forgive me, you're of a mature age,

0:23:440:23:47

and most of the people I know that like Spare are young,

0:23:470:23:50

and sometimes a bit weird.

0:23:500:23:52

Yeah, well...

0:23:520:23:55

perhaps I'm quite the opposite.

0:23:550:23:57

It's not a very well-loved painting.

0:23:570:24:00

For a long time, the last 20 years or so,

0:24:000:24:02

it's just been in the wardrobe.

0:24:020:24:03

How did you get it, then?

0:24:030:24:06

Well, it was my father, in 1937,

0:24:060:24:09

he read an article in what was then the Herald Daily newspaper.

0:24:090:24:15

My father thought, well, he'll have one of those,

0:24:150:24:19

and we went to his studios in Elephant and Castle.

0:24:190:24:25

Oh, yes. Is that the catalogue to it?

0:24:250:24:27

-Indeed it is.

-Cool.

0:24:270:24:28

Can I have a look?

0:24:280:24:30

You've got, is the picture in here, isn't it?

0:24:300:24:32

Yeah, there it is.

0:24:320:24:34

Self Janus Combined, that's its title.

0:24:340:24:37

-Yes, yes, that's right.

-And you paid the princely sum

0:24:370:24:40

of three guineas for it.

0:24:400:24:41

That's right, well, my father did.

0:24:410:24:43

And took it home,

0:24:430:24:45

and my mother wasn't very...

0:24:450:24:48

Not pleased!

0:24:480:24:50

No, she said, I like the artist, but...

0:24:500:24:54

She was rather a lady of Victorian ideas, and unclothed bodies...

0:24:540:25:00

..wasn't quite her style.

0:25:010:25:03

OK. Because you know what's happening here, don't you?

0:25:030:25:06

-No.

-Austin Osman Spare often drew himself,

0:25:060:25:10

and there's always a spirit dimension to his pictures.

0:25:100:25:13

He's not of the mainstream.

0:25:130:25:15

He believed in the occult,

0:25:150:25:17

-he was a friend of the warlock Aleister Crowley...

-Oh, really?

0:25:170:25:20

-..who was a very nasty piece of work, I think.

-Yes, yes.

0:25:200:25:22

Yeah, and not for long, I might add.

0:25:220:25:25

But this drawing underneath, which is connected by the frame,

0:25:250:25:29

by the artist, he did that...

0:25:290:25:31

-He did, indeed.

-..is the Janus, the two-faced god.

0:25:310:25:35

-Yeah.

-You can see the two faces of Janus here.

0:25:350:25:37

What he's doing is he's getting in touch with the spirit world,

0:25:370:25:40

in his mind, and a direct conduit is established,

0:25:400:25:43

and he produces this, which he called an automatic drawing.

0:25:430:25:47

-OK.

-So it's all a bit weird.

0:25:470:25:48

And this relates to him, it's almost what's going on inside his body.

0:25:480:25:52

You see the way the frame is constructed?

0:25:520:25:54

-Yes, indeed.

-This is his psychic reality.

0:25:540:25:57

-Yes.

-And this is his physical reality.

0:25:570:26:00

Yep, oh.

0:26:000:26:01

That's the point of it.

0:26:010:26:02

-Ah.

-And this is actually what he looked like.

0:26:020:26:05

It's done very quickly in pastel,

0:26:050:26:07

and he's got a really immediate effect,

0:26:070:26:10

with the hair just "voom" like that.

0:26:100:26:11

It's a very good likeness.

0:26:110:26:13

Yes, except he was going slightly to seed by now, I think,

0:26:130:26:15

drinking too much beer, yeah.

0:26:150:26:17

When he was young, he was very, very good-looking,

0:26:170:26:20

and quite lionised by society.

0:26:200:26:22

George Bernard Shaw thought he was a child prodigy, a genius.

0:26:220:26:24

-The greatest hope of British art.

-Ah.

0:26:240:26:27

And indeed he is a great draughtsman,

0:26:270:26:30

but the problem was with all this, frankly, slightly kooky stuff,

0:26:300:26:33

he loses out in the market these days.

0:26:330:26:36

Although there is a devoted group of followers,

0:26:360:26:39

of which I would number myself.

0:26:390:26:41

-Really?

-And this means money!

0:26:410:26:44

Really?

0:26:440:26:46

Yeah.

0:26:460:26:47

It's worth £4,000 to £6,000.

0:26:470:26:51

Oh, really? Oh, well, that's very nice, yes.

0:26:510:26:54

Well, that's appreciated somewhat.

0:26:540:26:56

So does that mean you're going to sell it?

0:26:560:26:59

Probably.

0:26:590:27:01

It tends to be rather unloved,

0:27:020:27:04

but I'm beginning to love it now.

0:27:040:27:07

OK, so we're going to start with a bit of a quiz question.

0:27:110:27:14

What is one of the main things that helps a cheetah to run so fast?

0:27:140:27:19

OK, I'm going to give you a minute

0:27:190:27:21

to think about it.

0:27:210:27:23

So, we see all sorts of amazing things on the Roadshow,

0:27:230:27:27

and then something like this comes in,

0:27:270:27:30

quite an ordinary sort of pair of running shoes.

0:27:300:27:32

Tell me what you've got here.

0:27:320:27:34

They are my running spikes that were made for me by my uncle,

0:27:340:27:39

and his claim to fame is that he made the running spikes

0:27:390:27:42

that Sir Roger Bannister wore

0:27:420:27:45

when he first ran under the four-minute mile.

0:27:450:27:50

-So...

-That's where it becomes so cool.

0:27:500:27:53

The great thing with something like this, you've got all the proof,

0:27:530:27:56

we've got the name on the running shoes,

0:27:560:27:59

and the photograph of your uncle -

0:27:590:28:01

-and his name was?

