Baddesley Clinton 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Baddesley Clinton 2

A visit to Baddesley Clinton sees the team uncover an exceptionally rare silver box, a revealing painting and two gold boxes once used by surgeons to apply snuff.


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On the Antiques Roadshow we love an eccentric, and there were certainly

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a few of them here at Baddesley Clinton near Solihull,

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in the West Midlands.

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Welcome to a return visit of the Antiques Roadshow.

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Marmion Edward Ferrers lived in this picturesque moated house

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in the second half of the 19th century with his wife, Rebecca.

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Both were fascinated with the past.

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They dressed up in theatrical costume and lived an existence

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from another era, quite secluded from the pace of industrialisation

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in nearby Birmingham.

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Marmion's wife, Rebecca, was a keen painter, and she created

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dozens of images of life here.

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The couple never had much money,

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so they invited Rebecca's wealthy aunt, Lady Chatterton,

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and her husband, Edward Dearing, to come and live with them.

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They were quite a foursome.

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They became known as the Quartet.

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Marmion liked to wear a beard,

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intentionally styled into a Charles I style point,

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and had a penchant for 17th-century Cavalier-style clothing.

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In fact, they all loved dressing up, casting themselves into roles -

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the philosopher, the squire.

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Baddesley Clinton became a playground where they could live out

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their fantasies in privacy.

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The Quartet were all the company they needed.

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In the evenings, Rebecca would paint,

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Lady Chatterton would recite poetry,

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the gentlemen would sing or play instruments.

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They were true 19th-century romantics.

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After 1876, it all began to change when Lady Chatterton died.

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A few years later, Marmion also passed away.

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As soon as the official mourning period was over,

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Rebecca wasted no time and married her late aunt's husband.

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The story goes that years earlier, when Edward Dearing approached

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Lady Chatterton to ask for permission to wed Rebecca,

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she misheard, and thought he was proposing to her.

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And, being a gentleman, he was too polite to set her straight,

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and so he married her instead.

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Now, I think that's taking chivalry a step too far.

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The Quartet's time here is recorded on almost every wall, thanks to

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Rebecca's paintings, and even on some of the stained-glass windows.

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Rebecca had new stained-glass panels in the style of the 16th century

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installed, featuring Edward and Marmion's names as a memorial

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to her two husbands. Their lives are literally etched

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into the very fabric of this building.

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Our time at this National Trust house is more fleeting,

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so let's get a move on and discover what treasures have been unearthed

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at today's Antiques Roadshow.

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You've brought along a really pretty filigree box.

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Now, filigree was made all round Europe

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from the end of the 17th century, copying filigree made in China

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from a much earlier period.

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Where did you get hold of this particular piece?

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Well, I bought it at a watch fair ten years ago,

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exactly ten years ago, and I was looking for a box

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that I could have as a 16th century watch movement.

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And I've been looking for a number of years, and it's fit the bill.

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It cost the princely sum of £20.

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When I got home, I was anxious to drill the back of the box

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for the winding square, only to be told by my wife that I'd promised

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to do something else, so it was postponed.

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And on the evening when we were sitting in bed I thought,

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"I'll just check those marks out," because I hadn't recognised them,

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and the book fell open, Jackson's book, which I'd got,

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at the page which was the Glasgow goldsmith's.

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-Right.

-And there it was, the same marks.

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Now, if I tell you in 45 years of looking at silver,

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I don't think I've ever seen a piece of filigree from the 17th century

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that's had marks.

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In fact, I'm trying to think of a piece of the 18th century that's had

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British marks in.

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This is unbelievably rare.

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Not only are filigree boxes seldom marked,

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but to have one made in Glasgow, and we've got the mark WC,

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for William Clark, we've got the Glasgow town mark in the centre,

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and we've got the date letter, which I think is a Q, it's a bit obscured,

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for 1696.

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So, this has got practically everything you could wish to have

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in an early box, but particularly a filigree one.

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Filigree is simply a process of coiling lots of little bits of wire,

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and it produces this beautiful patterning on the top,

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and around the sides,

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which is really a stunning form of decoration.

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I love it, personally, and if we look at the base,

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rather unusually, it's got this rather scratchy decoration,

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which again is absolutely typical for the late 17th century.

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Now, I've got to put a price on this.

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You paid...far too much, wasn't it?

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-£20.

-£20.

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-I'm pretty comfortable in saying £3,000 to £5,000.

-Oh!

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Well, I'm staggered. Absolutely staggered.

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It was so good that that book fell open at that page,

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because, in the morning, it would have been drilled.

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I'm a great believer in fate,

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because the value would have been quartered if you had.

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You've got an exceptionally rare museum object here.

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A massive pleasure to handle it and see it.

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Wonderful object. Thank you so much for bringing it along.

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Thank you very much. I'm delighted.

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Ever since Greek and Roman times,

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artists have looked for excuses to incorporate nudity in art,

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and in this instance, Fred Yates, the painter, has lucked out.

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What's the title of the painting?

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Well, the title is, as we think, anyway,

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The Nudist Colony Annual Dinner Dance.

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Hang on a moment, The Nudist Colony Annual Dinner Dance.

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-That's what it says.

-OK, I've got to ask you,

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do you have a recreational interest in nudity?

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Personally, no, except in the bathroom, which is where it hangs.

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It hangs in the bathroom, does it?

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Very appropriately!

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So, the artist, Fred Yates, and of course when we look at it, I mean,

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let's put aside all this nudity for a moment, it looks like a Lowry,

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-doesn't it?

-It does, very much so,

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and most of his stuff - that we've seen, anyway - is very Lowry-esque

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-in the figures that he's done.

-So Yates and Lowry,

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-both Lancashire men.

-Yup.

-Lowry, of course, a little bit more sombre,

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a little bit more serious, and nothing like as frivolous as Yates.

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And this of course is... This is comedy, isn't it?

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It's hysterical. Every time I look at it I find all sorts of different

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-bits of comedy in there.

-Different bits, certainly!

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So tell me, how do you know... How do you know about Yates?

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-I mean, how did he come into your life?

-OK. Back in the '70s,

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my mum and my step-father, who was a picture framer,

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had a cottage, a little fisherman's cottage in Polruan in Cornwall,

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and Fred used to live in Fowey, which is just opposite Polruan,

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get the ferry over, and do these paintings in the streets.

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And I think he needed a coffee one day, and my mum was very bohemian

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and said, "Oh, come in for a coffee, no problem at all,"

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and they got very friendly ever since.

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He used to go there, do his painting, go in for a coffee,

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talk to the family, and I think he did this for us.

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Whether he did it specifically I have no idea,

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but I know that we acquired it from him, and he did lots of other

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silly little drawings or paintings on, for example,

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the back of a loo seat, which I've got at home.

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My sister's got that, actually, now.

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And then we've also got a breadboard with little drawings and figures on.

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So, he was just very amusing and he also looked like my father,

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very big beard, very eccentric, and together they just had great fun.

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So, as this painting demonstrates, he was up for a laugh.

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-Yeah, sure.

-But also he knew how to craft a picture as well, and,

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compositionally, the painting is actually rather sophisticated,

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because... Look at the way it's structured.

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You've got these curtains on the right and the left,

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you're looking down upon this scene of cavorting flesh and nudity,

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and the subjects themselves set against this white background,

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almost evokes like mosaics or images on Etruscan vases.

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But perhaps most potent of all is the humour achieved by these

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-figures in the foreground.

-You know, I'd just love to see their faces,

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to see if they're approving or not approving of what's going on.

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Because they're not just dressed, but they're in thick,

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-rather majestic looking coats with hats.

-They are very conservative.

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Very conservative, so dressed, and what's in front of them is so nude.

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Absolutely. It's highly amusing and every time you look at it,

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you laugh at something. So I've really enjoyed watching it

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when I'm in the bath, in the nude.

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In terms of value, on the basis of your connection with the artist,

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great provenance.

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Even though he's not made huge sums of money of late, you know,

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low thousands, I would put this in the upper echelons.

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I think... I think there's a lot of flesh on the bone with this one.

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I would put it around about £5,000 or £6,000.

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That's fine. It's going to stay in the bathroom.

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When I first saw this book with The Black List written on the front

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of it, its rather ragged state,

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I was just kind of hoping I wasn't going to be on your blacklist.

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But, obviously, opening it up, I discovered something very different

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to what I expected to find, to be honest with you,

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and here we've got a title which says Licensing Act 1902,

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Habitual Drunkards.

