Baddesley Clinton 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Baddesley Clinton 1

A visit to Baddesley Clinton near Warwick uncovers a gruesome box containing a wooden peg removed from a child's eye by a surgeon in the 1780s.


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In this idyllic setting, it feels as if we've stepped back in time.

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It's hard to believe we're only 15 miles from Birmingham.

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And the history of this picture-perfect moated manor house

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stretches back 800 years.

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But it was in Tudor times that things got really interesting.

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That's when the Ferrers family took up residence,

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and one of them, called Henry,

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earned himself the nickname The Antiquary.

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So I like to think he'd be pleased

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that the Antiques Roadshow has come to his home.

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Welcome to Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire.

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A 16th-century lawyer, Henry Ferrers had quite a passion for history

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and was very proud of his ancestry.

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He lavished a fortune on this house,

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making it a home he could be proud of,

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fitting for a man of his stature.

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He commissioned heraldic stained-glass windows,

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ornately carved mantles -

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he couldn't get enough of it.

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There are heraldic carvings everywhere.

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Henry kept a record of his many purchases,

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and he was particularly proud of this chimney piece

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he had made for the grand master bedroom.

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Can't say I blame him. Certainly rather impressive.

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And Henry kept a list of things that he owned

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and things he'd like to own,

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and he placed them under certain categories. -

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for storage, for necessity,

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for profit, or for pleasure.

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Sounds like a few of the antiques experts I know.

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By the late 1580s,

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Henry was struggling financially

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and made the decision to lease out the house

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to an ardently Catholic family.

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Showing any Catholic leanings

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during the reign of the Protestant Elizabeth I was risky.

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It was an act of treason to harbour

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a Roman Catholic priest in your house.

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But his tenants were undeterred.

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One day, in October 1591,

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a handful of Catholic priests were staying here

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when there was a knock at the door.

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The priest hunters had arrived, and they wanted to search the house.

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Quick as a flash, the priests ran for the privy,

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which gave access via its waste pipe

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to a well-concealed priest hole in the medieval sewer below.

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Compared to the fate that awaited them if they were caught,

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this must have seemed like the preferable,

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if distinctly unpleasant, option.

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Of the priests that hid at Baddesley Clinton,

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three were later executed for treason.

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Although Henry Ferrers was dangerously close

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to these illegal activities -

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either due to luck, or friends in high places -

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he managed to escape any blame.

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Successive members of the Ferrers family continued to live here,

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enjoying the building and possessions

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that were Henry's labour of love,

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until it was all handed over to the National Trust in 1980.

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We're hoping to see more fine antiques and artefacts

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at today's Antiques Roadshow.

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I wonder which of them will be for profit or for pleasure?

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Let's join our experts and visitors and find out.

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So, this is quite a heavy pedestal. How on earth did you get it here?

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Well, we pushed it in the back of the car somehow this morning,

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and when we got to the car park, there were some very nice gentleman

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that carried it all the way in for us.

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That's fantastic. Well, thank you for bringing it in.

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It's an interesting item.

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Do you have any story about it? Do you know anything about it?

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It came from an old country house where my aunt was a housekeeper

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58, 60 years ago,

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and they were clearing it out,

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and this was destined to go on the bonfire

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because they considered it wasn't any good,

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that it was plaster or something like that.

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And my husband knew I liked things like this,

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and he said, "Could we have it"?

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So I've looked after it. In a fashion.

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Saved from the bonfire.

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Yes, it was before skips!

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LAUGHTER

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Well, OK. We've got to date this.

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Do you know anything about the house at all?

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-Do you remember the name of the house?

-Yes, it was Northwick.

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-Northwick.

-Yes.

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Right. Well, if we could do some research,

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I think we could find out possibly who made this.

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Have you any idea of what date it is?

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I just called it my Adam pillar,

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because it reminded me of the way Adams do their fireplaces

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so we just called it Adam.

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You don't need me at all here, do you, at all?

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-It's exactly what it is.

-I do.

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You're going to tell me how badly I've looked after it.

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Well, what have you done to it, then?

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Why are you so worried about it?

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-Have you had it stripped or something?

-Yes.

-Ah.

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So, what colour was it?

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It was a sort of dirty grey-green.

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Ah. You mean, it was the original Adam grey-green?

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-LAUGHTER

-Probably.

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The Adam grey-green from the late 18th century?

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1775, 1780.

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I don't know.

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I just assumed that it was Adam.

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Something to do with Adam and then...

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-Yes.

-And you still had it stripped?

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Well, yes, because my father-in-law painted it again,

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-and he painted it blue and white.

-OK, OK, OK.

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-Let's end that one.

-Yes, I know, you didn't want to know.

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This is beautiful. It is a Adam-period pedestal

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of the 1770s, 1780, from a grand country house,

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possibly one of a pair, originally.

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What I love about it is the quality of this pine.

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I know it's been stripped - so many of these pieces have -

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but just look here, the lovely, lovely straight-grained pine...

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-I think it's beautiful.

-It's beautiful. But look at this.

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What do you think this is made of?

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-Well, I'm sure it's wood.

-Mm-hm.

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But everybody kept telling me it was plaster.

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But when little pieces come off, it's wood.

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It is, isn't it? You can see it's clearly wood. But not pine.

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It's probably a lime wood, which is the best wood for carving.

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And just look at the detail of the ribbon, the flowers.

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-Look at this.

-It's gorgeous, the ram.

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And that's typical of Adam.

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The ram's head is so typical of Robert Adam, the architect.

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It would've been made, probably, for standing a candlestick on,

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a candelabra, for lighting.

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I always thought it ought to have a bust on it.

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-I don't know why.

-I think candelabra.

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I think lighting, I think for lighting.

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It's a fantastic object.

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So... Well, you clearly don't value it at all,

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if you had it stripped from the original Adam green.

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I just love it.

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And I wanted people to know that it was wood

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and not keep telling me it was plaster.

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It's carved wood, very special.

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Difficult to value.

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A minimum, I would say, of £5,000.

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-CROWD:

-Oh!

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Thank you.

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Thank you.

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LAUGHTER

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Perhaps my daughter will appreciate it a little more now!

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The sort of secret Catholics

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that would've lived in the house behind me,

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had they seen objects like this,

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had they been around at the time,

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they would have been deeply impressed.

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So, you're a vicar, and these are your saints.

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Yeah, they sit in our church on a Sunday

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and just add to the beauty of the building.

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It's St Mary Magdalen's in Coventry.

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We're famously known as the church with the blue roof in the city.

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So, where do they come from?

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There's a little bit of a story

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that one of the early vicars went over to the Continent

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and brought them back to decorate the church for its worship.

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It's a 1930s building,

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yet there's something about them being 18th and 17th century.

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With this one,

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the story is that it's St Joseph

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with the toddler Jesus, from Germany.

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It looks to me as though it's St Christopher with his staff

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but you're the vicar.

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We just know it's roughly about 17th century,

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but that's what's in the church archives.

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Well, I would put it a little bit earlier.

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I would say it was late 16th, early 17th century.

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I think you're possibly right, southern German.

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Now, the one to the left of that, well, she's very different.

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Of course, she's polychrome, she's painted,

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and gives an idea of the extraordinary colour

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that would've been around in churches

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in the 16th and 17th century,

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that is so lost to us in many of them now.

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I would say, though, that it was 18th century, probably Spanish,

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and it certainly looks to me

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to be a good example of oak carving.

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This one is supposedly of St Anne,

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and it's St Anne teaching Mary how to read.

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What a wonderful image.

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And this is baroque.

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It's beginning to move.

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It's quite different from the one we've just seen.

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Well, actually, not as active

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as the figure next to which it stands.

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St John, is that?

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Supposedly so, yes.

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St John with a lamb that's jumping up at him.

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What I love, though, is this is full-blown baroque

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going into rococo.

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It's like a cloud that's fused with a human being.

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And I would say that was late 17th, early 18th century.

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I suspect, Spanish again.

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And a rather different image at the end.

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Who are we calling him? Is it St George?

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It is, it's St George killing a dragon.

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Ah, I see, he's wrestling with it.

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But how does he go down with the congregation?

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Well, he's started to cause a bit of problem with the congregation

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and worry a few of them.

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And that's because...?

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Well, it caused a bit of concern

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when it silhouetted against a window.

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Oh, I see, OK.

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And so what's the solution for that one?

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He's been relegated to the organ loft nowadays.

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-The organ loft?

-Yes.

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I can understand where you're coming from.

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Well, let's talk about some valuations, if we may.

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So, starting with, it could be St Christopher, at the end,

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I would say somewhere in the region

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of £10,000 to £15,000.

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Wow.

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I think the 18th-century Spanish St Anne and Mary,

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I think that's £15,000.

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The St John, a little bit later, but with all of that animation

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and movement and twisting bodily form,

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again, something that attracts the eye.

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£10,000 to £15,000.

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And I've thought long and hard about the problematic St George.

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I'm beginning to wonder whether he could be much, much later.

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But I'm going to say only about £2,000 to £3,000 for this.

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-That's good!

