New Lanark 1 Antiques Roadshow


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New Lanark 1

Fiona Bruce and the experts visit the 18th-century cotton mill of New Lanark, where items include a pearl necklace and a rare cuddly toy found in a skip.


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We're setting up today's Roadshow

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in a magnificent World Heritage Site in Scotland called New Lanark.

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And in the 18th century, this rugged landscape

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and the fast-flowing River Clyde made it the ideal spot

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for manufacturing cotton.

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It was also the backdrop for a radical social experiment.

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At a time when poor housing conditions and long working hours

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for little reward was the norm,

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along came philanthropist Robert Owen,

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and turned all that on its head.

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Owen took over management of New Lanark in 1800

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and his aim was to build a society based on charity and kindness.

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He believed the key to this utopia was through education,

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cleaner living conditions,

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and by phasing out the employment of young children.

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So he set about ensuring that workers' homes,

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which were unsurprisingly often filthy and unhygienic,

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were cleaned on a weekly basis,

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and there were frequent home inspections too,

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to ensure a healthier workforce.

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Unlike most factory owners of the time,

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Owen didn't believe in using abusive language and violence

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to make his employees work harder.

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Instead, he came up with an ingenious way to encourage them.

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LOOMS CLACK

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In what was a very noisy environment,

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every worker had a silent monitor next to their work station -

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one of these - and the colour that faced outwards

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indicated their performance.

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White was for excellent,

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yellow for good, blue for indifferent,

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and black for bad.

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So Owen was able to walk through the mill and tell at a glance how each

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employee was doing.

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There was, he said, "No beating, no abusive language.

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"I merely looked at the person and then at the colour."

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Robert Owen's greatest legacy is that he set up the first school

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in the world for children from the age of three.

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They learned the three Rs, but the focus was more on

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music, dance, nature,

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sharing and being kind to each other.

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And he also decreed that no child under the age of ten

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would be allowed to work in the mill.

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BELL RINGS

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As well as introducing shortened working hours,

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he also established a sick fund, a savings bank and a village store,

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selling cheap food and household goods -

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an idea that helped form the origin of the cooperative movement.

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His ideas seem humane to us today,

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but in the early 19th century they were considered far too radical.

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The government was unpersuaded and rejected his ideas as crazy.

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But even in his own time, more than 20,000 tourists came to wonder

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at his achievements, and today the people of New Lanark and beyond

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have come to share their own stories with our Antiques Roadshow team.

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Now, is this a picture you like?

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-Yes, I love it very much.

-You do?

-Yes.

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And where does it hang in your house?

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It's in my hallway and I look at it every morning.

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And what is it you like about it?

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It's the subject matter,

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just because the little boy seems to be playing

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and enjoying whatever he's doing.

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And I think it's the intrigue, cos there's always that little bit

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of mystery, what's actually going on in the background,

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which you can't actually see.

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Unfortunately, it had been lying in a junk room.

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And, therefore, when we were cleaning out the junk room,

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we found it, and I liked the piece so much that it's been hanging

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-on my wall ever since.

-Now, have you any idea where it was painted?

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-No idea.

-And do you know who it's by?

-No, I don't.

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Well, it's a very interesting picture.

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The frame drew me to this straightaway,

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cos only one artist used this sort of frame,

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and he's an artist called Mortimer Menpes.

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And it is signed on the bottom left here, which half is hidden

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by the slip there. It's got "Mortimer Menpes."

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Difficult to see, that's why you didn't know.

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He was born in Australia in 1855,

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and he came to live in this country,

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and he was a pupil of a very famous artist,

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who was James McNeill Whistler,

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who was the American artist that painted in London.

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So he was one of his pupils.

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And Menpes went on to do a lot of travel painting.

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So he went to India to paint, he went to Japan to paint,

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and he went to North Africa and to Anguilla to paint,

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and some of his pictures were reproduced by A&C Black,

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which is a book publishing firm, on these various countries,

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and you see his pictures in those books.

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And I'm wondering if this is in one of A&C Black's books

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on North Africa.

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But it's fabulous. It's fabulous because it's in its original state,

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it's in the original cushioned frames,

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and he had these specially made for him.

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And when anybody shows me a frame like that, I know who the artist is

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straightaway, just by the style.

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But let's look at the painting.

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Here we've got some Arab children outside a little house there,

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and there's a little fire going on in the background there.

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And it's a little shack on the outside of a house,

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and they're probably making bread inside.

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It's a wonderful, wonderful picture by him.

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And it's got a value.

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I think that if that came up for sale, and it's in such

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original condition, it would make at least

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£2,000 to £3,000.

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Thank you. That's very nice, thank you very much.

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Well, it's a lovely thing to have, and don't ever change the frame,

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because although it's slightly chipped,

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you can have that gently repaired. But it's a wonderful piece.

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-Wonderful piece.

-Thank you very much.

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Yes, you've made my day. Thank you.

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Now, someone told me that you were the first in the queue this morning.

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Half past six this morning.

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Half past six?

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So what time did you get up?

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About 4am.

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That's amazing!

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Well done you. You've come a long way, then?

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I have travelled a long way, it took 12 hours to reach here.

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What? Where have you come from?

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From Yorkshire.

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That's incredible. Well, welcome,

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and I'm delighted you brought something that we're filming,

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which is fantastic.

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I must admit when I first saw him, I thought he was a wasp.

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-But he's not, he's a bee!

-Definitely a bee.

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Tell me the history of him and how you came to have him.

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An old lady over the road was going into a care home,

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and there was a large skip outside her house,

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and the family were sorting and throwing bits out

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-and this was thrown in the skip.

-What?!

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And my dad asked if he could have him, and it's been with me

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ever since I was little.

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I love it. How could they throw him in a skip?

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I know, he's gruesome, but in a nice way.

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He's in such good condition.

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-I have looked after him.

-You have.

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So you didn't take him to bed and squeeze him, because he's got wings.

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-I was tempted when I was younger.

-Yes, I bet you were.

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But I managed to refrain from doing that.

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Now, the Hygienic Toy Company was working in Fulham

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in the '20s and '30s.

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I think that he's probably 1930,

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but he's called...

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Imperial Bee Esquire.

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I mean, how could people think up these wonderful names for things?

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-So, he's made of sort of plush, which is a mohair plush.

-Yes.

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And his face is just a bit of material,

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and he's got felt ears and felt hands,

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and his body's also plush, and then he's got these lovely wings,

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which, I think, are sort of wired muslin.

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They are very delicate.

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Yeah, there's a lot of work in it, isn't there?

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Do you have a name for him?

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I call him Busby.

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Well, I think to people that collect every animal

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and every insect, and particularly Hygienic Toys

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which is a very good English make, I would think he's probably worth

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about £200.

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He's not going anywhere.

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Normally, it's the sheer attention to detail that sets Meissen figures

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-apart from everybody else...

-Yeah.

-..but in this case,

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the size is remarkable too, they're huge.

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They are quite big! Are they usually smaller?

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Well, this is about as big as you get in Meissen, which is

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lovely to see.

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Where do they come from?

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Well, they come from my husband's family.

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It was in their house when they died, it was cleared,

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and I asked if I could have these,

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so that's where they came from.

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So you chose these because...?

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I chose them, and actually they were in really poor condition

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when I got them. I didn't notice that at the time

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cos they were on a high mantelpiece, so they looked lovely,

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but there was fingers missing,

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and all kinds of things that I had to have fixed.

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-Oh, you had them restored?

-I had them restored.

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I mean, there's so many things to get damaged when you have

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-figures like these.

-I know, I know.

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Because everywhere you look there's more detail, isn't there?

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-Every hair is carefully painted, one little line at a time.

-Yeah.

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The fingers, they've got the little nails and all the flowers,

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-every one separately made.

-Mm.

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-And I love this lace.

-I know, I was going to ask you,

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is the lace, is it actual lace that's been painted over,

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or they've made it look like that in the ceramic?

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-It's clever, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Meissen invented this process. They took real lace,

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just little strips of fine lace, and dipped it in clay

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-and then they stuck it on the figure.

