Downes Cash in the Attic


Downes

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Welcome to Cash In The Attic, the show that helps you

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find hidden treasure in your home and then sells it for you at auction.

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Today, I'm in Walsall, just north of Birmingham.

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I've come to the Arboretum in the town centre.

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This beautiful park was built on land owned by the prominent Reynolds family

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and, in the mid-18th century, it was used for limestone quarrying.

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But, by the 1830s, the mines were no longer cost-effective and they were closed down.

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The pits were flooded and given over to fishing, boating and skating in the winter months.

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Nowadays, the park is used for art installations and it's been designated a conservation area.

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And let's hope we find some things worth conserving today,

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as we begin our hunt for auction-worthy antiques.

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Coming up on today's Cash In The Attic,

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we find some collectables that rub us up the wrong way.

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I think he's horrible.

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Not pretty, is he?

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While others, we just can't resist.

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-Look at that! It is amazing, isn't it?

-Such a red!

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But, at auction, will the bidders throw us a lifeline?

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Fingers crossed, cos this is your holiday - in one item.

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Find out when the hammer falls.

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I've come just around the corner

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from the Arboretum to meet a lady who wants to raise some money

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and get her and her family away from it all.

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Anne Downes has led a fascinating life.

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She's a very widely travelled lady who, over the years,

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has had a number of interesting jobs, including five years as a bobby on the beat.

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But, these days, she's concentrating on her lovely grandchildren, Danielle and Charlotte.

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-Paulie-Paul! How are you?

-How are you, mate?

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Good. It's a bit chilly and damp.

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It's great. Positive thinking. It's lovely! See what we can find.

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'Oh, bless him! Let's hope Paul's upbeat attitude is infectious.'

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-Morning, ladies.

-Oh, good morning.

-How are you?

-Fine, thank you.

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-What are you looking at?

-Just a few family photographs.

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Ah. That's you with a Kalashnikov.

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Yes - dangerous lady, yeah!

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What made you call in Cash In The Attic?

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I'm downsizing to a smaller property and I've accumulated a lot of stuff over the years

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and I think I'd like to get rid of it.

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-And you might make use of the money. What will you do with it?

-We'd love a holiday.

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A holiday. Where would you like to go on holiday?

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I'd quite like to go to Spain.

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-And you?

-Probably Majorca or somewhere in the Canaries.

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-The Canaries, warmer. Yes. Is that where you're thinking?

-I think so.

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And how many will go?

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My two granddaughters and Alex, my grandson.

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Oh, all the grandchildren get a holiday.

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Yeah. We leave the mums at home.

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We just go, don't we?

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So how much is it gonna set you back?

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I don't know - about £1,000.

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-So is that what we're looking for?

-Yes.

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£1,000 for a holiday - that's a tall order, but I'm sure we'll find it in this lovely house.

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Let's start looking.

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As we look around, it strikes me what a generous woman Anne is,

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not only taking the kids off their parents' hands but jetting them off somewhere warm.

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We could all do with a granny like Anne!

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But we do have the lovely Paul.

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Let's hope he's in a generous mood.

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-Here you are, Paul.

-Ah, hello.

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-What's this you've found? This is gigantic!

-You couldn't help but miss it, could you?

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Isn't that amazing? This is Cappa de Monte.

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It's a very famous Italian factory. It went very much out of fashion

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in the last 10 or 20 years, but they've come back in recently.

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The way they produced their items was a biscuit porcelain.

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The idea is that, if you have a cup of tea or any other ceramic item,

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normally it has a protective surface. This one doesn't. It's almost like a raw clay.

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It gives this great character and great definition, so you've got eyebrows,

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you've got a great beard going on here,

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you've got details on the fruit and flowers.

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-Where does it come from, Anne?

-It was my mother-in-law's. She actually had it from Italy as a present.

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It was in the family for ages.

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Surely you want to keep this for your grandchildren?

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-I think he's horrible.

-Not very pretty, is he?

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-You think it's horrible, too?

-What a shame!

-I'd probably agree

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-that it's not super-fashionable.

-No.

-But you say it's back in fashion?

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-It's having a comeback.

-To the tune of how many pounds?