-So, a valuation for the group,

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somewhere in the region of about £50,000.

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I think we'll have to have a meeting

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because we've lots of children running around,

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I think it's going to cause me a bit of a heart attack now!

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When I look at a pocket globe like this

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it immediately takes me straight back

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to the time that it was made.

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A time when it was about discovery.

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It was about discovery in astronomy,

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it was about discovery in geography,

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it was about discovering new lands,

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and a little object like this catalogues it all.

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How did you get hold of it?

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It belonged to my late father.

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I don't know where he got hold of it.

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He showed it to us

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and pointed out some interesting things about it when I was a lad,

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but in those days I wasn't terribly interested,

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and I probably shrugged my shoulders and walked off.

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But now I'm fascinated by it

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-and I want to know some more about it from you, please.

-Very good.

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Well, the first thing is,

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-I'm going to be really pedantic and put on gloves.

-Right.

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Now, the reason I'm putting on gloves

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is that the acid in your fingers

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interferes with the coating over the globe.

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And, fine, you've been handling it very happily

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for the last I don't know how long,

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but what I would say is that, from now on,

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it would be really handy

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to use gloves, to stop anything happening.

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-You know, it's in remarkable condition.

-Yes.

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First of all, we've got the cartouche here,

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and it says the name of the maker,

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Nath Hill - Nathanial Hill - and the date, 1754.

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Well, Nathanial Hill was a globe maker.

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He was thriving up until about 1768,

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about that period.

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But the interesting thing is, it's this particular globe,

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the 1754 globe, which seems to have been incredibly popular,

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judging by the number that have survived.

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And at that time in 1754,

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there were all kinds of stuff going on.

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-How closely have you looked at it over the years?

-Pretty closely.

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I always notice the fact

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that half of Australia hasn't yet been discovered,

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so it isn't on the globe.

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Exactly, it's pre-Cook.

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It's pre-Captain Cook.

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Now, I've got my lens here,

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and I'm just going to give myself a bit of an aid.

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Yeah, you see, this is... This is fantastic.

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Up here at the top of America where Alaska, we now know it to be,

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it says, "Unknown Parts"!

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THEY LAUGH

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It's the parts that explorers hadn't yet reached.

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So, one has to remember,

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in the Age of Enlightenment,

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that this was a time when cultured people were encouraged

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to get a knowledge in the broad arts and sciences,

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and this was part of that education.

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We have astronomy here, with the Northern Hemisphere

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and the Southern Hemisphere printed inside the cover of the globe.

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And it would've been a conversation piece,

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you would have discussed it with your friends.

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"Ah, I've got the 1754 one."

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"Well, what's happened since the last one was printed?"

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"Well, look, they've discovered another little bit of X, Y and Z."

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So these were talking points,

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but also, they were educational amusements as well.

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I would say, at auction, we're talking about

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between £7,000 and £9,000 on it.

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-CROWD MEMBER:

-Wow!

-LAUGHTER

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Don't fall over!

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Could you say that again, please?

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Shall I write it down?

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With all the noughts!

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£7,000 to £9,000.

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No question.

0:13:590:14:00

It's a cracker.

0:14:000:14:02

Well, at first glance, this looks like it's a fairly typical

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little silver, late Georgian pillbox,

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maybe a patch box.

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But it's slightly more interesting than that, isn't it?

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You can see on the lid here,

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-it's engraved with an eye and an inscription.

-That's correct.

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What can you tell me about it?

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It's a small silver box

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and, inside it, it contains a wooden peg.

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The peg is about three quarters of an inch long

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-by about a quarter of an inch thick.

-Little peg there,

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-and it's beautifully attached to the box on a little silver chain.

-It is.

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And around the outside,

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it tells a story

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of a young boy called Ben Taylor,

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and when he was nine years old, he had a fall,

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and the peg that is in the box

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went into his eye.

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It was in his eye for around five months...

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..and then it was removed by a surgeon

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called Richard Sandbach.

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Now, I'm assuming that as the date of it was 1730-1731

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that this would have been a barber-surgeon,

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not a surgeon as we would know today.

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Well, in fact, I had a quick look at it

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and the date on it is actually 1781.

0:15:230:15:26

-Oh, right.

-It's slightly...

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It's in old script,

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so it's quite difficult to see.

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I've spoken to our silver experts,

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and they agree that it is 1781.

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-I think it's just got a little rubbed.

-OK.

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So he wouldn't have been a barber-surgeon,

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he would've been a pretty skilled surgeon

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to have done an operation like that.

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So, how did you come to own it? Is it a family piece?

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It belonged to my late husband.

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It was in a shop, possibly one of his father's shops,

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in the back of a cupboard.

0:15:520:15:54

It was black...because it had obviously been there

0:15:540:15:58

for many, many, many years,

0:15:580:15:59

and didn't discover what it was until it was cleaned.

0:15:590:16:03

So we don't know any history about it really at all?

0:16:030:16:05

We don't know any history at all.

0:16:050:16:06

Well, I think it's a fantastically macabre little piece.

0:16:060:16:09

Probably a little pillbox, dated from the 1780s.

0:16:090:16:12

No hallmark on it, and as a box,

0:16:120:16:15

-it doesn't really have a great deal of value.

-No.

0:16:150:16:17

But with the story behind it, and its beautifully engraved

0:16:170:16:21

inscription giving us a detailed history of the story,

0:16:210:16:25

it's something that would be really, really collectable.

0:16:250:16:28

I would like to see it in a museum.

0:16:280:16:30

And have you tried to research the name of the surgeon at all?

0:16:300:16:33

Yes, but as I was looking for 1730 as opposed to 1780,

0:16:330:16:39

that may be why I wasn't very successful.

0:16:390:16:42

Obviously, we have to talk about value.

0:16:420:16:44

I think, if it came up for sale,

0:16:440:16:46

it would really appeal to a doctor or a surgeon

0:16:460:16:50

who collects things of a medical nature,

0:16:500:16:53

and in a medical sale, I think you'd be looking at a price

0:16:530:16:56

of maybe £700, £800,

0:16:560:16:58

something of that sort of order.

0:16:580:17:00

That's more than I expected,

0:17:000:17:02

but it's not for sale.

0:17:020:17:04

Nowadays, I try and avoid using superlatives,

0:17:080:17:13

but I have to tell you,

0:17:130:17:14

this is probably the finest piece of electroplate

0:17:140:17:17

I've ever seen on the Antiques Roadshow.

0:17:170:17:19

LAUGHTER

0:17:190:17:20

What can you tell me about its history?

0:17:200:17:23

Well, it's been in my family

0:17:230:17:24

for as long as I can remember, obviously.

0:17:240:17:27

My grandfather bought it originally,

0:17:270:17:30

I believe from a country house sale not far from here.

0:17:300:17:33

I think it was Wootton Hall,

0:17:330:17:35

-which I think might have been in the Guinness family.

-OK.

0:17:350:17:38

I expect you might know also who might have made it?

0:17:380:17:41

I know the top is Elkington.

0:17:410:17:43

-That's correct.

-And the base,

0:17:430:17:45

I've never been able to find a mark,

0:17:450:17:47

but whether there is one...

0:17:470:17:48

Well, Elkingtons were the great pioneers of electroplate

0:17:480:17:54

in the 19th century.

0:17:540:17:55

They didn't invent it,

0:17:550:17:57

but they adapted the process

0:17:570:17:59

to such a terrific degree

0:17:590:18:01

that they went round museums all around Europe

0:18:010:18:04

copying great works of art,

0:18:040:18:07

and they did this by a specific process,

0:18:070:18:10

and that's called electro-forming,

0:18:100:18:12

or then it was called electro-typing.

0:18:120:18:15

And, very oversimplified,

0:18:150:18:17

electro-forming is building up layer upon layer upon layer of plate

0:18:170:18:22

on top of a mould,

0:18:220:18:23

and it produces the most perfect copy.

0:18:230:18:26

Then, as with this piece,

0:18:260:18:29

gold is used to just highlight it

0:18:290:18:32

and make it, aesthetically, a stunning object.

0:18:320:18:36

-There's one thing I didn't say.

-Yep.

0:18:360:18:38

The family history also says that they believe it might have been

0:18:380:18:41

an exhibition piece at the Great Exhibition,

0:18:410:18:44

-but I've got no way of proving that.

-OK.

0:18:440:18:46

All right, well, we'll come to that in a moment.

0:18:460:18:49

Let's have a look at the decoration on the top here.

0:18:490:18:52

We've got...astrological signs around the outside.

0:18:520:18:56

For example, we've got October here,

0:18:560:18:58

and then we've got the scorpion for Scorpio on the edge.

0:18:580:19:02

In the centre,

0:19:020:19:03

it looks like harvest time.

0:19:030:19:06

The fruits of the earth sort of symbols.

0:19:060:19:09

And in answer to your question about

0:19:090:19:11

whether this was made for the Great Exhibition,

0:19:110:19:15

-I can tell you, no, it wasn't.

-No.

0:19:150:19:17

Because this little mark here

0:19:170:19:19

-is a registration mark.

