Winstanley Cash in the Attic


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Winstanley

Claire Winstanley wants to treat her daughter Tasmin, a singer in a Girls Aloud tribute band, to a weekend in Paris, and hopes the team can locate enough items to fund the trip!


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Welcome to Cash in the Attic, the programme that joins you in the hunt for hidden valuables around

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your home and then sells them with you at auction.

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Today I am in the very beautiful northern city of York

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but I couldn't resist stopping off to take a much closer look at the very attractive Barley Hall.

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The city isn't short of historic buildings but this is something quite special.

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An authentic reconstruction of a medieval family house.

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The foundations were discovered under a derelict office block in 1984.

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And today form the basis of this wonderful living museum.

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These discoveries relate to a period in York's history that goes back almost 600 years.

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And we are about to uncover a few treasures of our own right now as we head off to our next location,

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though I suspect they will be on a rather smaller scale than this.

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Coming up on today's Cash In The Attic some rather unexpected finds.

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You've had it all these years and that's the first time you've seen it.

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I can't believe that.

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I'm having to keep our expert in line.

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-Paul?

-Yes. Oh, dear me, my ears.

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And some unbelievable results at auction.

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-Gosh.

-Do you know what that is, record price, that's amazing?

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Let's hope we'll all still be smiling when the final hammer falls.

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I'm on way to meet a mother and daughter

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who have called in the Cash In The Attic team

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because they would like to have a taste of la vie francaise, oo la la.

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This large semi on the outskirts of York is home to Claire Winstanley

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and her daughter Tamsin, who is a singer and aspiring actress.

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Claire is partially deaf which led her to choosing a career as a special needs teacher

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and she now works with dyslexic pupils at a sixth form college.

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She's a self confessed hoarder but with a rather special European trip

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on the horizon, she wants to turn some of the treasures into tickets.

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-Good morning, Paul.

-Good morning, Angela, how are you?

-I'm really good.

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Isn't York the most wonderful city with its cathedral, its history and all that varied architecture?

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Do you know there is something for everybody in York?

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It's a fantastic day out whatever age you are and my kids love it.

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-It's near to my home, which is great.

-The other side of the Pennines.

-Other side, exactly, two hours away.

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-And we've got some wonderful things we are going to see today.

-Great, OK.

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Shall we go and meet the family?

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-Morning, Claire, Tamsin, hi.

-Morning.

-Or should I say, "Bonjour, mesdames"?

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Bonjour, Angela.

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-I guess you want to be off to Paris, don't you?

-We do.

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Now, I'm going to ask you about that in just a moment, but if you are going to go to Paris,

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how can Cash In The Attic help you to get there?

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Well, as Tamsin will tell you, I'm such a hoarder, I've got so much stuff

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in the attic, around the house, and so I'm really trying to streamline and get rid of some things.

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So, why Paris in particular?

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Well, it was my 50th birthday a couple of years ago and we planned to do something a bit different

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and we thought we'd go to Paris but then Tamsin was working down in Devon so we couldn't go,

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so this is it, a couple of years later, we're treating ourselves.

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And we really want to go to Disneyland Paris, so we thought we'd go there.

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Your mum's the big kid in the family really, isn't she?

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-She is definitely.

-I don't hear the words retail therapy here, does that come into it too, Paris?

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Of course it does, definitely, definitely.

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And how much is all this going to cost?

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Well, if you add in the retail therapy it's going to cost hundreds, so £500.

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Well, I think we should not chercher la femme but chercher le Paul and get him to work, come on!

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Getting Claire and Tamsin some quality time on the Continent is

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a wonderful idea so we need to get down to the business of rummaging.

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Leading the search today is our expert Paul Hayes.

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He's been working in the antiques trade all his life and we find him in the dining room.

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-Ah, now then, hello.

-Hi. How are you all right?

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I told you he'd be hard at work and he's found, is that the smallest

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chest of drawers you've got in the house, is it? Where did you get it?

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The first flat that my husband and I lived in belonged to this doctor

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and she very kindly gave us this as a wedding present,

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but it hasn't had a place and it's just sat in the attic for all this time

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so I think it needs to go to a better home.

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Well, you hit the nail on the head when you mentioned the medical profession.

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This is an apothecary set and this is exactly the sort of thing you would find in the early 19th century.

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And this would belong to an early form of doctor.

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We are so used to now having doctors, the medical profession

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having a role each, you'd have a surgeon, a doctor, a pharmacist.

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This really goes back to a different time, this was almost quack medicine.

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So you would have somebody who would go round, he would diagnose your illness,

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he would prescribe something for you, he would have all the implements

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you would need to conduct an operation

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but also at the same time he would sell you an ounce of tobacco or sweets or something like.

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An early pharmacist, if you like.

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The outside looks a lot bigger than the inside.

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Now then, you spotted it.

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In here there's a secret compartment, did you know that?

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-I didn't.

-OK, you might have seen it already before, there's four bottles on the front here.

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But for the ones that are quite dangerous and perhaps a bit more expensive,

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if I turn this round here, there's actually a secret compartment

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-there, look at that!

-You'd never know that!

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You've had it all these years and that's the first time you've seen it!

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And this one is mid 19th century. It's quite easily done for me today.

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It's solid mahogany but on the top it has an inscription, "1855".

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That's the golden era, I always think of Sherlock Holmes

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and dimly lit streets and somebody wandering around with something like this.

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What would that fetch if we took it auction?

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If this was complete we are looking at a lot of money,

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the fascination tends to be in the bottles.

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Some of them are shaped like coffins, different signs, skull and crossbones.

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You can imagine the interest that you get there.

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But I think value wise you are looking towards the £100 mark,

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-but if I said £50 to £100 to give us a chance.

-That's fantastic.

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-Great.

-You'd be happy with that?

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-I certainly would.

-Well, great start.