-Wow.

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And in the kiln, the lace burnt away,

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-leaving its skeleton in china.

-Oh, right, OK.

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And it goes right the way round.

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The lace dress... Look at this trim there.

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-That dress is beautiful, isn't it?

-I mean, all the way round,

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all there, every little piece of lace, so delicate, isn't it?

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I mean... So, Meissen was the greatest of the German factories.

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There were lots of others who imitated,

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they copied everything that Meissen made,

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but they never did it so well.

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So, we look at the clues, especially around the mark,

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to tell just when they were made, and underneath the base...

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If one can lift up the weight.

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And this is a sheer sign of the Meissen, because it's the weight.

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-Very heavy.

-They're heavy, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-It weighs a ton,

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-doesn't it?

-It does.

-And Meissen is very heavy porcelain,

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that's a good sign.

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And there's the other sign you want to see, the crossed swords mark,

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and that shape of mark is right for about 1870, something like that.

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OK.

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So there they are.

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Still here.

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Was it expensive repairing them?

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I think altogether for both it was about £500.

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-So quite a bit to spend on them.

-Yeah, yeah.

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It was worth doing because now they look good, and size alone, erm...

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..couple of thousand pounds.

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Wow.

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That's good.

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Was worth having them repaired, then.

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And not too expensive. I won't be frightened to have them

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-in the house.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Well, two of the most exuberant armchairs I've ever seen!

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I mean, do you like them,

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and where did you get them?

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Oh, I absolutely love them.

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My husband inherited them from a rambling old house

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-down in Herefordshire...

-Right.

-..in 1959.

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-The owner of the house, he collected a lot of Burmese artefacts.

-Right.

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And then after that, they were stored in a garage.

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OK. What prompted you to approach the Roadshow with them?

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Well, last year, I was in Malaysia

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and we were invited to the king's palace, um...

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Now you... Invited to the king's palace?

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Well, how come?

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Do you know him?

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Well, a long story, but we know a very close friend of his,

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and we were invited along.

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And I happened to spot these two chairs and I said to my friend,

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"I can't believe we've these two chairs in the garage!"

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And he said, "No, you must be mistaken."

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Well, interestingly, these chairs are carved with motifs

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to do with water.

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And it just seems appropriate that with the beautiful flow

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of the River Clyde in the background

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that we should look at these mythical animals.

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To the left, the back panel of this chair is centred by

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the fabled hairy-tailed giant turtle.

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And there he is, there's the turtle with this enormous tail,

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which flows into a stream.

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On top, we have a crane.

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There's its beak and its head.

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And one wing goes that way,

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but this wing comes beautifully over the top of it.

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And can you see its sprawling leg?

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Very well observed, as the Japanese always do.

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And on this other chair, it's smothered with dragons,

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which are associated with rain and rivers.

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-So, I mean, what a coincidence.

-Yes, it is.

-Yep.

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-Burmese, not so sure.

-No?

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I know these are actually from Japan.

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-Japan?

-Yes, yes.

-Right.

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-Gosh.

-And date from around about 1910...

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-Uh-huh.

-..at the end of the reign of an emperor called Meiji.

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-Right.

-And these would have been made for export, not just to Europe,

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cos I see these in auction rooms in the UK quite often,

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-but they went all over the Far East, so...

-Yes.

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-My goodness.

-The king's chairs, they're probably Japanese.

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-Yeah.

-Your friend who collected Burmese things

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must have got something Japanese.

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Erm, being absolutely frank with you,

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the fashion for big dark armchairs from the sort of

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late 19th, early 20th century, it's gone.

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-Oh.

-Japanese things are not that fashionable on the market,

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and I'm afraid that is reflected in the value

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-which I'm going to give you.

-Oh, right.

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The value at auction would be

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-1,000 to £1,500.

-Mm-hm.

0:14:570:14:59

And, you know, I might get a kick up the backside by fellow valuers,

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-who may think even a little less than that.

-Right.

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We'll certainly have to decide what we're going to do with them,

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whether they go back into the garage or what, I'm not sure.

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It's another lovely travelling case,

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so I know there'll be something

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pretty good in here.

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Yes.

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-And that is pretty good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Now, would it be true, or presumptuous of me, to suggest

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that you're not from the UK?

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No, I'm from Germany.

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And is this something from Germany, or where did it come from?

0:15:330:15:36

It belongs to my husband, really.

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He can't be here today, so he asked me to come.

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And he bought it somehow in 1994, on a flea market in Hanover, he said.

0:15:420:15:49

You're joking?! This was found in a Hanover flea market?

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-Yes.

-That's unbelievable!

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Did he ever tell you what he paid for it?

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Well, he said about 100 marks, German marks, those days.

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So in those days, we're talking just before, around the time

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of the wall coming down...

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About three marks to the pound, was it?

0:16:060:16:09

I don't really know, but if you say so.

0:16:090:16:12

I think it was something like that.

0:16:120:16:13

-I spent a lot of time in Berlin during the '80s.

-Mm-hm.

0:16:130:16:17

And I'll tell you something, I was always looking for things like this

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in the markets in the Tiergarten,

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and I never found anything like that for the equivalent of £30.

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So he was very lucky?

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-Er, exceedingly!

-OK.

0:16:270:16:30

Anyway, let's have a look at it.

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It is what we call a strut clock.

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And there is the stamp of the retailer, which is London & Ryder.

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So we'll just shut that up momentarily.

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And the reason we call it a strut clock is cos

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we have this strut at the bottom,

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to support the clock, or we can lean it right back.

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-It's top quality.

-Oh.

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And this...

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is something that I know was made by one specific man.

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Despite the London & Ryder inscription on the bottom there,

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-it was made by a man called Thomas Cole.

-Uh-huh.

0:17:120:17:15

Typical Cole dial, beautifully engraved, as I say.

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You've got roses and I think what looks like fuchsias there.

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Very pretty thing.

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And then all around the outside,

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against more of a matt rather than a shiny finish to the silvering,

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we've got lovely foliage and other flowers,

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fleur-de-lis hands.

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And even the sides of the clock - I don't know whether you've noticed -

0:17:360:17:40

are all engraved with flowers and little vignettes of flowers

0:17:400:17:44

-down here.

-Yeah.

0:17:440:17:45

Just turning it round, we've got, once again, London & Ryder,

0:17:450:17:49

New Bond Street, London, who were one of Cole's retailers.

0:17:490:17:54

-Oh, yeah.

-Cole was manufacturing for various people, London & Ryder,

0:17:540:17:59

-another famous company, Hancocks, of Bruton Street.

-Oh.

0:17:590:18:03

-So top, top jewellers.

-Mm-hm.

0:18:030:18:06

And this is a very, very serious size of clock.

0:18:060:18:10

-Like all Cole things, there is a number on the bottom...

-Ah, yeah.

0:18:110:18:15

..which you only see when the strut is swivelled round.

0:18:150:18:20

So, British, by one of the best makers of the period

0:18:230:18:27

and we're talking, this is probably around 1860.

0:18:270:18:31

-Oh.

-OK?

-Yeah.

0:18:310:18:33

And your husband bought this for the equivalent of £30 to £35?

0:18:330:18:38

It's not a lot.

0:18:380:18:39

Fully signed, fully numbered, with its box.

0:18:400:18:44

Do you think he'd be happy if I quoted you between

0:18:440:18:46

£4,000 and £5,000?

0:18:460:18:48

Yes, I would be happy!

0:18:490:18:50

That's very nice!

0:18:500:18:52

Yeah.

0:18:520:18:53

-Thank you.

-I spent years looking for this sort of thing in Germany,

0:18:530:18:57

never found it, so all credit to you both.

0:18:570:19:00

I've never seen such a comprehensive selection

0:19:250:19:29

of prisoner of war

0:19:290:19:31

camp memorabilia.

0:19:310:19:33

And just looking at it,

0:19:330:19:36

you can see all kinds of scenes of life...