-He was George Thomas Law.

0:28:010:28:04

George Thomas Law. And what a claim to fame to have that,

0:28:040:28:08

to have made the running shoes,

0:28:080:28:10

not just A pair of running shoes,

0:28:100:28:12

but the shoes that he was wearing when he broke the four-minute mile

0:28:120:28:16

at Iffley Road in Oxford,

0:28:160:28:17

and by a second, or something ridiculous like that.

0:28:170:28:19

Yes, yes indeed.

0:28:190:28:21

Tell me you've got a second pair

0:28:210:28:22

that he made for Roger Bannister at home?

0:28:220:28:24

I wish, I only wish.

0:28:240:28:27

My uncle believed that they had been lost.

0:28:270:28:29

Oh, really?

0:28:290:28:31

And then I read last year

0:28:310:28:33

that Sir Roger had put them up for sale.

0:28:330:28:36

OK, so put them up for sale, and do you know how much they made?

0:28:360:28:39

Well, the auction taxes and everything,

0:28:400:28:44

I think it was around about a quarter of a million.

0:28:440:28:46

Exactly, 260-odd-thousand pounds.

0:28:460:28:50

-Yes, yes.

-OK, so, all that being said,

0:28:500:28:52

you've got a pair of running shoes from roughly the same period,

0:28:520:28:55

which were yours, made, no argument there, by the same firm.

0:28:550:29:00

-You've got the photograph.

-Yes. Him as a young man.

0:29:000:29:02

So, potentially, are you thinking

0:29:020:29:04

you've got one of the highest valuations on the Roadshow?

0:29:040:29:08

I wouldn't think that, I just think they're...

0:29:080:29:11

I'm so glad I've kept them.

0:29:110:29:13

I'm so glad you kept them, because, to me,

0:29:130:29:15

it's just lovely to have that connection.

0:29:150:29:17

They're sort of £100 or so, just because of their coolness.

0:29:170:29:21

But thank you. Oh, and - the answer?

0:29:210:29:24

A cheetah will run with its claws out.

0:29:240:29:28

-Oh, of course!

-Which is where running spikes are developed from.

0:29:280:29:31

-Oh, yes!

-Thank you.

0:29:310:29:33

I think that's good!

0:29:330:29:34

-A jawbone.

-But, like, what animal is it?

0:29:400:29:44

It's not a cat, is it?

0:29:440:29:45

It's not a Welsh cat, no.

0:29:450:29:47

It's a bit too big even for a Welsh cat, I would say.

0:29:470:29:50

Yeah.

0:29:500:29:51

But where did you find this?

0:29:520:29:54

Well, I went home from school,

0:29:540:29:55

I used to go to Monkton School, over there,

0:29:550:29:58

and I saw this bit, because I saw that tooth there,

0:29:580:30:00

so I had a dig around, and there it was.

0:30:000:30:03

What I love about this is the Scrimshaw work.

0:30:070:30:09

Right in the very centre, we have an elk.

0:30:090:30:12

It's 17th-, 18th-century, so it goes back some years.

0:30:120:30:15

-Right!

-So you did save this one for the Welsh nation

0:30:150:30:18

by excavating it at the time!

0:30:180:30:20

Value-wise, very little, very little, I mean less than £100.

0:30:200:30:24

But a charming piece.

0:30:240:30:26

Brilliant!

0:30:260:30:27

Well, here we are, sunshine, blue skies

0:30:350:30:38

and, in front of us,

0:30:380:30:40

some wonderful blue glass.

0:30:400:30:42

Mdina glass, made in the island of Malta,

0:30:420:30:45

which we do get on the Roadshow, a lot, single pieces.

0:30:450:30:49

But here we've got a bit of a cavalcade.

0:30:490:30:51

-These are yours.

-Yes.

0:30:510:30:53

-You're a collector?

-My mother-in-law was, yes.

0:30:530:30:56

OK, do you like them yourself?

0:30:560:30:57

Yes, I do like them, they are on show.

0:30:570:30:59

I mean, the first thing I think you really notice with Mdina glass

0:30:590:31:03

is this wonderful, vivid, blue-green colour, this turquoise,

0:31:030:31:06

which is there to evoke the blue of the Mediterranean Sea.

0:31:060:31:10

To look at this, we've got to go back

0:31:100:31:12

to London and the Swinging '60s.

0:31:120:31:14

This is where this glass originates, in essence.

0:31:140:31:17

Michael Harris founded the Mdina Glassworks.

0:31:180:31:21

He studies at the Royal College of Art in 1967,

0:31:210:31:24

when glass-making is being introduced as a subject,

0:31:240:31:28

which is revolutionary.

0:31:280:31:29

His teacher is a man called Sam Herman, who really is the creator,

0:31:290:31:33

the father of modern studio glass.

0:31:330:31:35

He's an American, he's spearheading what we call the hot-glass movement.

0:31:350:31:39

This is taking glass out of those very controlled, cut, polished,

0:31:390:31:43

very sleek Scandinavian forms that have been glass for so long,

0:31:430:31:46

and taking it into something that's pure art, really expressive.

0:31:460:31:49

This is what glass can do when it's in its hot state.

0:31:490:31:52

It folds, it moulds, it's like wine gums,

0:31:520:31:55

it's not controlled, it's its own thing.

0:31:550:31:57

He's really exploring these things.

0:31:570:31:59

This is the era of Sgt. Pepper, and that's Sgt. Pepper in glass form.

0:31:590:32:04

Michael Harris opens the Mdina Glassworks in Malta in 1968,

0:32:040:32:08

stays there till 1972, but after he leaves,

0:32:080:32:11

they keep his designs in production.

0:32:110:32:13

These are actually 1980s designs, but still as he designed them

0:32:130:32:17

ten-plus years before.

