Goodgame Cash in the Attic


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Goodgame

Series looking at the value of household junk. A beauty therapist and her husband call in Lorne Spicer to help clear their Oxfordshire home and earn enough for a Japanese garden.


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Welcome to Cash In the Attic, searching out your hidden treasures and selling them at auction.

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Today I'm in Oxfordshire and before I get to our final destination,

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I've stopped off here to look at one of our finest and most glorious landmarks.

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Blenheim Palace is the birthplace of Winston Churchill and home to the 11th Duke of Marlborough.

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Built between 1705 and 1724, during the reign of Queen Anne,

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it was given to John Churchill as a gift after the Battle of Blenheim.

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Set in 2,100 acres, it is surrounded by stunning, sweeping lawns,

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a magnificent lake and beautiful formal gardens, designed by Capability Brown.

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So let's hope we find plenty of royal antiques that fetch regal sums under the hammer at auction.

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'Coming up on today's show: we've got high hopes...'

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If this was in perfect condition, you could be looking at as much as £1,000.

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'Unearth some real finds...'

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That's not a bad result, is it?

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'And take a step back in time.'

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Hercule Poirot, Agatha Christie...

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-'But will our lots have us dancing for joy?'

-Yes!

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'All will be revealed when the final hammer falls.'

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Today I'm in Oxfordshire

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and I've come to meet a couple

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who want help raising funds for some desperately needed renovations.

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This gorgeous house in the heart of Oxfordshire is home to retired electrical engineer John Goodgame

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and his wife Margaret. They met and married four years ago and have been renovating their new home together,

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but the property is overflowing with their combined possessions

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so with Margaret's sister Queenie to help, they've decided to declutter

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and put the money towards a rather green-fingered cause.

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-Morning, Paul.

-Good morning.

-I've just been to Blenheim Palace.

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-Really? They let you in?

-They did, actually! And the rest of the day will be the royal "we".

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This looks fantastic, but I know that despite outward appearances, there's still work to be done.

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-Let's meet the family.

-All right. Let's have a look.

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-Ah, here you all are!

-Hello!

-What a fantastic room.

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-Crikey. This is a beautiful house. You're very lucky.

-Thank you.

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-So you've called in Cash In The Attic. Who's responsible for calling us in?

-I did.

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Right. OK, Margaret. Why?

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Because we want to raise money to build a Japanese garden.

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-Why a Japanese garden?

-Well, they always intrigued me.

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They're so alien to our type of gardens,

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but I've seen pictures in books and, yeah, they intrigued me.

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OK, so what sort of money are we looking for, Margaret?

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-About £500.

-Where has all the stuff come from that we'll be looking at?

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Because we just got married, as you know,

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it's from my house and then from John's house as well. We came to live in this house.

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Queenie, some of the money is going towards something about your job?

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Well, I'm a student union officer and they help a lot at the college with the student hardship fund.

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They said they would donate some money to the student union fund.

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Right. So we need to raise £500 to get the money for a Japanese garden,

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-plus a donation for the student hardship fund. That sounds great. We'd better get on.

-Of course.

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Come on, then. Follow me this way.

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With eight rooms and three old stables at our disposal,

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we should be spoilt for choice today and who better to help us decide what to save and what to sell

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than our very own Paul Hayes?

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He's worked in the antiques trade all his life and is on the case.

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Ah, hello! How are you? I'm not checking my make-up before you say anything!

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-I found this lovely little set. It's fantastic.

-It's quite nice.

-It's from the golden age of travel.

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It took a long time to get anywhere.

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Even going from Scotland to London might take several days.

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You needed travelling items with you. This is remarkable, actually.

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What you have to check is the mirror. It's the most usable part.

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If the mirrors are cracked and gone, it's quite expensive to repair.

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-What's it actually made of?

-It's ivorine, an imitation ivory.

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Because it's a form of plastic, you can make wonderful shapes, unlike the real material.

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This one's very Art Deco. Think of Hercule Poirot and Agatha Christie.

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That wonderful golden era.

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-What sort of value for this?

-Quite a bit. You have two scent bottles,

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toothpaste holder, your pastes and powders here,

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a comb... Value-wise, £80-£150. How does that sound?

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-That would be brilliant.

-OK. Let's see what else we can find, then.