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£50 in the kitty already is just what the doctor ordered

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but with a £500 target to reach, there's a way to go yet.

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Tamsin has started her search in the garage

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and she tots up the Paris kitty by another £40 to £80

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when she digs out this four piece silver plated tea set

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by James Dixon and Son.

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Back inside it seems Mr Hayes has spotted another shiny lot.

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This is beautiful. Where has this little ornament come from?

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My father used to go to these auctions on his day off with one of his friends called Reg Hall,

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and Reg gave him this on one of their outings together,

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and I gather it's Continental silver.

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Well, it certainly looks like silver doesn't it?

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Let me just have a look on the bottom. What an interesting item.

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Yes, Continental silver.

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I can tell that by these three numbers here.

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930.

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Now, Continental silver is hallmarked

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different from what we get here in the British Isles.

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What they tend to use is a purity mark.

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If you can imagine if you made this from pure silver, the whole thing would collapse if you picked it up,

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so what they have to do is mix it with a harder metal to give it its strength.

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The ratio is represented by these three numbers, so that means it's 93% pure.

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That's a little bit higher than what we have Britain

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and that's a good sign it's a Continental silver item.

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But one thing I can tell you it's been sold here in the British Isles,

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it's been imported and the import mark here is a large letter F,

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that means it's foreign.

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So, it's come into this country, it's been hallmarked and resold, so it has been sold here.

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But what a lovely example.

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You're right, it's solid silver, and it's a Roman chariot and it's beautiful.

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-Gorgeous.

-Well, in the 19th century particularly there was

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a fascination with anything to do with the classics and the actual style is called Neo-classical.

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It was a rediscovery of everything in ancient Rome and Greece.

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This style was really popular and they made lots of candlesticks

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with Corinthian columns and Romanesque type things,

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so I think that could create a bit of a stir actually.

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If I was being quite conservative here, if I said at least £50 up to £100, how does that sound?

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-For such a small item, brilliant.

-OK, let's ride on.

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With Continental silver and a Parisian target,

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we are developing a bit of French theme today.

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Being partially deaf has not held Claire back one bit

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and I am keen to find out a bit more about her life in teaching.

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Claire, you have had a very long and varied career as a teacher,

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which has sort of taken you towards children with special needs in particular.

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I have, I started with primary school teaching and then did some supply work at Tamsin's school.

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And then was recommended to become a learning support teacher.

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So, I ended up in a secondary school with seven hours of support and it gradually mushroomed

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and I applied to run at dyslexic unit that was being set up

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in the school, and I did that for eight years.

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Very, very rewarding, I'm sure.

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Very rewarding, it's lovely to be able to have relationships with the students.

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Clearly your eldest daughter Chloe has followed in your footsteps,

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and is a teacher but Tamsin you must have inherited the performance gene.

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Have you always wanted to be an actress and singer?

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Oh, I think so. I started doing ballet when I was about three.

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Then I did my first professional production at 11 and since then,

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I think I've been bitten by the bug, so...

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And it's been extremely successful, cos you've had a wonderful career up until now,

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where you've got the next stage in your career, you're a member of a girls' tribute group,

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-Girls Aloud only you are Girls Are Loud.

-Yeah, that's right.

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-Who are you?

-I'm Kimberley, the fellow Yorkshire girl.

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But it's really good and it's with a great group of girls as well,

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four brilliant girls that I do it with,

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so it's really good fun actually.

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Well, in the meantime we've got this trip to Paris being planned,

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what's so special about Paris, Claire?

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We really want to go to Disneyland because when the girls were small,

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we went to America a couple of times and just loved the whole Disney experience.

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So, I'm itching to get there again. So, we want to go to Paris.

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Are you happy just to go to Disneyland?

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I am definitely but I think we'll be doing a bit of shopping as well.

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And of course you are taking your sister Chloe with you.

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-Yes.

-Is that the call of the Champs Elysees I hear?

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No, I think it is Paul saying, "What are you lot doing, why aren't you rummaging?"

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Otherwise we'll never get you across the Channel. Come on.

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We need to put thoughts of croissants, coffee and shopping

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aside now, as we need a lot more finds before we reach that £500.

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Paul has been searching upstairs and he's certainly got money in mind

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as he's found a gold sovereign necklace, dated 1964

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with a nine carat gold mount and chain.

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We're hoping it will turn into £50 to £100 worth of cash

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when it goes under the hammer.

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In the kitchen Claire has dug out a set of coloured German wine glasses.

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They add another £20 to £40 towards the Parisian trip.

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Meanwhile, Tamsin's found another lot for our Mr Hayes' attention next door.

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-Paul? I think I've got some treasure.

-Let's have a look.

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Look at these. Now then, do you know what these are?

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-Sovereigns.

-That's right.

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-Are these yours?

-Well, one was given to my mum from her great-aunt Dora.

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And the other was my grandfather's so it has been passed down through the generations.

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-So, these are family heirlooms?

-Yeah.

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Well, technically this one is a sovereign, this one is a half sovereign.

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It's often quite difficult to tell when you find one coin at a time,

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when you get two together like that we can see quite clearly the different sizes.

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And the idea is that this has twice as much gold in here as this one, so it is worth twice as much.

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But this goes back really to a time when we used to use gold as a currency.

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Now, when we go on holiday nowadays, we have credit cards and paper money.

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At this time the only recognised currency that you could get if you were trading with India or Africa

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or Indonesia, something like that, the only currency you could actually use was gold,

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it was instantly recognisable.

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But what used to happen, you'd go to your grocer's shop or your corner shop

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and you would spend one of these.

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And the trader would clip the edge of the coin.

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Unscrupulously, he would just clip the edge of the coin and just put it back into circulation.

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and what would happen at the end of the week, he'd have a little bag full of gold filings.

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So, what they did they introduced this little edge, can you see that?

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That's called a milled edge and that is on every coin we have today,

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-and that prevents that sort of clipping happening.