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I think a nice decorative piece like that,

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at least 30 to £50. Does that sound all right?

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Wow-ee, yeah!

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-Could you let it go for that?

-Yeah.

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Everyone's like, "Yeah, it's going!"

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-£30 is a good start, but we need £1,000 today.

-OK.

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So we'd better get our searching hats on. He's got one, so he can come.

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I think our first valuation of just £30 has given Danielle and Charlotte a bit of a wake-up call.

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If they're going to enjoy the Mediterranean sun, they do need to pull their fingers out

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and find some of Granny's collectables, and there's a long way to go.

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Meanwhile, Anne has found something interesting in the kitchen.

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Right, what have you got there?

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This is sort of lovely. I think the ribbon and that is really pretty.

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Ancient Order of Forest - isn't that smart?

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I don't think I've seen one with a sash before.

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Look at that! It's fantastic. Look at the quality of the sewing there.

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-What have you found there? Look at the colours!

-The colours are beautiful.

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-Where is it from?

-It was an uncle's.

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-He had it for years.

-Is it a war medal?

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-No, it's the Ancient Order of the Foresters.

-What's that?

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That's like an insurance company, life assurance thing.

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-Exactly, yes.

-Nothing to do with forestry?

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No. The saying was, though,

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they would help you out through the forest of life,

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give you a safe passage through life. That was the ancient idea.

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But it dates back from the 18th century.

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The original idea was that a group of people would get together

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and pay a small subscription charge, a few pounds a week,

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a few pence a week in those days.

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And then, if one of them was to fall ill

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or they needed help, the whole organisation would help them.

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So like a co-operative, friendly association?

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-Exactly, yeah.

-Right.

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I've never seen one with the sash. That's quite an unusual item.

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What's this saying?

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-Unity, benevolence...

-And concord.

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-What we're left with are some fantastic decorative medals.

-It's beautiful.

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It's amazing, isn't it?

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-Is it OK to sell it?

-Oh, yes.

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How much do you think we'll get?

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I think quite a bit.

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The combination of enamelled silver, beautifully boxed, attractive item...

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I think, value-wise,

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40, perhaps up to maybe £80.

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-Does that sound all right?

-That sounds wonderful.

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£40 is a nice bit for our total,

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but still short of £1,000, so let's keep hunting.

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I love that idea of a society helping you through the forests of life.

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Perhaps someone at auction will fall for this unusual item

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and pay a little bit more than the £40 Paul has estimated.

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Danielle has come up trumps with another item passed down through the family,

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and, again, it's an object with a fascinating history.

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I must admit, I love this picture. Where's this come from?

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It's my great uncle's. It's been in the family for a long time.

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So it's been passed down, has it?

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-Yeah.

-Did he ever tell you what it represents, what it is?

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The Lusitania.

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Do you know what happened to the Lusitania?

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I think it was hit by a torpedo.

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That's right. It was tragic. It was actually a passenger ship.

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It's one of the Cunard Line's flagships at the time.

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They were the first transatlantic crossings for the upper class and the gentry.

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If you have a look at the bottom here, it says,

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"Cunard Line, Lusitania, torpedoed by the enemy without warning,

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"May 7th 1915. 1,441 lives lost."

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They do say the reason why so many perished,

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it was secretly carrying weapons for our side of the war,

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if you like, and of course they needed to destroy it.

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This is a reverse painting. It looks like a stained-glass panel.

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You can imagine this in a window, Do you think it's sentimental?

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I think so, cos it's been passed down the family, but...

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-as long as it goes to a good home, she'll be happy.

-It's a beautiful thing.

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A shipping line collector would love that. It's in good condition.

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-I'd say 40 to £60. Does that sound all right?

-Yeah.

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Does that float your boat? Hey!

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-Come on, let's keep looking.

-That's another good find,

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but we still really need to step up our efforts

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if we're going to get anywhere near that target.

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Danielle carries on the great work

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by unearthing this industrial oil warning lantern from the 1930s.

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Its three red lenses would have shone a warning glow on the railways.

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With an estimate of only £10, it's a warning to us

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that we're still a long way from that Mediterranean holiday.