0:32:170:32:19

Well, let's take a look, a close look, at one of these.

0:32:190:32:21

Now, this is the one that I'm immediately drawn to,

0:32:210:32:24

a big piece here,

0:32:240:32:26

this is known by a lot of people as the axe-head vase.

0:32:260:32:29

-The what, sorry?

-The axe-head vase,

0:32:290:32:30

so it's a bit like the end of an axe,

0:32:300:32:32

and you chop it. They're wrong.

0:32:320:32:35

It's not the axe-head vase,

0:32:350:32:37

it's the angelfish vase.

0:32:370:32:39

-Oh, nice!

-Can you see?

0:32:390:32:40

-Yes!

-There you are.

0:32:400:32:42

So, what are we talking, value-wise?

0:32:430:32:45

Had you given much thought to value?

0:32:450:32:47

No idea at all. This one I bought at a local antique auction,

0:32:470:32:50

oh, many years ago, for about £5.

0:32:500:32:52

About £5, OK.

0:32:520:32:54

That's going to be £30, £40 at auction,

0:32:540:32:57

so a good return on your £5.

0:32:570:32:59

This one here is a sort of take on,

0:32:590:33:00

a similar take on the angelfish vase,

0:33:000:33:03

and that's going to be about £120, £140.

0:33:030:33:07

This one, my favourite - and I have to do this,

0:33:070:33:10

because I like doing this -

0:33:100:33:11

the angelfish vase, that's going to be £150 to about £180 at auction.

0:33:110:33:17

So, a nice collection.

0:33:170:33:18

Nice collection. Thank you very much.

0:33:180:33:21

-It brings us thoughts of sunnier climes.

-It does, yes!

0:33:210:33:23

Tell me about these.

0:33:280:33:29

Well, I don't know a huge amount

0:33:290:33:31

but, when my mother died,

0:33:310:33:33

she left them to me, with a couple of other ones.

0:33:330:33:36

And I do know that when Dad was in India and Sri Lanka

0:33:360:33:43

he bought the sapphire and the diamonds,

0:33:430:33:46

and he brought them home to England,

0:33:460:33:49

and they were set, back in this country, as far as I know,

0:33:490:33:54

likewise that.

0:33:540:33:55

And then my mother used to wear them.

0:33:550:33:57

They were made for her.

0:33:570:33:59

And when she died she left them to me,

0:33:590:34:02

and I have to admit that I have never worn them.

0:34:020:34:04

I'm too frightened to wear them, really, and they look so nice,

0:34:050:34:09

but I should do.

0:34:090:34:11

Well, I have been in gemological heaven.

0:34:110:34:16

What do you think this is?

0:34:160:34:18

I think it's a citrine.

0:34:180:34:19

-OK.

-Mum told me it was a citrine.

0:34:190:34:21

Right.

0:34:210:34:23

It seemed awfully heavy to wear that.

0:34:230:34:25

Well, I have some good news for you,

0:34:250:34:28

and that is it is a sapphire.

0:34:280:34:31

Is it? Good Lord!

0:34:310:34:33

I'm so excited!

0:34:330:34:35

I'm so excited - it's a sapphire!

0:34:350:34:38

-Really?

-Yes! Isn't that exciting?

0:34:380:34:40

Yes!

0:34:400:34:42

Yes, it is!

0:34:420:34:43

And how I know is because it's got this wonderful,

0:34:430:34:47

like a fingerprint inclusion, just underneath the surface.

0:34:470:34:51

-Good Lord.

-And that is telling me

0:34:510:34:53

that it is a sapphire.

0:34:530:34:56

It's not the best colour at all of a yellow sapphire.

0:34:560:35:01

Yellow sapphires, to command high prices,

0:35:010:35:04

have to be sort of really quite a vibrant yellow.

0:35:040:35:07

But nevertheless, it's nearly 100 carats.

0:35:070:35:12

-Right.

-Now, I'm just... While I was cleaning it,

0:35:120:35:16

I was cleaning this one as well.

0:35:160:35:18

-Right.

-It's a beautiful colour, sort of blue, isn't it?

0:35:180:35:21

-It's really lovely.

-Sort of this really wonderful, vibrant blue.

0:35:210:35:25

But this was in artificial light,

0:35:250:35:29

and this went purple.

0:35:290:35:32

Totally purple.

0:35:320:35:34

It is a colour-change sapphire.

0:35:360:35:40

Never heard of that!

0:35:420:35:43

Well, I've certainly never seen one on the Antiques Roadshow,

0:35:430:35:47

and I can't tell you, I was so excited!

0:35:470:35:49

People have been saying to me, "Have you had a good day?"

0:35:500:35:53

Good day?!

0:35:530:35:55

I've had the best day!

0:35:550:35:56

I'm having quite a good one, too!

0:35:560:35:58

But it is just extraordinary.

0:36:000:36:02

Now, it is something that does happen with sapphires.

0:36:020:36:07

I mean, sapphires, we think of them as blue - they can be all colours.

0:36:070:36:11

Except, of course, when they turn red,

0:36:110:36:14

and then that's when they're a ruby,

0:36:140:36:16

because rubies and sapphires are the same, it's corundum.

0:36:160:36:19

Aluminium oxide is the chemical composition of a sapphire,

0:36:190:36:23

but it is the trace elements that make the colours different.

0:36:230:36:28

Now, there's more iron in the aluminium oxide,

0:36:280:36:32

which makes a sapphire more yellow.

0:36:320:36:34

With this, it's chromium.

0:36:350:36:38

Chromium is making the absorption bands change

0:36:380:36:42

in different light sources.

0:36:420:36:45

They are both stones from Sri Lanka, or Ceylon.