0:19:360:19:39

..in the prisoner of war camps.

0:19:400:19:42

And I'm guessing that it's associated with

0:19:420:19:46

this splendid looking gentleman in his tam-o'-shanter,

0:19:460:19:49

-with regimental badge and with his pipe?

-Yeah.

0:19:490:19:52

Who was he and is he a family relation?

0:19:530:19:55

The gentleman we have in front of us,

0:19:550:19:58

his name was Company Sergeant Major Thomas McMahon

0:19:580:20:01

of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders.

0:20:010:20:04

The story is that the collection was handed down

0:20:040:20:07

through my stepmum's family.

0:20:070:20:09

Now, the Highlanders fought during the Battle of Tobruk

0:20:090:20:12

in World War II and, unfortunately, Sergeant Major McMahon

0:20:120:20:16

was actually captured and later incarcerated in

0:20:160:20:20

Stalag B prisoner of war camp in Germany.

0:20:200:20:22

The collection we have of photographs and sketches

0:20:230:20:27

and the diary give a very personal account of his time in Stalag B.

0:20:270:20:33

The photographs explain in detail what happened during his time

0:20:330:20:38

in incarceration. Now, what's quite special about the photographs

0:20:380:20:42

is that many of them were taken by a hidden camera,

0:20:420:20:45

which was hidden inside a Bible.

0:20:450:20:48

-This is the camera in the hollowed-out Bible.

-Oh, God, yeah.

0:20:480:20:53

-Yeah.

-That would appear to be how...

-You can see the camera's in there,

0:20:530:20:56

and presumably there's some sort of button that you

0:20:560:20:58

-trigger the shutter with.

-Absolutely.

0:20:580:21:00

Point the Bible in the right direction.

0:21:000:21:03

And I have a few smaller pictures.

0:21:030:21:05

That's really interesting, there's some pretty senior German officers.

0:21:070:21:11

They always had enormous greatcoats,

0:21:110:21:13

you can see them getting into their transport there.

0:21:130:21:15

They wouldn't want to be photographed.

0:21:150:21:17

You don't know, it might have been a senior officer visiting the camp.

0:21:170:21:20

-Certainly something that he didn't want snapping.

-Right.

0:21:200:21:24

And that's interesting.

0:21:240:21:26

That's really domestic, there.

0:21:260:21:30

That's them eating, there.

0:21:300:21:32

And perhaps what they're eating wasn't as wonderful

0:21:320:21:35

-as the Germans liked to let on was being served to them.

-No, no.

0:21:350:21:38

So, again, that would be potential propaganda if that got out.

0:21:380:21:43

Yeah, there's talk in the diary of a lot of malnutrition and disease

0:21:430:21:46

-caused through malnutrition.

-Yeah, I'm sure.

0:21:460:21:48

Obviously when he was in the camp, as a Warrant Officer Class 2,

0:21:480:21:53

Company Sergeant Major, he would have been very important in...

0:21:530:21:57

leading the British prisoners, liaising with the German guards,

0:21:570:22:02

the commandant, and because he had that warrant rank,

0:22:020:22:07

he would be looked up to.

0:22:070:22:09

Let's look through the diary.

0:22:090:22:10

You said there were various other things,

0:22:100:22:12

and their concert parties...

0:22:120:22:14

and here we are.

0:22:140:22:16

-Isn't that just fantastic?

-Yeah.

0:22:160:22:18

It Ain't Half Hot Mum.

0:22:200:22:22

-Exactly.

-And there, as you said,

0:22:220:22:24

one of the other prisoners dressed up as a lady.

0:22:240:22:28

-As a lady.

-Fantastic.

0:22:280:22:29

I've never seen this many photos from a prisoner of war camp.

0:22:290:22:32

-Yeah, quite special.

-It is very special.

0:22:320:22:34

One of the pictures I like the most is these two chaps hammering the

0:22:340:22:40

-living daylights out of each other in friendly competition.

-Uh-huh.

0:22:400:22:43

Taffy Jones of Wales,

0:22:430:22:45

this chap here, is giving a really good hammering

0:22:450:22:48

to the smiling kid, who is a Dutchman.

0:22:480:22:51

And we're not told who won, but my money's on Mr Jones.

0:22:510:22:54

This is very interesting.

0:22:550:22:57

"March past of all nationals."

0:22:570:22:59

And, "The camp commandant takes a salute."

0:23:010:23:03

So here we are.

0:23:030:23:05

You can see there's the Army, the Royal Air Force...

0:23:050:23:09

..the French...

0:23:110:23:12

..and the Hollanders. So there's obviously Dutch prisoners in there.

0:23:130:23:17

I think this is one of the most interesting pieces

0:23:180:23:21

of prisoner of war memorabilia that we've ever had.

0:23:210:23:25

Things like this, they don't have a tremendous commercial value.

0:23:250:23:28

If you bought this lot in an auction room, you'd be paying

0:23:280:23:31

200 or 300 quid for it, that's not very much.

0:23:310:23:33

-It's not the financial value that's important...

-No.

-..it's the story.

0:23:330:23:36

Yeah. And I think that with self publication,

0:23:360:23:40

-so easily these days...

-Yeah.

-..you should tell his story.

0:23:400:23:43

Yeah, I think I should, there's something can be done with it.

0:23:430:23:47

-I can see a book in this lot.

-Yeah. Thank you very much.

0:23:470:23:49

-This is what I'd call a large table, even a very large table.

-Yeah.

0:23:530:23:57

-It's made of solid oak, but with a huge great marble slab.

-Yeah.

0:23:570:24:01

How on earth did you get it here?

0:24:010:24:03

It was actually taken down a spiral staircase, so your team

0:24:030:24:07

done very well, actually.

0:24:070:24:09

A spiral staircase?

0:24:090:24:10

Yeah.

0:24:100:24:12

Well, thank you for that, anyway. Where is it in the house,

0:24:120:24:14

up in the bedroom or something?

0:24:140:24:16

No, no, no, it's up in my kitchen. I use it... This is my...

0:24:160:24:19

I eat my dinner off this.

0:24:190:24:20

It's a fantastic table and I'm rushing around in my mind trying to

0:24:200:24:23

work out what I think it is. Do you have any history at all?

0:24:230:24:26

I don't have really a lot of history at all.

0:24:260:24:28

I bought it maybe about ten years ago from a dealer friend of mine.

0:24:280:24:32

I really like Gothic kind of furniture

0:24:320:24:35

and it looked really Gothic, and I needed a table for my kitchen.

0:24:350:24:38

-THEY LAUGH

-Fair enough!

0:24:380:24:40

And I had a really small in there, so this was perfect.

0:24:400:24:42

Fantastic. It's a lovely table. I mean, it's just over six foot long,

0:24:420:24:46

it's a big table. With this marble top, almost certainly

0:24:460:24:49

-for perhaps game or for cold meats, something like that.

-Yeah.

0:24:490:24:54

Possibly in a back hall, when you come in from the shoot

0:24:540:24:57

to put the game, you know, pheasants and things...dead bird and game

0:24:570:25:01

and things like that on it. I don't know, that sort of thing.

0:25:010:25:03

That would make sense to have this big marble top.

0:25:030:25:05

-It's not made as an eating table, anyway.

-No, no.

0:25:050:25:08

Well, it's got a shelf at the bottom, so you can't actually

0:25:080:25:10

get your legs underneath it so you have to sit a little bit funny.

0:25:100:25:13

And of course what is not obvious,

0:25:130:25:15

that it's actually not carved at the back,

0:25:150:25:16

so the carvings are all on the front here, this wonderful carving.

0:25:160:25:19

And I love the grace of this carved oak ogee arch here,

0:25:190:25:23

slender going up like that to these crocketed finials at the end.

0:25:230:25:26

That is so typical of the Gothic period.

0:25:260:25:28

From the early Gothic to the Gothic reform, it's almost the hallmark.

0:25:280:25:31

But if you go from the back here, you've got a rose.

0:25:310:25:35

I don't know if it's a Scottish rose or not.