-Oh, I see.

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Isn't that lovely? These are 22ct gold, that one weighs eight grams.

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So at the present value it's about £5 a gram.

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So that coin alone for scrap value is about £40 bullion price in that,

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and about £20 bullion price in that.

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But as nice desirable coins, they are worth a little bit more.

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-Any idea how much they might be worth?

-100?

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I think you are getting too good at this!

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I think you're dead right, if I put a value of £80, £120, someone would buy them as an investment, wear them,

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-use them, keep them away and just watch them go up in value.

-Excellent.

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-Does that sound all right to you.

-Brilliant, yeah.

-Great.

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'Well, the coins really were worth their weight in gold

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'and it's another big step towards the £500 target.

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'Meanwhile, Claire and I have been carrying on the search

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'in another room.'

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-So, what have we got there?

-A baby's rattle.

-It's a baby's rattle?

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-Given to me on my christening.

-And...

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SHE BLOWS WHISTLE

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..it's a whistle! Paul.

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Yeah? Oh dear, you've hurt my ears.

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Take a look at that,

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-you say you got it at your christening.

-Yeah.

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-Who gave it to you?

-It was given to me by an adopted great aunt

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who used to be very fond of my father,

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and she took us under her wing and she gave it to me on my christening.

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Well, silver has often been given to child as a christening present, so that fits in definitely.

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It's where the expression comes "Born with a silver spoon in your mouth",

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so silver is often given as a christening item.

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Now this one is solid silver and has a nice piece of coral.

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Now that acts actually, almost like a teether, like a teething ring,

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and sometimes they are ring shaped but this is stick shaped.

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But that would help the child cut their teeth, they would chomp on it

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and chew it and that would keep them amused for hours.

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The beautiful thing about British silver is that when it's hallmarked, automatically it has a date,

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you are able to date it to pretty much a year.

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But what I've seen right at the bottom there

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is a portrait of Queen Victoria,

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and that tells me this was made while she was on the throne in her early years.

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So, sometime 1830s, 1850s that sort of time.

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It also looks to me, very Indian.

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Now we know Victoria was Empress of India.

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Would there be an Indian influence in the Victorian era in that, do you think, Paul?

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Of course, Queen Victoria was the fashion leader at the time with her being the Empress of India.

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Of course there were lots of Indian designs came onto the market, so yes.

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But it is British silver, it's not been made in India.

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-It is a British example.

-So, what sort of value might you put on it?

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Well, that's a nice example. It's nice that the coral has survived.

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Sometimes these are replaced by bits of mother of pearl or bits of ivory,

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but the coral is quite desirable and the fact that it's British silver.

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There are two bells missing but at least £50 up to about £80.

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Does that sound all right?

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-Fantastic.

-You'd be happy with that.

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I certainly would.

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I thought the coral holder was wonky and I thought it's flawed, it's a second.

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In fact it's not that at all, it's just the shape of the coral.

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And the fact that two of the little bells are missing

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I thought would reduce the value, so I'm really thrilled that is raising so much, or could do.

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'This house really is proving to be an Aladdin's cave,

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'that's another £50 towards the trip.

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'There's another good edition when Tamsin digs out this heart shaped pearl pendant necklace.

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'Paul hopes that it will win the bidders' hearts at auction,

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'and gives it a £30 to £60 price tag.'

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Claire, with your father being a clergyman,

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being now a retired Bishop, in fact,

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the church in general has always had a very strong influence on your life, hasn't it,

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but in particular, York Minster Cathedral.

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It has. We lived in the shadow of York Minster for a number of years

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and that was beautiful, and I went to school at one side.

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I went to work in the Minster as well.

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My father was given the onerous task of raising £2 million

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when the central tower was in danger of collapse.

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Of course, £2 million was a heck of an amount,

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but one of the schemes they had was a minutes of history scheme,

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where people could buy a minute of history.

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It cost 60p, it cost 60p to run the Minster for one minute.

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In return for this you were given a certificate and you needed a team of calligraphers,

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and I was one of the first calligraphers there.

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So you gained yet another skill.

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I have and it comes in very useful.

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I bet it does. As well as the skill you have as being a calligrapher,

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you are also a bit of a dancer, because you love to salsa.

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I love salsa, yeah. It's very sexy, very good for your hips as well.

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I used to go with Chloe, we danced together and it was such fun.

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And I just love the beat and the music and everything.

0:17:480:17:51

But I'd love to be able to dance like they do on Strictly. Beautiful.

0:17:510:17:54

Well, perhaps we can shimmy on down

0:17:540:17:57

and find Paul and see what he's up to.

0:17:570:18:00

'Dance moves aside, it's time to get our minds fixed firmly on the target

0:18:000:18:05

'as we do need a final few items before we can get the girls on their trip to France.

0:18:050:18:10

'Luckily, it seems our expert has been busy.'

0:18:100:18:14

-Tamsin?

-Yeah?

0:18:140:18:16

I've found some brooches. Are these yours or your mum's?

0:18:160:18:19

They're actually my grandmother's.

0:18:190:18:21

-Really? So these are family heirlooms.

-They are, yeah.

0:18:210:18:24

-Oh, right.

-My grandfather used to give them to my grandmother because she actually couldn't wear necklaces

0:18:240:18:29

unless it was proper gold, so he used to buy her brooches.

0:18:290:18:32

-Do you know I've heard that story before actually.

-I bet you have.

0:18:320:18:35

But people do have an allergy to semi-precious metals.

0:18:350:18:39

But amber itself is over 30 million years old.

0:18:390:18:44

-Really?

-Isn't that fascinating.

0:18:440:18:45

And what happens you know all those pine forests, the pine resin,

0:18:450:18:49

what happens the actual sap from the tree over a period of years

0:18:490:18:52

-it turns into amber and that's where it comes from.

-Oh, right!