0:36:450:36:49

These would have come from an area called Ratnapura,

0:36:490:36:51

and I've been to Ratnapura,

0:36:510:36:53

and I've been down those sapphire mines,

0:36:530:36:55

and they're still done by artisan mining now, by hand,

0:36:550:36:59

they're still cut by hand.

0:36:590:37:00

These have been native-cut, or they've been cut without machines,

0:37:000:37:04

it's all been hand done,

0:37:040:37:06

and these are a wonderful indication

0:37:060:37:08

of what you find in that country.

0:37:080:37:11

I mean, if a yellow sapphire, if it was brighter,

0:37:110:37:14

because it's all about the colour,

0:37:140:37:16

this hasn't got the vibrancy of that colour, but still, I would say,

0:37:160:37:20

at auction, you would be looking in the region

0:37:200:37:23

of around about £5,000 to £7,000.

0:37:230:37:26

Well, that's jolly good, isn't it?

0:37:260:37:27

And this one here, it's quite deep, the stone,

0:37:290:37:32

but I love the fact that it's a colour-change sapphire.

0:37:320:37:35

It's about 11 carats,

0:37:350:37:37

and that's going to be in the region of about £4,000 to £6,000.

0:37:370:37:42

Oh, lovely, thank you very much.

0:37:420:37:44

They're not going anywhere.

0:37:440:37:46

Well, thank you so much for bringing them.

0:37:460:37:48

-A great pleasure, thank you for your help.

-Thank you.

0:37:480:37:50

We've got three dogs here.

0:37:530:37:55

-Yes.

-And they couldn't be more different in style,

0:37:550:37:59

and substance, and value, as well.

0:37:590:38:01

Are you a dog collector?

0:38:010:38:02

I'm not, personally, but my aunt was,

0:38:020:38:06

and, in fact, all of these three dogs came from her house.

0:38:060:38:09

OK. Well, as I said, they're all very different.

0:38:090:38:11

This one, to all intents and purposes, it looks like bronze,

0:38:110:38:15

it's patinated to look that way, but it's actually cast resin.

0:38:150:38:19

And if you feel it, it feels very warm to the touch.

0:38:190:38:21

If it were bronze, it would be a lot colder.

0:38:210:38:23

And also it's got almost like a soapy sort of texture to it.

0:38:230:38:27

-Right.

-And it's meant to look old, but actually it's not terribly old,

0:38:270:38:30

-it's probably maybe 30 or 40 years old.

-Right.

0:38:300:38:32

This one, again it looks like bronze, it's actually brass,

0:38:320:38:36

probably from the very early 20th century,

0:38:360:38:38

probably of French manufacture, on a little marble base.

0:38:380:38:42

And then this one,

0:38:420:38:43

which is my favourite one,

0:38:430:38:45

this one is Austrian coal-painted bronze,

0:38:450:38:48

dating probably from the 1870s, 1880s.

0:38:480:38:52

-Oh, right.

-The big name, of course,

0:38:520:38:54

in Austrian coal-painted bronzes from this period is Franz Bergman,

0:38:540:38:58

but his pieces are always generally signed.

0:38:580:39:00

Sometimes they're actually signed backwards,

0:39:000:39:03

but this has nothing on it,

0:39:030:39:04

so there's no indication of who actually made it.

0:39:040:39:07

You couldn't attribute it to him?

0:39:070:39:08

It's not really attributable to him.

0:39:080:39:10

So, three different prices.

0:39:100:39:12

-Right.

-So, let's start with this one.

0:39:120:39:14

Resin, not terribly old, probably £30 or £40.

0:39:140:39:19

-Right.

-The French brass one, nice enough,

0:39:190:39:22

but maybe sort of £80 to £100 or so, on that one.

0:39:220:39:26

-Right.

-So you know where this is going, don't you?

0:39:260:39:28

This one, completely different kettle of fish, very desirable,

0:39:280:39:32

probably somewhere in the region of £500 to £700.

0:39:320:39:35

Wow! Thank you very much indeed.

0:39:350:39:38

We've all heard of the Royal Yacht Britannia, haven't we?

0:39:410:39:44

But, to be honest with you, this is a different royal yacht

0:39:440:39:46

to the one that we're used to talking about.

0:39:460:39:49

-Yes.

-And this is a royal yacht that was built in 1893

0:39:490:39:53

for the then Prince Albert, who was a bit of a playboy.

0:39:530:39:56

Now, we've got various items on the table here,

0:39:560:39:59

but one thing we've got is a photograph,

0:39:590:40:01

and I want you to tell me what your association is with the yacht,

0:40:010:40:04

and who the people are in this photograph.

0:40:040:40:06

My great-aunt's husband crewed for King George V, who's there.

0:40:060:40:11

That's George V there, yeah.

0:40:110:40:12

And that's my great-aunt's husband.

0:40:120:40:14

-What was his name?

-James Cousins.

0:40:140:40:16

James Cousins. Was he a naval man,

0:40:160:40:19

were they naval men that were employed on the royal yacht?

0:40:190:40:21

Yes, he was in the Royal Navy.

0:40:210:40:22

-Right.

-And just like on the later yacht, Britannia,

0:40:220:40:26

they were chosen from the Royal Navy

0:40:260:40:29

to crew in the races.

0:40:290:40:30

OK, right. Well, this particular royal yacht

0:40:300:40:33

was something pretty special.

0:40:330:40:35

It was what was called a gaff-rigged cutter,

0:40:350:40:38

and we've got a picture of it here on a postcard.

0:40:380:40:41

There's an incredible sail volume there, isn't there?

0:40:410:40:43

-Yes, wonderful.

-Built in 1893 by DW Henderson,

0:40:430:40:48

and, to be honest with you, yacht-racing at this point

0:40:480:40:50

really was the sport of kings, wasn't it?