0:25:350:25:37

I think that's a lady's slipper or orchid down there

0:25:370:25:40

and then we move to... Oh, shamrock. Ah!

0:25:400:25:43

And a margarita or something and lily of the valley,

0:25:430:25:46

so it's intricately carved, it's really beautifully carved.

0:25:460:25:49

To me, I think there is a possibility it's

0:25:490:25:51

from Taymouth Castle. It's exactly the sort of thing I'd expect in

0:25:510:25:55

a big Scottish, possibly Highland castle, like Taymouth.

0:25:550:25:58

You know, the sort of French baronial look, which of course

0:25:580:26:01

was loved in Scotland.

0:26:010:26:02

I can't be sure, research might prove me right or wrong,

0:26:020:26:06

but I think I'm right because it was remodelled several times.

0:26:060:26:10

But in the late 1830s, by an architect called

0:26:100:26:12

James Graham, and one of the young people working with him

0:26:120:26:17

was the very young, at that time unknown, Augustus Pugin.

0:26:170:26:21

-If you like Gothic, you must have heard of him?

-I have, yes.

0:26:210:26:23

He's better known for the interiors of the House of Commons.

0:26:230:26:26

He is one of England's great architects.

0:26:260:26:30

Is it Pugin?

0:26:300:26:31

I hope so.

0:26:330:26:34

I don't think it's Pugin himself, but the interior decoration...

0:26:360:26:40

Pugin worked on that, not as a designer, as I know it,

0:26:400:26:43

but as a workman or drawing. I mean, nothing particularly important.

0:26:430:26:48

-Yeah.

-I mean, a house like that would have been typical

0:26:480:26:50

for this sort of very grand furniture, large-scale,

0:26:500:26:52

very expensive. This is very good quality oak,

0:26:520:26:55

-imported marble from Italy, so no expense spared.

-Yeah.

0:26:550:26:58

So we have something which he might have seen, he might have touched.

0:26:580:27:02

-Wow.

-Queen Victoria also stayed at the castle,

0:27:030:27:06

so we're getting a nice provenance, possibly, but we have to prove that.

0:27:060:27:09

-Yeah.

-Even so, without that proof at the moment, I think it's a...

0:27:090:27:14

..pretty good piece of furniture.

0:27:160:27:17

-Great.

-So...

0:27:170:27:19

..what is it worth?

0:27:200:27:21

I think £15,000 to £20,000.

0:27:240:27:26

Oh, my goodness.

0:27:260:27:28

Oh, my goodness. Oh, no!

0:27:280:27:30

Yes.

0:27:300:27:32

Now I'm going to feel very guilty if I have a curry on it.

0:27:320:27:35

Did you steal it or wheedle it out of the chap?

0:27:350:27:38

No, no! Well...

0:27:380:27:40

I actually bought it from the dealer, actually, for £5,000

0:27:400:27:46

and I thought I was happy to pay that, and I had...

0:27:460:27:49

It was a beautiful table. But I then met the dealer who sold it to that

0:27:490:27:53

dealer for £600, and he says, "Oh, you've been ripped off."

0:27:530:27:56

So I guess I haven't, actually.

0:27:570:28:00

Wow, that's fantastic.

0:28:000:28:02

-Thank you so much.

-You bought what you liked and it's paid off.

0:28:020:28:05

Brilliant, great, thank you very much.

0:28:050:28:07

We often find that people bring along items

0:28:080:28:10

that reveal their family history, but in your case,

0:28:100:28:13

what you brought along has opened a Pandora's box

0:28:130:28:16

-of family secrets?

-Yes.

0:28:160:28:19

It begins with your grandfather, Heinrich,

0:28:190:28:22

who was German and he was married to...?

0:28:220:28:25

-To Elspeth.

-Your grandmother.

0:28:250:28:27

Now, the problem was that Elspeth was not... Well, she was German,

0:28:270:28:30

-but she was also...

-She was a Jewess.

0:28:300:28:33

So that's not a particularly easy situation in the 1930s in Germany.

0:28:330:28:37

-Definitely not, no.

-I should point out that you're father and daughter?

0:28:370:28:41

-Yes.

-And you've got photographs of...

-We do, yes.

0:28:410:28:44

-..Heinrich and Elspeth.

-I do.

-Can we see?

0:28:440:28:45

This is Heinrich. This is my great-grandfather.

0:28:450:28:48

-In his German uniform.

-In his German uniform.

0:28:480:28:50

And he reputedly won the Iron Cross Class One

0:28:500:28:54

-and also the Knight's Cross for bravery.

-And so highly decorated.

0:28:540:28:57

So he was obviously in the German Army serving,

0:28:570:29:00

and this is my great-grandmother, who was Elspeth,

0:29:000:29:04

and being Jewish, obviously in the 1930s,

0:29:040:29:08

it was not possible for them to be together.

0:29:080:29:11

So the decision was made that they would need to separate.

0:29:110:29:15

So their marriage came under scrutiny, did it?

0:29:150:29:17

They had to divorce, I understand.

0:29:170:29:19

-They had to divorce?

-Yeah.

-Because she was Jewish and he was...

0:29:190:29:21

To break away and, of course...

0:29:210:29:23

..her family came to... came to the UK.

0:29:240:29:28

She left behind...

0:29:280:29:29

-..Heinrich.

-He was left behind, yes.

-Her husband.

0:29:300:29:32

And when he divorced her, do you know, was that an act of repudiation

0:29:320:29:36

because she was Jewish or was it an act of love to free her

0:29:360:29:39

-so that she could get to safety?

-I think it was an act of love,

0:29:390:29:41

to be honest with you. Something that had to happen.

0:29:410:29:44

So your father, along with his siblings, came to Britain.

0:29:440:29:47

He then took part in the Second World War?

0:29:470:29:50

-That's right.

-Of course, he was German.

-Yes.

0:29:500:29:52

-Did he admit to that?

-Never, never. He admitted...

0:29:530:29:56

He would say he was Scandinavian.

0:29:560:29:58

To admit to being German at that time when war was imminent and there

0:29:580:30:02

would have been a lot of anti-German feeling at that time in Britain,

0:30:020:30:06

but also the fact that there was the Jewish connection

0:30:060:30:09

in that Dad's grandmother was Jewish as well,

0:30:090:30:11

so they felt it was so shameful

0:30:110:30:13

that Dad wasn't even told about his origins.

0:30:130:30:16

Well, he found out quite accidentally,

0:30:160:30:19

he came across a family stamper that had the German name on it

0:30:190:30:23

and had no idea what it was and asked questions about it.

0:30:230:30:26

Any family documentation, any photographs were all destroyed,

0:30:260:30:31

so there was little or no evidence of the Germanic history there.

0:30:310:30:35

And do you think he felt a sense of shame about his heritage?

0:30:350:30:38

Yes, exactly. In fact, he admitted while I was there,

0:30:380:30:42

he said he's ashamed to be German.

0:30:420:30:45

And you've brought along all sorts of things,

0:30:450:30:47

a painting in particular...

0:30:470:30:49

-That's right.

-..which belonged your grandmother?

0:30:490:30:51

-That's right.

-To your great-grandmother...

-Yes.

0:30:510:30:53

..which we're going to look at.

0:30:530:30:54

That's the one thing she gave me after her death.

0:30:540:30:58

And that will no doubt reveal more of your family past,

0:30:580:31:01

-your family secrets?

-That's right.

0:31:010:31:03

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:31:030:31:05

There's something about the colour red

0:31:110:31:13

that really evokes the passion and it stirs the soul,

0:31:130:31:17

the power and desire and temptation

0:31:170:31:19

and there are a few gemstones that are red in colour, as well.

0:31:190:31:24

Now, before I tell you about those stones,

0:31:240:31:28

how did you get to have this?

0:31:280:31:30

My mother gave it to me, it was handed down to her

0:31:300:31:35

and she's now passed it on to me.

0:31:350:31:37

So don't really know anything about the bracelet, at all.

0:31:370:31:41

When did you receive this?

