Audley End 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Audley End 1

Fiona Bruce and the team visit Audley End near Saffron Walden in Essex. One of the items uncovered is the sword that ended the War of Independence in America.


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Our venue today has had a varied past.

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There was an Abbey here in the 12th century,

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and then by the early 1600s,

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it had been transformed into one of the finest Jacobean houses

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in the land.

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But then, as successive generations ran out of money,

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it was gradually made three times smaller.

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But, still, today it is magnificent.

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Classically elegant on the outside,

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and a hotchpotch of styles on the inside.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from Audley End,

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near Saffron Walden in Essex.

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As country houses up and down the land were updated over the years,

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particular rooms with particular functions were lost forever.

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But here at Audley End, there's a very rare survivor.

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It's a great big coal store up on the top floor,

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quite possibly unique for a stately abode like this.

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It was used by staff to provide coal for the fireplaces in the bedrooms,

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which were mostly on this floor,

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and to provide heat for their hip baths and foot baths.

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And the coal was brought up by the bucket-load through the window.

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Now, that's some kind of carbon footprint.

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Some of the staff started work at four in the morning

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to get the fires going.

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They were long, hard days.

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The Neville family, who owned Audley End, had up to 30 staff.

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Here in the kitchen, the cook, Avis Croakham,

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along with the kitchen maids, would prepare the meal.

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The scullery maids washed the vegetables and plucked the birds,

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the dairy maids had the task of churning the butter.

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The laundry maids would clean and iron the clothes.

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And they would do this for hours.

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Phew!

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In the 1760s and '70s,

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the ground staff were kept hard at work by famed landscaper

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Capability Brown, as they reshaped the Audley estate

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according to his plans.

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But he was never allowed to finish the job, because,

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according to the marvellously-named Sir John Griffin Griffin,

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who commissioned Capability Brown,

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the bend in the river went the wrong way.

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The dispute over money went on for years,

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and the bend in the river...

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stayed the same.

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English Heritage now own and care for

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this well-shaped landscape and house.

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They've kindly invited the Antiques Roadshow onto their lawns,

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where we find our specialists hard at work.

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When you first saw this elephant here, what did you think?

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I've always loved this elephant.

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When I was a very small girl,

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we would go and have lunch with my great-grandparents,

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and if we behaved very well at lunch,

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then we were allowed to go upstairs and see the elephant. Yes.

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And it was given to my great-great-grandfather

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as a child, as a Christmas present full of chocolates.

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Ah! Well, let's have a look at him.

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Because, he's enormous. I thought,

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"Goodness, how did you bring that in? He must be so heavy!"

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But he's not.

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He's papier-mache.

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And he has...

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It's not elephant skin,

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but it's, you know, it's calf suede.

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And you couldn't sit on him as a child. Well, I hope you didn't!

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No, we were never allowed to sit on him.

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The good news is that his tusks are not ivory... No.

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..they're porcelain. You mentioned the chocolates, so...

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a hell of a lot of chocolates can go in there.

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Well, it's actually quite a small, little...

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It's just a small part of it. Yes.

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I think he's somewhere around 1890.

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I don't think he's as early as maybe your great-great-grandfather,

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but he's just heaven,

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and I would imagine he was made in Germany and exported, because...

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he has a voice.

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Shall I pull it? Yes, you can pull it.

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HIGH-PITCHED GROANING

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LAUGHTER

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That does sound like an elephant!

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That's interesting you see because when we were allowed to pull it,

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we were told to be very careful, so it sounds like this...

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It sounds like a sheep!

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It sounds like a sheep. DEEP GROANING

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LAUGHTER

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You're the first person who's pulled it strongly

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and then, I agree, it sounds like an elephant.

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Can I do it again? Yes, you can do it again! Thank you.

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HIGH-PITCHED GROANING

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LAUGHTER

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He is wonderful.

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Unfortunately, my great-grandparents' family

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lent it to some other children, another family, for a few years...

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Oh, no. ..and they broke its trunk,

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cos its trunk used to come up at the same time when you pulled the...

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Oh, I see, that would've been so realistic! So exciting.

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Oh, I'm sure that can be rectified.

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I'm sure of it.

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But he's very old and he's very wise,

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and he's still screaming, which is amazing,

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cos usually they lose their voice. Yeah.

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In that condition,

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I think we've got to be talking about around ?1,500 to ?2,000.

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Well, we'd never sell him.

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At least now we know he doesn't sound like a sheep!

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HIGH-PITCHED GROANING

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GENTLE LAUGHTER

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You can't get more eccentrically British

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than what's known as a Fair Hebe Jug.

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There's so much going on, isn't there?

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There is. You've got, on one side there's the young lad,

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and he's happily having, enjoying a drink,

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inscribed there, "a bumper, a bumper."

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That's a happy toast, he's merrily getting drunk.

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And then on the back we've got his lass and his love,

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though she seems more interested in somebody else.

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And there's her name, Fair Hebe.

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Do you know the story, or anything about the history?

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I don't know anything about Fair Hebe, no.

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It comes from a song that was popular back in the 1700s,

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and I think it was something that you would drink in pubs and taverns

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to the tale of the rivalry between the different characters,

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but mainly it's about getting drunk and enjoying the drink

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that came out of the jug.

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Is there... Have you found a signature on it?

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I did, I took it down off the shelf yesterday,

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and I thought I'd better clean it a bit cos it was dusty,

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and it says...

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"I Voyez."

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Yes, "Voyez",

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and it's actually dated 1788.

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I didn't even see the date.

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1788?

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Hard to see, but that takes it back a nice long time, doesn't it?

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That's Jean Voyez.

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Josiah Wedgwood discovered him in London

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and brought him to Staffordshire

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to make models for the Wedgwood factory.

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But Voyez repaid Wedgwood's friendship

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in a rather disastrous way -

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he stole moulds and clay from Wedgwood

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and ended up sentenced to seven years in prison.

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And it was probably in prison when he modelled this jug!

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So it makes it even more interesting.

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We don't see Voyez's name on many of his pieces.

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Mostly, he signed them with Wedgwood's name

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and tried to pass them off. He was a faker, really. Really?

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So Jean Voyez's masterpiece, the wonderful running glazes,

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this is an early Staffordshire pottery through and through.

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This was my mother's, which is why I brought it.

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Before that, it was my great-auntie, Sarah.

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Now, they were from the Midlands, does that tie in with Staffordshire?

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Well, absolutely.

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The Potteries around Stoke is where so much pottery was made,

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that's where this jug was made.

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And, so, Auntie Sarah's jug never travelled terribly far in its life.

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There's a few little cracks there,

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we've got a little bit of damage on the spout there,

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but I think we can forgive it that, don't you?

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Oh, yes. I forgive it everything!

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Because of that... It's probably worth, as a handsome jug,

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oh, ?1,000.

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MURMURING IN BACKGROUND

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I had a vague idea it might be like that, yes.

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Thank you very much.

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A piece of furniture like this

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is stretching my expertise to the very limit.

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It's one of the wonderful things about the Antiques Roadshow,

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you see more and more difficult pieces.

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This is a very early piece of furniture, potentially,

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and it really makes me have to think very hard.

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So, you help me -

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what can you tell me about it, where did you get it from?

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Right, it was actually a very special birthday present

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for a very special birthday last year.

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It was given to me by my husband to make it less painful, basically.

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He knows that I'm very passionate about early English history,

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and last year, when he asked me,

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"Where do you want to go for your birthday?"

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I turned down Paris, Brussels,

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I said I wanted to go to Leicestershire.

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Leicestershire. Leicestershire, yes, the Battle of Bosworth,

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because it happened to have been on the day of my birthday,

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and therefore there was no better place than the Battle of Bosworth.

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So, the Battle of Bosworth, 1485?

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August the 22nd, 1485.

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And I'm hoping that you will be able to confirm

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that there is a possibility

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that this piece was made around that time.

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Well, pieces like this fall into two, or possibly three categories.

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Right. One, that it's totally original... Yeah.

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..two, that it's a fake, a made-up fake... Yeah.

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..three, that it's a 19th century revered copy.

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I look at things like this,

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this sort of almost looks like artificial distressing, and I think,

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"Surely this can't be a period piece?"