0:40:500:40:53

-Absolutely.

-Enormously expensive, carried an awful lot of prestige,

0:40:530:40:56

as well, and I think if you were a crew member on that yacht,

0:40:560:41:01

-that must have also carried a great deal of prestige.

-Absolutely.

0:41:010:41:04

Do you know what sort of period he served on the yacht?

0:41:040:41:07

Right through to the 1920s.

0:41:070:41:09

He died in 1933, so...

0:41:090:41:11

Right, well, it was a legendary yacht,

0:41:110:41:14

in that in its first year it made 43 starts and won 33 of those races.

0:41:140:41:20

And we're up against other really, really good yachts.

0:41:200:41:23

I believe that George V

0:41:230:41:25

used to race his cousin, the Kaiser.

0:41:250:41:28

-That's it.

-And there was a great deal of competition involved there,

0:41:280:41:31

and huge amounts of money spent.

0:41:310:41:33

I see we've got some objects here on the trunks,

0:41:330:41:36

and I presume that these are items

0:41:360:41:37

that are actually related to the yacht?

0:41:370:41:39

-Can you tell me about those?

-Yes.

0:41:390:41:41

Well, this beautiful Irish linen damask tablecloth

0:41:410:41:44

came from the yacht,

0:41:440:41:46

and it's woven with all the emblems,

0:41:460:41:48

the anchor, the royal crown,

0:41:480:41:50

the thistle, oak leaves,

0:41:500:41:53

and these are items of cutlery.

0:41:530:41:55

Obviously, I can see the anchor insignia

0:41:550:41:58

on the cutlery there as well.

0:41:580:42:00

As a kind of strange epitaph to this story,

0:42:000:42:03

we've got to talk about actually what happened to the yacht,

0:42:030:42:06

because people are probably wondering what did happen to it.

0:42:060:42:08

-It's very sad.

-You know, where is HMY Britannia?

0:42:080:42:12

The fact is that it's at the bottom of the ocean, isn't it?

0:42:120:42:14

-It is.

-Just off the Isle of Wight.

0:42:140:42:17

-Yes.

-And why is it there?

0:42:170:42:18

It's there because George V decreed, after he died,

0:42:180:42:22

-that he wanted it scuttled.

-Absolutely.

0:42:220:42:25

And isn't that a strange thing?

0:42:250:42:26

-Yeah.

-So I suppose, really,

0:42:260:42:27

we need to talk about the value of some of these objects.

0:42:270:42:30

Quite a difficult one to do, really,

0:42:300:42:32

because there's nothing enormously tangible

0:42:320:42:34

and individually valuable here.

0:42:340:42:36

What am I going to say?

0:42:360:42:37

I suppose, if a little package came up for sale like this,

0:42:370:42:40

with some original photographs,

0:42:400:42:41

some cutlery and this beautiful damask tablecloth,

0:42:410:42:44

I think it would probably make

0:42:440:42:45

around about £300 or £400 at auction,

0:42:450:42:47

but the value to me is very much in that history and in that story.

0:42:470:42:50

Yes. Thank you.

0:42:500:42:52

Wendy, we saw you in Aberglasney,

0:42:570:42:59

and you brought along an armorial plate.

0:42:590:43:01

-I did, yes.

-And John Axford had a look at it.

-Uh-huh.

0:43:010:43:04

It was quite an exciting moment for us at the Roadshow,

0:43:040:43:07

-and for you too, I would imagine.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:43:070:43:09

We finally had to ditch the rain outside

0:43:110:43:13

and come in to this cloister,

0:43:130:43:15

but anyway, what a dish, fantastic.

0:43:150:43:17

I'm glad you like it.

0:43:170:43:19

This was made in China, in a city called Xinxiang.

0:43:190:43:23

There's usually nothing on the back of them.

0:43:230:43:25

It's unmarked, roughly finished,

0:43:250:43:29

which is ever so typical.

0:43:290:43:32

But what's really interesting...

0:43:320:43:33

HE TAPS

0:43:330:43:34

..is all of this. We've got, what have we got there?

0:43:340:43:37

We've got a monogram, and it's FR.

0:43:370:43:40

That's for Fredericus Rex,

0:43:400:43:44

that's Frederick II

0:43:440:43:46

of Prussia.

0:43:460:43:48

-Ah.

-Not many bits of this come onto the market.

0:43:480:43:52

It is fairly unusual, but there was a soup plate

0:43:520:43:55

which sold last year for £31,000.

0:43:550:43:58

-What?

-Good gracious.

0:43:580:44:00

This has got to be, what, £80,000, £100,000?

0:44:000:44:04

-No!

-I don't believe it!

0:44:040:44:06

Are you sure?

0:44:060:44:07

How amazing, my son will be simply thrilled.

0:44:070:44:10

-Have you got any more?

-His children will be...

0:44:110:44:13

No, I haven't got any more,

0:44:130:44:14

and I certainly won't be putting it on that rickety stand any more.

0:44:140:44:18

John Axford valued it at £80,000,

0:44:180:44:20

which was tremendously exciting for us,

0:44:200:44:22

because we had never seen a ceramic item on the Roadshow,

0:44:220:44:25

in what was then 30 years, as valuable as that.

0:44:250:44:28

It had a Prussian connection, didn't it?

0:44:280:44:30

Yep, it was part of the Hohenzollern dinner service,

0:44:300:44:34

and it was made for the King...

0:44:340:44:36

King Frederick of Prussia.

0:44:360:44:38

So we're talking about, what, mid-1700s, I suppose.

0:44:380:44:41

What happened to it afterwards?

0:44:410:44:44

Well, it was sold, not quite for the £80,000,

0:44:440:44:47

but I think it was round about 65,000,

0:44:470:44:49

which was still an amazing price for what is just a dish, basically.