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'We're off to a promising start. With £500 to raise, there's still a long way to go,

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'so we need to spread out and dig deep. Paul's magpie instincts home in on a real rarity.'

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-Margaret, who's the huntsman?

-I think it's a lighter.

-A lighter?!

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-How does it work?

-Em...

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Oh, right. I see. This is clever. It uses the power of gravity.

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As you flick it upside down, the top opens and makes the spark, hitting against the flint.

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-Yeah.

-And that burns and causes the light. That's amazing, isn't it?

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You'd keep this on your coffee table or near your paraffin or oil lamps.

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It's a very useful thing to have. Nowadays smoking is more taboo

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so there's a massive market for historical items. I've never seen that before.

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Two people might buy this - anybody interested in the history of smoking

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-and anybody into hunting and horse racing.

-Right.

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-If I said £40-£60, how does that sound?

-Yes.

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Some bright spark will buy it!

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'Hopefully that will burn a hole in our bidders' pockets at auction.

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'John's hard at work next door and spots this pair of Art Deco scent bottles,

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'which Paul packs off to auction with a very colourful price tag.

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'We're making good progress so far. And I've spotted a rather colourful looking figurine.'

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I think I've found something here. Very unusual figure.

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-A bit of Doulton, is it? Quite nice.

-Where's this from, John?

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My late wife bought it from a charity shop. She did have a good eye.

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She paid £50 for it,

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but she knew that it was rare

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and it would be worth a lot more.

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I've seen a lot of Doulton figures, but never one with all these...

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-Is she selling toys?

-I think they are actually other Doulton figures.

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Pan, the devil, a ballerina, a horse and jockey,

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and that looks like maybe Cupid.

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I've never seen this figure before. Normally they have a maker's name or a character's name.

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There's no name on this one.

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-Do you know what she's called?

-Yeah, she's called the Sketch Girl.

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-OK. Any connection with Sketch magazine?

-Yes.

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I do know my late wife was...

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-..offered an obscene amount of money for her.

-When you say an obscene amount, what sort of offer?

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-In the late hundreds.

-Crikey.

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This was made for Sketch magazine.

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That's almost like an endorsement. They'd have this figurine commissioned.

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That would have meant only a few are in existence.

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You are talking 1920s, 1930s. If this was in perfect condition,

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you could get as much as £1,000,

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-but this one is damaged. See?

-Yes.

-Her head's been off and the head of the ballerina is off as well.

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A damaged piece has to go to auction with a realistic estimate.

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-If I say £100, maybe £200?

-At the end of the day, money is not everything.

-Of course.

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-I would have to think seriously.

-I'll put it back, safe and sound.

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I've got the easy job. You can now find something else.

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'We'll have to wait and see if John decides to part with her,

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'but £100 would be a much-needed addition to the gardening fund.

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'In the meantime, the search continues.

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'A beautiful silver mirror catches Paul's attention and is valued at £40-£60.

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'Downstairs, Margaret spots a wooden table which will hopefully add a further £50-£80 to the kitty.

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'After a successful morning, I whisk John and Margaret off to the garden

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'to learn more about their plans.' How long have you lived here?

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-We've been...two and a half years?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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-But you're from here, John?

-Yeah, that's right. I was born three houses down.

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-So...

-And we built the house next door.

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I lived there for about 30 years.

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-And we moved here.

-So how did you two meet?

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I was cleaning the windows at his shop. He said, "Somebody's cleaning the windows!"

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Just trying to impress the landlord. He said, "Sorry, we haven't met."

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And that's how we started going out.

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-So you had a beauty therapy shop and he was your landlord?

-Yeah.

-She asked me out on a date.

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And I haven't had any rent since!

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It's a lovely garden. Why decide on a Japanese garden?

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We didn't want a typical English garden. We wanted something different.

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I'd gathered some literature on Japanese gardens and I was drawn towards that.

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'Let's hope our bidders are as drawn to John and Margaret's collectables.

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'We've got a £500 target to reach.

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'The others have been busy inside and Queenie discovers this colourful embroidered piano stool,

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'which should hit all the right notes with this price tag.

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'In the hall, something shiny has caught John's eye.'

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-There you go, Paul.

-Let's look.

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-Do you know what these are?

-Eh, apart from salts, no.

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Yeah, that's exactly what they are. Salt cellars. These would go on a dining table of a wealthy family.