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I then had a peep earlier at the inside of the door.

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That's wonderful, it's a typical early frame saw,

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when they stood in a pit and had a big, wobbly saw...

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To tighten up the blade, a string would tighten up the blade,

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you'd cut like that,

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and if you were underneath you'd get all the sawdust on you.

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That is how this sort of piece of furniture would be made,

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that's a very good sign. And these wonderful...

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We've all seen this before, every cathedral,

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Reims Cathedral, any big cathedral you go to,

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you've got this wonderful ogee trellis here with this carving.

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This is delightful carving.

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It's really inspired,

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hand-carved by an artist who knew and loved his work.

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The hinges on the locks to me are all very, very good signs.

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Mm.

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So, you know, looking at it...

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..I'm perfectly happy about it.

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Let's just for a minute think, do you know what it was used for?

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Right, um...

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I'm not quite sure whether you would call it a dressoir,

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or possibly ambry, one of the questions I actually have for you.

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Well, it's French, and it would be a dressoir. Right.

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The wonderful thing about these, the original ones... Yeah.

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..are made to go in the main room of a house.

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Yeah. And dressoir means you would dress it.

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You would probably have white linen,

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you would have pewter on top and below,

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or silver, or something of this quality,

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probably even gold plate,

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cos that was your duty as a host,

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to bring people into the house to show them how wealthy you were.

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Yeah. You didn't hide it, you showed your status,

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so you'd dress your dressoir. Yeah.

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So that's the correct word.

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So you asked me if it was

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the same date as the Battle of Bosworth, 1485.

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It's around that date.

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Nobody can be that accurate but certainly within 50 years, yes,

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if it's what I think it really is.

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Brilliant.

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If we can prove my theory and it is right, a period piece,

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insure it for...

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?30,000? OK.

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And hopefully it's going to be the one and only object

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in our family that's worthy of being passed on

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generation after generation, and possibly another 500 years.

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SHE LAUGHS Thank you. Thank you very much.

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I've had quite a few deja vu moments here at the Antiques Roadshow.

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When you got that out,

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I was having yet another one,

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because things like this, back in the 1970s, were my stock in trade.

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Is it something that you or your family use?

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It's not, I don't really know too much about it.

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My father worked in the casino business

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in the late '60s and early '70s.

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I can only surmise that he acquired it.

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About three or four years ago,

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I had a friend who worked in Hatton Garden,

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and I took some old jewellery up to scrap it,

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and Dad gave me this and said,

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"Can you take this up and scrap it?" No!

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It was on the scales...

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No! ..and I couldn't bring myself to do it.

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Thank God for that. Well, obviously, it's here.

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I can't believe... I came back and I said to Dad,

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"Look, it's a beautiful thing, I can't do it."

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He obviously wanted the money, so we came to an arrangement.

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I gave him the scrap value of it...

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And how much was that?

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I gave him ?2,500 for it. That's quite a lot. Yeah, but...

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You rescued it, in other words. Yeah.

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Well, obviously, you know what it is, it's a Dunhill.

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I believe so. Nine carat gold... Yeah. ..cigarette lighter.

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Can I open it? Of course, yeah.

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Which way does it open? Ah, there. There's a cigarette lighter,

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And here is a compact, with a lipstick in there,

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and the lipstick goes in there... That's got a mirror...

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..and the powder goes there and the mirror's there.

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But the best part about it is,

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we press the side piece here and the watch shoots out.

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This was called a vanity compendium.

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I looked at the hallmark... Right. ..and this is 1933.

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One in 1932... Right.

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..won the gold prize at Goldsmiths Hall,

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and it was said to be an ingenious assemblage of engineering,

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which you can see it is.

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It's so fine, it's finely reeded.

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And here, at this end,

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there's a little thumb piece where you put your fingernail,

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and lift the flap, and pull it, and you've got a gold pencil.

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I mean, that is extraordinary.

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The downside is smoke has become less popular.

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Yeah. The upside is, compacts are very collectable,

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and the other upside is that Dunhill is very collectable.

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So, they're made in Switzerland.

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Right. I mean, obviously the watch is a Swiss watch.

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But in the '70s, I used to sell one like this for about ?900. Right.

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But you paid 2,000, didn't you? 2,500. 2,500.

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Well...

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..now, that 2,500,

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I don't know if you'll get your money back, and probably...

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triple it, actually... Right. ..and it's between 7,500 to 10,000.

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It may be even as much as ?12,000 for this.

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So you were right to rescue it.

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Now that you know it's worth about three times

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the price that you paid to rescue it,

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what do you think you're going to do with it?

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Keep it. My father died a couple of months ago.

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I'm sorry. So, every time I get it out and look at it,

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it's a reminder of my dad. So...

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I'd do just the same, I think.

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Yeah. No, I won't be selling it.

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So, this fabulous poster of "Bostock and Wombwell's

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"World Renowned Menagerie, the oldest,

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"largest and best travelling exhibition ever organised."

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What's your connection with it?

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My connection is that George Wombwell

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was my great-great-great uncle.

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He started it because he loved animals,

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and he happened to go into the London docks one day

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and he saw a pair of boa constrictors, which he bought,

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and that was the start of it.

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So, this was established in 1805, this particular zoo,

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and of course continued throughout the 19th century...

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About 120 years.

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And what I think we've got to realise and remember,

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most people didn't leave the village or town they were born in

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and suddenly this menagerie would arrive with zebras and elephants,

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never seen before.

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So I think we've got to remember how exciting... Oh, yes.

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..that was for people in the 19th century. Yes.

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They were commanded to go to Windsor Castle

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on several occasions by Queen Victoria,

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and she wrote about them in her diaries.

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Again, because it was such a fascinating thing.

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And you've got Staffordshire figures,

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with lions and tigers and elephants.

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I mean, incredibly exotic. Mm.

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You've got this little book here of all the money they took,

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Banbury were very interested, cos they've paid ?44,

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they took ?44 at Banbury.

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But all these other, Broadway, they travelled all over the countryside.

0:17:340:17:38

Yes. And all over the world.

0:17:380:17:40

New Zealand, Australia, India...

0:17:400:17:43

Incredible. ..China and Japan.

0:17:430:17:45

Absolutely amazing.

0:17:450:17:47

And this is, who's this gentleman here?

0:17:470:17:49

This is James Bostock, this is my great-grandfather,

0:17:490:17:52

Edward Henry Bostock's father.

0:17:520:17:54

So, a fascinating piece of history.

0:17:540:17:57

I remember growing up in the Scottish Borders,

0:17:570:17:59

being excited when the circus came, or when the fair came once a year.

0:17:590:18:04

But take me, you know, back to the 19th century,

0:18:040:18:07

it was even more exciting. Mm.

0:18:070:18:08

And obviously, if we're looking at valuation,

0:18:080:18:12

it's not going to be terribly high, so we're talking a few hundred,

0:18:120:18:16

but it's the personal connection... It's the connection.

0:18:160:18:19

..that's so important. Yes, it is.

0:18:190:18:20

Thank you.

0:18:200:18:22

UPBEAT MUSIC

0:18:220:18:25

Hello. Hi there, what have you got in this briefcase?

0:18:420:18:44

Important papers? Well...

0:18:440:18:47

you might be surprised.

0:18:470:18:49

THEY LAUGH

0:18:510:18:53

Are these...? Are these...?

0:18:530:18:55

They are what you think they are, yes.

0:18:550:18:56

..toilet chain pulls? That's correct, yes.

0:18:560:18:58

Um, why?

0:18:580:19:01

Well, I used to watch this show back in the '80s.

0:19:010:19:03

I felt I needed to collect something,

0:19:030:19:05

and it needed to be something I could afford,

0:19:050:19:07

it needed to be something small,

0:19:070:19:09

and I found that one...

0:19:090:19:12

in Brighton, and I understand it to be Royal Doulton.

0:19:120:19:15

So how many have you got of these things?

0:19:150:19:17

About 200.

0:19:170:19:18

LAUGHTER

0:19:180:19:20

So it must mean you're FLUSH, then?

0:19:220:19:24

Oh, very good! Never heard that one before(!)