-Yeah.

0:19:190:19:21

And from that, I can tell you

0:19:210:19:24

that the design was registered

0:19:240:19:25

on the 5th of October 1869.

0:19:250:19:29

So it should be an exhibition piece -

0:19:290:19:31

that you are right about -

0:19:310:19:33

but it's not for the Great Exhibition.

0:19:330:19:35

You know, nearly 20 years too late.

0:19:350:19:38

I think we're looking at something between

0:19:380:19:41

£7,000 and £10,000.

0:19:410:19:42

-CROWD MEMBER:

-Gosh!

0:19:420:19:44

-Very nice. Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

0:19:450:19:48

-Wonderful. Thank you very much.

-Great object.

0:19:480:19:50

-I think I've found the coolest item today.

-Oh!

0:19:540:19:58

Tell me about it.

0:19:580:19:59

OK. My friend Tony give it to me in about 1985.

0:19:590:20:03

He run a pub in Liverpool, someone come in the pub one day and said,

0:20:030:20:07

"I was working in a cinema, I found this in the attic."

0:20:070:20:10

And Tony says, "Oh, I like that," he says. "Come in the pub," he says,

0:20:100:20:13

"you can have free beer for, like, two nights."

0:20:130:20:15

It's just different.

0:20:180:20:20

I like it on the wall, but the wife doesn't like it on the wall

0:20:200:20:22

-so it's stuck in the attic most times.

-Hence the dust!

0:20:220:20:25

I was going to say...

0:20:250:20:26

It's very basic in form

0:20:260:20:28

-and, literally, to do what it said.

-Yes.

0:20:280:20:31

It's a sign to say, "This is a talking film".

0:20:310:20:34

Yeah, that's correct.

0:20:340:20:35

Get it up on the wall,

0:20:380:20:39

cos it's worth £300 to £500.

0:20:390:20:40

OK. You know, it's going to stop in the attic, unfortunately!

0:20:400:20:44

LAUGHTER

0:20:440:20:46

So, look, "The world of fashions and continental feuilletons.

0:20:540:20:58

"A monthly publication dedicated to high-life fashionables, fashions,

0:20:580:21:01

"polite literature, fine arts, the operas, theatres,

0:21:010:21:04

"embellished with London and Parisian fashions."

0:21:040:21:06

What a great thing.

0:21:060:21:07

-Is it yours?

-It's my grandma's,

0:21:070:21:09

-and she had it when she was 15 from a family friend.

-Right.

0:21:090:21:12

-And she's kept it ever since in her wardrobe.

-Right.

0:21:120:21:14

Wrapped up nice and neatly.

0:21:140:21:17

She used to read it when she was younger,

0:21:170:21:18

and I've had a look at it and I think it's fascinating.

0:21:180:21:21

It's wonderful, isn't it?

0:21:210:21:22

I mean, it's got some fabulous drawings in, from back in the 18...

0:21:220:21:26

1832, it was.

0:21:260:21:28

Yes, these are engravings, so these are prints, engraved prints,

0:21:280:21:32

but they're lovely because they've been hand-coloured at the time,

0:21:320:21:35

-so the colours really leap off the page.

-Yes.

0:21:350:21:37

-I suspect that's something that appeals to you?

-Definitely.

0:21:370:21:40

-I love anything with colour.

-Right.

0:21:400:21:41

Colourful clothes, colourful pictures,

0:21:410:21:43

so it's definitely appealing to myself.

0:21:430:21:46

It's incredibly opulent, isn't it?

0:21:460:21:47

These over-the-top gowns, fantastic fabrics, silks,

0:21:470:21:52

lovely sequence of hats here,

0:21:520:21:54

just on their own.

0:21:540:21:55

-Yeah, so quite an unexpected piece.

-Yeah, it is.

0:21:550:21:57

I mean, it's a wonderful book, and to have kept it for that long,

0:21:570:22:00

nearly 200 years, it's just wonderful.

0:22:000:22:03

-It survived very well.

-It has.

-It's lost its covers, unfortunately,

0:22:030:22:06

and I think it may have lost a couple of pages, front and back.

0:22:060:22:09

-Here and there.

-It's not a big problem.

0:22:090:22:11

It has a value.

0:22:110:22:13

People will always love colour, people will always like fashions.

0:22:130:22:16

So, what's it worth?

0:22:160:22:18

-£150, £200.

-OK.

0:22:180:22:21

I wasn't expecting it to be quite that, worth quite that much.

0:22:210:22:24

No, that's great.

0:22:240:22:26

When I was told by one of my colleagues

0:22:280:22:30

that there was an owner at the counter

0:22:300:22:31

with an archive material relating to the Mayflower,

0:22:310:22:34

from Plymouth to the New World,

0:22:340:22:36

I thought all my birthdays had come at once.

0:22:360:22:39

And then, subsequently, I heard that

0:22:390:22:41

you had... It was his grandfather

0:22:410:22:44

who'd been cook on board, I suddenly thought,

0:22:440:22:46

-"That can't be right."

-Doesn't add up.

0:22:460:22:48

Doesn't add up. 1620? No!

0:22:480:22:52

So it then clicked that this must have been a later voyage.

0:22:520:22:56

It was. If you roll forward to 1955,

0:22:560:23:01

they hatched a plan to recognise the close relationship

0:23:010:23:04

between Great Britain and America

0:23:040:23:06

during the Second World War

0:23:060:23:07

by recreating the voyage of the Pilgrim Fathers

0:23:070:23:09

from Plymouth to Plymouth Rock, Cape Cod, etc.

0:23:090:23:12

And so they commissioned a builder in Brixton to build from English oak

0:23:120:23:16

an exact replica of the Mayflower,

0:23:160:23:18

called the Mayflower II.

0:23:180:23:20

That was crewed by 33 men,

0:23:200:23:22

went to sea for 50 days

0:23:220:23:24

and the cook was my grandfather, Walter Godfrey.

0:23:240:23:26

I mean, was he a ship's cook normally?

0:23:260:23:28

Yeah, he was chief steward

0:23:280:23:30

on the General Steam Navigation sailing steam vessels

0:23:300:23:33

that went from Southend to Broadstairs,

0:23:330:23:35

and that was his living.

0:23:350:23:37

He was 57 when he sailed on the Mayflower II.

0:23:370:23:40

And one assumes, then, they lived the life on board, they...

0:23:400:23:44

Did they dress in modern clothes or contemporary clothes?

0:23:440:23:46

No, they had an outfit

0:23:460:23:48

which was contemporary in 1620,

0:23:480:23:51

and he can be seen here wearing the outfit.

0:23:510:23:55

One hears about the awful food

0:23:550:23:57

they used to eat in the 17th century,

0:23:570:23:59

you know, ship's biscuits with weevils in.

0:23:590:24:02

Did they have a modern menu?

0:24:020:24:03

I think... No, they didn't have a modern menu.

0:24:030:24:05

When you look at his menu book, which is here,

0:24:050:24:07

it details everything that was served,

0:24:070:24:09

three meals a day for 33 men, 53 days.

0:24:090:24:12

And generally starts with rolled oats,

0:24:120:24:14

so that was a sort of kick-off point,

0:24:140:24:17

but the crew really appreciated the efforts he was making.

0:24:170:24:20

Some of the notable things he did was to issue lime juice,

0:24:200:24:22

-which is, of course, a great scurvy inhibitor.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:24:220:24:25

So I think the crew really appreciated his efforts.

0:24:250:24:29

And bobbing around in a ship like that...

0:24:290:24:31

Yeah, interestingly, when you read his diary, his handwriting,

0:24:310:24:33

when he says "a rough sea", you can tell!

0:24:330:24:36

Because the handwriting...

0:24:360:24:38

is almost following the waves!

0:24:380:24:40

And did you know your grandfather at all?

0:24:400:24:42

I knew him till I was about six.

0:24:420:24:44

He was a bit of a character.

0:24:440:24:45

This photograph here,

0:24:450:24:47

when they arrived in America, they were feted.

0:24:470:24:50

Just tell me what's going on here.

0:24:500:24:51

What's happening here, they arrived at Cape Cod

0:24:510:24:53

and sailed up the Hudson,

0:24:530:24:55

past Lady Liberty and landed at Manhattan

0:24:550:24:57

and were given a ticker-tape parade through Broadway,

0:24:570:25:01

celebrating the close union between the two countries.

0:25:010:25:04

And they were welcomed very, very...

0:25:040:25:06

Grandpa went on American TV shows

0:25:060:25:09

doing cooking programmes,

0:25:090:25:10

you know, met the President, and they had a fantastic time.

0:25:100:25:13

They were welcomed with open arms,

0:25:130:25:15

and it was a celebration of a union.

0:25:150:25:17

And a true adventure.

0:25:170:25:19

And a true adventure, yeah.

0:25:190:25:20

I mean, they talk about lightning strikes,

0:25:200:25:22

they had no fresh water to wash in,

0:25:220:25:23

when it rained they all went on deck starkers

0:25:230:25:25

and ran round cleaning themselves.