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These look like solid silver. They're a very good style. Look at that.

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See the silver hallmarks? That lion tells me it's solid silver. The other ones are quite indistinct.

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We're looking at some time around the turn of the century, 1900. These are really stylish.

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-They're from the Arts and Crafts movement. Heard of that?

-Yes.

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Round about 1880, 1900, there was a group of artists got together

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to rebel against mass production. They made items like this,

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that looked hand-beaten. They would over-emphasise that these were hand-made.

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Those really are fantastic. A matching pair, quite collectable.

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-I think you're looking at £100, maybe £150.

-Brilliant.

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-Is that all right?

-Yeah.

-But take that with a pinch of salt!

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'With time running out, we need some top-notch finds to get a garden to be proud of.

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'Not time to fetch your hat yet, John, as Margaret's sister, Queenie, who is helping out today,

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'stumbles upon this attractive wooden corner cabinet.

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'Not even the stables go unsearched today.'

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-Paul, look at this.

-Oh, a nice table. Can that go?

-Not the table.

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-The lamp.

-That's lovely as well. Beautiful. Did you have a Victorian look at one point?

-Yes.

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Let's have a close look at this.

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Ah, now then, Lorne, John, step this way. Here we are. I'm going to light up your life.

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I found a great oil lamp. These are wonderful items from an age before we had electricity.

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This would have been your main source of light in your house,

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in your parlour or sitting room.

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It adds a lovely mood lighting or a very romantic light.

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Is that the original shade?

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You find that people marry these up.

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These glass shades get broken very easily. Every time you cleaned this or every time you lit it,

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you had to take the glass shade off and it gets broken or damaged.

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I know one gentleman who spends his life buying bits of oil lamps -

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the shade from one lamp, the well from another - to make new lamps.

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Lots of people threw these out. They end up in stables and sheds.

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-So what sort of value?

-This one is a very visual one.

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You get very cheap ones for use in the kitchen. This is quite a grand one, used in a nice room.

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That adds to its favour. I think £100-£200. It's a nice one.

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-If we can get that, I'll laugh all the way to the bank.

-Not bad for something in the shed!

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You probably want to know how much money you may be making at auction. The total comes to £600.

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Very good. I'm very surprised, actually.

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I know you're in two minds about the Royal Doulton figure, but that could add another £100.

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-So that's not bad, is it?

-Very good.

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The next time we see you will be at the auction house. 'What a fantastic result.

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'Fingers crossed, the garden kitty and the student union fund could soon be in the money

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'as we've got a great haul of items.

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'There's the immaculate Art Deco ladies' grooming set valued at a respectable £80-£150.

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'And the pair of solid silver Arts and Crafts salt cellars,

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'complete with matching spoons, estimated at £100-£150.

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'But doubt remains about the rare, but damaged Royal Doulton figurine.

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'Will Paul's £100-£200 valuation persuade John to let her go to auction? Only time will tell.

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'Still to come: our expert's at a loss to explain some of the sales.'

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-What's going on?

-I've no idea!

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-'And resorts to cracking jokes.'

-There were 10 of them, but they fell off one by one.

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-'John may be laughing...'

-I can take that home.. with the other things!

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'but will they have reached their target when the final hammer falls?'

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It's been a few weeks since we had a good look round John and Margaret Goodgame's property.

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With the help of Queenie, we found lots of lovely items to bring here to auction in Sudbury.

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They're looking to raise £500 to turn that expanse of back garden into a beautiful Japanese garden.

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Let's hope when our items go under the hammer today, the bidders are ready to pay up.

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The auction house is filling up and I spot Paul Hayes checking out how our items look in the sale room.

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-I can see sparks flying and it's you!

-Oh!

-I love this. It's a great novelty item.

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Yes. These can be very collectable, especially the Art Deco ones with watches in.

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-I've had a quick scan, but I can't see that Royal Doulton figure.

-It was a particularly rare one.

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Hopefully they've brought it. We'll have to wait and see.

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-We'll have to delve around. It's very small, as I recall.

-Yes!

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'That's going to be like looking for a needle in a haystack in here.

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'We spot our family saying goodbye to one collectable.'

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-Hello!

-Hello!

-You got here, then? I'm really pleased to see this is in. It's a lovely piece.