0:19:240:19:26

HE LAUGHS

0:19:260:19:28

Now, I think everybody would know we're looking at a smoker's cabinet,

0:19:360:19:39

a very common piece of furniture in the Victorian and Edwardian periods.

0:19:390:19:44

It's quite pretty, but I have to say to you,

0:19:440:19:46

it's not very special, is it?

0:19:460:19:48

Well, it's not really special until you come up to this part here...

0:19:480:19:51

Right. ..where it's been presented to Dr Hugh Ferguson Watson,

0:19:510:19:55

who was the first doctor to force-feed the suffragettes

0:19:550:19:59

in Perth Prison.

0:19:590:20:00

Now, the suffragette movement was very powerful in Scotland.

0:20:000:20:04

I think the focus is always on London and the South, as usual.

0:20:040:20:08

What did Scottish suffragettes do?

0:20:080:20:10

Well, they did all the usual things -

0:20:100:20:12

they broke windows, they demonstrated,

0:20:120:20:15

there was a huge march in Edinburgh in 1909,

0:20:150:20:18

and of course force-feeding, which becomes a major issue, not so early,

0:20:180:20:23

normally from 1911, 1912 onwards, was important in Scotland.

0:20:230:20:28

And obviously, this chap, Hugh Ferguson Watson,

0:20:280:20:31

was the doctor that did it.

0:20:310:20:33

Do you know anything about him?

0:20:330:20:35

Only what I read or found out about him.

0:20:350:20:38

He was the doctor of Perth Prison, he was the doctor of Perth Hospital,

0:20:380:20:43

and he was the first one that actually started force-feeding

0:20:430:20:46

the four suffragettes that were there at the time.

0:20:460:20:49

I think we have to think briefly about that.

0:20:490:20:51

I mean, it was a very intrusive, aggressive process,

0:20:510:20:55

humiliating, dangerous and utterly unpleasant.

0:20:550:20:59

It was done, as it sounds, force-feeding,

0:20:590:21:02

often the tubes went into your lung rather than your stomach,

0:21:020:21:05

it gave you pneumonia,

0:21:050:21:07

it gave you permanent physical and psychological damage,

0:21:070:21:10

and it was administered by doctors.

0:21:100:21:12

And you think, "Well, hang on a minute, doctors are supposed to...

0:21:120:21:15

"cure, not maim."

0:21:150:21:17

And this was the big debate at the time.

0:21:170:21:20

So I think this is a classic case,

0:21:200:21:22

where an interesting but frankly fairly ordinary object,

0:21:220:21:25

reveals a really, really sort of dark piece of our history,

0:21:250:21:29

which we must not forget.

0:21:290:21:31

This was a great fight for freedom.

0:21:310:21:33

Women did not get the full voting rights

0:21:330:21:36

that you and I have until 1928.

0:21:360:21:38

It was a long, long battle.

0:21:380:21:40

What's it worth as a cabinet?

0:21:400:21:42

?40 or ?50. Yeah. But that's not it.

0:21:430:21:45

That makes it a really important piece of social history.

0:21:450:21:48

That's what it is, the history of it, I think it's brilliant.

0:21:480:21:51

Yes. Just to find that out about it.

0:21:510:21:53

Well, you did very well rescuing it.

0:21:530:21:55

Thank you very much. Thank you. Pleasure, thank you.

0:21:550:21:58

Well, here's how they landed the catch in the early 19th century -

0:22:010:22:05

you wait for the tide to go down, and you beach your fishing boat,

0:22:050:22:09

and then the family of the fishermen come and take the fish off the boat.

0:22:090:22:13

It's an extraordinary capture of early 19th-century life, isn't it?

0:22:130:22:17

Absolutely. And it's by Edward William Cooke.

0:22:170:22:20

Yes. Signed and dated 1839.

0:22:200:22:22

Yes. And why are you interested in Cooke, if you are?

0:22:220:22:26

Well, he's my great-great-grandfather,

0:22:260:22:29

and we've always had a great interest,

0:22:290:22:33

although he's not a very famous painter.

0:22:330:22:36

Well, he is in my world.

0:22:360:22:37

In his day,

0:22:370:22:38

he was one of the most successful British landscape painters,

0:22:380:22:41

well, marine painters, really,

0:22:410:22:43

and you've got to remember, of course,

0:22:430:22:44

that, in those days, Britain was very much king of the seas.

0:22:440:22:47

Yes. And we relied on the sea for everything, commerce, militarily,

0:22:470:22:52

diplomatically, in every way we were masters of the sea,

0:22:520:22:56

and people would've understood sea pictures in the Royal Academy

0:22:560:22:59

in those days in a way that they don't now.

0:22:590:23:02

It's quite fun to deconstruct one now, isn't it,

0:23:020:23:04

and look at it with older eyes?

0:23:040:23:07

Yes. The wide variety,

0:23:070:23:09

and the sheer size of the fish that they've caught,

0:23:090:23:11

and landed it straight on the shore

0:23:110:23:13

and shipped it straight to Billingsgate to be sold fresh.

0:23:130:23:15

It's a very different food chain, isn't it, looking back? Absolutely.

0:23:150:23:19

And much more real, somehow. Yes, healthy. Mm.

0:23:190:23:22

I rather like the boy. He's probably the skipper's son, isn't he?

0:23:220:23:25

Cos the clothes look too big for him.

0:23:250:23:27

Now, usually, with EW Cooke,

0:23:270:23:31

you can tell exactly the topography,

0:23:310:23:34

and if I knew the south coast better,

0:23:340:23:36

then I'd be able to say exactly where it was, but I don't.

0:23:360:23:38

I know that he liked to go to the Isle of Wight a lot... Yes.

0:23:380:23:41

..and it could be there.

0:23:410:23:42

So, it's obviously oil on canvas,

0:23:420:23:45

it's really got everything you should want, except that,

0:23:450:23:49

if you don't mind me saying,

0:23:490:23:50

it has been quite heavily cleaned... Yes.

0:23:500:23:52

..and it's lost some of the glazes in the rocks

0:23:520:23:56

and the sky has gone down a bit as a result.

0:23:560:23:58

His skies are so luminous.

0:23:580:24:00

You can just see that this one is too,

0:24:000:24:02

but less so perhaps than one in very fresh condition. Mm.

0:24:020:24:05

Um, you know, there was a time not so long ago

0:24:050:24:09

when this picture would've been worth about ?20,000. Yes.

0:24:090:24:13

Now, I fear that the market may have slipped a little since then,

0:24:130:24:16

I'm afraid. Yep.

0:24:160:24:18

And, actually, I want to leave it at 20,

0:24:180:24:21

but I worry that we wouldn't quite get there these days.

0:24:210:24:24

Yeah. But it's still a wonderful picture.

0:24:240:24:27

Thank you very much.

0:24:270:24:28

So, most people come along to the Antiques Roadshow,

0:24:320:24:35

on the ceramics tables,

0:24:350:24:36

and they bring cups and saucers and plates and vases

0:24:360:24:40

and figurines of shepherdesses,

0:24:400:24:42

but you...

0:24:420:24:44

you come along with Nelson's Column,

0:24:440:24:46

which is quite incredible!

0:24:460:24:48

Now, the first thing that strikes me

0:24:480:24:50

is where do you keep such an extraordinary object?

0:24:500:24:54

Well, it is a bit of a problem,

0:24:540:24:55

but at the moment,

0:24:550:24:56

Nelson is in our spare bedroom, on the side, in the corner...

0:24:560:24:59

So, this all comes apart, doesn't it? It all comes apart

0:24:590:25:02

and the four lions are on the piano.

0:25:020:25:04

It's very funny, isn't it? Well, in actual fact,

0:25:040:25:07

I think this was designed as a table centrepiece.

0:25:070:25:11

And you can imagine,

0:25:110:25:12

you'd need quite a grand dining table to accommodate such a thing.

0:25:120:25:16

And here we are, standing in front of Audley End House,

0:25:160:25:19

behind us, just there, and it's just the kind of grand residence

0:25:190:25:22

that something of this nature perhaps would have been made for.

0:25:220:25:25

So, what do you know about where it's from or what it's made from?

0:25:250:25:29

Well, I know it belonged to my father and his first wife.