0:25:250:25:27

So, they had a good, fun trip.

0:25:270:25:29

Monetary value - we have to talk about that -

0:25:290:25:31

we're not talking about, you know, thousands of pounds.

0:25:310:25:35

I think it's important, it must be kept together,

0:25:350:25:37

to donate it to a museum would be ideal.

0:25:370:25:40

And in real terms, it's worth, I don't know,

0:25:400:25:42

maybe between £600 and £800 for the whole archive.

0:25:420:25:45

-But that's not the point, is it?

-No, no.

0:25:450:25:47

It's a reflection of his memory,

0:25:470:25:50

of what was a daring and exciting voyage.

0:25:500:25:53

Well, thank you so much for bringing it and sharing it with us.

0:25:530:25:55

It's a pleasure.

0:25:550:25:56

Well, antiques come with stories...

0:26:010:26:03

and they come with other stories -

0:26:030:26:05

and this one's a blinder.

0:26:050:26:06

So, take it away.

0:26:060:26:08

Well, my great-great-grandfather was in Paris, I guess, in 1848

0:26:080:26:14

when the Revolution happened,

0:26:140:26:16

and he somehow got a hold of this

0:26:160:26:19

and, several years later, brought it out to Australia

0:26:190:26:21

when he emigrated, with him,

0:26:210:26:23

and it's just stayed in the family ever since.

0:26:230:26:25

So, what we have is a picture

0:26:250:26:28

of your 16-year-old great-great-grandfather

0:26:280:26:31

in Paris, tumultuous Paris,

0:26:310:26:33

in the middle of yet another French Revolution

0:26:330:26:36

in which the King, Louis Philippe, is deposed,

0:26:360:26:39

and here we have a glass

0:26:390:26:41

that I don't doubt is from his dining table.

0:26:410:26:44

So how do you interpret that?

0:26:440:26:45

Are we talking about a looter or...what?

0:26:450:26:49

Erm...possibly he helped the King and maybe the King gave it to him.

0:26:490:26:53

I see. That's what it was - he was a royal servant aged 16.

0:26:530:26:56

-Possibly!

-Very likely story, don't we think(?)

0:26:560:26:59

Well, good on him.

0:26:590:27:00

I mean, the idea that this has been

0:27:000:27:03

transported from a royal palace in 1848

0:27:030:27:05

through you, an Australian,

0:27:050:27:06

to bring it here to the Roadshow is magic.

0:27:060:27:09

You know, it's history come alive.

0:27:090:27:10

So, what are they going to make of this in Australia when they see it?

0:27:100:27:13

I haven't actually told anyone I was bringing it over!

0:27:130:27:15

You spirited it out of the country?

0:27:150:27:17

I'm sure nobody'll find out out there,

0:27:170:27:20

nobody watches the Roadshow in Australia -

0:27:200:27:21

you've got nothing to fear!

0:27:210:27:23

It's only on eight times a day!

0:27:230:27:25

So, I mean, it's a story piece, of course.

0:27:250:27:27

I mean, value, not magnificent -

0:27:270:27:30

not as magnificent as the story -

0:27:300:27:32

£150 is about it.

0:27:320:27:33

But please get it back to Australia,

0:27:330:27:36

cos if you don't get it back in one piece, you're mince.

0:27:360:27:39

Thank you!

0:27:390:27:40

We've brought along a rather gruesome little object

0:27:540:27:56

for you to look at for this week's Enigma Challenge,

0:27:560:27:59

which is when our experts trawl the local museums

0:27:590:28:01

to see what they can come up with

0:28:010:28:03

and see if they can fox us - fox me in particular -

0:28:030:28:05

as to what it's used for.

0:28:050:28:07

And Marc Allum, you've brought this along.

0:28:070:28:09

I say "gruesome" because it is a bit.

0:28:090:28:11

You've got a few options as to what it was used for,

0:28:110:28:13

only one of which is right.

0:28:130:28:15

-That's right, yes.

-So let's hear them.

0:28:150:28:17

Well, the first one is that this is a prototype prosthetic hand.

0:28:170:28:22

So it's a very early prosthetic hand,

0:28:220:28:24

and this one was particularly designed

0:28:240:28:26

for a pilot who joined the First World War,

0:28:260:28:29

crashed, and unfortunately lost his hand.

0:28:290:28:31

Where would this go? Up his arm?

0:28:310:28:33

Yeah, basically that was concealed up his arm

0:28:330:28:36

and that's a number of levers and manoeuvrable sections

0:28:360:28:39

that went on a belt inside his jacket,

0:28:390:28:41

and he could operate those parts to make the hand move.

0:28:410:28:44

Now, the hand was interchangeable.

0:28:440:28:45

This is just one of the hands. But this was the first of its type.

0:28:450:28:49

-What do we think of that? CROWD:

-No.

0:28:490:28:52

-No.

-The date's about right.

0:28:520:28:54

-I'm not sure about that.

-Date about right? Yeah.

0:28:540:28:57

-Well, just after the First World War.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:28:570:28:59

Right. So, a prosthetic hand. What else?

0:28:590:29:02

Secondly...

0:29:020:29:03

..cars in that period weren't very well equipped

0:29:050:29:08

with kind of indicator signals and things like that,

0:29:080:29:11

and it became a bit of a problem on the roads.

0:29:110:29:13

So they decided to make this object,

0:29:130:29:16

which was a kind of an add-on indicator

0:29:160:29:18

that you could clip on to the side of a car,

0:29:180:29:21

and then the driver, as he was driving along,

0:29:210:29:23

could operate the lever and the hand would go like that.

0:29:230:29:25

-Or go like that, presumably.

-Or go like that!

0:29:250:29:28

Whatever you wanted!

0:29:280:29:29

And would indicate that you were going in that direction.

0:29:290:29:32

OK, so a hand indicator - literally - for a car.

0:29:320:29:36

Intriguing.

0:29:360:29:38

What's your final offer?

0:29:380:29:40

My final offer is, are you a member of the AA?

0:29:400:29:42

-I used to be.

-You used to be, OK.

0:29:420:29:44

Well, you're not old enough, Fiona, to remember that when AA repairmen

0:29:440:29:48

used to ride motorcycles,

0:29:480:29:50

that essentially there was a kind of camaraderie on the road

0:29:500:29:53

between them and the people that were members of the AA.

0:29:530:29:56

You would have an AA badge on the front of your car -

0:29:560:29:58

many of you will remember those chrome and yellow badges.

0:29:580:30:02

The AA man on his bike could see that badge on the grill of your car

0:30:020:30:05

and, as he came towards you, he would salute you.

0:30:050:30:08

-Everyone knows about the AA salute.

-Yes.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:30:080:30:12

Now, the problem is that as the roads became busier and busier,

0:30:120:30:16

it became a real problem

0:30:160:30:17

because AA men were having to salute a hell of a lot

0:30:170:30:20

and it was getting dangerous.

0:30:200:30:22

They were taking one hand off their motorbikes,

0:30:220:30:25

they were saluting,

0:30:250:30:26

and this was made as the solution to that.

0:30:260:30:30

-LAUGHTER

-Flick the lever, the hand saluted,

0:30:300:30:33

people got their salute and the AA man carried on.

0:30:330:30:35

An AA saluting hand.

0:30:350:30:37

So, what do we think, folks?

0:30:370:30:39

You think it's the AA saluting hand?

0:30:400:30:42

I think it's possible... I think I'll go for option three.

0:30:440:30:46

You're going for AA saluting hand.

0:30:460:30:48

I was going for two, but I'm going for three now.

0:30:480:30:50

OK, well, this is what I think.

0:30:500:30:52

As a prosthetic hand, it's a bit useless.

0:30:520:30:55

-I'm not sure I buy that.

-OK.

0:30:550:30:57

-Then the indicator...

-Mm-hm.

0:30:570:31:00

..you wouldn't just have one, would you? Cos you'd have to have two.

0:31:000:31:03

You'd have to be driving along, you know,

0:31:030:31:05

and pressing your little levers...

0:31:050:31:07

-So we don't think that, do we?

-No.

0:31:080:31:10

I mean, I had no idea about the AA salute,

0:31:100:31:13

-but I'm inspired by you, sir...

-Yeah, so many people...

0:31:130:31:15

..who remembers it, remembers the AA salute.

0:31:150:31:19

That's what we think, isn't it? The AA salute.

0:31:190:31:21

-CROWD MEMBER:

-£3 a year to join.

0:31:210:31:23

£3 a year to join!

0:31:230:31:25

-A princely sum. AA salute. Are we agreed?

-Yeah!

0:31:250:31:29

Apart from you, in the bowler hat. The AA salute, Mark.

0:31:290:31:31

Do you know, I am just SO pleased.

0:31:310:31:35

No.

0:31:350:31:36

-CROWD:

-Aw!

0:31:360:31:38

Really? Is it the prosthetic hand?

0:31:380:31:40

I knew I would be good at Call My Bluff.

0:31:400:31:42

It's number two.

0:31:430:31:45

It's the transport semaphore direction indicator.

0:31:450:31:49

-Really?

-Yes.