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It actually was issued to publicans, wasn't it?

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-Yes, yes.

-And that's where it comes from in your family, I understand.

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That's right, yes.

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My uncle's father and his father before him ran the Brewer's Arm pub

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-in Highgate.

-Right.

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So it would have been given to my uncle's grandad first,

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-and then it's been passed down.

-Right, and what we actually have

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here is a document that was issued to licensees

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-for people who had been convicted of being drunkards.

-Yes.

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And so publicans were issued with this, with photographs and a list of

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their attributes, basically, to forbid them from buying alcohol.

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Now, this is just after the Victorian period, obviously,

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so what we're doing is we're looking at people who,

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to all intents and purposes, look Victorian.

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-Yes.

-It's well over 100 years ago, and do you know, it's funny,

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because I suppose, initially, I kind of started to snigger a bit

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about the idea of these drunkards rolling around and not being able

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to buy a drink and then, actually, when I started to look at it,

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I realised, actually, this is not a laughing matter.

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-No, it's really sad.

-It is a sad document.

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-Yeah.

-And I alighted on this gentleman, Charles Christian Page,

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who was a bit of a character, I thought,

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wearing his kind of quite tall hat,

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and I noticed that he was a photographer and commission agent.

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"Date and nature of conviction, 20th of January 1903,"

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so this is just after the 1902 date on here.

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"Drunk on licensed premises.

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"Convicted at Birmingham City Police Court."

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Now, it doesn't say that he served time or did anything there.

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Here he is without his hat on, and I presume they did that so that

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you could tell the difference, perhaps, to identify them.

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-That's right, yeah.

-If we go on a little bit more...

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..pass by a few other people here, we come to this double page.

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Now this really, really moved me because I found this gentleman

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called Richard Fleming, known as Dirty Dick or Dick the Devil.

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Now, if we look at Richard, he is in a terrible,

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terrible state, and what this appears to be, really,

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is a catalogue almost, and I hate to use the expression,

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really, of the dregs of humanity, in many respects.

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-Yes.

-These were people who were in a terrible state,

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perhaps had lost livelihoods, had gone, fallen into drunkenness.

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He was convicted at Birmingham City Police Court, drunk and disorderly,

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and served 21 days' hard labour for that offence.

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Really, this is a social document of the hardship that these people went

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through. They were in a terrible state, a lot of these people.

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And there was no help for them like there is today.

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No Social Security, no housing associations.

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And then to be given hard labour on top of everything else, you know.

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They were living hand to mouth, essentially.

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That's right, yeah, so it's very sad.

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It's a very difficult thing to put a price on.

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I mean, it's obviously an integral part of your family history,

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-in many respects.

-Yeah, yes, yes.

-I doubt you're ever going to sell it.

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-No.

-But I suspect as a kind of social kind of document,

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and something that's of interest to people in that way,

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I suspect it would make £200 or £300 at auction.

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It's been of real interest and quite emotive for me to look at it.

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-Yes, yes.

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

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Well, I'm always a bit of a sucker for a nice English landscape,

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but I kind of get the impression that's not an enthusiasm we share.

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Not really. No, Lawrence, no.

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It's never really caught my eye.

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-Why is that?

-Well, it used to belong to my grandmother.

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It was given to her by a very good friend, in east London.

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She had it on a mantelpiece for many years.

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I hated it as a child.

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Really hated it, she passed away, passed it on to my mother.

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Unfortunately, she passed away, so it ended up with me,

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and it's sat in a cupboard for about ten years.

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And I was actually going to throw it away with the refuse one day,

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and decided to sort of check up on the name, Carel Weight,

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and here we are.

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The background story is, in many ways, just as interesting.

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It's sort of such a central part to what really excites me

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about this picture. On the back, this label, what does that say?

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It came from an exhibition in 1944, as you know,

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the Leicester Galleries.

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And it was an exhibition that was really staged.

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It was during the war, 1944, towards the end,

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during times of austerity, and it was this idea about

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artists of repute, but not necessarily big names,

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the idea that you come along, they were mixed in there with names

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that probably no-one had ever heard of.

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Buy something, put it on your wall, take a bit of a punt.

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Now, plenty of artists working at this date who sort of came to

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release nothing, but Carel Weight is actually a very interesting artist,

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I think. The title of this work is Mill Hill, and obviously we know

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Mill Hill at that date, which is now a borough of London,

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was where a lot of army barracks were, and we know he also served

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during the Second World War, so it's possible that's why he was

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drawn out to this area. You know, and Carel Weight is a very

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-well-respected modern British artist now.

-Right, OK.

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I mean, his works can sell for up to £60,000 at auction.

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-Really?

-And this...

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-Not this one, though.

-Not this one!

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But this is kind of a rather unusual work in the sense that

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it's quite small compared to the other works you see by him.

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-Sure.

-But again, this would have been taken out on

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a bright summer's day, sketched, and then off it went.

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It sort of would have been a, not a sort of a pot-boiler,

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but a small work compared to what he was probably used to

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before and after the war. But I really like it,

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and I like the fact it's sort of moody, quite sort of atmospheric.

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-Sure, OK.

-Now, so you said you were going to throw it away.

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-Yes.

-So, presumably you don't think it has any value whatsoever?

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There's certainly no emotional value.

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I wish I could say there was, but unfortunately there isn't.

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So, if it's worth anything, it would be a surprise.

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Well, actually, I think it's...

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I can give you a pretty accurate idea with this, because there was

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a similar work that was at auction five or six years ago,

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of a similar dimension, same date, Mill Hill as the subject as well.

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-Right.

-So actually I think if this were to be sold at auction,

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I think it would sell for somewhere in the region of £2,000.

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Get out!

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£2,000?

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Would you like to buy it?

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1,500 for you!

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That's incredible. Fantastic.

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I'm really surprised. Thank you very much.

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-Thank for bringing it in.

-You're welcome. You're welcome.

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We live locally, and my husband said,

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"It'd be nice to go to the Antiques Roadshow, see what happens.

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"Have you got anything to take"?

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And I said, "Well, no."

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Then I said, "Well, the only thing I could slip in my pocket

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"is that medal." It belonged to my father.

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This is the South Africa campaign, the Zulu Wars, which was 1877-79.

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Obviously, there will be collectors for the Zulu campaign,

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and also to that regiment, etc.

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So, it's nice. It sort of ticks all the boxes.

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If I told you that you're likely to get at auction between

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-£600 and £700, how would you feel about that?

-Staggered!

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I'm just glad I didn't throw it out with the other bits and pieces

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I thought was junk.

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Well, they say that the sun brings out the flowers,

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and what a stunning flower. So, tell me,

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how do you come to be the lucky owner of this?

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It was my mother's.

0:17:380:17:40

A present from somebody that she played bridge with,

0:17:400:17:43

and she probably won a very good game,

0:17:430:17:46

because he invited her to his house.

0:17:460:17:49

His name was Bill Weedon, and he had a huge collection of paperweights,

0:17:490:17:53

and she picked that one out, and he said

0:17:530:17:55

"Very good choice," but that's all he said.

0:17:550:17:58

-Oh, really?

-And I think he was a great admirer, as well,

0:17:580:18:02

of my mother, so he allowed her to keep

0:18:020:18:04

probably his best paperweight, I don't know.

0:18:040:18:07

But I don't know much about it. Maybe it's French.

0:18:070:18:10

So this is a token not only of maybe a win in a good hand of bridge...

0:18:100:18:13

It might well have been, it might well have been. I hope so.

0:18:130:18:17

Or possibly a slight element of unrequited love as well?

0:18:170:18:20

Who knows?

0:18:200:18:21

Well, that, I think, is charming, and the sentiment in that actually

0:18:210:18:25

does roll itself beautifully in what you quite correctly assumed was

0:18:250:18:29

a French paperweight. Not only a French paperweight,

0:18:290:18:33

but made by one of the greatest French glass houses.

0:18:330:18:36

And whilst there is no markings, no signature within it,

0:18:360:18:41

the piece itself is its signature.

0:18:410:18:44

The moment I saw this, I knew who it was by.

0:18:440:18:47

This is by the great glass house, Baccarat.

0:18:470:18:49

They made beautiful weights, and this weight dates from around 1850.

0:18:490:18:56

We're talking about what we call the classic period of paperweights,

0:18:560:18:59

where the French were absolutely in their element.

0:18:590:19:02

There were various factories creating - St Louis, Clichy,

0:19:020:19:06

and Baccarat, who were producing the most beautiful weights.