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Meanwhile, I'm dying to find out more about Anne's fascinating past life,

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so I persuade her to take a few minutes out.

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Anne, we want a break from all this rummaging.

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I want to catch up about you, because you've had quite a busy life.

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-You were a policewoman at one stage I hear?

-Yes, I was.

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In fact when I first left school, I was a bus conductress.

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-Chink chink.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Then I joined the police, which was what I always wanted to do.

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-You also wanted to be an actress in between, didn't you?

-Yes.

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I had visions of being an actress and I wrote to these people,

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to the television company and they wrote me a lovely letter

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giving me instructions on how to be an actress, who to contact,

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but then I decided to join the police, so I wrote back, "Thank you very much,"

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-and joined the police force instead.

-"I've decided to become a police woman"?

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I did, yeah. Thinking, "Oh my God!"

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How long were you in the force?

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About five years. Then I left to have babies.

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I had three babies in four-and-a-half years and didn't go back to the force,

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but then I got a job with Sandwell council as a rent collector.

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I retired when I was 50, never ever to work again,

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and then went back again. Cos I tried the belly dancing....

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-Belly-dancing?

-Yeah.

-Tell me about the belly-dancing.

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It's good, it's really good exercise. You know, you sort of...

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dance away, but then I got high blood pressure and I had to give it up!

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-You don't want to pass out when you're on stage belly-dancing.

-No. That would have been bad.

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So bus conductress, wannabe actress,

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-police woman, debt collector, belly dancer, anything else?

-Tap dancing.

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-It sounds like sitting around doing nothing isn't going to wash.

-I do like to be doing something.

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You seem to have a close bond with your granddaughters. Do you go on holiday often?

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As much as we can, yeah.

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Where were you hoping to go to?

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Anywhere in the Canaries.

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I like Tenerife, but, as long as it's hot.

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With all your careers behind you it won't be a problem to get this money,

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but it won't happen if we sit on the sofa, so let's find what Paul and the girls are doing.

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Maybe the girls have inherited their granny's let's-get-on-with-it attitude,

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as they're unearthing some real gems,

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including this charming oil painting, signed by the 20th-century artist, Dallas Simpson,

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who was known for depictions of wide-eyed children and women

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from the more innocent period of the '40s and '50s.

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Paul thinks it could bring in as much as £70.

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As you'd expect, Anne's amassed quite a few leaving presents

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from her many jobs, but will any of them make us money at auction?

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So were these what you wanted to show me?

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-Yes, they're lovely, aren't they?

-Yes, they're beautiful. You've collected them?

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They've been bought to me as gifts.

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That was from my work when I retired, never to work again.

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Which job was that, belly dancer?

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-Which one was it?

-Rent collector.

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Rent collector.

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These really are top quality items.

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Royal Doulton, I think, really make the best figurines.

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-Which one's your favourite?

-I think this one's my favourite.

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Oh, OK, which one's she? Let's have a look.

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What I like about these figures, they're all named.

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-This one is Elizabeth.

-That's another Elizabeth. That's lovely.

-Two Elizabeths?

-Yeah.

-There we are.

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The way they tend to be collected is that they would make a doll or a figurine

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for a short period of time and what they would do would be each one has an individual number...

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HM2465, this one. So you can actually look that up

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in the catalogue and they'll tell you what year this figure was made.

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What happened was that they changed the colour or the pose slightly,

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gave her a different outfit sometimes, and people collect that type of thing,

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and because they didn't sell so many of the variations

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they've become rare now, and people want to buy into that market.

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-So they're instantly collectible. Do you still like them?

-I think they're beautiful,

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but I think they might need a new home now.

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-Have you any idea how much they might be worth?

-I'm thinking £100 each at least.

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They certainly cost that, I can see where you're coming from there,

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but you've got to imagine a resale value. I'd like to see these

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with an estimate of maybe between 200 and 300 to give them a chance.

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-Does that sound all right?

-Yes.

-There's no real rarities amongst them.

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-You haven't got a rare issue?

-No.

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That's another 200 towards the target. We're doing OK, aren't we?

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-We are, yes.

-All right, let's go and find everybody else.

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And because Royal Doulton is so collectible, it's very likely to sell.