0:18:520:18:56

And you do see lots of them with prehistoric insects in there,

0:18:560:18:59

because when the pine tree was growing it was very sticky,

0:18:590:19:02

and of course the insect went down the pine and it became amber,

0:19:020:19:05

and they are locked away in there for millions of years.

0:19:050:19:08

But this one is pure amber. There is nothing in there at all, it's perfect

0:19:080:19:13

and in the shape of a heart as well,

0:19:130:19:14

that's always a good typical Victorian symbol of a union or a joining.

0:19:140:19:19

I think what makes it very nice, it's every warm. The instant way to

0:19:190:19:22

tell amber, it's not like any other gemstone, it's classed really as a gemstone, but officially it isn't.

0:19:220:19:27

It's a lot warmer. Most stones are cold to the touch.

0:19:270:19:30

And this is gold mounted, of course, because only the best for your grandma.

0:19:300:19:34

But how do you feel about selling something like that?

0:19:340:19:37

Well, I think they are lovely but I don't think I'm a brooch wearer I prefer necklaces really.

0:19:370:19:42

But I think they are attractive.

0:19:420:19:44

OK, I think you are looking at least £30 to £50, something like that.

0:19:440:19:48

-Excellent.

-Does that seem all right to you?

-Yeah.

0:19:480:19:51

I am sure someone will love it.

0:19:510:19:53

Let's keep looking.

0:19:530:19:54

'Well, Tamsin may not be a brooch wearer but hopefully there will be some in the saleroom,

0:19:540:20:00

'as I think they are rather charming.

0:20:000:20:02

'Our search continues and I've found a rather impressive

0:20:020:20:06

'collection of coins on the landing.

0:20:060:20:07

'Paul hopes it will bank us £30 to £50 when it goes under the hammer.

0:20:070:20:11

'And Claire has made a first class addition to the kitty

0:20:110:20:15

'when she decides to part with these six albums of stamps as well.

0:20:150:20:19

'They get sent off to auction with a £50 to £100 price tag.

0:20:190:20:24

'It's nearly the end of our day's rummaging here in York,

0:20:240:20:27

'but I hope that Paul hasn't stopped work just yet.'

0:20:270:20:30

HE PLAYS PIANO

0:20:300:20:32

Paul, what do you reckon? Can we send this to auction?

0:20:320:20:35

-That's very nice, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:20:350:20:37

So is this something that your mum bought or is it yours?

0:20:370:20:40

Well, apparently it's been handed down through out generations.

0:20:400:20:44

It's from my maternal grandmother, who is from Hull.

0:20:440:20:47

And apparently it's actually painted by William Penny

0:20:470:20:49

who was from Hull as well.

0:20:490:20:51

-Wow, he is actually quite famous. Is it a genuine item, do you think?

-I hope so.

0:20:510:20:56

Well, there's a William Daniel Penny

0:20:580:21:00

and he was well known to be a pier head painter.

0:21:000:21:02

In other words he would stand around the harbour in Hull and

0:21:020:21:06

paint whatever boats were there at the time.

0:21:060:21:07

But he is very famous actually for doing things like steam liners and very rough seas. He was very good

0:21:070:21:13

at capturing atmosphere, so dark skies and rough seas especially on the north-east coast.

0:21:130:21:17

Very popular. But a little tip here actually.

0:21:170:21:20

It says on the front here 91 which will be 1891.

0:21:200:21:23

If I turn it round to the back, what I am looking for here

0:21:230:21:26

is to make sure that this picture has always been in this frame.

0:21:260:21:29

And the way to tell that, you can see these nails here.

0:21:290:21:32

Those are as they were in 1891 they have not been removed.

0:21:320:21:35

If those had been scratched out or bent around or altered in any way,

0:21:350:21:39

then the chances are the painting that's inside has been altered,

0:21:390:21:42

so there could have been a bit of skulduggery going on there.

0:21:420:21:45

I think that's very nice actually.

0:21:450:21:46

So, have you any idea how much you think that might be worth?

0:21:460:21:50

I'd like to say £500 but I don't know.

0:21:500:21:52

I think you would be right.

0:21:520:21:54

A genuine WD Penny is worth at least that sort of money.

0:21:540:21:57

But they did have their imitators.

0:21:570:21:59

Just in time, come on through.

0:21:590:22:00

I'm just saying about your painting here, it's beautiful, isn't it?

0:22:000:22:04

-It's lovely.

-It wants a bit more further research so I'm being a bit cautious.

0:22:040:22:08

If I say sort of £80 to £120, how does that sound?

0:22:080:22:12

-Smashing.

-Brilliant.

-Great.

0:22:120:22:14

Another £80 to put in the pot,

0:22:140:22:16

but let's in the meantime add our £80 to what we've already looked at.

0:22:160:22:21

Your goal was £500,

0:22:210:22:23

well, with a bit of "bon chance" and quite a lot of "ooh la la",

0:22:230:22:29

we ought be able to make about £560.

0:22:290:22:33

Excellent.

0:22:330:22:35

Brilliant.

0:22:350:22:38

That'll buy a couple of extra bottles of champagne whilst you are in France.

0:22:380:22:43

'We've had a great time with the girls today,

0:22:430:22:46

'and we've got a fantastic selection of items winging their way to auction.

0:22:460:22:51

'There are the coins of all shapes and sizes

0:22:510:22:53

'with the highlight being the gold sovereign and half sovereign

0:22:530:22:56

'which Paul hopes to turn into £80 to £120.

0:22:560:23:00

'The fascinating apothecary case with the hidden compartment

0:23:000:23:05

'that Claire had never seen.

0:23:050:23:07

'We're looking for £50 to £100 for that wonderful find.

0:23:070:23:12

'And, of course there's the beautiful nautical painting

0:23:120:23:15

'that could be by WD Penny,

0:23:150:23:16

'with an £80 to £120 valuation we are hoping that it sales to success at auction.'