0:19:060:19:09

This one in particular is what we call a clematis weight.

0:19:090:19:13

It's actually a clematis, double flower.

0:19:130:19:16

You have right to the very centre a beautiful complex millefiori,

0:19:160:19:20

or star dust cane, and then all around the outside,

0:19:200:19:24

this millefiori garland.

0:19:240:19:26

The quality of the crystal, the quality of the manufacture,

0:19:260:19:29

the finish, the style, the finesse.

0:19:290:19:32

-All of it's there.

-Gorgeous.

0:19:320:19:34

Your mother... Your mother had a wonderful eye.

0:19:340:19:37

-Oh, good.

-It also sounds like she had a lovely admirer.

0:19:370:19:40

She did, yeah.

0:19:400:19:42

And the value of that gesture?

0:19:420:19:43

The value of that moment today?

0:19:430:19:46

£1,000 to £1,500.

0:19:460:19:48

Oh, wow. I said if it was worth 100,

0:19:480:19:50

it would have been good, so 1,000's brilliant.

0:19:500:19:53

But I shall look after it, because it's got nice memories.

0:19:530:19:57

-It's a beautiful thing. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:19:570:19:59

I'm sure I've seen this particular chair somewhere before.

0:20:020:20:05

-Where?

-You probably have, actually.

0:20:050:20:07

It's kept here at Baddesley Clinton, in the chapel.

0:20:070:20:10

It looks beautiful in there, as you can well imagine.

0:20:100:20:13

-But it's your chair?

-It is, it's my chair.

0:20:130:20:15

I see. But on loan to the National Trust, presumably?

0:20:150:20:17

It is, that's right, yes.

0:20:170:20:20

When we acquired it, we had young children,

0:20:200:20:22

-and there was always a risk of it getting damaged.

-OK.

0:20:220:20:24

So we contacted Baddesley Clinton 14 years ago and said

0:20:240:20:29

"Would you be interested in having it here on loan?",

0:20:290:20:31

and they were quite glad to have it, and of course,

0:20:310:20:33

it means that lots of other people can see it as well.

0:20:330:20:36

Well, thank you, because these are quite rare chairs.

0:20:360:20:39

Well, let's go to what this is first.

0:20:390:20:41

I'm sure you know what sort of chair it is.

0:20:410:20:43

-A Glastonbury chair.

-Of course.

0:20:430:20:45

It was one of the most popular chairs of the 19th century.

0:20:450:20:48

Copying the famous chair at Glastonbury.

0:20:480:20:51

The original one was late 16th century,

0:20:510:20:54

and we've got to look at this in a minute to decide what date

0:20:540:20:57

this one is, and the original one was in the collection of

0:20:570:21:00

Sir Horace Walpole at Strawberry Hill, and when that collection

0:21:000:21:05

was sold, the vicar - or I'm not sure what status he was -

0:21:050:21:07

at Glastonbury, said "Please can we have it back?"

0:21:070:21:11

So nobody bid against him, and that chair is now at Glastonbury.

0:21:110:21:13

Just to explain, I'm sure that people looking at it will think

0:21:130:21:17

-it's a folding chair. Of course, it's not.

-No.

0:21:170:21:19

You and I know that it's actually the early flat-pack.

0:21:190:21:21

-Yes, yes.

-It all comes apart and can be laid flat for, presumably,

0:21:210:21:25

travelling around at the time.

0:21:250:21:27

-Yes.

-So from one cathedral to another.

0:21:270:21:28

-Yeah.

-There are hundreds, as I said, of the 19th-century ones.

0:21:280:21:33

There is a small handful of the early ones.

0:21:330:21:35

This, to me, looks like a really nice 17th-century chair.

0:21:350:21:40

What's your...? Do you have a feeling about it?

0:21:400:21:42

Have you researched it at all?

0:21:420:21:44

Er... Only a little bit.

0:21:440:21:46

I mean, we acquired it originally from our local church.

0:21:470:21:51

I'm an antique furniture restorer, and they were having a sale

0:21:510:21:55

of various items, including pews.

0:21:550:21:58

When I walked in and saw this, I thought, "That's an early chair."

0:21:580:22:01

What we found out from the church is that it originally came from

0:22:010:22:05

Barbara Cartland's family, who were the local family to the church.

0:22:050:22:09

-The novelist?

-That's right, that's correct.

0:22:090:22:11

-The famous Barbara Cartland?

-That's the one.

-Wow!

-Yes, yes.

0:22:110:22:14

Right, OK.

0:22:140:22:15

But it's quite sad because in May 1940, on the 29th of May,

0:22:150:22:21

her brother John was...

0:22:210:22:23

He died, actually, of wounds received on the battlefield,

0:22:230:22:26

and then a day later, his brother, James, was also killed.

0:22:260:22:30

At that point, they had to make a decision, so they decided to sell

0:22:300:22:32

what was the Priory, which was the family home

0:22:320:22:35

in the area that it was in.

0:22:350:22:36

-Right.

-And somebody bought this at auction,

0:22:360:22:39

I believe on the second day,

0:22:390:22:42

for the church and there it was until we bought it 15 years ago.

0:22:420:22:46

It's a lovely oak chair.

0:22:460:22:47

It really is. I mean, this carving is clearly 17th-century.

0:22:470:22:50

Shall we say the early part of the 17th-century,

0:22:500:22:52

which is consistent with this small handful?

0:22:520:22:54

I only have heard of about 15 or 20 of them myself, personally,

0:22:540:22:57

that are old.

0:22:570:22:58

What a super chair. It's a rare bird.

0:22:580:23:00

So, valuation. Hmm.

0:23:000:23:02

I'm going to have to be conservative to start with,

0:23:020:23:06

-and say £2,000 to £3,000.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:23:060:23:09

Which is, for what we paid for it, is wonderful.

0:23:090:23:12

What, it's more than you paid for it?

0:23:120:23:14

Oh, it's a lot more than we paid for it.

0:23:140:23:15

But you see, it should be worth much more than that.

0:23:150:23:18

It really should be worth more.

0:23:180:23:19

It's a rare item, and it's an icon against all the thousands, hundreds,

0:23:190:23:23

of the 19th-century copies.

0:23:230:23:24

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:23:240:23:26

Thank you.

0:23:260:23:27

Well, two spectacular icons blazing in the sunshine in silver

0:23:290:23:33

and silver gilt. But tell me about them with you.

0:23:330:23:36

They came into our family as a gift from the fiancee of our son,

0:23:360:23:41

from her parents as a gift when they got married here in this country.

0:23:410:23:47

-And the parents came over from Ukraine.

-Yes, yes.

0:23:470:23:51

And we were flab... Absolutely amazed.

0:23:510:23:54

I knew immediately what they were, and I understood the emotional value

0:23:540:24:00

of them, so we cherish them, very much so.

0:24:000:24:04

They have pride of place in our living room.

0:24:040:24:07

Our Lady with candles and flowers,

0:24:070:24:10

and we say our morning prayers in front of her,

0:24:100:24:13

and Saint Nicholas by the door of the living room

0:24:130:24:16

and he gets special flowers at Christmas time,

0:24:160:24:19

because Saint Nicholas is the original Father Christmas.

0:24:190:24:22

-Wonderful.

-Yes.

-Well, I should think there are very few icons

0:24:220:24:25

in the United Kingdom that would be honoured and venerated in that way,

0:24:250:24:28

and it's exactly what happened in the Orthodox tradition,

0:24:280:24:32

and Saint Nicholas is desperately important in that tradition.

0:24:320:24:35

Rather conveniently he's labelled here in Cyrillic, isn't he?

0:24:350:24:39

-Yes.

-Have you noticed that?

0:24:390:24:40

But he's accompanied by Christ Pantocrator,

0:24:400:24:44

the Christ in blessing, and Mary the mother of God here...

0:24:440:24:48

-Yes.

-..who's ascended into heaven.

0:24:480:24:51

There are other references to... Well, here are the Gospels,

0:24:510:24:53

with Matthew, Mark, Luke and John here.

0:24:530:24:55

-Right.

-And another image of Christ Pantocrator as well.

0:24:550:24:58

Yes, that's very Orthodox.

0:24:580:25:00

Yes, very Orthodox, but also, of course, very Christian

0:25:000:25:04

-in the strictest sense of the word.

-Yes, yes.