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Of course there will always be stamp collectors,

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and this Victory album is a banker at between 10 and £30.

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Paul's been hovering in the hall,

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and has wound up next to a very upstanding and impressive character.

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Danielle, Charlotte, do you know anything about this clock?

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Not really, it's been in the family for a very long time.

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-It's a genuine heirloom then?

-It's, yes.

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I was wondering when we were going to value this.

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-Is it for sale?

-Yes, yes.

-Do you like it?

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I think it's a lovely piece,

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but it doesn't fit here and it wouldn't fit in my new house either.

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-It's massive.

-You can't help but notice it, can you?

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These are very attractive pieces, aren't they?

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It's not so much the way they look,

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it's the quality of the movements, that's where the value tends to be,

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and the first thing I always do, if you open this little door at the front, always count the weights.

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-You see that? There's one there.

-Yes.

-It's the force of gravity,

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the pull on the gravity of the weight causes the clock to go,

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and the way it works, the cheapest movement that you can have

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will run off one weight and that means it needs winding every day.

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When it has two weights, like this one, it means it only needs winding once a week,

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and that's a big advantage with clocks like this.

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-So it's a quality movement in there.

-How much is it worth?

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I was thinking about £3,000, but I don't know.

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Right, have you any reason why it would be that sort of value?

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Yes, it was valued at just over £3,000 in the late '90s.

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OK, I think insurance purposes, then yes, insurance is always exaggerated.

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But for that sort of value, really, I'd like to see a maker.

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It's very important, especially a London maker.

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I think realistically you're looking more around 1,000.

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I'd like to see it go to auction with 800 to £1,200 estimate. If that's all right?

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-Is it OK to sell it for that?

-Oh, yeah.

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That makes our total much more healthy,

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because with that, if it sells at Paul's estimate, your grand total

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for your holiday is £1,180, if that sells at Paul's estimate.

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-Sounds good.

-Is that good?

-Yeah.

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It all depends what happens at the auction.

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Things go up and down. On a good day things can go sky high,

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on a bad day they can go rock-bottom so let's hope for a good day.

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Fingers crossed.

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What a great rummage. So let's take a look at Anne's most exciting items

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that are heading for the sale room.

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The Cappa de Monte statue of a farmer which isn't to everyone's taste,

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especially Danielle and Charlotte's, but valued at a reasonable £30 to £50.

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The Foresters medal, with this unusual colourful ribbon attached,

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estimated to fetch £40 to £80.

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Worth a very useful £40 to £60 there's also

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this collectible glass picture of the doomed ship Lusitania.

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And these Royal Doulton figurines

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are a great addition, they could fetch as much as £300.

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Coming upon today's Cash In The Attic,

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the auction house is buzzing, but are the bidders in a buying mood?

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We hit some lows...

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-That's a disaster!

-Oh, yes...

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Anne and the girls feel the strain.

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I'm going to cry!

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So stay put to find out how today's antiques fare

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when the final hammer falls.

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It's been two weeks since we were in Walsall looking through Anne's house

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with her granddaughters, and we brought all the treasure we found

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here to Melton Mowbray, to Shouler and Sons.

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Sadly, Paul Hayes, our expert, is feeling poorly,

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and he's up in Morecambe recuperating,

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so it's me who has got to guide the ladies through the auction

0:16:560:16:59

and make sure they raise the £1,000 they need for that holiday.

0:16:590:17:03

Remember if you're thinking of buying or selling at auction,

0:17:030:17:07

there are various fees to be taken into account,

0:17:070:17:09

such as commission, so make sure you check first.

0:17:090:17:12

With the sale about to begin, I'm going to have to tell Liz, Danielle and Charlotte

0:17:120:17:17

that they'll have to make do with me today, while Paul is convalescing.

0:17:170:17:21

Hello. How are you?

0:17:210:17:23

-Did you get here all right?

-Yes, lovely, thank you.

-Paul can't be with us today,

0:17:230:17:27

he's left you in my capable hands, don't panic!

0:17:270:17:31

It's going to be fine. We've got big items like the grandfather clock, our real star item.

0:17:310:17:36

-Have you got a reserve on that?