0:25:300:25:35

And then he married my mother

0:25:350:25:38

and I think she rather tolerated it, a black...

0:25:380:25:41

It used to be in her small sitting room, on a table in the corner.

0:25:410:25:45

And I think she tried to brighten it up a little bit

0:25:450:25:48

cos you can see the watermarks in there,

0:25:480:25:50

and she would put some flowers in there occasionally,

0:25:500:25:52

if we had visitors, to try and make it a bit more attractive.

0:25:520:25:56

But, yeah... Well, it's actually made from

0:25:560:26:00

a kind of stoneware called Black Basalt.

0:26:000:26:02

And Black Basalt is most associated with Wedgwood.

0:26:020:26:06

And indeed, when we pick up this lion here,

0:26:060:26:09

cos the lions are all loose, we can see...

0:26:090:26:11

..that there's an impressed Wedgwood mark.

0:26:130:26:16

These are extraordinarily rare

0:26:160:26:18

and, you know, in 30 years of looking at pottery and porcelain,

0:26:180:26:22

I've never seen this. Oh, right.

0:26:220:26:25

There is one in the National Maritime Museum,

0:26:250:26:28

made in 1917,

0:26:280:26:30

but apart from that, I know of no other.

0:26:300:26:33

What is so interesting about it is the quality of the moulding.

0:26:330:26:37

You can just see here, these delicate little acanthus leaves,

0:26:370:26:40

and the real care in which

0:26:400:26:42

the flutes of the column have been created.

0:26:420:26:45

So, it's a luxury, grand object...

0:26:450:26:48

..and probably, therefore, its life in a back bedroom and on a piano

0:26:500:26:54

is not what it was intended for,

0:26:540:26:56

but it doesn't matter.

0:26:560:26:57

So, there must be a lot of collectors out there

0:26:570:27:01

who would really love this.

0:27:010:27:04

So, based on what they pay for things of equal rarity,

0:27:040:27:08

I'm going to put a figure of ?3,000 to ?5,000 on it.

0:27:080:27:12

Wow! That's fantastic!

0:27:120:27:14

It's time for our regular guessing game,

0:27:290:27:31

set by our experts, The Enigma.

0:27:310:27:33

And this week's Enigma comes here from Audley End,

0:27:330:27:36

this beautiful silver object,

0:27:360:27:37

brought along by our silver specialist, Alastair Dickenson.

0:27:370:27:40

This looks fiendishly difficult, Alastair.

0:27:400:27:42

I haven't got a clue what that is and I know you've got three options.

0:27:420:27:45

Certainly have. So, what are they?

0:27:450:27:47

Well, the first possibility is that this is a stone holder.

0:27:470:27:52

Why would anyone want a stone holder?

0:27:520:27:54

Ah, well, it's not just any stone holder.

0:27:540:27:57

We're not talking a pebble from a beach, here? We're not.

0:27:570:27:59

Right, OK. We're talking of something more like a gall stone.

0:27:590:28:02

Yuck! Like a fatty concretion from the gut of an animal,

0:28:020:28:07

specifically from the goat.

0:28:070:28:10

And it's called a bezoar stone holder.

0:28:100:28:13

And the word "bezoar" is Persian

0:28:130:28:16

and it means antidote or cure.

0:28:160:28:20

And the bezoar was meant to guard or cure poison.

0:28:200:28:25

They were highly prized,

0:28:250:28:27

and they made these lovely containers to put the bezoar in.

0:28:270:28:32

When abouts are we talking? We're talking of the late 17th century.

0:28:320:28:36

They must have been massive, for the goat,

0:28:360:28:39

if they went into something that size, is what occurs to me.

0:28:390:28:42

Well, I've not been on the inside of a goat recently,

0:28:420:28:45

so I can't tell you what the average size...

0:28:450:28:47

It must have made that goat's eyes water!

0:28:470:28:50

So, that's one option.

0:28:500:28:52

I have heard of bezoar, so it's not quite as preposterous as it seems.

0:28:520:28:56

So, what else?

0:28:560:28:57

The second possibility is that this is a miniature globe holder.

0:28:570:29:01

In the 19th century,

0:29:010:29:03

when explorers were going all around Africa

0:29:030:29:06

and other different parts of the world,

0:29:060:29:08

the normal case for a globe would be made of chagrin or leather.

0:29:080:29:14

Of course, they all fell apart in the tropics.

0:29:140:29:17

So they made, initially, metal cases

0:29:170:29:19

for these smaller, more portable globes.

0:29:190:29:22

And special silver ones, like this, were made

0:29:230:29:26

as gifts to visiting emissaries and dignitaries.

0:29:260:29:30

We've had some beautiful miniature globes on the Roadshow in the past.

0:29:300:29:35

I've never seen one in a case or ever heard anyone mentioning a case,

0:29:350:29:39

I have to admit. They... As I say,

0:29:390:29:41

they were usually given to foreign dignitaries.

0:29:410:29:44

Well, that's handy, isn't it? That's why we haven't seen one! Exactly.

0:29:440:29:47

If this is a tall tale,

0:29:470:29:49

you're going into an extraordinary amount of detail,

0:29:490:29:51

which makes me think maybe it has the ring of truth about it.

0:29:510:29:54

What's your third option?

0:29:540:29:57

The third option is that this is

0:29:570:30:00

an 18th-century story sphere.

0:30:000:30:03

And what is that?

0:30:030:30:04

Well, story spheres originated in south-west France,

0:30:040:30:08

way back in the 14th century.

0:30:080:30:10

And the first ones were wooden

0:30:100:30:14

and carved, on the outside, with folklore and fables and tales

0:30:140:30:19

about things that they loved talking about.

0:30:190:30:22

And you may wonder why...

0:30:220:30:25

..Christmas trees have balls hanging from them.

0:30:260:30:29

Or baubles, as I prefer to call them! All right,

0:30:290:30:31

but they originate from the story sphere.

0:30:310:30:33

Crikey!

0:30:360:30:37

What do you think?

0:30:390:30:41

Very confusing.

0:30:410:30:42

Yes! LAUGHTER

0:30:420:30:44

I'm quite confused, I must say.

0:30:440:30:46

So, what have we got? The innards of a goat...

0:30:460:30:49

What was the second one?!

0:30:490:30:51

LAUGHING: Miniature globes. The miniature globes.

0:30:510:30:55

Or the bauble on a Christmas tree.

0:30:550:30:59

So, what do we think? Any ideas?

0:30:590:31:00

Goat, has to be... Where's the globe?

0:31:000:31:02

And if the globe's not there any more...

0:31:020:31:04

Where is the globe, if it's a globe case?!

0:31:040:31:06

That's a very good point!

0:31:060:31:08

Actually, for that reason alone - thank you, madam - I am going for...

0:31:080:31:11

I think let's go for the goat, the bezoar holder.

0:31:110:31:15

You sure? LAUGHTER

0:31:150:31:16

No, but that's what we're going for!

0:31:160:31:20

Well, I hate to tell you, Fiona...

0:31:200:31:22

you're right!

0:31:220:31:24

Yes! CHEERING AND LAUGHTER

0:31:240:31:27

Well done, that lady who told me about that!

0:31:270:31:31

Right.

0:31:310:31:32

The bezoar was a massively valuable thing.

0:31:320:31:36

In the Renaissance period,

0:31:360:31:39

a bezoar was worth ten times the value of gold.

0:31:390:31:43

Wow!

0:31:430:31:45

They were phenomenally expensive and valuable,

0:31:450:31:49

and that's why you had these wonderful cases.

0:31:490:31:53

Alastair, thank you for setting us this week's Enigma

0:31:530:31:55

and telling us some preposterously tall tales about it.

0:31:550:31:59

Story of my life!

0:31:590:32:00

So, do you remember these from your childhood?

0:32:050:32:07

No, not from when I was very young.

0:32:070:32:09

We weren't allowed to sort of play with anything like this,

0:32:090:32:12

it was sort of kept away from us.

0:32:120:32:13

I was a bit destructive as a child.

0:32:130:32:15

Well, you know, you and me both, really.

0:32:150:32:18

But clearly it was a good thing they were kept away from you

0:32:180:32:21

if you were destructive,

0:32:210:32:22

because what we've got here are two absolutely lovely

0:32:220:32:25

second-half-of-the-19th-century children's books.