0:25:040:25:07

The thing about icons is they're not representations of the divine,

0:25:070:25:12

they ARE divine in the Orthodox tradition, that these are...

0:25:120:25:15

Have a sanctity all of their own and they're a window into heaven itself.

0:25:150:25:20

And beneath this silver gilt mount, called the oklad,

0:25:200:25:23

is the full icon.

0:25:230:25:25

It's hiding behind here, and it's probably never been seen.

0:25:250:25:28

And there's a sense, too, of touching icons is terribly important

0:25:280:25:31

because if they are divine objects,

0:25:310:25:33

the touch of them imbued you with some spiritual beneficence.

0:25:330:25:37

I didn't know that, Geoffrey.

0:25:370:25:38

That's interesting.

0:25:380:25:40

This one is, I feel, almost certainly Russian.

0:25:400:25:43

It's slightly different, isn't it, in the engraving?

0:25:430:25:46

And it has an earlier feel to it than this one.

0:25:460:25:49

Here are the blazing halos.

0:25:490:25:50

-Yeah, yeah.

-Anyway, what an amazing story to have you venerating icons

0:25:500:25:55

in the United Kingdom, and they were venerated in middle Europe

0:25:550:25:58

in the 19th century, which is when they were made.

0:25:580:26:01

This one probably 1870.

0:26:010:26:02

-Wow.

-This one, I think, just before the Russian Revolution took place,

0:26:020:26:06

maybe 20th century.

0:26:060:26:08

Perhaps this one may be £400 or £500.

0:26:080:26:12

-Wow!

-And, ironically, even though this is larger,

0:26:120:26:15

I think just a tiny bit less, maybe only £200 or £300.

0:26:150:26:19

-Yeah.

-You don't care,

0:26:190:26:21

and I certainly don't care, and here we look at something

0:26:210:26:25

that's not a representation of the divine,

0:26:250:26:28

they ARE divine, and thank you very much for bringing them.

0:26:280:26:31

Oh, thank you for the valuation.

0:26:310:26:32

-Thank you.

-Wonderful.

0:26:320:26:34

You've brought along what looks like, at first sight,

0:26:370:26:40

a silver mounted wooden bowl.

0:26:400:26:43

How did it come into your life?

0:26:440:26:45

Well, it belonged to my late father, and he will have acquired it

0:26:450:26:51

during the course of his work. He was an antique dealer in London

0:26:510:26:54

in the '50s, '60s and '70s, and he kept certain things

0:26:540:26:58

that appealed to him back, they didn't go into the showroom,

0:26:580:27:02

and that's how it comes to me.

0:27:020:27:04

It is, in fact, a tumbler cup,

0:27:040:27:07

which was a common drinking vessel from the 17th century,

0:27:070:27:11

throughout the 18th century.

0:27:110:27:13

Supposedly, you weren't meant to spill anything with it,

0:27:130:27:15

-it was always meant to right itself.

-Yes.

0:27:150:27:18

It's made out of treen, but the interesting thing about it is that

0:27:180:27:22

-it has this very special inscription around it, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:27:220:27:26

"Bought at ye fair upon ye ice on ye River Thames in ye great frost,

0:27:270:27:33

"January 26 1683, for Priscilla Tavener."

0:27:330:27:39

Now, is she any relation of yours?

0:27:390:27:40

No. I'd love to know who she was.

0:27:400:27:42

I picture her as a very small child, but I don't know.

0:27:420:27:44

-She might well have been.

-Mm.

0:27:440:27:47

Your tumbler cup has a bit of damage to it.

0:27:470:27:50

There's cracks on the sides here, held together by Sellotape.

0:27:510:27:56

So that will have a detrimental value to the piece.

0:27:560:28:00

But, still, 3,000-4,000.

0:28:010:28:03

Wow. Thank you.

0:28:030:28:05

So your father knew what he was buying.

0:28:050:28:09

He did. He did.

0:28:090:28:10

Thank you very much indeed.

0:28:100:28:11

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:28:110:28:13

Right. These are firearms as a fashion statement.

0:28:150:28:19

-Yeah. Beautiful.

-I mean, yeah.

0:28:190:28:22

We're not really interested in their use as a firearm.

0:28:220:28:24

It's just, they're so beautifully put together.

0:28:240:28:29

I can't think of a reason why I wouldn't buy them.

0:28:290:28:32

What was your specific reason for acquiring them?

0:28:320:28:35

Well, I'd collected a few other firearms.

0:28:350:28:38

-Yes.

-Flintlock pistols, and I was at an antique fair

0:28:380:28:43

just over 20 years ago, and I saw this pair and was blown over,

0:28:430:28:47

like you, with the beauty, rather than anything else.

0:28:470:28:50

Unfortunately, the person that was selling them was going through

0:28:500:28:54

a divorce and he had to sell all his firearms,

0:28:540:28:56

which was unfortunate for him, but good for me.

0:28:560:28:59

Every cloud has a silver lining.

0:28:590:29:02

When I said fashion statement, I mean, if we look at these,

0:29:020:29:05

I doubt if these have actually been shot.

0:29:050:29:09

They're by Parker of Holborn, who's a very good maker.

0:29:090:29:13

I'm of the opinion somebody went in to Mr Parker and said,

0:29:130:29:17

"Mr Parker, a pair of your finest pocket pistols,

0:29:170:29:20

"and don't spare the expense". And he was obviously a dandy.

0:29:200:29:23

I mean, nowadays he'd be the sort of bloke wearing, I don't know,

0:29:230:29:25

a ridiculous shirt and... Oh.

0:29:250:29:28

Trousers like this.

0:29:280:29:30

Yeah, a gentleman would carry these and he'd be down in the tavern and

0:29:300:29:34

say, "Look chaps, I've just got this new pair of pistols from Parker".

0:29:340:29:38

I mean, can we have a look at one?

0:29:380:29:39

-Yes, sure.

-So, flintlock, turn-off barrel.

0:29:390:29:43

So barrel unscrews,

0:29:430:29:45

fill, as you know, that's the top with powder, then a ball...

0:29:450:29:49

..screw it back on,

0:29:510:29:54

prime the pan, and we're good to go.

0:29:540:29:57

-Yeah.

-And, of course, lovely little touch,

0:29:570:30:00

safety catch to keep it all there.

0:30:000:30:01

These are just top, top, top quality pistols.

0:30:010:30:06

You bought them because you could see they were top quality.

0:30:060:30:08

Absolutely.

0:30:080:30:10

And, period,

0:30:100:30:12

late 1700s, early 1800s.

0:30:120:30:14

They're just wonderful, wonderful pistols.

0:30:160:30:19

And now we have to address the question,

0:30:190:30:21

if you wanted to be a dandy again and go and buy them,

0:30:210:30:24

what would they cost?

0:30:240:30:26

They are SUCH good quality.

0:30:260:30:29

I can see them making minimum of £2,000, the pair.

0:30:300:30:36

-That's a lot more than I paid for them.

-You astound me.

0:30:360:30:39

They are really one of the nicest pair of pocket pistols I've seen,

0:30:390:30:42

-and thanks so much for bringing them in.

-It's my pleasure.

0:30:420:30:45

-They're really great.

-My pleasure.

-Thanks a lot.

0:30:450:30:47

So what we have here is a fascinating

0:30:490:30:53

early 19th-century

0:30:530:30:54

English table clock.

0:30:540:30:57

But as soon as I see it, I notice an instantaneous theme about it.

0:30:570:31:02

Can you tell me more about what that is?

0:31:040:31:05

Well, we call it an Egyptian clock.

0:31:050:31:09

I inherited it after my aunt died and her father, my grandfather,

0:31:090:31:15

apparently, according to some people in the family, bought it in Egypt.

0:31:150:31:19

So we call it an Egyptian clock, because he was in the

0:31:190:31:22

First World War in Egypt, and we think he bought it there.

0:31:220:31:26

Or is it because of the logo on the front?

0:31:260:31:29

And was it sent to Egypt, he brought it back?

0:31:290:31:32

We don't really know.

0:31:320:31:33

But we certainly call it the Egyptian clock.

0:31:330:31:35

Let's have a look at it. We see it's signed "Benson Higgs" on the dial.

0:31:360:31:40

I do know the company Bensons, and I do know the company Higgs,

0:31:400:31:44

and at some point, they must have joined together.

0:31:440:31:46

I do know that, from the shape and the style of the clock,

0:31:460:31:50

that it was made around 1835 to 1840,

0:31:500:31:53

which is in a period of time where the English and the French

0:31:530:31:57

-were mad about Egyptiana.