-Er...£500.

0:17:360:17:39

-£500. Any reserves on anything else?

-My Doulton ladies, £300.

0:17:390:17:43

Are you going to miss anything? Have you changed your mind about any items?

0:17:430:17:47

-The Doulton ladies.

-I'm quite sad about the ladies.

-Right.

0:17:470:17:50

Hopefully they won't make the reserve and you can take them home.

0:17:500:17:53

No, no, no! We want them to sell! It's important for that holiday.

0:17:530:17:57

We've got £1,000 to raise today, so fingers crossed, just go and enjoy it.

0:17:570:18:00

It's already started, so we should go and get our places.

0:18:000:18:03

Here in Melton Mowbray, we've two auctioneers, who work the room between them.

0:18:050:18:09

Let's hope that two heads really are better than one as our first item comes up for sale.

0:18:090:18:14

113, the Cappa de Monte figure, a farmer with a dog.

0:18:140:18:19

Impressive that is, isn't it?

0:18:190:18:21

OK, it's the giant farmer with dog.

0:18:210:18:25

It's the biggest Cappa de Monte figure I've seen in ages.

0:18:250:18:28

Paul thinks about £30 to £50.

0:18:280:18:31

-What do you reckon?

-A million pounds!

0:18:310:18:33

A million, nice and realistic.

0:18:330:18:34

£30 to a million we're looking for.

0:18:340:18:37

30 quid?

0:18:370:18:39

£30.

0:18:390:18:42

£20.

0:18:420:18:44

A tenner for it.

0:18:440:18:45

£10, £10, £10, £10, at 10, £10,

0:18:450:18:48

at 10 only. At £10, at £10 it is,

0:18:480:18:51

£10, £10, £10 only.

0:18:510:18:53

At £10 only, at 10, 10.

0:18:530:18:55

10 it is there, now at 10.

0:18:550:18:56

12, at 12, 15, 15, now, at £15.

0:18:560:19:00

At £15. At £15, only, now at £15,

0:19:000:19:03

only now at £15, £15, at 15 only,

0:19:030:19:06

I'll let it go, then, for 15.

0:19:060:19:09

What a shame! My little man.

0:19:090:19:11

£15, it wasn't little.

0:19:110:19:12

That's a bit of a shaky start.

0:19:120:19:14

The auctioneer was really working the room

0:19:140:19:17

but nobody seemed interested in our Cappa de Monte farmer.

0:19:170:19:20

Perhaps the bidders, like the Downes family,

0:19:200:19:22

don't find him very attractive.

0:19:220:19:24

The girls do love this next item.

0:19:240:19:26

It's the picture set in glass of that tragic passenger ship, the Lusitania,

0:19:260:19:30

sunk during the First World War.

0:19:300:19:33

All hands to deck, it's the Lusitania.

0:19:330:19:36

It's really a nice unusual piece,

0:19:360:19:37

because it's reverse painted onto the glass as you know.

0:19:370:19:40

We want about £40 for it.

0:19:400:19:43

Here she blows.

0:19:430:19:44

£40.

0:19:440:19:46

£30.

0:19:460:19:48

£20.

0:19:480:19:50

Here it is, £20.

0:19:500:19:52

£10.

0:19:520:19:54

£10, thank you, now, at £10, at £10, 10,

0:19:540:19:57

12? 12.

0:19:570:19:59

15, 18.

0:19:590:20:00

20, make it?

0:20:020:20:05

£20, only, now, at £20,

0:20:050:20:07

all done then at £20.

0:20:070:20:09

Don't worry, some things don't do well,

0:20:110:20:13

but other things do really well, so it's swings and roundabouts.

0:20:130:20:17

It's a shame the ship picture didn't make more,

0:20:170:20:19

as it's been in the family a long time

0:20:190:20:21

but it's a step towards our total.

0:20:210:20:23

I just hope the new owner will appreciate it,

0:20:230:20:25

cos they got themselves a bargain.

0:20:250:20:27

Let's hope things improve with the stamp album.

0:20:270:20:30

At this point £10 to £30 would at least get things moving.

0:20:300:20:34

380A, the Victory stamp album and stamps.