0:44:490:44:53

I mean, a special dish, but...

0:44:530:44:54

A very special dish! And do you know who bought it?

0:44:540:44:58

I don't know exactly who bought it,

0:44:580:44:59

but I know it went to a foreign royal family.

0:44:590:45:01

-Ooh, which one?

-I don't know.

0:45:010:45:03

-It's a mystery.

-Well, one we'd like to solve.

0:45:030:45:06

But thank you for solving part of the mystery,

0:45:060:45:08

at least what happened to the plate and what it eventually sold for.

0:45:080:45:11

-Wendy, thank you so much.

-Thank you very much, Fiona.

0:45:110:45:13

I think it looks like Charles Montagu Doughty.

0:45:170:45:20

-Oh!

-Charles Montagu Doughty was a poet and a traveller

0:45:200:45:24

in the late 19th century.

0:45:240:45:26

-But...the thing about Doughty...

-But!

0:45:260:45:30

..was that he was a very successful man.

0:45:300:45:32

This chap looks as miserable as sin!

0:45:320:45:35

He does, yes!

0:45:350:45:36

I know what you're going to say,

0:45:390:45:41

it actually came from a tobacconist shop, aren't you?

0:45:410:45:43

-Poor chap.

-Have you smelt him?

-No!

0:45:430:45:46

Well, it's such a breezy day, I can't...

0:45:480:45:51

I can't smell anything!

0:45:510:45:52

But he does need touching up very carefully,

0:45:540:45:56

but it's very finely modelled.

0:45:560:45:57

Value. What do you think?

0:46:020:46:04

I haven't the faintest idea.

0:46:040:46:06

Well, if it's Doughty,

0:46:060:46:08

which we doubt,

0:46:080:46:09

I think it's worth a lot of money.

0:46:090:46:12

But if it isn't...

0:46:120:46:14

That's more like it, yes.

0:46:140:46:15

That's more like it! It must be worth at least £500.

0:46:150:46:19

Good gracious! Thank you very much indeed for your pearls of wisdom.

0:46:190:46:22

So, portrait miniatures really are,

0:46:290:46:31

I think, one of the most intimate forms of portrait painting.

0:46:310:46:35

Unlike big oil paintings,

0:46:350:46:37

which were sort of intended for public display,

0:46:370:46:40

or for display in a dining room or on your wall at home,

0:46:400:46:43

miniatures were far more personal, and actually far more intimate.

0:46:430:46:46

Let me just turn over this top one here -

0:46:460:46:48

and look at this, this is intricately wound, plaited hair,

0:46:480:46:52

and this really is what miniatures are about,

0:46:520:46:54

this adds that extra personal dimension to them

0:46:540:46:56

that you just don't have in other forms of painted portraits.

0:46:560:46:59

I mean, these would have been tucked away under a jacket pocket, perhaps,

0:46:590:47:03

or they would have been handled. There was this idea that

0:47:030:47:06

you sort of catch a glimpse of them throughout the day

0:47:060:47:08

as a sort of reminder of your loved one away.

0:47:080:47:10

I mean, they're the precursor

0:47:100:47:12

to the screensaver on your smartphone, really, I think.

0:47:120:47:15

So, who are these people here?

0:47:150:47:17

Who's the chap at the top, for example?

0:47:170:47:19

That's John Adams, in my mother's family.

0:47:190:47:22

There were 19 generations altogether,

0:47:220:47:24

my mother being the 19th down here.

0:47:240:47:26

He's actually about the 13th,

0:47:260:47:28

so they started way back in the 1300s.

0:47:280:47:31

And do you know anything about this man in particular?

0:47:310:47:34

Well, what I can tell you about him is, yeah,

0:47:340:47:36

he lived at a house called Holyland House on the edge of Pembroke

0:47:360:47:40

and, sadly, he was drowned at the age of 29

0:47:400:47:44

off Linney Head.

0:47:440:47:46

Fortunately, he had married, and had a son, another John Adams,

0:47:460:47:50

who kept the line going.

0:47:500:47:53

Well, this is actually by an artist called Philip Jean,

0:47:530:47:56

and Philip Jean was born in Jersey

0:47:560:47:59

and he joined the Navy,

0:47:590:48:01

and he then soon left the Navy,

0:48:010:48:02

and turned to portrait-miniature painting,

0:48:020:48:04

which is a bit of a change in career.

0:48:040:48:07

Now, his work's very, very distinctive,

0:48:070:48:10

and this is a really nice example by him.

0:48:100:48:13

So, what is the relation between these two subjects to the man above?

0:48:130:48:18

I think the answer to that is they would have been in-laws,

0:48:180:48:21

because John Adams' son married Anne Gibbons,

0:48:210:48:25

who was their daughter.

0:48:250:48:27

So, the artist is William Wood,

0:48:270:48:29

and he was a very, very, very well-known,

0:48:290:48:32

celebrated and successful painter.

0:48:320:48:35

For me, these look like typical of his work in the mid to late 1790s,

0:48:350:48:39

when he was at his most confident.

0:48:390:48:41

-Yes.

-This work, I think, slightly earlier.

0:48:410:48:45

The way in which they're painted is actually very different.

0:48:450:48:47

If you look at William Wood, for example,

0:48:470:48:49

his strokes are far broader than Jean,

0:48:490:48:52

who is a much finer painter.

0:48:520:48:55

I mean, with Wood, for example,

0:48:550:48:56

you can sort of almost, up close under magnification,

0:48:560:48:58

looks like an oil painting, with the brisk, thick brushstrokes.

0:48:580:49:02

I mean, he was a very bold painter.

0:49:020:49:04

Now, Philip Jean isn't as quite in-demand as William Wood is.