0:32:250:32:28

Dean's New Magic Peep Show Picture Book.

0:32:280:32:31

It's not a sort of peepshow like the end of the pier,

0:32:310:32:34

with what-the-butler-saw kind of peeps,

0:32:340:32:36

this is rather more for children.

0:32:360:32:39

And the first two peeps of this are just fantastic.

0:32:400:32:44

They're the wonders of the age.

0:32:440:32:45

We can see in a second why it was a good thing

0:32:450:32:47

you weren't really allowed to play with them as a child,

0:32:470:32:49

because here we have a wonderful peep

0:32:490:32:51

and, as you look down into it,

0:32:510:32:53

you see all the way along

0:32:530:32:54

the grand central aisle

0:32:540:32:56

of the Crystal Palace.

0:32:560:32:58

So, it is a pretty amazing thing, actually. Unbelievable.

0:32:590:33:03

And then the next one is also another wonder of the age,

0:33:030:33:07

rather less well known today,

0:33:070:33:10

and this is the Thames Tunnel.

0:33:100:33:11

The Thames Tunnel was built

0:33:110:33:13

slightly before the Crystal Palace,

0:33:130:33:15

and the intention was that it was going to be for wheeled transport.

0:33:150:33:20

But it cost so much money to make,

0:33:200:33:21

and it was a bit of a white elephant at the time,

0:33:210:33:24

so it became a pedestrian tourist attraction. Right.

0:33:240:33:27

And about two million people a year went to see it.

0:33:270:33:30

Two million?! Yeah. And, of course,

0:33:300:33:32

this is educating children at a time when children

0:33:320:33:35

were no longer being sent up chimneys, by and large,

0:33:350:33:39

and they were having to go to school.

0:33:390:33:42

And then this other one

0:33:420:33:43

is absolutely charming, as well,

0:33:430:33:46

which is Dean's Pantomime Toy Books.

0:33:460:33:48

Aladdin.

0:33:480:33:50

And this is all to do with

0:33:500:33:52

going to the theatre and everything

0:33:520:33:54

and it's just so dazzling!

0:33:540:33:56

It is printed with chromolithography,

0:33:560:33:58

which was a relatively new technique,

0:33:580:34:01

which allowed cheap mass production in colour printing.

0:34:010:34:04

And it's not just a little bit of text and a picture in the middle.

0:34:040:34:07

It's got folding pages and the whole story of a Aladdin told in pictures.

0:34:070:34:13

So these are very collectable today,

0:34:130:34:15

and I think you've got some quite valuable things here.

0:34:150:34:18

The Peep Show book, at auction, would make somewhere...

0:34:180:34:21

?600 to ?800.

0:34:210:34:23

Cor!

0:34:230:34:24

And the Pantomime Aladdin,

0:34:240:34:27

charming as it is, is not as valuable,

0:34:270:34:30

and is worth perhaps ?200 to ?300.

0:34:300:34:32

Blimey! I didn't think it was anything like that.

0:34:320:34:34

I just liked them. So it is the best part of ?1,000 there.

0:34:340:34:37

Fantastic. Thank you.

0:34:370:34:39

You've brought me this sword,

0:34:430:34:45

but this is a sword with a really special story.

0:34:450:34:48

Absolutely. This sword...

0:34:480:34:51

..ended the War of Independence in America,

0:34:520:34:57

because my husband's great-great-great-great-grandfather,

0:34:570:35:02

four greats, I think I got them right, Lord Cornwallis,

0:35:020:35:06

surrendered with this sword at Yorktown

0:35:060:35:09

and that was the beginning of the end of the War of Independence

0:35:090:35:13

and we lost all our American colonies,

0:35:130:35:17

which was a very dismal result.

0:35:170:35:19

It was. And wasn't Cornwallis's fault.

0:35:190:35:22

They'd been besieged by the French, they were hung up,

0:35:220:35:26

they couldn't get out, there was nobody coming for them.

0:35:260:35:29

No. He had no option other than...

0:35:290:35:31

And he had to surrender.

0:35:310:35:32

And Cornwallis was diplomatically ill and wouldn't attend.

0:35:320:35:37

That, I didn't know. Poor man. Oh, dear. How very sad.

0:35:370:35:41

You can understand why Cornwallis realised that that was

0:35:410:35:44

the end of English possession... Absolutely.

0:35:440:35:46

..in the American colonies.

0:35:460:35:48

Absolutely, it was the beginning of the end.

0:35:480:35:50

And this is the actual sword?

0:35:500:35:52

And this is the actual sword with which he had to surrender.

0:35:520:35:56

And then, because it was the etiquette of the day,

0:35:560:35:59

they gave the sword back. Yes.

0:35:590:36:02

So we've had it pretty well ever since, I think.

0:36:020:36:05

But it's just an ordinary sword, really, isn't it?

0:36:050:36:07

Yes, it's just a work... a workmanlike sword. Mm.

0:36:070:36:13

But historically, absolutely fascinating.

0:36:130:36:16

Amazing.

0:36:160:36:17

Um... A value?

0:36:170:36:19

I would have thought - a low estimate -

0:36:190:36:23

?10,000 to ?12,000?

0:36:230:36:25

Goodness me, that is amazing.

0:36:250:36:28

It's such a fascinating thing for the American market.

0:36:280:36:31

It is, isn't it? It represents the start of modern America.

0:36:310:36:34

I think they would love it,

0:36:340:36:35

but I think we'll probably have to keep it. Splendid.

0:36:350:36:38

That's what I like to hear.

0:36:380:36:40

Any time I see any type of box,

0:36:430:36:46

I wonder if there's a secret inside.

0:36:460:36:48

Tell me about this work box.

0:36:480:36:51

It was my grandmother's engagement present,

0:36:510:36:55

and we think she got it about 1900s.

0:36:550:36:59

It is a sewing table,

0:36:590:37:02

but my grandmother loved writing stories, even as a little girl,

0:37:020:37:05

she was always writing stories.

0:37:050:37:06

She wanted to be a journalist, but wasn't allowed to.

0:37:060:37:09

But, as she grew older,

0:37:090:37:11

she wrote stories for broadcast on Listen With Mother at lunchtimes,

0:37:110:37:16

which people probably remember.

0:37:160:37:18

And she always used to keep the scripts for those

0:37:180:37:21

and other things that she wrote in this work table.

0:37:210:37:25

This was your grandmother.

0:37:250:37:26

That's my grandmother, yes.

0:37:260:37:28

Janet Gemmill. Janet Gemmill, yeah.

0:37:280:37:31

And, so, she kept her scripts in here?

0:37:310:37:34

Yes, all of them, the ones that were accepted

0:37:340:37:36

and the ones that were rejected. Right.

0:37:360:37:38

They were always in there.

0:37:380:37:40

And why didn't she become a journalist?

0:37:400:37:42

She wasn't allowed to,

0:37:420:37:43

I mean, woman's work and all that sort of thing.

0:37:430:37:45

Oh, gosh, yes. You know, her grandmother just didn't let her.

0:37:450:37:48

Yes. So...

0:37:480:37:49

..these are her...her stories.

0:37:500:37:52

Let's just put this back down again.

0:37:520:37:55

And one is tempted to say,

0:37:580:38:01

"Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin."

0:38:010:38:04

LAUGHTER And here it is.

0:38:040:38:07

"The little green gnomes had lived in the forest

0:38:070:38:09

"for years and years and years.

0:38:090:38:11

"They had come to look upon it as their very own,

0:38:110:38:14

"although they knew that it was part of the country ruled over by a king,

0:38:140:38:18

"the father of their beloved Princess Coralie."

0:38:180:38:21

Well, she might not have been allowed to be a journalist,

0:38:220:38:24

but it has been read out!

0:38:240:38:27

So that was very good.

0:38:270:38:29

So, we're saying that she got this as an engagement present in...?

0:38:290:38:34

We think 1900s.

0:38:340:38:36

Of course, it was not new then.

0:38:360:38:38

No. No. I mean, this is very typical

0:38:380:38:41

of the walnut furniture made around the middle of the 19th century.