-Oh, right.

0:31:570:32:00

Yes, it's got Egyptian themes to it.

0:32:010:32:03

It's got lovely sweeping volutes to the case, which are made in ebony.

0:32:030:32:09

It has lovely brass inlay to the front, and you're absolutely right,

0:32:090:32:14

we've got this lioness chaise longue on the front,

0:32:140:32:17

and the whole thing is very Egyptian-styled.

0:32:170:32:20

I think it's highly unlikely that it was brought back from travels

0:32:220:32:27

in Egypt in the First World War.

0:32:270:32:29

I can't imagine why it would be in Egypt at that time,

0:32:290:32:33

because they had plenty of these things, not clocks like this,

0:32:330:32:36

but they were surrounded by Egyptiana,

0:32:360:32:39

because that's where it all comes from.

0:32:390:32:41

It's the English and the French that were obsessed by

0:32:410:32:44

Egyptian style, the whole mythology about the whole thing.

0:32:440:32:48

Because they were so obsessed by it,

0:32:480:32:50

they copied this style, and often using mahogany, in this case,

0:32:500:32:54

mixed with ebony and brass inlay,

0:32:540:32:58

in beautiful shapes and forms.

0:32:580:33:00

What I like about the clock particularly is its shape, its form.

0:33:000:33:04

I like the fact that it's shaped on the top in a very elegant way,

0:33:040:33:08

and then it has much more masculine volutes at the front,

0:33:080:33:11

and it's finished off with these rather large, outsized

0:33:110:33:14

what I would call almost acorn, inverted acorn feet.

0:33:140:33:18

And it's very appealing.

0:33:180:33:19

I hinted that this style isn't the flavour of the month at the moment

0:33:190:33:23

in the market, and it isn't.

0:33:230:33:25

In the 1990s, it was... They were flying high.

0:33:250:33:30

Today, they're a little bit less than they were.

0:33:310:33:33

I love it to bits, I think it's a fabulous clock,

0:33:330:33:35

I'd love to have it in my house.

0:33:350:33:37

Would I buy it because it was a great investment?

0:33:380:33:41

I think that, at the moment, the value at auction would tell me

0:33:410:33:45

that it's a good time to buy it.

0:33:450:33:47

And today, at auction, between 1,500 and £2,000.

0:33:470:33:51

Probably not going to shock you.

0:33:520:33:54

No, no.

0:33:540:33:55

And ten years ago, probably 2,500 to £4,000.

0:33:560:34:00

Oh, interesting.

0:34:000:34:01

Yes, yeah, that would have shocked me, then.

0:34:010:34:04

-Yes, yeah. Very interesting.

-Yeah.

0:34:040:34:07

Now, how has this survived in such amazing condition,

0:34:080:34:13

considering its age?

0:34:130:34:14

Because it hasn't been used that much.

0:34:140:34:16

I don't know what the origin is,

0:34:160:34:19

I don't know whether my father acquired it.

0:34:190:34:22

I mean, he was a farmer, so why he would acquire an engine like this,

0:34:220:34:26

I don't know.

0:34:260:34:28

Whether it was something that was handed down to him or whether

0:34:280:34:31

it came down from my mother's side of the family, I don't know.

0:34:310:34:34

But did you play with it?

0:34:340:34:36

I played with it a few times, and in fact, when I got it out

0:34:360:34:40

to bring it here, I found a note inside that said

0:34:400:34:44

I had last played with it in 1963.

0:34:440:34:47

-So it's untouched.

-Yes, basically.

0:34:470:34:49

Well, that answers part of my question.

0:34:490:34:52

You know, it's lived a lot of its life in very careful conditions,

0:34:520:34:56

-probably by mistake, rather than by intent.

-Yeah.

0:34:560:34:59

Because it is a wonderful thing, and it's a wondrous thing to see.

0:34:590:35:04

Did you enjoy playing with it?

0:35:040:35:06

Oh, I loved it. Yes, because it goes in a circle, in fact.

0:35:060:35:10

-And you could make it do that?

-So that was great fun.

0:35:100:35:13

-Yeah.

-Yeah. Well, I did fiddle about a bit, and I got the key.

0:35:130:35:16

-Right.

-And I did wind it up, and it does go.

0:35:160:35:18

Yes. And you can brake it, can't you?

0:35:180:35:20

-You can change gear.

-Yes.

0:35:200:35:21

You can make it go forwards and backwards, and there's a brake.

0:35:210:35:24

-Yeah.

-And everything is as it should be.

0:35:240:35:26

-OK.

-We're looking at a train which is now - it goes back to about 1900.

0:35:260:35:32

-OK.

-So it's very old indeed.

0:35:320:35:35

The box is hardly ever seen for a train of that period,

0:35:350:35:38

because they didn't survive. This box is in pieces.

0:35:380:35:41

-Yes.

-But it has kept the train intact.

0:35:410:35:44

-Yeah.

-For 40 years or whatever it's been sitting there, dust free,

0:35:440:35:48

dirt free, uncared for, but untouched.

0:35:480:35:52

-OK.

-We don't know the origins, so we go back to 1900.

0:35:520:35:54

-It's made by a German company called Ernst Plank.

-Yeah.

0:35:540:35:58

At that point, we didn't really make trains in Britain, we imported ones

0:35:580:36:02

from Germany, and they dominated the market completely.

0:36:020:36:05

-Names like Bassett-Lowke and Hornby would come a bit later.

-Oh, yeah.

0:36:050:36:08

-Yeah.

-And so what we've got here is a sort of generic train,

0:36:080:36:11

it's not particularly British, it's not particularly German,

0:36:110:36:14

and you can see on the side of the tender the initials G N R.

0:36:140:36:17

-Yeah.

-Now that is Great Northern Railway.

0:36:170:36:19

Well, that's what I thought, and yet you said it's German.

0:36:190:36:22

Yes, but it was made for the British market.

0:36:220:36:24

-Ah.

-And so they've branded it as a British train,

0:36:240:36:26

-and in fact the colours are relating to that.

-Yeah.

0:36:260:36:29

So you could buy ones that appeared to be British trains...

0:36:290:36:32

-Yeah.

-..in various companies but they were always German-made.

0:36:320:36:35

-Oh, I see.

-So you've got this great story.

0:36:350:36:37

-It's what's called gauge 1, which is bigger than O gauge.

-Yeah.

0:36:370:36:42

And what, to me, is miraculous is the condition.

0:36:420:36:46

You know, it hasn't been repainted, which would be really bad news.

0:36:460:36:49

It is as presented in the box.

0:36:490:36:51

-It's had a bash at the front.

-Mm.

0:36:510:36:53

There's bits and pieces of wear, but essentially,

0:36:530:36:56

it is a remarkable survival from its time.

0:36:560:37:00

-You are very lucky to have it.

-Really?

0:37:000:37:03

Yeah, cos even... It was rare by the time you were playing with it

0:37:030:37:06

-in the

-'60s. Right.

0:37:060:37:07

Well, it was by chance, because I'm one of four sisters,

0:37:070:37:10

-and just things were distributed.

-You got the train?

0:37:100:37:13

-Yeah.

-Well, where does it go now?

0:37:130:37:15

I don't know, we'll have to discuss that.

0:37:160:37:18

Will we? That sounds ominous.

0:37:180:37:20

If you're coming up with something interesting...

0:37:200:37:24

Oh, I see, you're talking about value.

0:37:240:37:25

Well, I don't know.

0:37:250:37:27

Could be. OK, let's do value.

0:37:270:37:29

And so we are going to look at 1,500, £2,000.

0:37:290:37:32

Really?

0:37:320:37:34

They're very, very rare things.

0:37:340:37:36

I had no idea.

0:37:360:37:37

It was a last-minute decision to bring it along.

0:37:370:37:39

-Well, I'm jolly glad you did.

-Yes, so am I. Thank you.

0:37:390:37:43

This is a model, as it says on the side,

0:37:450:37:47

-of the Rolls-Royce Supermarine, the S.6.

-Yes.

0:37:470:37:51

Which won the Schneider Trophy in 1929.

0:37:510:37:54

-Yes.

-Now, the Schneider Trophy was a race,

0:37:540:37:57

specifically for aircraft that could land on the sea.

0:37:570:38:01

-Yes.

-And, obviously, this model is one of those.

0:38:010:38:03

So, I've never seen this particular trophy before,

0:38:030:38:06

although I've seen similar models.