0:20:340:20:40

Tenner for them. Tenner for them.

0:20:400:20:44

A fiver, get on.

0:20:440:20:46

A fiver, get on. The stamp album and stamps.

0:20:460:20:50

A fiver, anybody?

0:20:500:20:51

Today.

0:20:530:20:55

-Shame.

-It's a shame, a real shame. Not even £10 for the stamps.

0:20:550:20:59

Anne is trying to put a brave face on here,

0:20:590:21:01

but the girls are feeling a little worried, I can tell you.

0:21:010:21:04

The painted clock...

0:21:040:21:06

Our next item could change all of that.

0:21:060:21:09

It's the stunning grandfather clock with an estimate of £800 to £1,200.

0:21:090:21:15

You've put a £500 reserve on,

0:21:150:21:17

-is that right?

-I did, yes.

-It can't go for anything less than that?

-No.

0:21:170:21:21

OK, so fingers crossed, this is your holiday in one item.

0:21:210:21:25

600.

0:21:250:21:28

500.

0:21:280:21:29

£300.

0:21:290:21:31

At £300, thank you, now,

0:21:310:21:33

at 320, 320,

0:21:330:21:34

40, 340,

0:21:340:21:36

60, 360,

0:21:360:21:37

at 360, at 360, at £360,

0:21:370:21:41

80, 380, at £380, at 380,

0:21:410:21:46

400, 400,

0:21:460:21:48

420, 440,

0:21:480:21:51

at 440, at 440,

0:21:510:21:54

60, may I say?

0:21:540:21:56

£440 only, then, at £440.

0:21:560:22:01

-Oh, no!

-Not sold.

0:22:010:22:04

-Oh, God, that's a disaster!

-Not to worry.

0:22:040:22:07

That's our biggest item unsold.

0:22:070:22:10

It just doesn't seem to be our day so far,

0:22:100:22:13

but at least Anne had a reserve

0:22:130:22:14

on her beloved clock, and she can take it home.

0:22:140:22:18

Next up we have a chance to improve our fortunes

0:22:180:22:21

with the Dallas Simpson oil painting.

0:22:210:22:25

18.

0:22:250:22:26

£18, it didn't do very well either.

0:22:260:22:28

If this is a roller-coaster ride, we've been on a downward spiral

0:22:280:22:32

for too long. The only way is up.

0:22:320:22:33

468A, the Order of Foresters medal with a sash.

0:22:330:22:40

This is a really interesting lot,

0:22:400:22:42

it's the regalia and the medal from the Foresters.

0:22:420:22:45

Really unusual.

0:22:450:22:46

It depends on whether there are people in the room who know

0:22:460:22:49

about the Foresters.

0:22:490:22:51

We want about £40. Do you think we'll get that?

0:22:510:22:53

I really don't know.

0:22:530:22:54

-Let's just hope.

-Hoping so, it's worth it for the colour.

0:22:540:22:57

It's beautiful. Let's see.

0:22:570:23:00

I am bid £12 on this,

0:23:000:23:02

£12, £12 only, £12,

0:23:020:23:05

15, 18, £18, 20, at £20, at £20,

0:23:050:23:08

at £20, only, now, at £20,

0:23:080:23:11

at £20 in front, £20, last look.

0:23:110:23:15

All done at £20.

0:23:150:23:18

Disappointing again.

0:23:180:23:19

It may not have reached its value, but it sold,

0:23:190:23:22

which at this stage is a step in the right direction.

0:23:220:23:24

And it's £20 towards the holiday.

0:23:240:23:27

Next up it's the Seralite Lens oil lamp.

0:23:270:23:30

It's valued at £10 and anything that can help our total is a bonus now.

0:23:300:23:34

At 18, is it 20, sir?

0:23:340:23:36

at 18, 20 bid, £20, £20,

0:23:360:23:38

at £20, at £20 only,

0:23:380:23:40

at £20 only, at £20,

0:23:400:23:42

last chance, then, at £20.

0:23:420:23:45

£20.

0:23:450:23:47

Double the estimate. Very good.

0:23:470:23:49

It's late in the day, but finally we have some luck.