0:38:410:38:46

And she obviously found this very special use for it. Mm.

0:38:460:38:50

Unfortunately, this sort of furniture is sort of out of fashion

0:38:500:38:54

and it's got quite a bit of damage to it.

0:38:540:38:57

And, in terms of the value of this,

0:38:570:39:02

it's probably only ?300 to ?400.

0:39:020:39:04

That's what we expected. But the thing is,

0:39:040:39:07

the value of what's inside, to you as a family, is very much more.

0:39:070:39:11

Mm. Lovely. Yes.

0:39:110:39:13

MUSIC: Listen With Mother theme tune

0:39:130:39:17

'Are you sitting comfortably?

0:39:210:39:25

'Then we'll begin.'

0:39:250:39:26

"Liberte, paix and solidarite."

0:39:320:39:36

Liberty, peace and solidarity.

0:39:360:39:39

What a lovely thing.

0:39:390:39:41

Interesting people designed them.

0:39:410:39:44

Very interesting people, I can see that.

0:39:440:39:46

How did you come by all these scarves?

0:39:460:39:48

Well, my husband and I,

0:39:480:39:50

we belonged to a choir called the London Youth Choir.

0:39:500:39:53

And this was when? This was in the early '50s, 1950s.

0:39:530:39:57

And our aim was really a sort of, hopefully, singing for peace.

0:39:570:40:02

You know, world peace sort of idea.

0:40:020:40:04

So, where did you go with this choir,

0:40:040:40:06

what kind of countries did you visit?

0:40:060:40:07

We went to the East European countries quite often.

0:40:070:40:10

They had youth festivals.

0:40:100:40:12

So, Poland and Bucharest and Prague and so on.

0:40:120:40:17

All the communist countries, all part of the Soviet Republic? Yes.

0:40:170:40:21

And then where did the scarves come in?

0:40:210:40:23

They were given to us.

0:40:230:40:25

Most of them were made specially for each festival. How fascinating.

0:40:250:40:29

I don't think anyone has ever brought along anything like this,

0:40:290:40:33

certainly since I've been on the Roadshow.

0:40:330:40:35

I think you and your idealistic scarves should be seen by Ronnie -

0:40:350:40:40

he's our specialist in scarves and he'll be thrilled to see them.

0:40:400:40:44

That's interesting. Thank you.

0:40:440:40:46

The relationships that we have with our jewellery is so important

0:40:490:40:54

and it's very unique to us.

0:40:540:40:57

We wear jewellery because it makes us happy,

0:40:570:40:59

it makes us think about past generations.

0:40:590:41:02

And what I think is wonderful about this,

0:41:020:41:05

is that two very, very different styles are in the same family.

0:41:050:41:09

So, first of all,

0:41:090:41:11

we'll start with the older style,

0:41:110:41:13

which is these wonderful pearls.

0:41:130:41:15

Tell me about how you got these.

0:41:150:41:16

They belong to my daughter,

0:41:160:41:18

they were given to her, when she was born, by my mother-in-law,

0:41:180:41:23

to whom they were given when my husband was born.

0:41:230:41:26

So, they're an heirloom? They're an heirloom.

0:41:260:41:28

And have you had the honour of wearing them yet?

0:41:280:41:31

I've never actually worn them, but Mum wore them on my wedding day,

0:41:310:41:34

so actually quite a special piece of jewellery to all of us.

0:41:340:41:38

They are a beautiful example of natural pearls.

0:41:380:41:41

And there has been such a renaissance with natural pearls

0:41:410:41:44

because they are so rare today.

0:41:440:41:47

And I love the fact that you've got this wonderful diamond clasp.

0:41:470:41:52

Quite 1950s, the clasp, actually,

0:41:520:41:54

so I would think the pearls have come from an earlier source

0:41:540:41:58

and then have been later strung

0:41:580:42:00

or married together with the '50s clasp.

0:42:000:42:02

But then suddenly, we have something completely different over here.

0:42:040:42:09

So, what was going through your mind when you saw this

0:42:090:42:13

and when did you see this?

0:42:130:42:15

I bought it in 1972,

0:42:150:42:18

with money from an insurance claim that...

0:42:180:42:23

I'd had a diamond brooch stolen,

0:42:230:42:25

which was given to me by my mother-in-law.

0:42:250:42:27

OK, so it was from the same collection.

0:42:270:42:29

It was from the same, yes.

0:42:290:42:31

So, I bought that in Collingwood's of Conduit Street,

0:42:310:42:35

a jeweller no longer with us, I think.

0:42:350:42:38

And I have no idea by whom it was made.

0:42:380:42:42

Collingwood's are quite a traditional jewellers,

0:42:420:42:45

so, for them, in the '70s, to be selling an item like this

0:42:450:42:49

was sort of quite out of the box. And for you...

0:42:490:42:53

I'm very interested in what gravitated you

0:42:530:42:56

to this style and this type of ring.

0:42:560:42:58

Well, I absolutely love 1970s jewellery.

0:42:580:43:01

I did then, and I still do now.

0:43:010:43:03

What do you love about it?

0:43:030:43:05

It's bold, it's slightly wacky,

0:43:050:43:08

and I just love the bark effect.

0:43:080:43:11

I can't stop holding it. You've seen me...

0:43:110:43:15

I am so in love with this, so in love with this ring!

0:43:150:43:18

The '70s was about big stones and dramatic pieces,

0:43:180:43:22

and diamonds were just there just to highlight a design.

0:43:220:43:26

And this stone is a tourmaline, which is a natural stone.

0:43:260:43:29

And this would have come from Brazil.

0:43:290:43:32

There were some wonderful workshops

0:43:320:43:34

that were making these types of jewels

0:43:340:43:37

and they're highly collected now, today.

0:43:370:43:40

The '70s period is really quite in.

0:43:400:43:44

And the only thing is, there is no signature.

0:43:440:43:47

I know. There is no signature of this wonderful craftsman,

0:43:470:43:52

and I would love to know who the craftsman is.

0:43:520:43:56

Maybe, he might be watching.

0:43:560:43:57

Wouldn't that be wonderful?! Wouldn't that be wonderful?

0:43:570:44:00

Yes, it really would. It really would.

0:44:000:44:01

We'll let you know if we hear. Thank you. We'll let you know.

0:44:010:44:05

But, because of the '70s jewellery being in vogue,

0:44:050:44:10

there's a lot of competitive bidding going on at the moment, out there,

0:44:100:44:15

as there are with pearls, too,

0:44:150:44:17

so you're not being left out, here.

0:44:170:44:19

THEY LAUGH

0:44:190:44:21

You've definitely, definitely got a wonderful heirloom.

0:44:210:44:24

And, you know, the natural pearls, as I said,

0:44:240:44:27

you don't find these in the oceans any more.

0:44:270:44:30

These are saltwater pearls.

0:44:300:44:33

And, at auction,

0:44:330:44:34

you are going to be looking in the region of around about...

0:44:340:44:38

?15,000.

0:44:380:44:40

Wow! Slightly more than you thought!

0:44:400:44:43

LAUGHTER

0:44:430:44:45

Now, as for this one, do you remember how much you paid for it?

0:44:460:44:50

No idea. Well...

0:44:500:44:51

I just think it is absolutely fabulous

0:44:520:44:56

and I think, at auction, you'd be looking in the region

0:44:560:45:00

of around about

0:45:000:45:01

?5,000 to ?7,000.

0:45:010:45:03

Heavens! SHE CHUCKLES

0:45:030:45:05

That's lovely.

0:45:050:45:07

And if the person phones us up and tells us who made it,

0:45:070:45:10

it'll be worth more!

0:45:100:45:11

THEY LAUGH

0:45:110:45:12

That would be a really good end to the story, thank you.

0:45:120:45:16

When you came to the table and I saw these coming out of your bag,

0:45:200:45:24

you brought them out, I couldn't believe my eyes!

0:45:240:45:27

And then... I know that you had

0:45:270:45:29

a conversation with Fiona about how you acquired them

0:45:290:45:33

and wasn't it through going to world peace festivals?

0:45:330:45:37

That's right, yes, it was. And when was that?

0:45:370:45:39

In the early '50s,

0:45:390:45:40

and into the '60s, but mainly in the '50s.