0:38:060:38:09

So, tell me how you came by it.

0:38:090:38:12

Right. The model came into our possession through my grandfather,

0:38:120:38:16

who at the time was the chief designer at Rolls-Royce.

0:38:160:38:19

And designed the engine that powered the seaplane that won the race

0:38:190:38:23

in 1929. That engine was then developed further in 1931 and then,

0:38:230:38:30

after the 1931 race, it won the speed record for 407.5 mph.

0:38:300:38:35

And that then was further developed, with a Merlin engine,

0:38:350:38:38

which powered the Spitfire.

0:38:380:38:40

-So, this was the start of the innovation for the Spitfire?

-Yes.

0:38:400:38:45

And in 1929, at the end of the race, they gave three of these models,

0:38:450:38:49

one to my grandfather, one to Mr Mitchell, the designer,

0:38:490:38:53

and one to the pilot.

0:38:530:38:54

So this is one of only three known?

0:38:540:38:56

That is, as far as I'm aware, that is correct, yes.

0:38:560:38:58

-No wonder I've never seen it.

-Yes. There we are.

0:38:580:39:01

And that was a race over the Solent.

0:39:010:39:04

-Yes.

-Just off the coast of the Isle of Wight.

0:39:040:39:06

-Yes, that's right.

-And because it was way up there in the sky and

0:39:060:39:10

everybody could view from the beach, and also from their yachts,

0:39:100:39:13

apparently there were hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people

0:39:130:39:16

-who used to go and watch.

-I can believe it, yes.

0:39:160:39:18

So it was very, very popular.

0:39:180:39:19

-Started in 1913, I believe...

-Correct, yes.

0:39:190:39:22

..and it went all the way through to about 1931.

0:39:220:39:25

-Correct, that is right. Yes.

-This aircraft beat the

0:39:250:39:29

-world speed record at 357 mph, which was incredible.

-Yes.

0:39:290:39:33

What a wonderful tribute to your... It was your grandfather?

0:39:330:39:35

Grandfather, yes. Yep.

0:39:350:39:38

Well, it is what it says, it's got all the information on it.

0:39:380:39:41

It's not silver, it's silver-plated bronze, I think.

0:39:410:39:45

Oh, right. I thought it was silver-plated, yes.

0:39:450:39:47

It's got the silversmith's mark on the front, but no hallmarks,

0:39:470:39:50

-so that's what I think it is. Very heavy.

-Yes, yes.

0:39:500:39:52

But an exquisite model.

0:39:520:39:54

And being Rolls-Royce,

0:39:540:39:55

they would have made it to perfection and gave it to

0:39:550:39:57

-the three most important people involved.

-Yes.

0:39:570:40:00

One being your grandfather.

0:40:000:40:01

-That's right, yes.

-What a wonderful thing to own.

0:40:010:40:04

Yes. It is, actually, yes.

0:40:040:40:07

Now you're going to ask me what it's worth. When we value things,

0:40:070:40:09

we compare directly with similar things we've sold in the past.

0:40:090:40:12

-Yes.

-One has never, ever appeared at auction.

-Yep.

0:40:120:40:15

So whatever I say is not based on knowledge of a similar one,

0:40:150:40:19

it's just on how important I think this is.

0:40:190:40:21

And I think people are interested in aviation, world records, high speed.

0:40:210:40:27

It has all those elements, and let alone,

0:40:270:40:29

-it is a beautiful, beautiful model.

-Yeah.

0:40:290:40:31

I wouldn't be surprised, should you ever decide to sell it at auction,

0:40:310:40:34

it would fetch between £5,000 and £8,000.

0:40:340:40:37

Really? I AM surprised.

0:40:370:40:40

I thought it would just be the historical sort of story

0:40:410:40:44

that would be important, not the actual item itself.

0:40:440:40:46

-The piece comes with the story.

-Gosh.

0:40:460:40:48

Without the story, the piece is worth a few hundred pounds.

0:40:480:40:51

With the story that you've just told me, it becomes really important.

0:40:510:40:54

Gosh, I'm surprised. Yes. Thank you.

0:40:540:40:56

Write it down, put it with it, in future generations,

0:40:560:40:59

-they need to know.

-Yes. Yes.

0:40:590:41:01

-I certainly will. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:41:010:41:03

You may remember at our Antiques Roadshow at Harrogate

0:41:070:41:10

that we showed you the FA Cup. Splendid piece of silver,

0:41:100:41:13

and Alastair Dickenson, our silver specialist, valued it

0:41:130:41:15

as the most valuable piece of silver we'd ever seen on the Roadshow.

0:41:150:41:20

It was a thrilling moment for all of us.

0:41:200:41:21

Now, Clive, you were watching this, and you win the prize for

0:41:210:41:24

eagle-eyed viewer, because you noticed that

0:41:240:41:26

something that Alastair said about the cup wasn't quite right.

0:41:260:41:29

I suspect this might have been an off-the-shelf piece.

0:41:290:41:34

That it was not specifically made.

0:41:340:41:36

I cannot see why it should have fruiting vines on it.

0:41:360:41:40

Although the marks are completely worn,

0:41:400:41:42

we know it was made by Fattorini and Sons.

0:41:420:41:46

Alistair thought that because of the design on it,

0:41:460:41:49

the grapes and vine leaves,

0:41:490:41:50

it was bought off-the-shelf,

0:41:500:41:51

and it wasn't specially made for the FA Cup.

0:41:510:41:53

But you know that's not the case,

0:41:530:41:55

because you've got the design for the FA Cup.

0:41:550:41:57

Well, I collect sporting memorabilia from approximately 100 years ago.

0:41:570:42:01

And amongst my collection I have a photograph of the original design

0:42:010:42:06

of the FA Cup. And also a letter from a Fattorini member

0:42:060:42:10

to another collector, saying so.

0:42:100:42:13

And, Tom, you're from Fattorini...

0:42:130:42:15

-I am, I'm Tom Fattorini.

-..who made the cup.

0:42:150:42:17

Indeed. That was in 1911.

0:42:170:42:20

And, in fact, 150 designs were submitted to the FA

0:42:200:42:23

for the new challenge cup, and we were fortunate enough to be chosen

0:42:230:42:28

as the winning design.

0:42:280:42:29

And that design is in our managing director's office,

0:42:290:42:33

and I stare at it every single day.

0:42:330:42:35

-And this is it.

-And this is it.

0:42:350:42:36

-This is the design for the cup.

-Absolutely.

0:42:360:42:38

Well, Alastair doesn't know that either of you are here.

0:42:380:42:42

So I thought we might go and surprise him and tell him

0:42:420:42:44

just a little bit more about the FA Cup, and how it was, in fact,

0:42:440:42:47

specially made for the competition.

0:42:470:42:48

I'm looking forward to seeing his face.

0:42:480:42:51

-That should be a bit of fun.

-Yes.

0:42:510:42:53

I like your eye. You've brought this lot out,

0:42:560:42:59

and you are seriously into antique glass, aren't you?

0:42:590:43:02

Yes, I definitely am, yes.

0:43:020:43:04

Go on, tell us about it.

0:43:040:43:05

Well, I started in 1990. I've been collecting ever since.

0:43:050:43:08

I've just got this passion for the Georgian and Regency periods.

0:43:080:43:12

I did eventually have about 1,800 pieces.

0:43:120:43:16

-Wow.

-I did gradually downsize and just kept all

0:43:160:43:19

-what I would call museum quality.

-OK.

0:43:190:43:23

So, what is the appeal?

0:43:230:43:25

I just love the shapes and things, with blown glass, basically.

0:43:250:43:30

What sort of money are you spending on these things?

0:43:300:43:32

Well, some I paid good money, like the Milchglass,

0:43:320:43:35

one at the front there, I think I paid about £103 for that one.

0:43:350:43:39

-£103?

-An odd figure, but, yeah.

0:43:390:43:42

-That was bought on an online site.

-Yes.

0:43:420:43:45

And this one here was bought from a charity shop for £3.50.

0:43:450:43:48

So what do you want to know about them?

0:43:480:43:50

-Well, basically, I just wondered about this piece in particular.

-OK.

0:43:500:43:54

Whether you thought it might be the last quarter of the 17th century.

0:43:540:43:59

-No.

-No?

-No, I don't.

0:43:590:44:01

Late 17th-century glass is rarer than Leyton Orient winning the cup.

0:44:010:44:06

-Yeah.

-So this is 1730.