0:31:410:31:43

Just about a year ago.

0:31:430:31:45

And have you worn it?

0:31:450:31:46

-Erm, only once.

-And what did you feel when you were wearing it?

0:31:460:31:52

Um...made me feel good cos I like things sparkly,

0:31:520:31:55

that's why my mother gave it to me.

0:31:550:31:57

Do you like the colour red?

0:31:580:32:00

It's my birthstone, ruby.

0:32:000:32:02

But what do you think the stones are?

0:32:020:32:04

Well, my mother seem to think it was garnet.

0:32:040:32:07

And that's a red stone.

0:32:090:32:10

-Yes.

-So you've got all different types of garnet,

0:32:100:32:12

you've got pyrope garnet, almandine garnet

0:32:120:32:15

and they have all different types of red.

0:32:150:32:17

You've also got tourmalines, red tourmalines, rubelite,

0:32:170:32:20

they're also red and very, very occasionally,

0:32:200:32:24

you can get a red diamond, but that is absolutely rare,

0:32:240:32:27

and you also get rubies.

0:32:270:32:29

Now, why my heart sung where I saw these is because they're rubies.

0:32:310:32:36

Right.

0:32:360:32:38

-And they're rubies that are from Burma...

-Oh.

0:32:380:32:42

..from Myanmar as we know now.

0:32:420:32:44

But this is an incredibly important part of the world

0:32:440:32:48

where rubies have come from for the last 800 years.

0:32:480:32:53

Rubies had this fire, this life and especially from Burma,

0:32:530:32:57

from the Mogok area because of the chromium

0:32:570:33:00

and the chromium inside makes it really like a fire inside the ruby

0:33:000:33:06

and that's what you're looking for, the intensity of colour.

0:33:060:33:10

I just want to have a closer look at these stones here...

0:33:100:33:13

..because...

0:33:140:33:15

SHE CHUCKLES

0:33:170:33:18

It's a joy for me to have a look at these

0:33:180:33:20

cos when I look through my loupe, I'm looking through into the stone

0:33:200:33:23

and it's like a world of its own and it was about 1890,

0:33:230:33:28

that sort of period is when it was made.

0:33:280:33:30

Right.

0:33:300:33:31

These are getting rarer,

0:33:310:33:33

the style is not particularly in fashion at the moment,

0:33:330:33:37

but do you know?

0:33:370:33:38

I don't like talking about jewellery and fashion

0:33:380:33:41

because it's about quality.

0:33:410:33:43

So I would say that at auction

0:33:430:33:45

you're going to be thinking in the region of about

0:33:450:33:49

£3,000-£5,000.

0:33:490:33:51

Oh, goodness, that's a lot.

0:33:510:33:55

Right. OK, wow.

0:33:550:33:57

Speechless.

0:33:580:34:00

A nice piece, then.

0:34:000:34:01

A very plain green dish.

0:34:040:34:07

It's very plain.

0:34:070:34:08

And how long have you been aware of this dish?

0:34:080:34:11

I'm ashamed to say I'm not generally aware of it at all,

0:34:110:34:14

it just is tucked away in the corner,

0:34:140:34:16

but, I mean, it's been in the family probably over 100 years, I imagine.

0:34:160:34:21

Over 100 years. And how do you know that?

0:34:210:34:23

Er, because it's in some very old photos of a very old house.

0:34:230:34:28

OK. Well, photographs -

0:34:280:34:30

beginning of photography, 1850s or thereabouts,

0:34:300:34:32

so we're only going back into the second half of the 19th century.

0:34:320:34:36

-Mm-hm.

-OK, all right.

0:34:360:34:37

We've got to go back to, let's say, 1480.

0:34:370:34:44

This is probably the oldest piece...

0:34:440:34:46

-Of anything in the house.

-..of ceramic in your house.

0:34:460:34:48

And it's certainly the oldest piece I've seen today.

0:34:480:34:50

Well, that's amazing!

0:34:500:34:52

This is a porcelain dish,

0:34:520:34:54

everybody thinks of porcelain as being white and light,

0:34:540:34:58

-it's actually...

-Very heavy.

-Quite heavy, isn't it?

0:34:580:35:03

-And the colour?

-And the colour, ah!

0:35:030:35:05

The colour!

0:35:050:35:07

Now, this colour is celadon.

0:35:070:35:11

And we don't know why it's called celadon,

0:35:110:35:13

-possibly because Saladin, the great leader...

-OK.

0:35:130:35:17

-..liked this sort of thing coming from China to him.

-Mm-hm.

0:35:170:35:21

Or it may be because a French character in a play

0:35:210:35:25

in the 17th century who wore a coat of many greens was called Celadon.

0:35:250:35:30

-OK.

-We don't know, but what it does mean,

0:35:300:35:33

it is this very translucent,

0:35:330:35:35

-very vibrant green.

-Mm-hm.

0:35:350:35:36

I'm going to turn it over and show you where it's not green there.

0:35:360:35:41

This is because they wanted the glaze to run

0:35:410:35:43

all the way over the foot rim,

0:35:430:35:45

but they couldn't do that and stick it on the floor

0:35:450:35:48

of the saggar in which it was fired, the box in which it was fired.

0:35:480:35:53

So they had to wipe away the glaze from this point here

0:35:530:35:56

and they put it on a circular ring

0:35:560:35:58

-which they could then put in the kiln like that.

-Raise it up, yep.

0:35:580:36:02

And it wouldn't stick. So that's why that's there.

0:36:020:36:05

This dish was made in or around the city of Longquan,

0:36:050:36:10

which as you will know...

0:36:100:36:11

It's a long way from here.

0:36:130:36:15

..is in Zhejiang province

0:36:150:36:16

and they specialise in these things.

0:36:160:36:19

They exported them all over the Asian archipelago.

0:36:190:36:22

It follows a sort of Islamic metallic shape

0:36:220:36:25

because the Chinese were trying to get this exported into the...

0:36:250:36:29

-Into that market.

-Into that market.

0:36:290:36:31

It's a lovely thing. It's a little bit worn.

0:36:310:36:33

It stands where in the house?

0:36:340:36:36

It's just kind of in an alcove.

0:36:360:36:38

-In an alcove, hidden away.

-Yeah, hidden away.

0:36:380:36:40

It's a lovely colour, it's probably worth

0:36:400:36:42

somewhere in the region of

0:36:420:36:43

£1,000-£2,000.

0:36:430:36:46

Wow. Pretty good for what I consider to be a flan dish.

0:36:460:36:49

-So...

-SHE LAUGHS

0:36:490:36:51

Good. Good, I'm glad you like it.

0:36:510:36:54

I understand you were talking to Fiona earlier on

0:36:580:37:00

about your family's traumatic past in Germany in the 1930s

0:37:000:37:05

-and your grandmother coming over here?

-That's right, yes.

0:37:050:37:09

And did the whole family come over?

0:37:090:37:11

Three of them, my father,

0:37:110:37:13

my grandmother and my aunt, the three of them.

0:37:130:37:16

And this picture came over with them?

0:37:160:37:18

-It did, yes.

-So looking at this picture,

0:37:180:37:21

are there things in this picture that you still have?

0:37:210:37:24

Unfortunately not, I don't recognise anything.

0:37:240:37:27

But this was the interior of the house in Germany?

0:37:270:37:29

-Yes.

-And where was the house in Germany?

0:37:290:37:31

Unter den Linden in Berlin.

0:37:310:37:34

It's a fantastic memory of what was there.

0:37:340:37:37

-That's right.

-But I noticed on here

0:37:370:37:40

that there is a little bit of damage here, what actually happened?

0:37:400:37:43

One of the properties was bombed so...

0:37:430:37:46

Prince's Gate was bombed, as my daughter's saying.

0:37:460:37:49

And there is damage here and I think this is bomb damage

0:37:490:37:52

-from that period so when it came out, it had to be restored.

-OK.

0:37:520:37:56

And usually when you restore a picture,

0:37:560:37:58

you put the canvas onto another canvas.