0:31:490:31:51

And it comes from the Coventry Motor Museum.

0:31:510:31:53

I think it looks like a wholly unreliable object, I have to say.

0:31:530:31:57

It's probably the reason it never really caught on.

0:31:570:31:59

HE CHUCKLES

0:31:590:32:01

Well...you foxed all of us, didn't he?

0:32:010:32:03

-Well done.

-Thank you, Fiona.

0:32:040:32:06

We've got a bit of a blue thing going on today -

0:32:100:32:12

our clothes, the brooch.

0:32:120:32:14

How has this come into your...?

0:32:140:32:15

It belonged to my grandmother,

0:32:150:32:17

and it's passed down to me as I'm the oldest granddaughter.

0:32:170:32:20

Lovely.

0:32:200:32:21

My grandparents lived in Berlin

0:32:210:32:23

and, in actual fact, they had to escape the Gestapo.

0:32:230:32:26

-Gosh.

-And she managed to take her jewellery with her.

0:32:260:32:30

But, obviously, on their travels,

0:32:300:32:31

she sold most of the pieces for them to live on,

0:32:310:32:34

and this is the one that remains.

0:32:340:32:36

Oh. It all sounds quite dramatic, doesn't it?

0:32:360:32:38

Escaping from the Gestapo and all that.

0:32:380:32:41

But thank goodness that they had something portable.

0:32:410:32:43

And she was a very stylish and sophisticated lady.

0:32:430:32:46

-Was she?

-So this is one of the pieces she kept.

0:32:460:32:50

It dates, actually, from the 1925-1930 period.

0:32:500:32:54

We've still got quite a bit of colour going on in it,

0:32:540:32:57

which the 1920s Art Deco period was all about, colour and vibrancy.

0:32:570:33:02

And then as we head towards the '30s, diamonds start to overtake,

0:33:020:33:06

so this is a sort of crossover style, basically, between the two.

0:33:060:33:11

Obviously it has been worn, which you can tell,

0:33:110:33:13

because it's been abraded

0:33:130:33:14

and it's been a little bit knocked around in the mount.

0:33:140:33:17

But I love the colour, and there are some, what we call,

0:33:170:33:19

inclusions or flaws going on inside it,

0:33:190:33:21

which, in many ways, gives a little bit of character

0:33:210:33:23

alongside the story, which adds to the fun

0:33:230:33:26

of the piece of jewellery, really, doesn't it?

0:33:260:33:28

Sapphires are beautiful.

0:33:280:33:30

Unusual cuts of diamonds, cos we've got square step-cut diamonds

0:33:300:33:35

which, again, takes it away

0:33:350:33:37

from that very traditional use of brilliant, round diamonds.

0:33:370:33:41

We've got a little bit of something exciting and extraordinary

0:33:410:33:44

going on with it, haven't we?

0:33:440:33:45

-Did you know your grandmother?

-Yes, I knew my grandmother.

0:33:450:33:48

Do you remember her wearing it?

0:33:480:33:50

Oh, yes, she wore it, and she was very stylish.

0:33:500:33:53

Even in her 80s, she was always very elegant.

0:33:530:33:55

Fantastic. Elegance is the key, really, isn't it?

0:33:550:33:59

As far as value is concerned, I'm sure you're never going to sell it.

0:33:590:34:02

-No, no.

-It goes to the grandaughter.

-That's the way forward.

0:34:020:34:05

But should it appear in a saleroom environment,

0:34:050:34:09

I can see this, at auction,

0:34:090:34:10

fetching round about £2,500 to £3,500.

0:34:100:34:13

Thank...you.

0:34:130:34:15

On a good day, because it's Art Deco, you never know,

0:34:150:34:17

it might fly a bit further.

0:34:170:34:18

Here we are, in this beautiful Midlands garden,

0:34:220:34:24

and what we were missing is some locally made garden ornaments,

0:34:240:34:28

and then you arrived with this.

0:34:280:34:30

What can you tell me about it,

0:34:300:34:32

and how did you come by it?

0:34:320:34:33

I found it underneath a stall

0:34:330:34:35

at a Leicester antique fair.

0:34:350:34:37

It was covered in about 30 shades of Dulux,

0:34:370:34:41

and I decided that it was nice and I bought it.

0:34:410:34:45

What I do know is, before we get going,

0:34:450:34:47

-I know this is one of a pair.

-That's correct.

0:34:470:34:49

I don't think the car springs would've taken both of them.

0:34:490:34:52

These must be displayed beautifully at home.

0:34:520:34:55

-Where do you have them at home?

-In the garage.

0:34:550:34:57

LAUGHTER

0:34:570:34:59

-And they've been in the garage for how long?

-For 45 years.

-OK.

0:34:590:35:01

So they came home, they went in the garage,

0:35:010:35:03

and that's where they've sat.

0:35:030:35:04

Well, that's a shame.

0:35:040:35:06

They probably deserve to be out and enjoyed,

0:35:060:35:08

they are marvellous things.

0:35:080:35:10

What we do know about this is it's made, as I said, locally.

0:35:100:35:13

It's made by the Coalbrookdale factory,

0:35:130:35:15

very near to here in Ironbridge in Shropshire,

0:35:150:35:18

and very famous for this type of iron production,

0:35:180:35:23

garden furniture, garden ornaments.

0:35:230:35:25

How do we know it's Coalbrookdale?

0:35:250:35:27

It's very distinct in its look, but we do know it's Coalbrookdale

0:35:270:35:31

because, if we look here, we can see it's got stamped "Coal" and "dale"

0:35:310:35:35

and obviously the bit in the middle, we can't see, the "brook",

0:35:350:35:38

because it's being blocked by that.

0:35:380:35:40

What is it?

0:35:400:35:42

Well, it's a curious thing, but actually what I think it is,

0:35:420:35:45

it's a lantern base.

0:35:450:35:46

So it would've had, on the top of it, probably a huge lantern,

0:35:460:35:49

so it may have ended up standing...

0:35:490:35:51

What have we got there? About three or four feet.

0:35:510:35:53

With the lanterns on top, you could add at least another three feet,

0:35:530:35:56

so it may well have ended up standing about...

0:35:560:35:58

something around six or seven feet, which I would've thought

0:35:580:36:01

would have stood rather nicely outside a grand house,

0:36:010:36:05

flanking the beautiful stepped entrance coming in.

0:36:050:36:09

What is nice about this one particularly

0:36:090:36:12

is these cast dog-mask finials here

0:36:120:36:15

with this lovely fruit hanging down in the mouth.

0:36:150:36:19

I think they're going to date

0:36:190:36:20

probably from around 1870, 1875, something like that.

0:36:200:36:24

In terms of their value,

0:36:240:36:26

I think, today, if those came up at auction as the pair,

0:36:260:36:32

those would carry a presale auction estimate

0:36:320:36:33

of between £2,000 to £3,000.

0:36:330:36:35

Yes, yeah.

0:36:350:36:36

And now you can tell us what you bought them for 45 years ago.

0:36:380:36:42

-£47.

-That's not a bad return on your money.

0:36:420:36:44

Although, having said that, £47 was quite a lot of money.

0:36:440:36:47

It was as much as I had at the time.

0:36:470:36:50

That's the typical collector's story, "It's everything I had".

0:36:500:36:53

The kids don't eat that night,

0:36:530:36:55

but look at this wonderful pair of lanterns I brought home for you.

0:36:550:36:57

Thank you very much for bringing them down. Lovely.

0:36:570:36:59

This was made for a Mr Plumb.

0:37:030:37:06

Are you are Mr Plumb?

0:37:060:37:07

I am indeed a Mr Plumb.

0:37:070:37:09

-So this has been in your family since 1842?

-It has. It has indeed.

0:37:090:37:13

And did you carry this all the way here today?

0:37:130:37:17

I did. Only from the car park,

0:37:170:37:19

I'm pleased to say.

0:37:190:37:20

It's the most magnificent jug.

0:37:200:37:22

I mean, it really... It's a tour de force,

0:37:220:37:25

and just before you put it on the table, I had a look inside.

0:37:250:37:29

-This has actually been cast in a mould.

-Right.

0:37:290:37:31

So, if you can imagine, not only is this jug huge,

0:37:310:37:35

when you saw the size of the mould,

0:37:350:37:36

the mould would probably be that much bigger

0:37:360:37:39

all the way around.

0:37:390:37:40

Can you imagine, not only pouring all the clay into it,

0:37:400:37:43

but then tipping the clay out

0:37:430:37:45

after the outside had dried?

0:37:450:37:48

It would take, I don't know how many men - four, five men.

0:37:480:37:51

So this was something quite special.

0:37:510:37:55

-And it was made for an ancestor of yours.

-Yes.

0:37:550:37:58

What did he do? Do we know?

0:37:580:37:59

-My family were farmers.

-OK.

-So we were farmers.

0:37:590:38:03

What we have to remember, in the 1840s,

0:38:030:38:05

the birth of a son was much more important.

0:38:050:38:09

It meant that the farm would survive.