0:44:060:44:09

-Right.

-1730.

0:44:090:44:11

This baluster glass is 1720.

0:44:120:44:17

That was a good buy.

0:44:170:44:19

This decanter, 1765, 1770.

0:44:190:44:25

This extremely rare bobbin meets King's Lynn tumbler, 1750.

0:44:260:44:34

-This one, completely fish out of water, 1860.

-Yeah.

0:44:350:44:39

There are a couple of 19th-centuries over here,

0:44:400:44:42

but I've concentrated here.

0:44:420:44:44

-This one, because it is so atypical of what you've got.

-Right.

0:44:440:44:48

So if we move that out of the way,

0:44:480:44:51

you have a very nice collection of early Georgian glass.

0:44:510:44:56

And bearing in mind you paid three quid for that,

0:44:560:44:59

so that's 200 quid for that, auction.

0:44:590:45:01

-I'm giving you auction values, right?

-Right.

0:45:010:45:04

Which is the fair. If you were to sell them,

0:45:040:45:06

how much would you get for them?

0:45:060:45:07

Lynn glass.

0:45:070:45:09

How much did you pay for that one?

0:45:090:45:11

-£15.

-15 quid. Erm...

0:45:110:45:13

450.

0:45:140:45:15

-How much did you pay for the...?

-£1.25.

0:45:170:45:21

-BLOWS RASPBERRY

-Car boot, that one.

0:45:210:45:23

1730 - 400 quid.

0:45:250:45:27

That's surprised me.

0:45:290:45:30

This is really good, you've got a good eye.

0:45:300:45:33

There's very little I don't actually like in what you've brought.

0:45:330:45:36

But my favourite, of course, is the decanter,

0:45:360:45:39

because it just seems to symbolise the act of sharing, really.

0:45:390:45:43

It makes wine work, it makes wine taste better,

0:45:430:45:46

and we are going to share this,

0:45:460:45:49

this is the fountain of the social intercourse,

0:45:490:45:54

where you come to mine, and we pour and we drink.

0:45:540:45:57

And I love that sharing thing.

0:45:570:45:59

-How much did you pay for that?

-That was £8.

0:45:590:46:01

-Eight quid. There's 400 quid there.

-Yeah.

0:46:010:46:04

So how much have you spent on this whole lot?

0:46:050:46:08

Oh, on both tables there, I bet we're talking about

0:46:080:46:12

probably about £200 with that other decanter.

0:46:120:46:15

Well, if you multiply auction, this is the lowest valuation

0:46:150:46:18

I can possibly give you, is 2,000 to 3,000,

0:46:180:46:21

and in a shop, it's five.

0:46:210:46:24

I'm going to have to send you packing, cos I am dead jealous.

0:46:240:46:26

Thanks a lot. This is a really nice collection.

0:46:260:46:29

-Congratulations.

-Thank you.

0:46:290:46:30

-Next.

-Alastair, it's us next.

0:46:330:46:35

Can I introduce you to Tom Fattorini?

0:46:360:46:38

-How do you do?

-That name rings a bell.

0:46:380:46:40

-Do you remember the FA Cup item we saw at Harrogate?

-I certainly do.

0:46:400:46:43

-Now, Tom's got some information about it for you.

-Right.

0:46:430:46:47

-Have a look.

-I'm bringing you the original design from 1911.

0:46:470:46:51

Isn't that fantastic?

0:46:510:46:54

Do you remember, you were conjecturing whether it was bespoke

0:46:540:46:56

-or off-the-shelf?

-Yes, I was saying I was going to be banned from every

0:46:560:47:00

football ground in the country for saying it was not specifically made

0:47:000:47:04

as a football trophy. How wrong could I be?

0:47:040:47:07

But where did this come from?

0:47:070:47:08

-This is owned by us, Fattorini.

-In Birmingham.

-In Birmingham.

0:47:080:47:12

And we got this original design,

0:47:120:47:15

since it was returned to us by the FA.

0:47:150:47:18

There were 250, or thereabouts, submissions, if you like.

0:47:180:47:22

Design submissions for the new challenge cup.

0:47:220:47:24

-This is in 1911.

-1911.

-Yeah.

0:47:240:47:26

And this was the one they chose, so it was very deeply thought of,

0:47:260:47:30

at the time, in the sense the bacchanalia

0:47:300:47:32

-- I think that's the right word -

-Yes.

0:47:320:47:34

That's the fruiting vines.

0:47:340:47:36

This is the sort of evidence that experts like me

0:47:360:47:39

absolutely love to see.

0:47:390:47:41

It's all here. I can't refute the evidence.

0:47:410:47:45

What value did you put on it?

0:47:450:47:46

-Over a million, I said.

-And you're still standing by that?

0:47:460:47:48

Absolutely. And this can only add to its value.

0:47:480:47:52

So whether it's one million or two million, who knows?

0:47:530:47:57

But I grew up watching this being lifted aloft

0:47:570:48:01

by all the great captains of all the great teams that won it.

0:48:010:48:05

And I think most people that watch this show probably agree with me.

0:48:050:48:10

I absolutely agree with that, yes.

0:48:100:48:11

So here we are, quite appropriately,

0:48:290:48:31

shoehorned in, and this is the object you've brought us along.

0:48:310:48:34

-It is.

-What can you tell me about it?

0:48:340:48:36

Well, this is a shoemaker's measure.

0:48:360:48:40

And it was bequeathed into my family in the 19th century

0:48:400:48:44

from a Stratford family, who, legend has it,

0:48:440:48:49

were contemporaneous with Shakespeare,

0:48:490:48:51

and this may have been used to measure Shakespeare's feet.

0:48:510:48:54

So my great-grandfather believed.

0:48:540:48:55

So, I'm going to slightly debunk that story

0:48:550:48:58

because, stylistically, when I look at this shoe,

0:48:580:49:01

it's a lady's shoe dating from the late 17th century.

0:49:010:49:04

And, of course, Shakespeare would have been 100 years or so earlier.

0:49:040:49:08

Right.

0:49:080:49:09

That's a pity. My grandfather had a card printed to say,

0:49:090:49:12

"As used by Shakespeare."

0:49:120:49:14

-Oh, really?

-Yes. We'd better tear that up.

0:49:140:49:17

You're absolutely right, it's a boot measure, a shoe measure.

0:49:170:49:19

Made in a fruit wood in England.

0:49:190:49:23

In the late 17th, early 18th century.

0:49:230:49:24

These sort of treen objects, one of the things treen collectors look for

0:49:240:49:28

is great colour, patination and I think this has it in spades.

0:49:280:49:32

It's absolutely just a fantastic colour.

0:49:320:49:35

It's been used, a lot of happy hands have held that over the years.

0:49:350:49:38

-Yeah.

-I mean, it's just a wonderful, rewarding thing to hold.

0:49:380:49:42

I've never seen one like this before,

0:49:420:49:45

so I'm going to say this is a one-off, a unique thing, possibly.

0:49:450:49:50

And because it's so unique, and because it's got great colour,

0:49:500:49:53

I think if that came up for auction, it is worth around 1,000 to £1,500.

0:49:530:49:59

-Really?

-Yeah. It's a very, very nice thing.

0:49:590:50:02

I'd better have a word with the insurance.

0:50:020:50:04

Now, it's lovely to see these working.

0:50:060:50:08

And here we've got a knitting automaton.

0:50:100:50:13

-Indeed.

-When I first got her started, I thought, actually,

0:50:130:50:16

is she just twiddling her thumbs?

0:50:160:50:17

But, no, she has got knitting needles there,

0:50:170:50:19

she wasn't just tired of waiting to see us.

0:50:190:50:22

She knits, and I understand, being from France, and a French doll,

0:50:220:50:27

I recall seeing written somewhere when we first got it, "tricoteur,"

0:50:270:50:32

or something like that, which was French for knitter.

0:50:320:50:36

Ah, well, that makes a lot of sense, because these would have been

0:50:360:50:39

marketed in a catalogue from the maker,

0:50:390:50:41

and it would have been marketed with that French name under it.

0:50:410:50:44

And these lovely automated dolls, they were very popular in France.

0:50:440:50:51

A few French makers, there was Gustave Vichy,

0:50:510:50:54

there was Rouellet et Decamps, there was Phalibois,

0:50:540:50:56

there was Bataille, there were a number of makers

0:50:560:50:59

that were thriving in Paris at the end of the 19th century,

0:50:590:51:03

and, in fact, Rouellet et Decamps, one of the big makers,

0:51:030:51:05

only went out of business in the 1990s,

0:51:050:51:08

so an incredible long run of success.