0:23:490:23:53

It's a surprise, but selling well over its estimate, the lamp goes for £20.

0:23:530:23:57

Big smiles from Anne and the girls.

0:23:570:24:00

We really do need a miracle if we're going to make sure

0:24:000:24:03

the Downes family get off to the sunshine.

0:24:030:24:06

We're praying our last item of the day sells well,

0:24:060:24:08

and it should, as it's the collection of figurines,

0:24:080:24:11

so loved by the girls.

0:24:110:24:13

Right, it's the Doulton ladies.

0:24:130:24:16

-They look rather special up there on display.

-They look wonderful.

0:24:160:24:20

-Do you miss them?

-I think I might.

0:24:200:24:22

Looking at them, they look beautiful.

0:24:220:24:24

-You put a reserve on these, what's the reserve?

-£300.

0:24:240:24:28

Paul thinks they'll go for more than this,

0:24:280:24:30

so hopefully we'll sail past that. Fingers crossed.

0:24:300:24:33

At £200, at £200 on the book now, at £200,

0:24:340:24:38

-220...

-Oh, very good.

-240,

0:24:380:24:41

260, 280,

0:24:410:24:43

300, £300, 20 may I say?

0:24:430:24:48

THEY LAUGH NERVOUSLY

0:24:480:24:49

At £300 it's here now at £300,

0:24:490:24:53

all done away, then, at 300.

0:24:530:24:56

I'm going to cry!

0:24:560:25:00

A bit emotional?

0:25:000:25:02

Don't film me doing this!

0:25:020:25:04

What are you feeling, a bit sad because they've gone?

0:25:040:25:07

No, I'm just excited.

0:25:070:25:09

Thank goodness. From the jaws of defeat, we've snatched a victory.

0:25:090:25:13

I thought for a moment Anne was regretting letting her ladies go.

0:25:130:25:17

Now it's time

0:25:170:25:18

to tell them how much they've made.

0:25:180:25:20

So it's been a tough old day today.

0:25:200:25:22

I'm really sorry about that, but that's the nature of auctions.

0:25:220:25:25

Sometimes they go really well, sometimes they don't.

0:25:250:25:28

It's a real shame, we had so much riding on that grandfather clock, and it didn't sell.

0:25:280:25:33

But you actually haven't done as badly, if you take out that £600,

0:25:330:25:37

you wanted £1,000, what do you think you've made?

0:25:370:25:40

About 350?

0:25:400:25:41

Almost there, 393.

0:25:410:25:43

-So that's actually not... you'd have made almost 1,000.

-We would have...

0:25:430:25:47

If you'd sold the clock at 600, but sadly that didn't sell.

0:25:470:25:50

It doesn't matter.

0:25:500:25:52

Good luck with your holiday, wherever you decide to go.

0:25:520:25:55

Thank you, we've really enjoyed it.

0:25:550:25:57

The girls will have to wait a few months before they hit the beaches,

0:26:020:26:06

but for Anne it's all about spending quality time with her grandchildren,

0:26:060:26:10

and we catch up with them on one of their regular outings.

0:26:100:26:13

We've come here for a bit of a treat today. We made enough money to go towards a holiday,

0:26:130:26:17

but we still have to put some more towards it, but I can't wait to go away in the spring.

0:26:170:26:22

The girls clearly appreciate having such a loving granny.

0:26:240:26:27

We're so lucky to have a nan like this, she takes us everywhere, and is so happy.

0:26:270:26:31

It's so nice, I love spending time with my nan. She's the best nan ever.

0:26:310:26:35

Despite a disappointing day at auction, Anne and the girls have put the money to good use,

0:26:390:26:43

and if you'd like to recycle some family treasures into something special,

0:26:430:26:47

come on the show. Our application form is on the website -

0:26:470:26:50

See you next time.

0:26:550:26:56

For more information about Cash In The Attic, including how the programme was made,

0:26:560:27:00

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle.

0:27:000:27:05

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:050:27:08

Email [email protected]

0:27:080:27:11

Liz Downes loves spending time with her grandchildren, and wants to raise enough money to take them to Tenerife, giving their parents a well-earned break. Alistair Appleton and Paul Hayes are on hand to help.


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