0:45:400:45:43

So you went to Communist countries

0:45:430:45:44

in the days when they were shut off to most people?

0:45:440:45:46

It was the only way to get in!

0:45:460:45:48

Well, these scarves are fabulous.

0:45:480:45:51

And I'd like to focus on my favourite,

0:45:510:45:54

and it's these up here.

0:45:540:45:56

You must know that one like this...

0:45:560:45:58

What does that say? "Liberte, solidarite."

0:46:000:46:05

And that's designed by

0:46:050:46:06

one of the most famous artists of the 20th century. Really?

0:46:060:46:09

Fernand Leger. I knew the name, but I didn't know he was so famous.

0:46:090:46:13

He was a cubist and a modernist... My goodness.

0:46:130:46:16

..and his work is really sought after.

0:46:160:46:19

And this chap here, who did this one, needs no introduction at all.

0:46:190:46:24

No. We all know who Picasso is.

0:46:240:46:27

And this one is what is known as...

0:46:270:46:30

These are propaganda scarves to collectors. Yes.

0:46:300:46:33

And artists that were interested in politics at the time

0:46:330:46:36

made images that got printed up to be used at congresses

0:46:360:46:41

and festivals like you went to.

0:46:410:46:43

And that was... de rigueur in the '50s...

0:46:430:46:47

Absolutely, yes, it was.

0:46:470:46:49

..for forward-thinking, enlightened people.

0:46:490:46:51

People really love these things.

0:46:530:46:55

I remember seeing one of these, in the '70s, in a gallery

0:46:550:46:58

and thought, I... I've always wanted one of those

0:46:580:47:02

and I've never actually found one

0:47:020:47:04

and you've got two of the greatest scarves

0:47:040:47:06

from this type of collecting that I know of. Golly.

0:47:060:47:11

And this Fernand Leger, as I said, is a huge name.

0:47:110:47:14

Unfortunately, it's a bit smudged, but it's not too bad.

0:47:140:47:16

I think it could be improved and this one,

0:47:160:47:19

if it was in really good condition, is probably worth about...

0:47:190:47:23

?1,200. Gosh!

0:47:230:47:26

Maybe this one's worth about 800 or 900 as it is.

0:47:260:47:29

This one is in really good condition

0:47:290:47:31

and one of these made $2,500

0:47:310:47:35

in a New York sale a few years ago.

0:47:350:47:37

So, in all,

0:47:370:47:38

the others are worth about ?500, plus about ?1,700 worth,

0:47:380:47:43

plus about ?1,000,

0:47:430:47:44

so that comes to something like ?3,000, I think,

0:47:440:47:48

for the lot. Wow!

0:47:480:47:50

Now, you've brought along some medals,

0:47:550:47:57

but also a box of draughts. What have you brought that in for?

0:47:570:48:01

We were clearing my parents' house

0:48:010:48:03

after my father went into residential care

0:48:030:48:05

and I found a draughts box, which I thought contained draughts.

0:48:050:48:09

I was just about to throw it into a box for the charity shop

0:48:090:48:12

and it rattled, so I looked in and I found the medals.

0:48:120:48:15

That's amazing. And these medals relate to the First World War,

0:48:150:48:19

but there's one medal in particular

0:48:190:48:21

that I want to talk about and that's this one here.

0:48:210:48:24

This is the Distinguished Service Medal.

0:48:240:48:28

What do you know about it?

0:48:280:48:29

My grandfather won the Distinguished Service Medal

0:48:290:48:32

at the Battle of Jutland.

0:48:320:48:34

He was a chief petty officer stoker.

0:48:340:48:36

He changed over oil tank, after the oil tank was hit,

0:48:360:48:41

to the other oil tank, under full steam

0:48:410:48:44

and was awarded the DSM.

0:48:440:48:46

So he was quite a brave man? Yes.

0:48:460:48:49

The Battle of Jutland took place

0:48:490:48:51

in 1916, on 31st May and 1st June.

0:48:510:48:54

And it's an incredibly famous battle -

0:48:540:48:56

it was the largest naval battle in the First World War.

0:48:560:49:01

Many sailors were killed, many ships were sunk.

0:49:010:49:06

This is a very, very important medal

0:49:060:49:08

and important group of medals.

0:49:080:49:11

These medals do have a value.

0:49:110:49:13

And you were about to, not throw them out,

0:49:130:49:17

but you were about to give them to a charity shop, weren't you? Yes.

0:49:170:49:20

The Distinguished Service Medal is the important medal in the group,

0:49:200:49:27

but you have got several other medals here, too -

0:49:270:49:29

you've got a Long Service And Good Conduct,

0:49:290:49:32

you've got a British War Medal,

0:49:320:49:34

you've got a 1914-15 Star.

0:49:340:49:36

The value of the group is going to be somewhere in the region of...

0:49:380:49:43

?2,500 to ?3,500.

0:49:430:49:45

I never imagined it would be that amount.

0:49:470:49:50

But they stay with the family, as far as I'm concerned.

0:49:500:49:53

So, what a pile of old bones

0:49:560:49:58

and bits of smashed-up crockery and shells you've brought to me

0:49:580:50:02

and I'm supposed to be the jewellery man.

0:50:020:50:04

But tell me all about it.

0:50:040:50:05

Well, we found them at the Thames,

0:50:050:50:08

cos we went on a little search

0:50:080:50:12

for all little pieces like this.

0:50:120:50:15

Yes, and who took you there first, was it a friend?

0:50:150:50:19

Yeah, and her family.

0:50:190:50:22

Yes. They call it mudlarking, don't they? Yeah.

0:50:220:50:24

And I'm a mudlarker,

0:50:240:50:26

I'm absolutely thrilled to do this

0:50:260:50:28

and once I get away from my jewellery table,

0:50:280:50:30

what I really want to do

0:50:300:50:32

is go down to the great, green, greasy Thames

0:50:320:50:34

and try to find these things

0:50:340:50:36

and you've found them perfectly, haven't you?

0:50:360:50:38

Which is your favourite?

0:50:380:50:40

It's probably...the jaw.

0:50:400:50:43

And tell us why that is.

0:50:430:50:44

Because I like that there's still teeth inside.

0:50:440:50:48

Yes, amazing.

0:50:480:50:49

And this is a jawbone of a sheep and we can only guess how old that is.

0:50:490:50:55

But the Thames was a sort of rubbish dump

0:50:550:50:57

and people hurled all kinds of trash into it, simply to get rid of it.

0:50:570:51:02

But of all the things you've shown me,

0:51:020:51:04

I think the most magical is this,

0:51:040:51:06

and have you any idea why I like that one so much?

0:51:060:51:10

Is it because it's very old?

0:51:100:51:13

It is very, very old and it's not only very old,

0:51:130:51:16

but it was made on the other side of the world.

0:51:160:51:19

It was made in China and a little potter, 400 years ago,

0:51:190:51:24

made a vast bowl and decorated it with all manner of good things

0:51:240:51:27

including what is left of a peony here,

0:51:270:51:30

in a dynasty known as the Kangxi Period, which is 400 years ago,

0:51:300:51:34

and we can only guess at the sort of people that were eating from it.

0:51:340:51:38

They were in the 17th century, they'd be wearing wigs,

0:51:380:51:41

they'd be very strange to us, living in the centre of London,

0:51:410:51:44

very prosperous, could afford all kinds of things

0:51:440:51:47

and then, dang it, the servant breaks the plate.

0:51:470:51:49

There's no point keeping that, fling it in the river

0:51:490:51:51

and then you come along 400 years later and find it and show it to me.

0:51:510:51:56

Well, if that isn't magic, what is? It's wonderful!

0:51:560:51:59

These are not valuable objects in the conventional sense of the word,

0:51:590:52:02

but they're enormously valuable to you

0:52:020:52:04

and they're enormously valuable to me.

0:52:040:52:06

I mean, I think they've got wonderful context

0:52:060:52:07

and maybe, one day, you can make a career from it.

0:52:070:52:10

What would you like to be when you come to work?

0:52:100:52:13

An archaeologist.

0:52:130:52:15

LAUGHING: Of course you would! I know!