0:51:080:51:12

Now, I have to say that you are not the obvious owner for a pair

0:51:120:51:17

of very, very pretty French automaton dolls.

0:51:170:51:21

-Probably not.

-Tell me the story.

0:51:210:51:24

Very briefly, my late wife, Sally, she was extremely interested

0:51:240:51:29

in collecting dolls through a friend of hers.

0:51:290:51:31

Sally, unfortunately, passed away many years ago.

0:51:310:51:33

-Oh, I'm sorry.

-And there was a collection of dolls.

0:51:330:51:37

There's three automata. I've brought two here today.

0:51:370:51:39

There's another one, a boy playing the fiddle.

0:51:390:51:41

And there was other dolls as well.

0:51:410:51:43

And they have been at my home for 25 years or more.

0:51:430:51:46

I found out you were here,

0:51:460:51:48

so I thought I'd bring them down to have a look at them.

0:51:480:51:51

Fantastic. Well, we're very privileged, aren't we?

0:51:510:51:53

Thank you very much for doing that.

0:51:530:51:55

And the reason doll lovers, really, are attracted to automata

0:51:550:51:59

is, of course, because the makers use really top-quality heads.

0:51:590:52:04

And here, in fact, we've got a head made by the Jumeau factory,

0:52:040:52:09

which is certainly a name...

0:52:090:52:10

-I'm well aware of that.

-Oh, you would have been.

0:52:100:52:14

That also looks like a Jumeau head,

0:52:140:52:16

these big, wide eyes, and rather thick eyebrows.

0:52:160:52:21

This is unique. This is why I brought it first.

0:52:210:52:23

-Go on, tell us what happens.

-Well...

0:52:230:52:25

-Describe it.

-I have wound it up and pressed the button.

0:52:250:52:27

What happens - the lady brings her head up,

0:52:270:52:31

the trap opens, she brings the stick up, and wallops the rat.

0:52:310:52:36

The rat runs out of the trap, gets hit by the stick,

0:52:360:52:39

and runs back again. It's great.

0:52:390:52:42

I turned it on for the first time for 20 years.

0:52:420:52:45

Of course, it's got dusty or something.

0:52:450:52:48

It's just seized up.

0:52:480:52:50

Put yourself into that atmosphere in France in the latter part

0:52:500:52:55

of the 19th century.

0:52:550:52:57

Here are these incredibly expensive

0:52:570:53:01

and opulent adult toys.

0:53:010:53:04

And they're created by?

0:53:040:53:05

Little children.

0:53:060:53:08

-Really?

-They were sweatshop made.

0:53:080:53:11

-I feel guilty now.

-Don't feel guilty.

0:53:110:53:13

This is... One has to say, that is how manufacturing was.

0:53:130:53:17

What we have are great objects, and this one here,

0:53:170:53:23

I would put at, perhaps, £800 to £1,200.

0:53:230:53:27

And actually, although that's a much more complicated and interesting

0:53:270:53:31

-automaton, it's broken.

-Yep.

0:53:310:53:34

So I think I would put perhaps 1,000 to 1,500 on it,

0:53:340:53:38

knowing you've got to spend some money on getting it restored.

0:53:380:53:43

-Thank goodness I'm not looking to sell them.

-Exactly.

0:53:430:53:46

I've got two daughters, and they'll have the rest of the collection.

0:53:460:53:49

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much for bringing them in.

0:53:490:53:53

Well, they say that gold is the colour of the sun. It's an element,

0:53:540:53:57

it does come from the sun at the foundation of the world. And then,

0:53:570:54:00

craftsman comes along and makes something utterly sublime like this.

0:54:000:54:04

-Yes.

-But they're family things, aren't they?

0:54:040:54:06

They are. It's my husband's family.

0:54:060:54:08

And there were seven generations, all surgeons, from Oxford.

0:54:080:54:12

Goodness.

0:54:120:54:14

And the First World War stopped the run,

0:54:140:54:18

like it did for a lot of professional people.

0:54:180:54:20

Indeed. But these date from 100 years before then, don't they?

0:54:200:54:25

-And more. Yes, that's right.

-But the thing is,

0:54:250:54:27

not everybody might understand that these are snuff boxes,

0:54:270:54:29

and they're to be carried by people in their pockets,

0:54:290:54:32

and every part of their arrangements would have been at this

0:54:320:54:36

level of luxury and superlative craftsmanship.

0:54:360:54:39

-Yes.

-And I had a little sneak preview earlier,

0:54:390:54:42

and I discovered this one is made by a very famous craftsman

0:54:420:54:46

-called "Straughan," who is actually spelled Strachan.

-Yes.

0:54:460:54:49

And he's a famous goldsmith in his own right.

0:54:490:54:52

And this one is 1818.

0:54:520:54:54

And this one is French, and about the same period.

0:54:540:54:57

And snuffing was everything.

0:54:570:54:58

There was a huge ritual associated with this.

0:54:580:55:01

You'd open your snuff box, offer snuff to all your friends.

0:55:010:55:04

I'm very intrigued at the coloration there.

0:55:040:55:06

-Yes, well...

-And what it is.

0:55:060:55:09

This, we call four colours of gold.

0:55:090:55:11

The way to tint it, to colour it, is to alloy it with other metals,

0:55:110:55:14

and here we can see roses picked out in pink gold,

0:55:140:55:17

which is alloyed with copper.

0:55:170:55:19

And then leaves of the roses in tin, to make it green gold,

0:55:190:55:23

and then even white gold here,

0:55:230:55:25

which is probably zinc or silver for the heads of the little thistles.

0:55:250:55:30

-Yes, yes.

-And it's a fantastically time-consuming job to accommodate

0:55:300:55:34

all these colours. And then to chase them up and to work them.

0:55:340:55:38

So, let's look inside and see a hint of the provenance here.

0:55:380:55:40

And yet more gleaming gold, polished gold here.

0:55:400:55:43

"To Frederick Symons, from Chermside's grateful children."

0:55:430:55:49

And then an inscription below in French, saying that they hoped

0:55:490:55:53

that this small gesture would meet their gratitude to him

0:55:530:55:56

for his kindness to their father. But they're treasures, aren't they?

0:55:560:56:00

And they take us straight back into an atmosphere of a slightly

0:56:000:56:04

claustrophobic social milieu, but in a way, something that these

0:56:040:56:09

evoke perfectly, and the gentleman would have carried it,

0:56:090:56:11

he would have a silk waistcoat and a silk coat, and he'd be a surgeon

0:56:110:56:14

and he would demand hefty fees for doing all kinds of

0:56:140:56:17

unimaginable things without anaesthetic to his patients.

0:56:170:56:21

And then they were grateful and gave him a gold box.

0:56:210:56:23

But stunning stuff, and I'm utterly thrilled to see them,

0:56:250:56:29

and so I'm going to say that this one is worth

0:56:290:56:32

£5,000 to £7,000.

0:56:320:56:34

And I think this one is worth £6,000.

0:56:340:56:38

Which is virtually the same.

0:56:380:56:39

Well, I'm 85, so my girls will enjoy them, I'm sure.

0:56:390:56:42

Nonsense, you'll have to wait another 100 years.

0:56:420:56:45

And they're quite right, too.

0:56:470:56:48

No, utterly marvellous, and thank you for bringing

0:56:480:56:51

sunshine into our day today with your gold.

0:56:510:56:53

Wonderful, thank you.

0:56:530:56:55

One of our visitors brought this along to the Roadshow earlier today,

0:56:580:57:01

and I'm told it's an ancient contraption

0:57:010:57:03

for measuring feet, yards and miles.

0:57:030:57:06

And I'm told it's 123 miles to our next venue,

0:57:060:57:09

so I'm off, and I'm going to see if this works.

0:57:090:57:12

Until the next Roadshow, bye-bye.

0:57:120:57:14

A return visit to Baddesley Clinton near Solihull finds Fiona Bruce and the experts poring over more family heirlooms with memorable stories.

Treasures brought to the cameras include a silver box, described by an excited silver expert as exceptionally rare, which was once nearly subjected to drilling by the surprised owner. There is a revealing painting called The Nudist Colony's Annual Dinner Dance, and the show-closer finds two exquisite gold boxes once used by wealthy surgeons to apply snuff in the early days of the 19th century drawing gasps from the onlooking crowd.