0:23:160:23:22

'Still to come on Cash in the Attic,

0:23:230:23:25

'our family can't believe their luck with some of their results.'

0:23:250:23:31

-Great, congratulations.

-That really was yours.

0:23:310:23:34

'And some results have emotions flying sky high.'

0:23:370:23:40

Amazing.

0:23:410:23:42

Do I have to take you down off the ceiling yet?

0:23:420:23:45

'But will we have reached our target when the final hammer falls?'

0:23:450:23:50

What a lovely day we had with Claire and Tamsin at their home in the historic city of York.

0:23:540:24:00

And of course now what we're hoping is that we're going to be able to send them on a girls' weekend

0:24:000:24:04

to the glamorous city of Paris.

0:24:040:24:07

All of those lovely things that we uncovered in our rummage have been brought to sale today, here

0:24:070:24:12

at Bamford's Auction room in Derby, and with a bit of luck we'll be raising £500 towards that trip.

0:24:120:24:18

And hopefully when the hammer comes down, Claire will be saying "Je ne regrette rien".

0:24:180:24:25

'There are certainly plenty of buyers here today,

0:24:250:24:28

'so I hope that bodes well for our family's lots,

0:24:280:24:31

'as we've got a fantastic collection up for sale today.

0:24:310:24:35

'And of course Paul Hayes is here as well so hopefully he'll make sure everything goes to plan.'

0:24:350:24:40

Are you keep us all in order with that whistle today, Paul?

0:24:400:24:43

Of course. It's a nice thing, it's one of my favourite items.

0:24:430:24:46

It's a most unusual piece. I don't think I've ever seen a baby's rattle quite like that.

0:24:460:24:50

Well, the coral actually has a meaning.

0:24:500:24:52

It wards off evil spirits so hopefully it will cast a spell over some of the buyers today.

0:24:520:24:57

-Oh, you're such a romantic.

-I know.

0:24:570:24:59

£500 is our total today. We should do quite well.

0:24:590:25:01

Yeah, we should. We've got some nice gold items,

0:25:010:25:03

the sovereign bits and pieces, nice gold brooch, the silver rattle, the apothecary box. I think we'll do OK.

0:25:030:25:09

Oh, I can't wait to see Claire and Tamsin's faces.

0:25:090:25:11

And got to send them off to Paris.

0:25:110:25:13

-Of course.

-Oo la la, let's go find them.

0:25:130:25:16

'Let's hope the bidders are as enthusiastic about our lots as I am.

0:25:160:25:20

'The auction house is really filling up now so we need to find Claire and Tamsin before the sale gets going.

0:25:200:25:25

'I just hope our hoarder hasn't got side-tracked.'

0:25:250:25:29

Hi Claire and Tamsin, now you've got to put that back because we are here to sell.

0:25:290:25:33

-Aah, can't I buy anything?

-No! Have you ever been to an auction before?

0:25:330:25:37

I haven't. Very exciting and I'm tempted to buy so much.

0:25:370:25:41

It's your things that'll be selling today and we've got some great things to sell too.

0:25:410:25:45

We've have some really nice things.

0:25:450:25:47

And I particularly like, I'd forgotten all about that lovely silver chariot.

0:25:470:25:51

Yeah, so that could go quite well today and you've got some gold items.

0:25:510:25:55

And you've put a reserve on a couple of things, haven't you?

0:25:550:25:58

Yes, the silver chariot because it was my father's and I don't want it to go for sixpence.

0:25:580:26:02

And what about you Tamsin, are you happy to see things going now?

0:26:020:26:05

Just get rid of it. More money the better.

0:26:050:26:07

Paris, here we come!

0:26:070:26:11

Well, actually before Paris we've got to head for that corner over there,

0:26:110:26:15

-because your things are about to go under the hammer.

-OK.

0:26:150:26:19

'In addition to the reserve on the chariot,

0:26:210:26:24

'Claire has also put a £50 reserve on the 1960s sovereign necklace.

0:26:240:26:29

'As it is more modern than the other sovereigns,

0:26:290:26:31

'it might not prove as popular,

0:26:310:26:33

'and she wants to make sure it doesn't sell below Paul's £50 to £100 estimate.

0:26:330:26:38

'It looks like the sale is about to start, so we found a spot to watch the action unfold,

0:26:380:26:44

'and one of our most colourful lots is first up for sale.'

0:26:440:26:47

Now, there was a time when these Bohemian hock glasses were

0:26:480:26:52

very fashionable. You'd see them on everyone's dining room table.

0:26:520:26:55

That's right. They were very sophisticated items to have

0:26:550:26:59

and usually a Harlequin set, all different colours,

0:26:590:27:02

adds a bit of excitement to your wine drinking and so on.

0:27:020:27:05

And they are visual items, so I put these in at £20 to £40. Let's see how we get on.

0:27:050:27:10

And 20... 22... start 22... 25...

0:27:100:27:12

28... 30... and 2... 35...

0:27:120:27:15

38... 40... 2...

0:27:150:27:17

5... 8... 50...

0:27:170:27:19

50... no. £48 in front, at 48.

0:27:190:27:23

-That's great.

-Was that ours?

0:27:230:27:26

Yes, that really was yours.

0:27:260:27:28

'Claire can't believe her luck,

0:27:300:27:32

'and it's certainly a great start to our sale.

0:27:320:27:35

'I hope the rest of our lots prove just as popular as we've got a £500 target to reach.

0:27:350:27:41

'The pair of brooches are going under the hammer next,

0:27:410:27:45

'and Paul rather hoped that the bidders would fall in love

0:27:450:27:48

'with the heart-shaped amber stone,

0:27:480:27:50

'so he gave them a £30 to £50 price tag.'

0:27:500:27:52

Again bids on this and £22 starts with me at 22... 25... 28... 30...

0:27:520:27:58

2... 35... 38... and 40...

0:27:580:28:00

40 is it, 40... and 42...