0:38:090:38:12

So this was a celebration, not only of the birth of a son and an heir,

0:38:120:38:15

but the fact that the farm would continue.

0:38:150:38:17

Have you seen how it's a bit rough and a bit mucky?

0:38:170:38:20

Yes, I've seen it's a bit mucky.

0:38:200:38:22

-Do you know why that is?

-No.

0:38:220:38:24

That's because it had another name on it.

0:38:240:38:26

-Oh!

-And that's been rubbed off with sandpaper.

0:38:260:38:29

Oh!

0:38:290:38:30

And the name of your ancestor has been painted on,

0:38:300:38:33

-possibly by the local coachbuilder or the sign writer.

-Oh.

0:38:330:38:37

So this jug actually dates to 1820, 1830,

0:38:370:38:43

so it would've been second-hand, I suppose.

0:38:430:38:46

-And, not that you're ever going to sell it...

-No.

-..but if you did,

0:38:460:38:50

I think you'd be celebrating to the tune of £3,000.

0:38:500:38:53

Because where would you find another one?

0:38:530:38:55

This is the Rolls-Royce, to go with your Rolls-Royce, of tea sets.

0:38:580:39:01

What do you know about it?

0:39:010:39:04

Well, it's a travelling tea set.

0:39:040:39:06

I believe it was made in the late 19th century.

0:39:060:39:09

My late mother saw it in an antique shop

0:39:090:39:12

and she obviously thought it was very pretty,

0:39:120:39:15

and bought it and brought it home, showed it to me.

0:39:150:39:17

I was very impressed, I thought it was lovely.

0:39:170:39:19

You have a little silver-plated tray,

0:39:190:39:23

then you have the teapot.

0:39:230:39:26

And then you've got all the fittings inside,

0:39:260:39:28

but then when you open up these pieces...

0:39:280:39:32

Little jars, sugar.

0:39:320:39:34

And the great thing is, it's crested.

0:39:340:39:36

Have you done any research on the crest?

0:39:360:39:38

Yes, the crest is from the Monson family,

0:39:380:39:42

Baron Monson.

0:39:420:39:43

I think, from my research,

0:39:430:39:46

the baronage was created in 1728

0:39:460:39:49

and it's still alive.

0:39:490:39:51

There is a Baron Monson now,

0:39:510:39:52

but I've never had the pleasure of meeting.

0:39:520:39:54

Well, that kind of sums up the type of wealth you need

0:39:540:39:59

to have purchased something like this. This wasn't cheap.

0:39:590:40:01

Although it's silver-plated,

0:40:010:40:03

you've got a gilt lining,

0:40:030:40:05

you've got Leuchars and Sons, Piccadilly -

0:40:050:40:09

that's the retailers -

0:40:090:40:10

in this red, kid leather, or Morocco leather, case.

0:40:100:40:14

It's just everything that you'd want.

0:40:140:40:16

I think that, at auction...

0:40:160:40:18

..because of the condition,

0:40:190:40:21

and it's got a great crest and provenance,

0:40:210:40:23

easily £1,500 to £2,000.

0:40:230:40:25

Good heavens.

0:40:250:40:27

Thank you very much.

0:40:270:40:29

Well, I have to say this is

0:40:300:40:32

the most superlative collection of buttons that I've ever seen.

0:40:320:40:35

Somebody must have spent a very long time building the collection.

0:40:350:40:38

What's their history?

0:40:380:40:40

Yes. When I was a youngster, when I was about ten or 11,

0:40:400:40:45

my mum and I started collecting buttons,

0:40:450:40:47

and when I was about 15, 16, I got bored,

0:40:470:40:52

and she bought them all back of me

0:40:520:40:54

-and she'd carried on collecting for years and years.

-Really?

0:40:540:40:58

So, where did your mum collect them?

0:40:580:41:01

Well, every weekend, my dad and her were off to fairs.

0:41:010:41:05

-Local antique...

-Always local.

0:41:050:41:07

I wonder, did she divulge to him what she was spending on this...?

0:41:070:41:10

Probably not.

0:41:100:41:12

She'd probably just have a little bit of money

0:41:120:41:14

and then just ask for a little bit extra to buy that last piece.

0:41:140:41:18

She obviously didn't have any particular style or era.

0:41:180:41:22

Anything that appealed to her.

0:41:220:41:24

This, I understand, is only a small part of the collection.

0:41:240:41:27

-This is only a small part, yes.

-Goodness. Right, OK.

0:41:270:41:29

Let's talk about a few of them, because obviously we have so many.

0:41:290:41:33

The ones that immediately caught my eye

0:41:330:41:36

were these little Essex crystal buttons here.

0:41:360:41:38

They're actually cuff links.

0:41:380:41:40

And these are doubly good,

0:41:400:41:42

because they're Essex crystal,

0:41:420:41:43

which are very collectable,

0:41:430:41:45

but they're also dogs, and people love dogs.

0:41:450:41:47

Other ones that particularly caught my eye were these French ones,

0:41:470:41:51

mother-of-pearl and enamel.

0:41:510:41:52

-They are French.

-We wondered, we wondered which country.

0:41:520:41:55

Late 19th century.

0:41:550:41:58

Had you ever considered these?

0:41:580:41:59

Other than knowing that there's a date on them,

0:41:590:42:03

we thought they must be gold.

0:42:030:42:04

What they actually are,

0:42:040:42:06

they've been made out of 18th century watch backs

0:42:060:42:09

that have been cleverly cut and turned into a set of buttons.

0:42:090:42:13

How amazing. We had no idea about that.

0:42:130:42:15

That's incredible.

0:42:150:42:17

Again, you've got the cabochon amethyst there,

0:42:170:42:20

with the silver mounts.

0:42:200:42:21

-My favourite colour.

-Fabulous things.

0:42:210:42:24

And these here,

0:42:240:42:25

these are Japanese.

0:42:270:42:28

-Are they?

-Ivory, with little silver backs on them.

0:42:280:42:32

Gosh, you know, I'm lost for choice on words here.

0:42:320:42:35

Another favourite of mine, I ought to point out,

0:42:350:42:37

are these little Italian mosaics

0:42:370:42:39

made out of tiny, tiny, little pieces of marble,

0:42:390:42:42

made in Italy for the tourist market, essentially,

0:42:420:42:45

in probably the 1860s, 1870s.

0:42:450:42:48

She must have been quite an authority on buttons.

0:42:480:42:50

-She was.

-After decades...

0:42:500:42:51

She was actually the co-founder of the Birmingham Button Society.

0:42:510:42:55

What sort of date would that be?

0:42:550:42:56

This is in the 1980s.

0:42:560:42:58

They organised lots of events,

0:42:580:43:00

and even just two weeks before she died

0:43:000:43:03

the retirement home that she lived in had a summer fair

0:43:030:43:07

and she was asked to do a little presentation of her buttons.

0:43:070:43:11

Everybody came and asked questions. They were fascinated.

0:43:110:43:14

-So that was a really big day.

-It was a nice legacy for her.

0:43:140:43:18

There's a very big interest in buttons, as a collector's subject,

0:43:180:43:23

and also in America

0:43:230:43:24

there's a huge amount of interest in European buttons.

0:43:240:43:28

Just to give you a little example,

0:43:280:43:30

the Essex crystal cuff links,

0:43:300:43:32

they would probably be £400 to £500.

0:43:320:43:35

-Because they're dogs.

-Gosh, that's just for a pair!

0:43:360:43:40

Just for a pair!

0:43:400:43:42

A little French set like this,

0:43:420:43:44

again, would probably be...

0:43:440:43:45

maybe £150, £200.

0:43:450:43:49

And as this is only part of the collection, it's really kind of...

0:43:490:43:52

Without going through it in great detail,

0:43:520:43:54

it's rather unquantifiable, to be honest with you.

0:43:540:43:56

But I would've thought, at a minimum,

0:43:560:43:59

it would be £5,000 to £8,000,

0:43:590:44:01

and more than likely more than that.

0:44:010:44:03

-Gosh, incredible.

-Gosh.

0:44:030:44:05

Absolutely incredible.

0:44:050:44:07

-Gosh. Thank you very much.

-It's a pleasure.

-It's a bit of a...

0:44:090:44:12

It's lovely. It's so beautiful to see them all displayed.

0:44:120:44:15

I've never seen them displayed like this. It's truly beautiful.

0:44:150:44:17

It's a lovely legacy for your mother.

0:44:170:44:19

Yes, just looking at it today, it looks beautiful for us.

0:44:190:44:23

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:44:230:44:24

So, you went to view an auction,

0:44:360:44:37

you saw this in a corner,

0:44:370:44:39

what happened next?

0:44:390:44:41

Well, I saw it was a snuffbox,

0:44:410:44:44

and I thought how well it had been sort of worked,

0:44:440:44:49

and I was really interested in it.

0:44:490:44:52

Then the lady who presented it to us

0:44:520:44:54

said there's a secret picture in there somewhere

0:44:540:44:58

and, to our surprise, there's a lovely picture of a lady there

0:44:580:45:02

which sort of made it a bit special as well.