0:37:580:38:00

This has been stuck on to board, which is the cheaper way of doing it

0:38:000:38:03

and I imagine during the Second World War

0:38:030:38:05

that's exactly what happened.

0:38:050:38:06

They wouldn't have had the materials.

0:38:060:38:08

But it's also signed down here, a slightly unpronounceable name,

0:38:080:38:12

I'm going to have to try to get my head around this.

0:38:120:38:15

It's Gertrude Zscheked.

0:38:150:38:17

And it's 1923, so this is a record of the family house in the 1920s.

0:38:170:38:22

That's correct.

0:38:220:38:23

What does it mean to you, having this picture?

0:38:230:38:26

I think it's fantastic to have some sort of memento, to start with.

0:38:260:38:31

As I've never seen... You know, I've never seen the actual building

0:38:310:38:35

since wartime, you know what I mean? I've never been over there.

0:38:350:38:39

Well, I think it's really nice to hear

0:38:390:38:41

because I'd want that,

0:38:410:38:42

having gone through what your family went...

0:38:420:38:45

-be able to have a memento.

-And being Unter den Linden,

0:38:450:38:47

of course that was bombed so the house wouldn't be in existence.

0:38:470:38:51

That would have been lost completely, as well.

0:38:510:38:53

Well, thinking about the past,

0:38:530:38:55

it's very nice to have a memory of that house in Germany.

0:38:550:38:59

It's very difficult to put a value on something like this

0:38:590:39:03

-because it's emotional.

-Yes.

0:39:030:39:05

And I feel that I look at this

0:39:050:39:08

and if I look... As a commercial picture, it's a nice interior,

0:39:080:39:12

1920s and it's probably worth in auction

0:39:120:39:18

£400-£600, maybe £500-£700.

0:39:180:39:20

But that's irrelevant cos it's priceless to you

0:39:200:39:22

-and it's such a nice thing to still have.

-Yes.

0:39:220:39:25

Could do a little bit of a clean.

0:39:250:39:26

-Could it?

-Yes. Just a little bit.

-We weren't sure what to do with it,

0:39:260:39:29

whether to leave it as is or whether to clean it.

0:39:290:39:31

Possibly a new frame, as well? I don't know.

0:39:310:39:33

No, the frame is contemporary with the period.

0:39:330:39:35

Very nice to see and it's nice to have that memory really of the past.

0:39:350:39:40

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:39:400:39:42

I've always wanted a musical box like this.

0:39:470:39:49

Then you'd want an aunt like mine.

0:39:490:39:52

Your aunt gave it to you?

0:39:520:39:53

She did indeed, yes. About three years ago.

0:39:530:39:57

I used to listen to it when I was a child

0:39:570:40:00

and she listened to it when she was a child

0:40:000:40:02

and it was her father that purchased it for her.

0:40:020:40:06

And it's second-hand from Switzerland, round about the 1920s.

0:40:060:40:11

So he was in Switzerland?

0:40:110:40:14

I believe it was one of his work colleagues.

0:40:140:40:16

He was an importer, based in Glasgow,

0:40:160:40:18

and I believe it was one of his colleagues

0:40:180:40:20

-that had brought it back for her.

-Fantastic.

0:40:200:40:23

Well, you probably know that this is all inlaid wood, various woods.

0:40:230:40:28

We've got kingwood, yew wood stringing,

0:40:280:40:33

rosewood. It's veneer, rather than solid.

0:40:330:40:36

And you can see how it's a little bit faded with the light

0:40:370:40:42

because here in the front, you can see the wonderful colours

0:40:420:40:47

they would have been and almost all of these particular musical boxes

0:40:470:40:51

had a musical element of the design in them.

0:40:510:40:55

So you know that it's a musical box before you even open it.

0:40:550:40:58

-Shall we open it?

-Yes, we shall.

0:40:580:41:01

Oh. Look at that. Look at that.

0:41:010:41:04

Now, what it... It's actually called Drum, Bells & Castanets.

0:41:040:41:10

And to me that is everything.

0:41:100:41:12

You've got the orchestra

0:41:120:41:14

rather than, if you like, just an ordinary cylinder

0:41:140:41:18

which hasn't got any extras.

0:41:180:41:20

Let's just open it up cos it's in extremely good condition,

0:41:200:41:24

you've obviously kept it very well.

0:41:240:41:26

I have to tell the truth and say, no, my aunt kept it very well.

0:41:260:41:30

Right, right.

0:41:300:41:31

Well, now these were made in Switzerland,

0:41:310:41:34

usually in a place called Bullet, Sainte Croix,

0:41:340:41:37

which is near Neuchatel and they're still making them today

0:41:370:41:41

and there were many, many makers there,

0:41:410:41:44

the most famous is Nicole Freres,

0:41:440:41:47

but if this was by Nicole Freres it would be plastered on there.

0:41:470:41:51

He would be, "I am..." You know, he'd put his name on it.

0:41:510:41:54

It could be by Vaucher Fils,

0:41:540:41:57

which is Vaucher Fils being sons.

0:41:570:42:00

But as they haven't got a name on it, it's one of those anyway.

0:42:000:42:04

So for a musical box of circa 1890, which is what this is,

0:42:040:42:09

if you were selling it at auction

0:42:090:42:11

you probably wouldn't get more than about £2,000 for it.

0:42:110:42:15

But if you were buying it, you'd probably have to spend 4,000.

0:42:150:42:19

Right. Gosh, that's a lot more than I expected.

0:42:190:42:23

So have you got a favourite?

0:42:230:42:25

I have indeed, it's Bygone Hours,

0:42:250:42:26

which is one of the wonderful waltzes that is on it.

0:42:260:42:30

So shall we play it?

0:42:300:42:31

-Yes, please.

-Right one, two, three.

0:42:310:42:33

MUSIC BOX PLAYS

0:42:330:42:35

It's a pretty little autograph book,

0:42:550:42:57

probably of the kind that was kept by countless young girls

0:42:570:43:00

over the course of time. Is it yours?

0:43:000:43:03

-It is, yes.

-And you're Joanne?

-Joanne, yes.

0:43:030:43:06

This is lovely.

0:43:060:43:08

"Joanne is a grocer girl." Do you want to read that to me?

0:43:080:43:10

"Joanna is a grocer girl

0:43:100:43:12

"She works in Biggar

0:43:120:43:13

"She climbs out and in the van

0:43:130:43:15

"So she can keep her figure."

0:43:150:43:17

That was written by one of my friends.

0:43:190:43:21

-Are you still friends?

-Friends with Agnes? Yes, yes.

-Lovely.

0:43:210:43:24

Lovely. So, yes, it's full of that kind of thing and very nice too.

0:43:240:43:28

But this is what brings me up short, look at this,

0:43:280:43:31

-this is signed by Hugh MacDiarmid.

-Mm-hm.

0:43:310:43:35

-He's one of the most important 20th-century Scottish poets.

-Yes.

0:43:350:43:38

What's he doing in there?

0:43:380:43:40

I took my autograph book and went with the groceries.

0:43:400:43:43

On your grocery round.

0:43:430:43:45

Grocery round and asked him to do an autograph for me

0:43:450:43:48

and he gave me a long lecture

0:43:480:43:50

about how he didn't do these kind of things.

0:43:500:43:53

And then I just stood there and the next thing he says,

0:43:530:43:56

"Give me it," and he wrote me this poem and he put the date.

0:43:560:44:00

Probably wasn't the most approachable of men, was he?

0:44:000:44:02

-No, he wasn't.

-He was quite old by then?

0:44:020:44:04

He was quite old by then and was very grey and always had a pipe...

0:44:040:44:09

-Yes.

-..smoked a pipe.

-Clearly a serious individual.

0:44:090:44:12

An important national poet, but also politician.

0:44:120:44:15

So involved in Scottish Nationalist politics.

0:44:150:44:17

He was what I'd call a grumpy old man.

0:44:170:44:20

Anyway what did he write?

0:44:220:44:23

Please, I would love it if you could read it to us.