0:49:040:49:10

This work, I think, if this were to come up at auction,

0:49:100:49:14

you would expect to see it sell for somewhere in the region

0:49:140:49:19

of £2,000 to £3,000.

0:49:190:49:21

The William Wood pair, however, I think are much nicer, and I think,

0:49:210:49:25

if they were to come up, you should expect to see them sell

0:49:250:49:28

for somewhere between £6,000 and £8,000.

0:49:280:49:31

-Thank you.

-Thank you for bringing them in.

0:49:310:49:33

I'm really impressed with your taste.

0:49:360:49:38

You've brought in a couple of really nice things that show a good eye.

0:49:380:49:43

So, where are you finding these bits?

0:49:430:49:46

I've been, kind of been watching you for a number of years,

0:49:460:49:49

I've been inspired, learning and listening to what you've been doing,

0:49:490:49:52

and so I just started going out to a few boot sales

0:49:520:49:55

to see what I could find, and this is the result.

0:49:550:49:58

OK. So what are you looking for, when you go out?

0:49:580:50:01

Where's your track?

0:50:010:50:03

Generally, my passion has been 20th-century glass.

0:50:030:50:06

I love the colours, I love the names,

0:50:060:50:08

Scandinavian, Czechoslovakian.

0:50:080:50:10

OK, so let's examine what you've got.

0:50:100:50:12

Well, what we have here is a very scruffy lamp base.

0:50:120:50:16

This is Italian, it's 1950s,

0:50:160:50:18

it's what's called sommerso technique,

0:50:180:50:21

where the glass-blower picks up successive layers of glass.

0:50:210:50:25

So, what it's done is that you pick up the first gather of glass,

0:50:250:50:29

then you roll it on a table, on a marver, to cool the surface,

0:50:290:50:33

and then you dip it in again, pick up some more.

0:50:330:50:36

And what's interesting in yours

0:50:360:50:38

is how you can see the lines

0:50:380:50:40

of how the successive layers have been picked up.

0:50:400:50:44

You can really see that.

0:50:440:50:45

This weighs a tonne.

0:50:450:50:47

You will know that I love holding stuff - but I try and hold this,

0:50:470:50:50

it's going to bust my arm off!

0:50:500:50:53

The guy who developed this was a guy called Flavio Poli, in Murano,

0:50:530:50:58

Venice, in the late '40s.

0:50:580:51:01

He never signed anything,

0:51:010:51:02

so it's very difficult to attribute to Flavio Poli.

0:51:020:51:06

Now, how much did you pay for this?

0:51:060:51:08

So, that I found locally for £20.

0:51:080:51:10

£20, right, well, it's a bargain.

0:51:100:51:12

First of all, it's a bargain.

0:51:120:51:13

Let's talk about the downside.

0:51:130:51:15

You've got a bit of damage, it's very scruffy.

0:51:150:51:17

Restored, this is worth some money,

0:51:170:51:19

and the way I do it, as a tip to you,

0:51:190:51:21

is I get airgun pellets, which you can drop in, one by one,

0:51:210:51:24

put some washing up liquid in,

0:51:240:51:26

stir it up a bit, and then tip it up and empty it,

0:51:260:51:30

that's just a pro tip for you.

0:51:300:51:31

The other thing that you brought in is these...which...

0:51:310:51:36

Well, it doesn't take a genius to work out who made them,

0:51:360:51:39

who designed them, because the words R Lalique France are on them,

0:51:390:51:45

which suggests that they might well be Rene Lalique designs,

0:51:450:51:48

which they jolly well are.

0:51:480:51:49

1930, 1935, and what they are is menu stands.

0:51:490:51:54

You'll see, there's a cut, down here,

0:51:540:51:57

where you put your place setting or your menu stands.

0:51:570:52:00

-How many of these have you got?

-I've got a set of 12.

-You're paying?

0:52:000:52:03

£15, I paid for them.

0:52:030:52:04

-15 for 12 of these.

-Yeah.

0:52:040:52:07

Well, I reckon that,

0:52:070:52:09

chippy as they are, they are 20 quid.

0:52:090:52:13

So you paid 15. 20 times 12 is 240.

0:52:130:52:16

This is pretty good going.

0:52:160:52:18

This lamp here, Flavio Poli,

0:52:180:52:20

it has a little bit of work to do -

0:52:200:52:23

I would spend 20, 30, 40 quid on having this restored,

0:52:230:52:26

get the scratches out, they're the worst.

0:52:260:52:28

But that, retail, is 400 quid!

0:52:280:52:32

Whoa!

0:52:320:52:33

400 quid! And you, how much did you pay?

0:52:330:52:36

Well, I've learned from the master.

0:52:360:52:38

Hey, put it there, baby, you're doing well!

0:52:380:52:40

That's fantastic, you're doing great.

0:52:400:52:42

Thank you very much indeed.

0:52:420:52:43

What most audiences at the Roadshow don't know

0:52:470:52:49

is that, at the end of the day, you, our steward,

0:52:490:52:52

have been working incredibly hard marshalling the crowds and so on.

0:52:520:52:55

But, at the end of the day when your work's over,

0:52:550:52:57

you can bring stuff to us to value,

0:52:570:52:59

and that's what you've done with these.

0:52:590:53:01

And they look fantastic.

0:53:010:53:02

They're Anglo-Indian, aren't they?

0:53:020:53:04

They are, yes, indeed.

0:53:040:53:06

And they're very early, aren't they?

0:53:060:53:07

Yes, they're about 1780.

0:53:070:53:10

They belong, actually, to my wife's family,

0:53:100:53:13

and one of her ancestors was a Major in the Indian Army,

0:53:130:53:18

and, in Bengal,

0:53:180:53:19

and he was commissioned

0:53:190:53:22

to do a survey of India.

0:53:220:53:25

-A modest job!

-A modest job, absolutely!