0:45:020:45:04

With the ringlets down and that, she'd got such a pretty face.

0:45:040:45:07

If you were a gentleman and you wanted to have a portrait done

0:45:070:45:10

of your wife or your daughter,

0:45:100:45:13

you may not walk around wearing them on your chest like this, all proud,

0:45:130:45:16

you'd have them tucked away.

0:45:160:45:18

Pocket-watch cases, for example,

0:45:180:45:20

or they'd hide them away under the lid of a snuffbox.

0:45:200:45:22

Women would wear them in a far more open way.

0:45:220:45:25

They'd have them either at their breast on a brooch, perhaps,

0:45:250:45:29

-or on their wrist.

-They'd display it.

0:45:290:45:31

They'd flaunt them a lot more than gentlemen would,

0:45:310:45:34

who were, on the whole, far more secretive.

0:45:340:45:36

So, what about the artist?

0:45:360:45:38

Where did your research go after that?

0:45:380:45:39

Well, I had it cleaned,

0:45:390:45:41

and someone took the picture out

0:45:410:45:45

and they advised me

0:45:450:45:48

to check the artist out.

0:45:480:45:49

It was Chalon,

0:45:490:45:51

and it had got 1835 on it.

0:45:510:45:54

And it had got RA after it, and that was Royal Academy.

0:45:540:45:57

You showed me an image of the reverse

0:45:570:45:59

when it was taken out the frame,

0:45:590:46:01

and it's totally right, it's in his hand,

0:46:010:46:04

that's how he would inscribed the reverse of his works.

0:46:040:46:07

Arthur Edward Chalon.

0:46:070:46:08

He was born in Geneva

0:46:080:46:10

and he moved over to England in the late 1790s,

0:46:100:46:15

and he really became one of the most important artists of that period.

0:46:150:46:20

Interestingly, with this, and given this is the original case,

0:46:200:46:23

we should also probably look at what's on the top of it.

0:46:230:46:27

Given that we have this rose here in full bloom,

0:46:270:46:29

it could be to celebrate their death.

0:46:290:46:32

And given the black nature of the box at the bottom,

0:46:320:46:35

the black colouring,

0:46:350:46:37

it's quite possible that, in fact,

0:46:370:46:39

this miniature was painted

0:46:390:46:41

to record the likeness of a lost loved one.

0:46:410:46:44

It's very personal with miniatures.

0:46:440:46:46

You don't really have this as much in the larger oil paintings.

0:46:460:46:49

They're very personal items.

0:46:490:46:51

And actually, I think, if this were to come up at auction,

0:46:510:46:54

it would sell for

0:46:540:46:56

anywhere between £3,000 and £5,000.

0:46:560:46:59

Wow.

0:46:590:47:01

-Excellent.

-Thank you for bringing it in.

0:47:030:47:05

Thank you.

0:47:050:47:07

Before we really closely examine it, tell me what you know about it.

0:47:090:47:13

Yes, it was given to me

0:47:130:47:14

by my Aunt Minnie and Uncle Barney on my wedding.

0:47:140:47:18

They bought it at an exhibition at Watches Of Switzerland.

0:47:180:47:21

It was a brooch. It had a rather large, curved pin on it,

0:47:210:47:26

and the pin would have done serious damage

0:47:260:47:28

to any jacket that you wore it on.

0:47:280:47:30

I know my aunt never wore it for that reason,

0:47:300:47:33

and she gave it to me, and I had it made into a pendant

0:47:330:47:36

which makes it more wearable.

0:47:360:47:37

-We know that it's made of yellow gold and white gold.

-Mm-hm.

0:47:370:47:41

-We also know that it's in the shape of a Beefeater.

-Yes.

0:47:410:47:46

And what is really interesting, and it's very exciting for me,

0:47:460:47:49

is that when you press

0:47:490:47:50

this little button here,

0:47:500:47:52

the drawbridge comes down

0:47:520:47:54

and it shows the watch.

0:47:540:47:56

I love that, I think it's absolutely brilliant,

0:47:560:47:58

but it's upside down, so you read it like a pendant.

0:47:580:48:01

-Don't you think that's the best thing?

-Beautiful.

0:48:010:48:03

I think it's just really cool.

0:48:030:48:04

I've never seen the like before,

0:48:040:48:06

and the jewellery department have not seen the like before either.

0:48:060:48:08

I also thought it was quite fun,

0:48:080:48:10

the fact that it's Baddesley Clinton we're at now

0:48:100:48:12

and it's a moated house, and here we are with the drawbridge.

0:48:120:48:16

-Don't you think that's just great?

-It's wonderful, yes.

0:48:160:48:18

-I think it's a beautiful piece.

-It's really wacky.

0:48:180:48:20

-Does everybody like it here?

-CROWD:

-Yes.

0:48:200:48:22

Isn't it great?

0:48:220:48:23

For me it dates in the 1960s, possibly 1970s.

0:48:230:48:27

When, can I ask, were you...?

0:48:270:48:30

It was 1990, I was married,

0:48:300:48:31

and I know my aunt had had it some time before that.

0:48:310:48:34

She'd had it for quite a while, I don't how long.

0:48:340:48:36

But, obviously, it's got London written all over it.

0:48:360:48:39

It's a Beefeater, the Tower of London,

0:48:390:48:41

this wonderful drawbridge mechanism.

0:48:410:48:44

This is a Swiss-made watch, which is almost irrelevant

0:48:440:48:46

because it's a lovely piece of jewellery which is integral.

0:48:460:48:49

Ruby set, a diamond set emerald set,

0:48:490:48:52

but they're only tiny stones, they don't really add to the value.

0:48:520:48:55

What I love about it is just its intrinsic quality,

0:48:550:48:57

and the fun of it.

0:48:570:48:58

Fashionable? I don't know whether it's fashionable.

0:48:580:49:01

-Do you think it's fashionable?

-Um...

0:49:010:49:03

-You either love it or you hate it.

-It's so quirky.

0:49:030:49:05

If you love it, you're going to want it.

0:49:050:49:07

So, at auction, I would say

0:49:070:49:09

probably between £2,000 and £3,000.

0:49:090:49:11

Right, lovely. Thank you very much.

0:49:110:49:14

This is a wonderfully detailed model

0:49:170:49:20

of a 12-metre racing yacht.

0:49:200:49:22

I don't think I've ever seen such a beautiful model.

0:49:220:49:25

I really, really like it.

0:49:250:49:27

I'm going to ask you a little bit about it first

0:49:270:49:29

before I go into the history of it and things.

0:49:290:49:31

What can you tell me about it?

0:49:310:49:33

Well, it was donated to the London Model Yacht Club

0:49:330:49:36

by Sir Thomas Glen-Coats

0:49:360:49:38

when he was president of the club in 1937.

0:49:380:49:42

Now, I know that name, Coats. That's Coats Textiles and Cotton.

0:49:420:49:46

Correct. Yeah, from Paisley in Scotland

0:49:460:49:48

Very, very wealthy family.

0:49:480:49:50

So wealthy that he never had to work in his life.

0:49:500:49:53

And he, as a young man, loved boats and sailing,

0:49:530:49:56

and he became a yacht designer.

0:49:560:49:58

And he designed himself several yachts

0:49:580:50:01

which were built by Mylnes, up in Scotland.

0:50:010:50:05

And this particular yacht, Iris, in 1926, I think it was,

0:50:050:50:09

which was an exact replica of his design,

0:50:090:50:13

which is in this photograph here.

0:50:130:50:15

I can see it flying the waves there.

0:50:150:50:16

Absolutely beautiful.

0:50:160:50:17

We can see the same 12-metre K6 class on the sail

0:50:170:50:23

which is engraved into the top of the sail here.

0:50:230:50:25

One of the most amazing things about this yacht is it's SILVER!

0:50:250:50:29

-Yes.

-It's beautiful, and I'm not going to pick it up,

0:50:290:50:31

but I have picked it up, and it's very, very heavy.

0:50:310:50:34

There's a lot of silver in it.

0:50:340:50:36

And I can also see... I looked at it earlier.

0:50:360:50:38

It's actually hallmarked along the front here for 1935.

0:50:380:50:41

-It's a little bit later than its '26 building.

-That's right.

0:50:410:50:46

I think what I really, really love about it is the detail.

0:50:460:50:49

It's an absolutely perfect representation

0:50:490:50:51

of the full-sized yacht.

0:50:510:50:53

What I really like about it as well

0:50:530:50:55

is that it evokes a place in yachting history, doesn't it?

0:50:550:50:58

In the early 20th century,

0:50:580:51:00

this was the domain of royalty, wealthy people,

0:51:000:51:04

and these beautiful, sleek yachts were just part of that world.

0:51:040:51:09

Something to a certain extent that's really disappeared now.

0:51:090:51:11

I mean, we all go on about the America's Cup and things like that,

0:51:110:51:14

but you did have to be very wealthy

0:51:140:51:16

to build yachts like this and run them.

0:51:160:51:19

You say he had several designed and actually had several built.

0:51:190:51:22

He did, yeah.