0:44:230:44:26

"The Little White Rose Of Scotland.

0:44:260:44:28

"The rose of all the world is not for me

0:44:280:44:31

"I want for my part only the little white rose of Scotland

0:44:310:44:35

"That smells sharp and sweet and breaks the heart.

0:44:350:44:39

"Hugh MacDiarmid."

0:44:390:44:40

It's very moving, isn't it?

0:44:420:44:43

Yes.

0:44:430:44:44

I think you did fantastically well to get that, but also to keep it.

0:44:440:44:50

This isn't an original poem.

0:44:500:44:51

This is one of his published poems and a well-known poem, as well.

0:44:510:44:55

It's got a commercial value, of course it has.

0:44:550:44:57

Maybe not for the other poems, but just for the Hugh MacDiarmid,

0:44:570:45:00

£200-£300.

0:45:000:45:01

Oh.

0:45:010:45:02

That sounds nice.

0:45:020:45:04

I'm keeping it, though.

0:45:040:45:06

Well, I must say it's not every day

0:45:120:45:14

I get to record with a Shippam's fish paste pot.

0:45:140:45:17

Last summer, we went mudlarking on the Thames in London

0:45:170:45:21

-and we found the pot.

-This is living history, isn't it?

0:45:210:45:25

What you're doing is you're finding relics of former people's lives

0:45:250:45:30

and that's my job. I love it.

0:45:300:45:32

And this one takes me back to my childhood.

0:45:320:45:34

That call, "Andrew, Andrew, tea is ready."

0:45:340:45:37

And you'd say, "What is it?"

0:45:370:45:39

And she'd say, "Shippam's fish paste."

0:45:390:45:41

Anyhow, I'm delighted you're going out and getting your hands dirty

0:45:410:45:45

and slimy, what fun, I mean, its value is infinitesimal.

0:45:450:45:48

What is it? 30p.

0:45:480:45:51

That's what we thought.

0:45:510:45:52

But, you know, it is...it's viewing into other people's lives

0:45:520:45:56

and that for me is what history's all about.

0:45:560:45:59

Here we are by the banks of the Clyde.

0:46:030:46:05

And I think if I was having a bit of a plodge in the water,

0:46:050:46:07

I'd have a bit of a brighter expression than her.

0:46:070:46:09

What's wrong with her?

0:46:090:46:11

I don't know. She does seem quite miserable, doesn't she?

0:46:110:46:13

She does a bit.

0:46:130:46:14

-Have you known her for long?

-Years.

-OK.

0:46:140:46:17

She was always in my grandparents' house, sat on the sill in the window

0:46:170:46:21

halfway up the stairs. My grandparents passed on,

0:46:210:46:24

I went to my aunt's house and she was there,

0:46:240:46:26

so I sort of said to my aunt, "Oh, there she is!"

0:46:260:46:28

My aunt said, "Take her," cos I love her, I've always loved her.

0:46:280:46:31

Does she have a name, it sounds as though you're quite attached to her?

0:46:310:46:34

-She's Fish Lady.

-Fish Lady?

0:46:340:46:35

We know absolutely nothing about her, where she came from,

0:46:350:46:38

what her purpose in life is,

0:46:380:46:40

she's just sat there and gathered dust.

0:46:400:46:42

Well, you call her Fish Lady.

0:46:420:46:45

Maybe we should rename her Madame Poisson,

0:46:450:46:48

or in fact actually Madame Dauphin because it's a dolphin.

0:46:480:46:52

Oh!

0:46:520:46:53

She's sitting on a dolphin.

0:46:530:46:55

What I think's lovely about her,

0:46:550:46:56

although she is kind of sliding down the side of a dolphin,

0:46:560:47:00

but look how one of her feet is actually in the water.

0:47:000:47:02

Oh, do you know what? I'd never noticed that before.

0:47:020:47:05

The wave is actually modelled across there.

0:47:050:47:07

So, Madame Dauphin.

0:47:070:47:09

So she is French, we just need to date her now.

0:47:090:47:12

-Yeah.

-She's quite old.

-OK.

0:47:120:47:14

She's dated about 1720.

0:47:140:47:16

-Seriously?

-Seriously.

0:47:170:47:19

She was made near Nievre in about 1720.

0:47:190:47:23

-OK.

-So that just comes to what it's worth.

0:47:230:47:26

-Yeah.

-So you found it on your auntie's windowsill?

0:47:260:47:28

Yes.

0:47:280:47:30

If this was at auction,

0:47:300:47:32

it would make between £800-£1,200.

0:47:320:47:34

-Oh, that's OK.

-So she's quite pricey fish lady.

0:47:340:47:37

-Yes.

-Lovely, thank you.

0:47:370:47:39

-It's a pleasure.

-Thank you very much.

0:47:390:47:41

The pearls were bought at a car-boot sale for £2.

0:47:440:47:48

And when did you buy this?

0:47:480:47:50

About 18 months ago.

0:47:500:47:52

What caught my attention

0:47:520:47:53

was the fact they had the little chain on them.

0:47:530:47:57

And I know if you have a bracelet and you don't want to lose it,

0:47:570:48:00

you have a little chain put on it.

0:48:000:48:02

Pearls, it's all

0:48:020:48:03

about the lustre, it really is.

0:48:030:48:06

It's about you waving

0:48:060:48:09

and you can see your hand waving back to you.

0:48:090:48:13

And also it's size - size is important.

0:48:130:48:15

Now with these,

0:48:150:48:17

if these are natural,

0:48:170:48:19

it really is the bottom sort of three, three and a half inches

0:48:190:48:23

that is where your money's in.

0:48:230:48:27

I think that these could be natural pearls.

0:48:270:48:31

I'm going to be conservative with the price here,

0:48:310:48:34

I would say that in auction,

0:48:340:48:37

you'd probably be looking in the region of about

0:48:370:48:42

£2,000-£3,000.

0:48:420:48:45

Gosh. Unbelievable.

0:48:450:48:48

-Great car boot sale.

-Isn't that unbelievable?

0:48:480:48:50

So even though I hate little safety chains,

0:48:540:48:57

if you hadn't seen that safety chain,

0:48:570:49:00

you never would have given £2 for it.

0:49:000:49:03

No, it was the chain that I noticed.

0:49:030:49:05

I thought someone valued the pearls because they've put a chain on them.

0:49:050:49:09

The Roadshow is truly remarkable

0:49:120:49:15

-for producing things I've never seen before.

-Yes.

0:49:150:49:19

And I've never seen anything quite as confusing as this.

0:49:190:49:23

It is confusing, you're right.

0:49:230:49:24

Where did you get it?

0:49:240:49:26

We don't know how he actually came by it,

0:49:260:49:28

but it belonged originally to our grandfather

0:49:280:49:31

and that was passed on then to our father and now to us.

0:49:310:49:34

So the names on this don't mean anything to your family?

0:49:340:49:39

-Not directly, no.

-So it is something you've acquired?

0:49:390:49:42

-Yes.

-Do you know where this is from?

0:49:420:49:44

Yes, I've been down to Stickland. Or do you mean originally?

0:49:440:49:47

-Where this is made?

-No, I don't.

0:49:470:49:48

Although it has an eastern panel around the outside.

0:49:480:49:52

-It's from Sri Lanka.

-Oh.

0:49:520:49:54

And it's repousse work that they made often for export,

0:49:540:50:01

sometimes for home use, but I've never seen Sri Lankan work

0:50:010:50:05

with anything but Sri Lankan symbolism on it.

0:50:050:50:08

That's obviously the parish church.

0:50:080:50:10

It is. I've been there, yeah.

0:50:100:50:12

And then it says church and rectory, Reverend W Churchill.

0:50:120:50:16

Well, it can't be Winston because it's dated 1847,

0:50:160:50:20

13th February to 12th November 1884.

0:50:200:50:25

-Yeah.

-This is probably where the Reverend Churchill

0:50:250:50:30

started his pious work in this village church.