0:52:150:52:17

I always wish I had been an archaeologist

0:52:170:52:19

but my break went in another direction,

0:52:190:52:21

I've been enormously lucky.

0:52:210:52:22

Thank you very much for bringing them.

0:52:220:52:24

It was really good, wasn't it? Yeah.

0:52:240:52:26

In the 1920s and 1930s, there was a lot of interest in fairies.

0:52:290:52:35

You may remember there were some photographs produced

0:52:350:52:38

and people were convinced

0:52:380:52:40

there were fairies at the bottom of people's gardens.

0:52:400:52:43

Yeah, there are!

0:52:430:52:44

Well, you're a good one to talk to me

0:52:440:52:46

because you've got fairies on your sideboard from what I can see.

0:52:460:52:50

Have you been living with these fairies for quite some time?

0:52:500:52:53

About 12 years.

0:52:530:52:55

12 years. Yes. And before then?

0:52:550:52:57

Before then, they lived in Ireland,

0:52:570:53:00

from about 1962 until 2004. Oh, right. Right.

0:53:000:53:05

Do you want to go further back? If you can go further back.

0:53:050:53:08

They were owned by a cousin of my aunt, who lived in Johannesburg.

0:53:080:53:13

Goodness me, these are well-travelled vases! They are.

0:53:130:53:16

So they've been fairies in South Africa,

0:53:160:53:19

they've been leprechauns by the time they got to Ireland...

0:53:190:53:21

That's it, yes.

0:53:210:53:22

..and now they are fairies again in Saffron Walden.

0:53:220:53:25

That's it. Right.

0:53:250:53:26

They are very special, because they remind me of my aunt.

0:53:260:53:29

Ahh. That is what it's about, at the end of the day, isn't it?

0:53:290:53:33

Let's have a look at the pieces

0:53:330:53:35

because I know you've done a little bit of research,

0:53:350:53:39

because, talking to the daughter who's behind you,

0:53:390:53:43

with the next inheritor in her arms... That's it, absolutely.

0:53:430:53:47

The big name here, it's one we've heard before on the Roadshow,

0:53:470:53:51

is Daisy Makeig-Jones, as the designer. Yeah.

0:53:510:53:54

She did come up with these amazing designs and produced by Wedgwood,

0:53:540:54:00

in Etruria in Stoke-on-Trent,

0:54:000:54:02

and...under the banner of Wedgwood Fairyland Lustre.

0:54:020:54:07

Oh, right. So, you've got three very nice prime pieces.

0:54:070:54:12

The thing about the Wedgwood Fairyland in general

0:54:120:54:17

is that it is very, very dependent on condition.

0:54:170:54:20

Right, yeah. A little bit of wear.

0:54:200:54:22

And so the first thing I do when I see a bowl like this is this...

0:54:220:54:27

BOWL CHIMES

0:54:270:54:28

Oh, sounds good. That sounds all right.

0:54:280:54:31

That's a good sound, that is a good sound.

0:54:310:54:33

The decoration is called Castle On The Road,

0:54:330:54:37

but the interior, for some reason,

0:54:370:54:40

is called Boxers. I am looking at these fairies...

0:54:400:54:43

Or Boxing, rather.

0:54:430:54:45

I can't see any boxing fairies but, anyway, that's what it's called.

0:54:450:54:48

That's what it's called.

0:54:480:54:50

So, it's making the right sound.

0:54:500:54:53

Good. OK?

0:54:530:54:54

Because if it had made a bit of a snare... Yeah?

0:54:540:54:57

..that would have been worth...?1,000?

0:54:570:55:00

It's worth a bit more than 1,000 now.

0:55:000:55:02

So I think we will start with that one...

0:55:020:55:05

at around the 3,000 mark.

0:55:050:55:06

Holy smoke! Really?! Maybe a little bit more.

0:55:060:55:10

So, leaning over, let's have a look at this one.

0:55:100:55:13

This one is called Pillar,

0:55:130:55:16

cos you've got these columns. Yeah.

0:55:160:55:19

OK, you have got these columns and...

0:55:190:55:22

VASE RINGS

0:55:220:55:26

Yeah, that's making a nice noise.

0:55:260:55:29

So, with a piece like that...

0:55:290:55:33

..the chances are, you're going to be...

0:55:350:55:38

nearer ?6,000.

0:55:380:55:40

Six?! What, for this ONE?!

0:55:400:55:42

Mm, yeah.

0:55:420:55:45

So... I should be sitting down! No, no, no.

0:55:450:55:47

Or laying down, Mum?

0:55:470:55:49

So we now move on to this big thing,

0:55:490:55:51

which could even work as an umbrella stand, couldn't it?

0:55:510:55:54

I think that's what they used it for -

0:55:540:55:55

they just dumped umbrellas in it.

0:55:550:55:57

Did they really? Yeah.

0:55:570:55:58

Let's have a look. It's called Bubbles, for obvious reasons,

0:55:580:56:01

and you've got this wonderful arrangement

0:56:010:56:03

of what appear to be like water babies, little winged sprites.

0:56:030:56:07

Have you noticed the sleeping dragon?

0:56:070:56:09

Have you looked at the bottom there? Yeah. Yeah.

0:56:090:56:12

Good. Now, I've to come round to this one

0:56:120:56:13

because I don't want to lift it. That's got a...

0:56:130:56:16

VASE RINGS

0:56:160:56:17

Lovely. Did you like that?

0:56:170:56:19

I did, yeah. Do it again! Are you sure?

0:56:190:56:21

VASE RINGS OK.

0:56:210:56:23

Um, right...

0:56:230:56:25

The thing is, that I'm looking in there

0:56:280:56:30

and I'm wondering if I can see a crack.

0:56:300:56:33

DAUGHTER GASPS

0:56:330:56:34

Because if that is a crack...

0:56:340:56:37

Let's say it's one of my hairs!

0:56:370:56:38

Well, no. The long and short of it is, if it's a crack...

0:56:380:56:41

Do you mind if I look at it? No, that's fine.

0:56:410:56:43

Because if it's a crack, it's ?2,000, you understand that?

0:56:430:56:45

Ooh! OK. Yeah.

0:56:450:56:47

That's still loads more than we expected. Still loads of money.

0:56:470:56:50

Yeah, it is. It is a crack?

0:56:500:56:52

No. I don't...

0:56:520:56:54

Hang on, let's have a look. No.

0:56:540:56:55

OK. No crack.

0:56:550:56:57

Well...

0:56:570:56:58

No, no crack. Excellent.

0:56:590:57:02

So, I suppose,

0:57:020:57:05

forget the 2,000,

0:57:050:57:06

I think we've got to now say...

0:57:060:57:08

?20,000.

0:57:080:57:09

CROWD GASPS LOUDLY Oh, my word! OK, that woke the baby!

0:57:090:57:13

You are joking?! My goodness.

0:57:160:57:18

Where money's concerned, I never joke, I never joke.

0:57:180:57:22

I'd better insure it.

0:57:220:57:24

Well, you know, I mean, it's nice...

0:57:250:57:28

It's nice to think that there's a profit to be had

0:57:280:57:31

by having fairies in anybody's house,

0:57:310:57:33

but in your house, it's come good. Yes, absolutely!

0:57:330:57:37

Excellent. Amazing. Amazing.

0:57:370:57:40

I think that family will be telling the story of that valuation

0:57:410:57:44

and their day at the Antiques Roadshow for years to come,

0:57:440:57:47

and it will certainly give that baby

0:57:470:57:49

something to remember when it grows up.

0:57:490:57:51

From all of us here at Audley End and the whole Roadshow team,

0:57:510:57:54

until next time, bye-bye.

0:57:540:57:55

I told you, I don't need any help. And I told you, you've got it.

0:58:290:58:33

Leopard changed its spots, has it?

0:58:330:58:34

Come on, then!

0:58:340:58:36

Grant, what you doing?!

0:58:360:58:37

Phil!

0:58:370:58:38

Fiona Bruce and the team visit Audley End near Saffron Walden in Essex. Scouring through the family treasures brought in by visitors, the experts discover a varied set of items. These include the sword that ended the War of Independence in America, a large collection of toilet chains, a beautiful silver container that once contained the gall stone of a goat and three vases decorated with fairies.