0:28:000:28:04

At the back of the room at £40, 42 anywhere, at 40.

0:28:040:28:08

Excellent.

0:28:080:28:09

-Right in the middle of your estimate, Paul!

-Got one right!

-Well done!

0:28:090:28:13

Teacher's going to give you a gold star before the end of the day.

0:28:150:28:19

Great, looking forward to that, my first one.

0:28:190:28:21

Another great sale,

0:28:210:28:22

'but don't let this success go to your head just yet, Mr Hayes,

0:28:220:28:26

'there's a long way to go before we get the girls their Parisian trip.

0:28:260:28:30

'Can we make it three in a row with the silver plated teaset

0:28:300:28:33

'which Claire inherited from her father?'

0:28:330:28:36

You've got, what, £40 to £80 on it?

0:28:360:28:38

Yeah, these really now are used as ornaments.

0:28:380:28:40

I mean it is very rare people will have a cup of tea out of them, but they look amazing in the cabinet.

0:28:400:28:46

So, £40 is a good buy, I think.

0:28:460:28:48

And £40 for it please, 40...

0:28:480:28:50

40 is it, 40's bid... and 2...

0:28:500:28:52

42... 45... 48... £45

0:28:520:28:56

and standing right at the back, 45...

0:28:560:29:00

There you go, how's that?

0:29:000:29:01

£45, do you think your father would approve of that?

0:29:010:29:04

I think he would, better than sitting in the attic.

0:29:040:29:08

'That's the attitude, Claire.

0:29:080:29:10

'The family heirlooms really are coming up trumps for us today,

0:29:100:29:13

'and long may it continue as there's another of Claire's father's favourite items coming up next.'

0:29:130:29:18

We've got the silver chariot coming up now on which you've put

0:29:180:29:22

a reserve of £50, which was Paul's lowest estimate on it.

0:29:220:29:26

What do you think of this, Paul?

0:29:260:29:27

Silver is extremely collectible, bear in mind this is continental silver it doesn't really have

0:29:270:29:32

the same collectability as British silver, you can't really date it to a year, like you can here.

0:29:320:29:37

But it is such an unusual item, the chariot,

0:29:370:29:40

I have never seen one like this before, so I've said £50.

0:29:400:29:43

We are in the lap of the gods, the Roman gods in this case.

0:29:430:29:47

-And £40... for it, 40... 40...is it.

-Starting at £40.

0:29:470:29:51

40... is bid and five... 50... 55... 60... 60, no. It's at 55...

0:29:510:29:55

and standing right at the back, £55.

0:29:550:29:59

There you go, that's gone.

0:30:000:30:02

-Over your reserve by £5.

-Brilliant.

0:30:020:30:05

That's great, very unusual item, that.

0:30:050:30:08

-Somebody else can enjoy it.

-Yes.

0:30:080:30:10

It's another step towards our £500 target, and not a bad result,

0:30:100:30:15

but it would be wonderful to see some of our lots reach their

0:30:150:30:19

highest estimates today, or even more, of course.

0:30:190:30:23

Perhaps our next family heirloom will prove even

0:30:230:30:26

more popular. Granny is helping towards

0:30:260:30:29

the trip to Paris now, because the gold chain with the lozenge pendant belonged to her, didn't it?

0:30:290:30:36

It did. I never saw her wear jewellery, but I remember when she gave it to me.

0:30:360:30:40

Not something that you would wear, then?

0:30:400:30:42

No, not anymore, so hopefully someone else can benefit from it.

0:30:420:30:46

And £22 starts. 22. 25.

0:30:460:30:50

28. And 30. And two. 35.

0:30:500:30:54

38. 40. And two. 42, is it?

0:30:540:30:57

£40 then, standing at 40.

0:30:570:31:01

-There you go. How's that?

-£40!

0:31:010:31:04

Thank you, Granny!

0:31:040:31:07

Thank you!

0:31:070:31:08

We've had a steady sale so far, but none of our lots have sold sky-high.

0:31:080:31:13

As the gold sovereigns take centre stage,

0:31:130:31:15

perhaps they'll be the first to break through their top estimate.

0:31:150:31:19

Paul certainly has high hopes.

0:31:190:31:21

There are two values with sovereigns.

0:31:210:31:23

One is the coin value itself, people do collect that, but also,

0:31:230:31:26

it's gold, and gold always fluctuates with the price of the moment.

0:31:260:31:31

Gold is almost at a world-record high.

0:31:310:31:33

Put these in at £80 reserve, expect at least to get that, if not more.

0:31:330:31:38

Let's see how we get on.

0:31:380:31:39

And again there are bids on this. It starts with me at £120...

0:31:390:31:43

-120 already.

-Before we even start!

0:31:430:31:46

140. 150. 160. 170. 170.

0:31:460:31:49

180. 190. 190? No.

0:31:490:31:52

190? It's on 180 on commission, then, at 180.

0:31:520:31:57

Do you know what? That is a record price, amazing!

0:31:590:32:02

Amazing!

0:32:020:32:04

Do I have to take you down off the ceiling yet?!

0:32:040:32:08

The gold coins didn't let us down, making a whopping £180.

0:32:080:32:14

With that outstanding result, I have a feeling our target might be nearly in our sights already.

0:32:140:32:18

We've have had some terrific results in that first half of the auction today.

0:32:180:32:23

I really am going to have to scrape you off the ceiling, I think, before the day's over.

0:32:230:32:28

Now, £500 is the target, isn't it? Well, I think you are going to

0:32:280:32:32

have a great time shopping - we're only halfway through.

0:32:320:32:34

Any idea how much you've made so far?

0:32:340:32:36

-No.

-All right. I'm going to hold onto her!

0:32:360:32:40

£408 so far!

0:32:400:32:42

Fabulous!

0:32:420:32:45

Fantastic! Wow! Crumbs!