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Quite unusual to be so complete.

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More often than not, there's bits missing or, worse still, broken. But, no, that's a nice example.

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Talking about bits that were broken, the Royal Doulton had some damage,

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-but it was very rare. Is it something you've decided to bring or not?

-I didn't bring it.

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-I'm very undecided.

-That's fine. The worst thing is to sell an item and then regret it later.

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-It's good to be sure.

-Are you looking forward to today?

-Yes.

-Really looking forward to it.

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Well, it's filling up.

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We'd better find a spot from where to see the proceedings. Follow me.

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If you plan on heading to your local auction, be aware that commission and other charges will be added,

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so always check the details first.

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We take our places just in time as our first lot comes under the hammer.

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It's a pair of silver salt dishes with matching spoons.

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Will they be to our bidders' taste?

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I'm starting this at 30.

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£30 I'm bid. At 30. 5.

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40. 5. 50. 5.

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60. 5. 65 at the back.

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-He might let them go for that.

-At £65.

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I'm selling at £65.

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-That's good.

-Is that all right?

-Yes.

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So the silver salt cellars fall some way short of estimate, but the family seem happy enough.

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We've got a long way to go to make £500, so let's hope the bidders dig deep.

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Now two green opaque bottles. They're not sitting on a wall.

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-What do we want, Paul?

-About £40. There were 10 of them, but they fell off one by one.

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Two opaque green glass square bottles and stoppers. 20? 20 I'm bid.

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At 20. At £20. At £20.

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At £20. Are we all finished and done? It's a maiden bid of £20.

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That's withdrawn.

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-They were worth more than £20.

-You're glad they didn't sell? OK.

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'The bottles fail to find a new home, but our gardeners-to-be didn't seem to mind.

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'Next up is our first piece of furniture.' Behind me is our next lot. You won't miss this?

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-Not at all.

-OK! In that case, let's sell it!

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-What do you want, Paul?

-About £80.

-And I'm starting this at 40.

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40 I'm bid. At 40. At £40.

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45. 50.

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-55. At 55.

-55.

-On my right at 55.

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All finished and done with that at 55? I'm selling at £55.

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-There you go.

-Well done, Paul.

-Sold it.

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That's some way under estimate, but they seem relieved to see it sold

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and it's a welcome addition. Next up, three Staffordshire figurines

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which John and Margaret brought to replace the Royal Doulton lady.

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Paul valued them at £40-£60.

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I'm starting this at 20. £20 I'm bid. At 20.

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-At £20.

-Somebody!

-It must go up.

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Selling at £20.

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£20 may not be megabucks, but with a somewhat sleepy sale room, every penny counts.

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Will they be more generous for this?

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The octagonal table has one fan!

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This is a quality table.

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For a conservatory or a Victorian home, this is what you look for.

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Pretty little table. I'm starting this at 25.

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-25 I'm bid. At £25.

-No...

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-30.

-Here we go.

-£30. On my right at 30.

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At £30. Gong to let it go at £30.

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All finished and done at £30?

0:21:110:21:14

-There you go.

-That's sacrilege.

-It is.

-Crikey.

-Needn't take it home.

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Paul's trying to look on the bright side, but £30 is disappointing

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and the bidders are driving a hard bargain. Not the easiest morning,

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but maybe the silver mirror will catch their attention. Remember, we're looking for £40-£60.

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Lot 46 is the Art Nouveau-style hand mirror, decorated with trailing flowers.

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Birmingham, 1908. And 20.

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£30? At £20.

0:21:480:21:50

-I can't understand that at all.

-At £20. All finished and done?

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-We'll leave that.

-That's a mystery to me. I don't know why there was no interest in that.

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Unsold is a disappointing result and we're all a bit puzzled.

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We're over halfway through the sale, but still have a long way to go to reach the £500 for their garden,

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so I hope things pick up.

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The next lot is that lovely dressing table set.

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-What price do we want?

-We hope £80.

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We'll see how it gets on.

0:22:230:22:26

And 30. £30. At 30.

0:22:260:22:29

At £30. At £30. At £30.

0:22:290:22:32

-At £30.

-Has everyone gone for lunch?

0:22:320:22:36

At £30. Are you all finished and done with that at £30?

0:22:360:22:41

-Pass that over.

-What's going on?