0:51:220:51:24

I think this is an absolutely beautiful thing.

0:51:240:51:26

I'm going to put a value on it,

0:51:260:51:28

because there's a lot of history imbued in this.

0:51:280:51:30

I think, if this came up for auction,

0:51:300:51:33

that this would make

0:51:330:51:34

£5,000 to £8,000 at auction.

0:51:340:51:36

Gosh, yes.

0:51:360:51:38

It's a very treasured item of our club heritage

0:51:380:51:41

and we will look after it very carefully.

0:51:410:51:43

-I'm not surprised.

-It won't go anywhere.

0:51:430:51:45

So, you've brought along this charming and small oil

0:51:480:51:52

of what appears to be a castle in the countryside,

0:51:520:51:54

with the sea beyond.

0:51:540:51:55

Obviously an amateur hand.

0:51:550:51:57

Normally I would say, well, very pretty,

0:51:570:51:59

obviously personal to you,

0:51:590:52:01

but worth just a few pounds.

0:52:010:52:02

But maybe it's more special than that.

0:52:020:52:04

Tell me.

0:52:040:52:05

This was given to me by my aunt in Ireland,

0:52:050:52:09

and it was gifted to her by a very special chap

0:52:090:52:12

who was a bodyguard to Lord Mountbatten.

0:52:120:52:14

Oh, right.

0:52:140:52:15

And the painting is actually by Lord Mountbatten,

0:52:150:52:18

and he gave it to him after many years of service.

0:52:180:52:21

And I think he gave so much as a police guard,

0:52:210:52:25

and I think that was his way of showing his gratitude.

0:52:250:52:28

And on the back it, it actually says, I think,

0:52:280:52:30

"With gratitude from Lord Mountbatten".

0:52:300:52:32

Well, that is a story, isn't it?

0:52:320:52:34

And suddenly that transforms what is an amateur oil

0:52:340:52:36

into something much more personal,

0:52:360:52:38

and I had no idea that he also painted.

0:52:380:52:41

And this is of the castle and Mullaghmore.

0:52:410:52:44

-And where's that?

-In Sligo. County Sligo.

0:52:440:52:47

That was his summer home,

0:52:470:52:49

so he would have gone there to relax during the summer with the family.

0:52:490:52:52

And then very sadly, in 1979,

0:52:520:52:54

that's where, just off the coast there,

0:52:540:52:57

he was assassinated.

0:52:570:52:58

Yes, that's right. Yeah.

0:52:580:53:00

And apparently, the bodyguard was actually

0:53:000:53:02

on another mission that day,

0:53:020:53:04

so he wasn't there at the time.

0:53:040:53:05

But obviously tragic and very distressing for everybody,

0:53:050:53:09

and, yeah...

0:53:090:53:11

I think it's a charming picture.

0:53:120:53:14

And with the story associated with it, it comes to life, doesn't it?

0:53:140:53:19

And here is the home he loved so much

0:53:190:53:21

and the time he spent with his family to relax,

0:53:210:53:24

so a lot of story there, a lot of emotion.

0:53:240:53:26

Please write it down and attach it to the base there,

0:53:260:53:29

because I think it adds to the story and it adds to the value.

0:53:290:53:33

Cos I think, if you ever did decide to sell it,

0:53:330:53:36

because of its story, I think you're talking of a figure

0:53:360:53:39

of, well, certainly between £600 and £1,000.

0:53:390:53:42

Wow. Wow! My goodness.

0:53:420:53:45

Such a little painting.

0:53:450:53:47

-But a big story.

-With a big story.

0:53:470:53:49

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:53:490:53:51

Diamonds sparkling in the sunshine here.

0:53:540:53:56

This is almost Hollywood sunshine, isn't it?

0:53:560:53:58

It is indeed, and that's exactly where this was bought.

0:53:580:54:02

Wonderful. Tell me every part of how you got it.

0:54:020:54:04

It was bought in Hollywood Boulevard,

0:54:040:54:06

and the lady who had the antique and jewellery store

0:54:060:54:09

only opened on Saturdays.

0:54:090:54:11

We were introduced to her.

0:54:110:54:13

I knew her, then, until she passed away, for about 24 years.

0:54:130:54:17

In fact, we used to go and stay with them in Miami.

0:54:170:54:19

-It's always nice to have a jeweller as a friend.

-Isn't it?!

0:54:190:54:22

And I had an inheritance,

0:54:220:54:25

so I thought I would put it into something

0:54:250:54:28

that was tangible and also pretty,

0:54:280:54:31

and also...probably a better investment than the bank.

0:54:310:54:36

Your best friend, a girl's best friend,

0:54:360:54:38

all these cliches are tumbling out.

0:54:380:54:40

And that was it.

0:54:400:54:42

But it was 23,000.

0:54:420:54:43

£13,500.

0:54:430:54:46

But, in fact, it had belonged to Rita Hayworth.

0:54:460:54:48

How marvellous. That's very good to know.

0:54:480:54:51

It was given to her by her husband, Aly Khan,

0:54:510:54:55

who was the son of the Aga Khan.

0:54:550:54:57

So, Rita Hayworth was married in the '40s,

0:54:570:54:59

but tell us a bit more about this wonderful star.

0:54:590:55:01

Well, she was an amazing star and she was a real Hollywood A-lister.

0:55:010:55:06

She acted with absolutely everybody in Hollywood at the time,

0:55:060:55:09

Glenn Ford, Frank Sinatra, Orson Welles.

0:55:090:55:12

She was in Only Angels Have Wings.

0:55:120:55:15

-Much adored, much loved.

-A very glamorous lady.

0:55:150:55:17

And perhaps the only girl in the world

0:55:170:55:19

-who didn't need the diamonds, but she had them anyway.

-Absolutely.

0:55:190:55:22

But this is '40s, American, fabulous Hollywood glitz.

0:55:220:55:26

I've looked at many, many, many pictures of Hollywood and so on,

0:55:260:55:29

but I can't find her wearing it!

0:55:290:55:31

I will send you home to actually look for those photographs,

0:55:310:55:35

-and maybe even her will would be interesting too.

-Yes.

0:55:350:55:38

You've got to go in for a bit of opencast archaeology here,

0:55:380:55:41

because the provenance of these pieces is absolutely crucial

0:55:410:55:44

in every sense of the word.

0:55:440:55:46

Because they are heirlooms, they're talismans,

0:55:460:55:48

and when you can associate them with somebody famous

0:55:480:55:51

and somebody utterly glamorous like this, in lifestyle and in looks,

0:55:510:55:54

then this adds hugely to your...

0:55:540:55:57

Well, which was an investment, in some regard,

0:55:570:55:59

but it's not only an investment cos you love it, don't you?

0:55:590:56:02

We know the diamonds are really of very nice quality

0:56:020:56:04

and they add up like mad,

0:56:040:56:05

and I haven't made any calculations.

0:56:050:56:07

-I know roughly.

-Do you? Come on, then, how many carats?

0:56:070:56:10

Roughly, they haven't been pulled away.

0:56:100:56:12

-There's nothing rough about this.

-No.

0:56:120:56:14

-Roughly 54 carats.

-54 carats.

0:56:140:56:17

Well, I'm not going to base my valuation

0:56:170:56:19

on any of that sort of thing,

0:56:190:56:20

-because I think the idea of breaking it down is...

-Sacrilege.

0:56:200:56:26

Maybe, maybe, if you go home and do your Rita Hayworth thing,

0:56:260:56:30

find a photograph of her wearing it

0:56:300:56:32

under the most spectacular circumstances, with somebody famous,

0:56:320:56:35

well, then...

0:56:350:56:36

£80,000.

0:56:360:56:38

-That's good!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:56:390:56:41

That was really quite a buy.

0:56:410:56:43

But if we can't find that -

0:56:430:56:45

and we never do -

0:56:450:56:46

then it's not so much fun,

0:56:460:56:48

it might be only a mere £45,000.

0:56:480:56:52

-It's still good.

-It's still good.

0:56:520:56:54

It's still lovely! I'm delighted.

0:56:540:56:57

-Brilliant.

-Thank you.

0:56:570:56:58

I'd love to find out if that lady does prove that bracelet

0:57:010:57:03

ever did belong to Rita Hayworth.

0:57:030:57:05

And if you compare the value to if it was Rita Hayworth's,

0:57:050:57:09

and if, in fact, she never owned it,

0:57:090:57:11

the difference in price, I guess, that's the value of celebrity.

0:57:110:57:14

From the Antiques Roadshow, until next time, bye-bye.

0:57:140:57:17

Fiona Bruce and the team visit the moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton, just 15 miles from the bustle of Birmingham.

A busy day of valuations uncovers more fascinating finds, including a gruesome box containing a long wooden peg removed from a child's eye by a surgeon in the 1780s, a glittering diamond bracelet once worn by Hollywood star Rita Hayworth and a painting made by Lord Mountbatten of his family home.

There's also much conversation about a carving of St George banished to the organ loft for offending parishioners, and a visitor gets a stern warning from a Roadshow expert after stripping a rare wooden pedestal of its original paintwork.