0:50:300:50:34

What I've deduced from it is that he was probably a missionary

0:50:340:50:38

in Sri Lanka from this time in 1847 to this date in 1884

0:50:380:50:45

and it was probably made as a goodbye gift.

0:50:450:50:50

-Right.

-Because this is obviously the end of his service there.

0:50:520:50:56

-Yes.

-I don't think that's his death.

0:50:560:50:59

We'd always assumed it was the end of his service in Stickland,

0:50:590:51:02

-but of course we don't know.

-No. I think in Sri Lanka, you see,

0:51:020:51:06

because these elephants, they're not Dorset elephants, are they?

0:51:060:51:10

-No!

-I mean, the extinct Dorset elephant.

0:51:100:51:13

We've got here this armorial thing with a Latin...

0:51:130:51:17

It's a rampant lion of sorts,

0:51:170:51:19

-with a Latin inscription that says, "Esse quam videri."

-Videri, yes.

0:51:190:51:24

What's that?

0:51:240:51:26

"To be, rather than seem."

0:51:260:51:29

Yes, that's right.

0:51:290:51:31

So I think if I saw that and I was taken by it and I had funds,

0:51:310:51:37

I'd probably pay as much as £300 for it.

0:51:370:51:40

But it's not as much about the value

0:51:400:51:42

as it is this cross pollination of cultures right there.

0:51:420:51:47

-It's just amazing.

-It is fascinating, it really is.

0:51:470:51:49

This is such a great toy car.

0:51:530:51:55

It's big, it's bold, it's beautifully decorated,

0:51:550:52:01

it's a snazzy colour.

0:52:010:52:03

Why have you got it?

0:52:030:52:04

My husband got it as a gift from his grandmother when

0:52:040:52:07

he was on holiday.

0:52:070:52:09

He would have been about seven, so about 43 years ago.

0:52:090:52:12

And she bought it at the jumble sale.

0:52:120:52:15

They were at the beach and she went off to a jumble sale

0:52:150:52:17

and came back with a car for him, so he was quite delighted with it.

0:52:170:52:20

I bet he was, presumably just bought for a few pence.

0:52:200:52:23

Yeah, I think it was 10p, 20p, something like that,

0:52:230:52:27

certainly not anything. It was a jumble sale in Millport,

0:52:270:52:30

nothing would have gone for a lot of money there.

0:52:300:52:32

Presumably, it had been played with and was in poor condition

0:52:320:52:36

-when he got it?

-Well, no. No, it wasn't.

0:52:360:52:38

He got it and he played with it.

0:52:380:52:41

He had his Action Men in it

0:52:410:52:43

and it was up and down the street and he had a lot of fun with it.

0:52:430:52:46

I suppose an object can only give once and it's already given.

0:52:460:52:50

-It has given a lot of pleasure to your husband.

-Absolutely.

0:52:500:52:53

But to me almost it's too good to be a toy,

0:52:530:52:57

for lots of reasons.

0:52:570:52:59

Let's just have a look at how beautifully made it is.

0:52:590:53:01

First of all, it's modelled on a real car.

0:53:010:53:04

It's modelled on an Alfa Romeo racing car called a P2.

0:53:040:53:08

So it's known as the P2 Alfa.

0:53:080:53:10

And just look at the detail.

0:53:110:53:13

First of all, the filler caps just below the cockpit

0:53:130:53:17

and on the radiator.

0:53:170:53:19

The radiator grille,

0:53:190:53:22

the tyres, they're proper cast tyres, they say Michelin on them.

0:53:220:53:25

The exhaust, the handbrake, the actual proper usable steering wheel.

0:53:260:53:33

So in every way, it looks like the real car,

0:53:330:53:35

apart from back here where of course you've got the arbor

0:53:350:53:38

to wind up the clockwork. Not seen on the full-size vehicle!

0:53:380:53:42

It was made in France by Compagnie Industrielle du Jouet, CIJ.

0:53:430:53:49

And the P2 Alfa was the car of the moment.

0:53:490:53:52

In 1925, it won an important race

0:53:520:53:55

and it was the Formula One car of its time.

0:53:550:53:59

So that's why the company produced them,

0:53:590:54:02

it was riding a wave of popularity,

0:54:020:54:05

and they produced a whole range of these in different colours,

0:54:050:54:09

so there was silver and white

0:54:090:54:11

and red and blue and the orange one is an unusual one.

0:54:110:54:16

Oh!

0:54:160:54:17

So let's think about the little boy

0:54:170:54:19

who would have owned this in the 1920s.

0:54:190:54:21

He would have been from a good family.

0:54:210:54:23

He would have probably heard about this fabulous race

0:54:230:54:27

where the P2 Alfa had won

0:54:270:54:30

and he would have got this at Christmas

0:54:300:54:32

and would have been completely over the moon.

0:54:320:54:36

So your husband had a lot of fun with it

0:54:360:54:39

and has it been passed down through the family or...?

0:54:390:54:42

Well, yeah, now it sits on a ledge in my son's room,

0:54:420:54:44

so he enjoys it, thinks it looks quite cool.

0:54:440:54:47

Cool it does look.

0:54:480:54:49

-What's it worth?

-I don't know.

0:54:490:54:52

I would have said year after year after year

0:54:520:54:55

these were fetching £2,000,

0:54:550:54:58

which is a lot of money for a toy car,

0:54:580:55:00

and I was very excited whenever saw one of these, as a result.

0:55:000:55:05

Something very strange happened this year

0:55:050:55:09

and one sold for £12,000.

0:55:090:55:12

So that has now made me completely rethink the value of this.

0:55:140:55:21

I mean, admittedly the one that was sold earlier in the year

0:55:210:55:23

was in perfect condition, original condition.

0:55:230:55:26

This isn't, but actually I like the fact it has been play worn,

0:55:260:55:30

it doesn't worry me at all

0:55:300:55:32

and it won't worry some types of collectors.

0:55:320:55:35

So I think I'm going to have to look at that £12,000 price and look at

0:55:350:55:40

the regular price and put it somewhere in the middle.

0:55:400:55:42

So I would say that your car today would be worth between

0:55:420:55:45

-£4,000 and £6,000.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:55:450:55:48

Oh, dear.

0:55:500:55:52

Well, he never expected that, not at all.

0:55:520:55:55

And is your son still going to have it?

0:55:550:55:57

Yeah. I think so.

0:55:570:55:59

Lucky son.

0:55:590:56:00

Thank you very much for bringing it in, it's been a real treat.

0:56:000:56:03

Thank you. Thank you very much.

0:56:030:56:06

I'll get it back in the bag.

0:56:060:56:07

THEY LAUGH

0:56:070:56:08

Throughout our day here filming at New Lanark,

0:56:120:56:15

we have been accompanied by the roar of the River Clyde.

0:56:150:56:18

And do you remember I told you at the beginning of the programme

0:56:180:56:21

that when this place was a thriving cotton manufacturers

0:56:210:56:24

it was a bit of a tourist attraction, as well?

0:56:240:56:26

Well, one of our visitors brought along an account written by her

0:56:260:56:29

great-great-grandfather of a visit to the cotton manufactory here,

0:56:290:56:34

as he describes it, and to the Falls of Clyde.

0:56:340:56:37

I just wanted to share his description

0:56:370:56:39

of the river here with you.

0:56:390:56:41

He writes, "A hollow murmuring noise first strikes the ear

0:56:410:56:45

"which gradually becomes louder and louder as you approach the fall."

0:56:450:56:50

From New Lanark and the whole Antiques Roadshow team, bye-bye.

0:56:500:56:53

Fiona Bruce and the experts head to the banks of the Cyde to meet visitors bringing family heirlooms to the 18th-century cotton mill of New Lanark. As evidence that you should never throw anything out, treasures featured include a pearl necklace bought cheaply at a boot sale, a valuable clock found in a flea market, and a rare cuddly toy found abandoned in a skip. Plus there is a moment of disquiet when a guest reveals how a family painting is a reminder of an uncomfortable family secret that dates back to the days of Nazi Germany.