0:32:450:32:49

-That's excellent!

-We can go to Australia!

0:32:490:32:53

It sounds like Claire's starting to get some far-flung ideas, but it's time to get our feet

0:32:550:33:00

back on the ground for now, as the girls take a quick break.

0:33:000:33:04

Though Paul is still hard at work.

0:33:040:33:07

PLATE CHIMES

0:33:070:33:09

You tuning up for a chorus of Food, Glorious Food?!

0:33:090:33:12

There is method in my madness. That little ring tells whether an item is damaged,

0:33:120:33:16

if there's a crack in this plate. If it doesn't ring... It should ring like that, that's OK. It's perfect.

0:33:160:33:21

-Is that a perfect plate?

-Well, it isn't, actually, it's a second.

0:33:210:33:24

There's a scratch there, proving it's a second.

0:33:240:33:27

But it is Crown Derby, and we are in Derbyshire, which is fantastic.

0:33:270:33:31

This is made about five miles from this very spot.

0:33:310:33:34

You could stand 200 yards away, couldn't you, and look at that and know immediately it was

0:33:340:33:39

Crown Derby because of those amazing colours, the blue, the gold, and that lovely orangey colour.

0:33:390:33:44

It's like an Imari, a Japanese-inspired pattern. I actually call it

0:33:440:33:48

a cigar pattern. It looks like the ribs of the old cigars, remember?

0:33:480:33:51

But you can still pick up Crown Derby at auctions for reasonable prices?

0:33:510:33:55

Exactly. This is extremely cheap, this is £20-30 a plate, which is nothing.

0:33:550:33:59

Cost more in the shops. You could furnish your home very cheaply.

0:33:590:34:03

I think you and I could afford fish and chips off that!

0:34:030:34:05

I think we could. I could just see it now, mushy peas on the side.

0:34:050:34:08

Mushy peas on that? Ugh!

0:34:080:34:10

I know how to treat a girl!

0:34:100:34:12

It's a good thing the plate wasn't damaged, as that would have really affected its value, but in

0:34:130:34:19

perfect condition, even as a second, the plate, along with three others, sold for a total of £233.

0:34:190:34:25

Well spotted, Paul.

0:34:250:34:27

If all this talk of antiques inspires you to go to auction, then remember that salesrooms

0:34:280:34:34

have charges, such as commission, which are added to your bill, whether you are buying or selling.

0:34:340:34:38

Your local auction house can give you all the details.

0:34:380:34:42

The sale is still in full swing, so it's back to work.

0:34:430:34:46

After the first half, we're feeling pleased with ourselves, but we've plenty left to

0:34:460:34:51

sell, and I have a feeling that our next lot might be rather popular.

0:34:510:34:55

It's lovely when you come into an auction room and see there are lots of people

0:34:560:35:00

looking at your items, and there were lots of people looking at

0:35:000:35:05

the Victorian silver baby's rattle,

0:35:050:35:07

with that lovely bit of coral on the end.

0:35:070:35:10

Yes, this is a real nice item. Anyone who is fascinated with childhood,

0:35:100:35:13

these are very nostalgic things.

0:35:130:35:15

It's not long ago when children would have actually had one of these.

0:35:150:35:19

-We did see two ladies looking before.

-We did.

0:35:190:35:21

So, looking for about £50.

0:35:210:35:23

Victorian silver baby's rattle with coral teether there.

0:35:230:35:26

£50 for it. 50. 50's bid.

0:35:260:35:29

Five. 55. 60. And five. 70.

0:35:290:35:33

At £65 seated. 70, is it? 70 anywhere?

0:35:330:35:38

At £65. Seated at 65...

0:35:380:35:41

-Excellent!

-65!

0:35:420:35:44

50 was your lowest.

0:35:440:35:45

£65 for that rattle!

0:35:450:35:48

-Told you they liked it!

-All bells and whistles!

0:35:480:35:52

Well, the rattle certainly went down a treat,

0:35:520:35:55

and we start the second half of our sale at a cracking pace.

0:35:550:35:58

Hopefully our next lot will bank us a bit more cash as well.

0:35:580:36:02

It's the coin collection, which Paul valued at £30-50.

0:36:020:36:07

Here we go, a couple of bids here. 12.

0:36:070:36:10

-18.

-A couple of bids in!

-So it starts at 22. £25, is it? 25.

0:36:100:36:15

25 in the room. 25. 28. 30.

0:36:150:36:18

-32. 35.

-Already up to it!

0:36:180:36:21

At £32. Still on commission buy, at 32.

0:36:210:36:24

£32 on commission. What was the face value of those coins, I wonder?

0:36:260:36:31

About 32 quid!

0:36:310:36:33

Well, it seems that Paul was right on the money with that valuation.

0:36:340:36:38

As the four stamp albums try their luck on the rostrum,

0:36:380:36:43

will they have a similar success?

0:36:430:36:45

Claire collected the stamps during her childhood. Paul valued them at a sizeable £50-100.

0:36:450:36:51

-So we start at £35.

-35, we're in.

0:36:510:36:54

40. Five. 50. Five.

0:36:540:36:57

60. Five. 70. 70? No. 70?

0:36:570:37:01

At £65. Are you all done, 65? Are you quite certain?

0:37:010:37:08

All those hours working with those books!

0:37:080:37:12

It was worth it!

0:37:120:37:13

That's what I like to hear!

0:37:150:37:18

It seems he was right again.

0:37:180:37:20

The bidders are certainly taking a shine to Claire and Tamsin's lots today, and I have a feeling we've

0:37:200:37:26

passed the £500 for their French weekend already, but with three more lots to sell,

0:37:260:37:32

the girls could be looking at a real luxury break if our luck continues.

0:37:320:37:36

Its one of my favourite lots up next, the charming apothecary box.

0:37:360:37:41

Paul valued this at £50-100,

0:37:410:37:43

so fingers crossed that the bidders agree.