0:53:250:53:28

So, anyway, he got going with it and, whilst he was doing it,

0:53:280:53:32

he was doing the ornithological survey of it, as well,

0:53:320:53:35

and he commissioned local artists

0:53:350:53:38

to do these paintings as he was going round.

0:53:380:53:41

As a matter of record?

0:53:410:53:42

-Yes.

-Just to record the species of flora and fauna as they went.

0:53:420:53:45

-Yes, yes.

-Where have they been since they were done in 1780-whatever?

0:53:450:53:49

Well, they've been with the family ever since,

0:53:490:53:51

and they were out in India for about 200 years.

0:53:510:53:54

And then my wife's grandfather came back from India,

0:53:540:53:59

and he came down to this part of the world,

0:53:590:54:01

and he brought the collection with him.

0:54:010:54:03

And there's a very large collection,

0:54:030:54:05

and they were in the attic in his house, down near here.

0:54:050:54:09

-He didn't even hang them?

-No, but they were here in Wales,

0:54:090:54:12

and they weren't really displayed at all.

0:54:120:54:15

And then my mother-in-law, when she was young,

0:54:150:54:19

she discovered them in the attic,

0:54:190:54:21

and so she took some of them out and decorated the Scout hut with them.

0:54:210:54:25

And so it was obviously appreciated by the local...

0:54:250:54:32

-The boys?

-..boys, yes, and she was Akela or something...

0:54:320:54:35

But they survived that ordeal to here.

0:54:350:54:36

Yes, in the Scout hut, which was a wooden hut,

0:54:360:54:39

and then got discovered again, and here they are.

0:54:390:54:42

Well, I think they're the most extraordinary fusion

0:54:420:54:45

of sort of Western ideas of what they wanted,

0:54:450:54:48

and Indian ways of painting.

0:54:480:54:50

I mean, this, I suppose it's either a heron or a stork,

0:54:500:54:53

I'm not really an aficionado,

0:54:530:54:56

but the detail on it is quite astonishing.

0:54:560:55:00

Of course, in the West, we want to have volume, and perspective,

0:55:000:55:03

and all these new-fangled ideas about art,

0:55:030:55:05

but the Indians want to flatten it in that ancient Mughal way,

0:55:050:55:09

and so they're really quite silhouetted,

0:55:090:55:11

and it's the same with these wonderful plants,

0:55:110:55:14

done in a very restricted colourway.

0:55:140:55:16

But, when you look really carefully,

0:55:160:55:19

you can see that whoever this artist was, and they're often anonymous,

0:55:190:55:22

you can feel confident that he's got everything, you know,

0:55:220:55:26

that he's recorded them perfectly, in an almost scientific way.

0:55:260:55:29

And then when you come to this extraordinary bird,

0:55:300:55:32

with its feathers individually painted with the finest of brushes,

0:55:320:55:37

and the most extraordinary detail

0:55:370:55:40

of colour and variation of tone,

0:55:400:55:43

I think that's an astonishing achievement, I really do.

0:55:430:55:45

They're wonderful things.

0:55:450:55:47

Ah, now, they've been sort of languishing

0:55:470:55:50

in attics and Scout huts and things,

0:55:500:55:53

and we've got to value them.

0:55:530:55:55

-Yes.

-I think that India,

0:55:550:55:57

which, of course, is going through its own renaissance at the moment,

0:55:570:56:00

you might say, discovering its own culture,

0:56:000:56:04

there are quite a lot of Indian collectors who are very interested

0:56:040:56:06

in the synthesis between British ideas

0:56:060:56:09

and Indian ways of painting, and culture, generally.

0:56:090:56:13

And these, I think, represent that synthesis

0:56:130:56:17

in the purest form.

0:56:170:56:19

So, I think that these, they work wonderfully as three,

0:56:190:56:23

but they might be sold separately, £8,000 to £12,000 each.

0:56:230:56:27

-What?!

-£8,000 and £12,000, each of them.

0:56:270:56:29

-Each?!

-It's worth that, yes, absolutely.

0:56:290:56:31

Yep. They are astonishingly beautiful.

0:56:310:56:34

I think anybody would see that.

0:56:350:56:37

Right, right, yes, right.

0:56:370:56:40

-Right.

-The bird is fantastic!

0:56:400:56:42

I mean, admittedly, there's a bit of a sort of condition issue,

0:56:420:56:45

but it's not serious.

0:56:450:56:46

The colours are as good as the day it was painted.

0:56:460:56:49

It's astonishingly beautiful.

0:56:490:56:51

I think that's worth between £15,000 and £18,000.

0:56:510:56:55

Oh, Lord, we've got more of them at home!

0:56:560:56:59

LAUGHTER

0:56:590:57:00

Oh, I wish you'd brought them!

0:57:000:57:02

Oh, Rupert, thank you very much indeed!

0:57:020:57:06

That is absolutely...

0:57:060:57:08

No, that is astonishing.

0:57:080:57:10

Our lovely steward, who had been working hard for us all day,

0:57:150:57:18

and what a great way for him to end it.

0:57:180:57:20

And I think that collection will be coming out of the attic pretty soon.

0:57:200:57:24

Now, all our venues for our next series, our 40th anniversary series,

0:57:240:57:28

are on our website, so have a look,

0:57:280:57:29

see if you can join us for our ruby anniversary.

0:57:290:57:33

From Pembroke Castle, and the whole Antiques Roadshow team, bye-bye.

0:57:330:57:36

A return visit for Fiona Bruce and the experts to the beautiful setting of Pembroke Castle in West Wales. Objects featured include a beguilingly rare sapphire ring that changes colour in different light, Pope Pius XII's papal hat, and a collection of remarkable Anglo-Indian paintings from 1780 which were once used to decorate a village scout hut.