-I've no idea, really. Auctions are very strange places.

0:22:410:22:48

There are loads of people here, but it's like the lights are on, but nobody's home. You know?

0:22:480:22:55

Unsold again! We're really struggling and it's a mystery.

0:22:550:22:59

Things get curiouser and they won't splash the cash on our next lot.

0:22:590:23:03

The pretty piano stool fails to reach anywhere near its price tag.

0:23:030:23:09

£40. All finished at 40? Right, we'll leave that.

0:23:090:23:14

That is an absolute shocker.

0:23:140:23:18

And we're really in the dark when the oil lamp suffers a similar fate.

0:23:180:23:23

At £70, then. All finished and done with?

0:23:230:23:27

-It's not going to sell, is it?

-No, ladies and gentlemen.

0:23:270:23:31

I can take that home... with the other things!

0:23:310:23:36

Either laugh or cry, I guess. John's putting a brave face on it, but the Japanese garden is far off.

0:23:360:23:43

The sale is almost over and we've got one final item.

0:23:430:23:46

Will this finally spark the bidders' attention?

0:23:460:23:50

The next lot, I love this. The Dunhill novelty lighter.

0:23:500:23:54

Looks like a hunting horn.

0:23:540:23:57

-You wouldn't know it was a lighter.

-These do very well indeed. One gentleman looked very closely.

0:23:570:24:03

-What do you want for this, Paul?

-Well, £40 upwards. I hope it fetches a little bit more, but we'll see.

0:24:030:24:09

-I'm starting this at 40. 5. 50.

-Yes!

-5. 60.

0:24:090:24:13

5. 70. 5. 80.

0:24:130:24:17

5. 90. 5. 100.

0:24:170:24:19

And 10. 20. 30.

0:24:190:24:22

I'm out. 130.

0:24:220:24:24

At £130.

0:24:240:24:26

Are you all finished and done with at 130?

0:24:260:24:31

-Yes!

-That's a great result.

0:24:310:24:34

Phew! It took a while, but at last a result to get excited about.

0:24:340:24:38

Over three times Paul's original estimate. Talk about a light at the end of the tunnel!

0:24:380:24:44

After a rollercoaster sale, how have we done?

0:24:440:24:48

The good news is some things did sell, but a lot of things didn't.

0:24:480:24:53

What are the options, then, with items that don't sell first time?

0:24:530:24:58

You have two options, really. Take them back with you or try to sell them on another day.

0:24:580:25:04

It could be just a total fluke.

0:25:040:25:07

-Now you wanted £500 to start work on this Japanese garden. We've made £300.

-Oh, wow.

0:25:070:25:14

-That's not too bad.

-Brilliant.

0:25:140:25:17

-Is that still going to be a help?

-With £300, we could get a lot of things for the garden,

0:25:170:25:23

for a Japanese garden. It's good.

0:25:230:25:26

What we've decided to do is up the money to the student union to 50%.

0:25:260:25:31

-Oh, wow. Thank you!

-That's nice, isn't it?

0:25:310:25:35

It's been a couple of weeks since John and Margaret raised £300 at auction

0:25:400:25:46

and they've wasted no time, but hold on - I thought the idea was for a Japanese garden.

0:25:460:25:52

-We made enough money to buy a fountain for the front garden.

-We both chose it.

0:25:520:25:59

I really like it. John liked another one, but I liked this one, so he bought it for me.

0:25:590:26:05

What a gentleman! So with Margaret's fountain in the front garden,

0:26:070:26:12

what's happened to John's dream of turning their back garden into a Japanese oasis?

0:26:120:26:18

Our rear garden will be ongoing, probably for another 12 months!

0:26:180:26:23

So, yeah, when it's all finished, it will look good.

0:26:230:26:29

I do hope John and Margaret, over time, achieve their visions of an Oriental landscape.

0:26:290:26:35

If you've got something to raise money for, a special project or a trip away,

0:26:390:26:45

fill in a form to come on Cash In The Attic.

0:26:450:26:50

We'll see you again next time.

0:26:500:26:52

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2008

0:26:590:27:04

Email [email protected]

0:27:040:27:07

Beauty therapist Margaret Goodgame and her husband John call in Lorne Spicer and the team to help de-clutter their marital home in Oxfordshire to realise their dream of creating a Japanese garden.