0:37:430:37:45

Three bids on commission,

0:37:450:37:46

one at 50, one 70 and one higher. So, 75 starts me.

0:37:460:37:51

There we go.

0:37:510:37:52

Fantastic!

0:37:520:37:53

90. 90. Five. 100.

0:37:530:37:56

Well, we've already hit your lowest estimate!

0:37:560:37:59

110. 120? It's at 110.

0:37:590:38:02

At the back of the room, £110.

0:38:020:38:05

-£110!

-How's that?!

-Fantastic!

0:38:070:38:10

Out second item to make more than Paul's highest valuation today.

0:38:100:38:15

It's a brilliant result, but there's no time to celebrate just yet,

0:38:150:38:19

as our only piece of artwork is coming up for sale.

0:38:190:38:23

620 is the late Victorian oil on board, ships in a harbour there, signed WD Penny.

0:38:230:38:29

Dated 1901, and £80 for it. 80.

0:38:290:38:31

£80. 80's bid.

0:38:310:38:34

85. 90. Five.

0:38:340:38:37

100. And ten. 110 for you.

0:38:370:38:39

110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:38:390:38:44

-It's one of those names that just...

-Yes.

0:38:440:38:46

160. 170. 170? It's at 160 to the side. 170?

0:38:460:38:52

You're all sure at 160 to the side? At £160.

0:38:520:38:57

Fantastic!

0:38:570:38:59

That's a pretty penny, that one, in't it!

0:39:010:39:04

I think we'll let you off the bad jokes after that result, Paul.

0:39:050:39:09

The bidders do seem to be digging deeper and deeper into their pockets as the day wears on, and with just

0:39:090:39:14

one item left to sell, will it be bon voyage for Claire and her daughters?

0:39:140:39:20

Now we've got a £50 reserve on the gold sovereign that's coming up now,

0:39:200:39:23

which is 1964, but bearing in mind how well we did on the sovereigns in

0:39:230:39:29

the first half of this auction, am I going to have to nail your feet to the floor again?!

0:39:290:39:34

We're excited about this now, aren't we?

0:39:360:39:39

I'm coming again next week!

0:39:390:39:41

It becomes an illness after a while!

0:39:410:39:43

So, £50, but we think we should make more.

0:39:430:39:46

Yes, but bearing in mind this one isn't quite

0:39:460:39:48

as collectible, with it being 1960s, it's not like an antique sovereign like the other ones were.

0:39:480:39:53

But £50-100 in today's market, who knows? Let's see how it gets on.

0:39:530:39:58

£60 is bid. 60. And five.

0:39:580:40:01

65. 65. 70. And five.

0:40:010:40:04

80. 80. Five. 85. 90.

0:40:040:40:08

100. And ten. 120. 130. 140.

0:40:080:40:13

140. 150 for you. 150?

0:40:130:40:16

Are you quite certain? It's at 140.

0:40:160:40:17

Lady's bid, then? At £140.

0:40:170:40:22

You know what? I've never known a sovereign be worth that sort of money. Incredible!

0:40:220:40:26

-Really?

-Gosh, yes, never, ever seen that sort of price.

0:40:260:40:29

-Honestly, yes.

-Thank you!

-Well done.

0:40:290:40:31

Even our expert was lost for words after that sale.

0:40:310:40:35

The sovereigns really came up trumps for us today.

0:40:350:40:38

With all of our lots winging their way to new homes,

0:40:380:40:40

all that's left for us to do is to see whether the family's trip will be four or five star.

0:40:400:40:46

Well, I think you can afford the shows, the shopping, Disneyland and several croissants

0:40:460:40:54

on the Champs-Elysees. Because you wanted to raise £500, didn't you?

0:40:540:40:59

-Yes, I did.

-And we did really, really well at halfway, didn't we?

0:40:590:41:02

-We did.

-If we add it all up together, it comes to £980!

-Never!

0:41:020:41:10

-It does!

-It's just amazing, thank you so much!

0:41:100:41:14

-That's nearly double.

-Brilliant.

-Fabulous.

0:41:140:41:18

Double the shopping, Tamsin!

0:41:180:41:20

After nearly doubling their target at auction, Claire and

0:41:270:41:30

her daughters Tamsin and Chloe are preparing for their French trip with a continentally-themed night out.

0:41:300:41:36

Had a great time at the auction, we got our target, got our money.

0:41:360:41:41

We are now able to book our hotel and our holiday in Paris, so we have come

0:41:410:41:46

here tonight to have a French meal to get us in the mood for Paris.

0:41:460:41:50

The ladies splash out on some authentic French wine and food,

0:41:500:41:54

and Tamsin clearly can't wait to hit the streets of gay Par-ee!

0:41:540:41:58

We just can't wait to go shopping and to Disneyland, so we're trying to practise our French because

0:41:580:42:04

mine's not very good.

0:42:040:42:06

-Ass-ette de...cha-ra-cut-erie.

-Assiette de charcuterie?

0:42:060:42:10

I think Tamsin has a little work to do on her French, but it won't be

0:42:100:42:14

long before she's up to speed.

0:42:140:42:16

As the ladies sample some top-quality French cuisine, I think their hearts are already in Paris.

0:42:160:42:23

I'm feeling very stuffed now, the food was gorgeous.

0:42:230:42:25

Mum did lots of French talking, which is always good, so hopefully we'll be fine in Paris.

0:42:250:42:30

We've had the most superb meal here, fantastic. We've had French wine and French cuisine, and now we can't

0:42:300:42:37

wait to go to Paris and have the real thing there, I'm so excited.

0:42:370:42:41

To Paris, cheers.

0:42:410:42:43

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:070:43:10

Claire Winstanley wants to treat her daughter Tasmin, a singer in a Girls Aloud tribute band, to a weekend in Paris and is hoping the Cash team can locate enough items in her York home to fund the trip!