Sansom Cash in the Attic


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Sansom

Antiques series. Jill and her son hope to honour her father by paying for a clock in the high street of a Nottinghamshire village where he played such a key role in local life.


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Welcome to the show that searches your home for hidden treasures, gets them valued

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and then sells them at auction. Lots of families have heirlooms,

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but it's usually one member of the family that ends up storing the lot.

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And that's the dilemma facing the family we're going to meet today.

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They're hoping that we can find out whether they've got any cash in the attic.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic, our expert, John,

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'dreams up inventive ways of wearing a 19th century Albert chain.'

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I think we could attach that little hook to that nose ring of yours

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-and put the T-bar in your ear.

-I could try it, if all else fails.

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'Maybe it's time for a confession.'

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-Three gold sovereigns, no less.

-There should be five.

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-Oh, really?

-Yeah. We can't...

-Is there something you want to tell us, John?

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There was only three when I found them!

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'When we get to auction, some results beat our expectations.'

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-Straight in at £50.

-Wow!

-Yes!

-Straight in there.

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'Find out what happens when the hammer falls.'

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Today, I've come to Edwinstowe,

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right on the edge of Robin Hood's Sherwood Forest.

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I haven't come to rob the rich to give to the poor,

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but we have come to help a family clear out their attic,

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and they're hoping we'll find plenty of riches

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because they're looking to raise the funds they need to set up a memorial for a much-loved family member.

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'Meet Jill Sansom and one of her three sons, Chris.

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'Their family has had a big impact on the local high street.

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'Jill's father transformed derelict buildings into new shops and businesses

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'and, over the years, he became something of a local hero.

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'Now Jill's hoping to raise some money that can be used to create a memorial to his achievements.

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'With me today is John Cameron. He's just the man to help us hunt down the items

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'that will give us the best chance at auction. While he makes a start, I check in with Jill and Chris.'

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-Ah, good morning!

-Hi!

-You must be Jill and you must be Chris. Is that right?

-Yeah.

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-And you're the youngest son.

-Yeah, the youngest of three.

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I understand that we're here to raise money for something rather special. Tell me about that.

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My dad passed away last year and he was a big Edwinstowe man,

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had a lot to do with the village, the parish council,

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shops in the village, as well. We've been in business for about 35 years.

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So we wanted something in memory of him,

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but not the traditional wooden bench or something like that.

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We wanted something a bit different. And somebody on the parish council suggested a clock.

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We haven't got a clock on Edwinstowe high street.

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Any idea about how much it'll cost? I imagine it's expensive, because it has to be durable to the weather.

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We're looking at about £1,500 for the clock.

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The council said they would donate so much money towards it.

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But we're looking for probably £1,000, if that's possible.

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We need to raise £1,000, then, so you can get this outdoor commemorative clock for your dad.

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-Yeah.

-OK. That sounds like a fantastic idea.

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Let's go and see whether we can find John. I can't hear creaking, so he's not in the attic yet. Come on.

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Let's do it.

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'Believe it or not, this spacious home used to be an old blacksmith's workshop.

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'I've already spotted a few collectables, and it looks like John is onto something, too.'

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-Ah, John, there you are!

-Hi, guys.

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-Have you found something already?

-I have! First thing of the day and we've struck gold!

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-Three gold sovereigns, no less!

-There should be five.

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-Oh, really?

-Yeah. We can't...

-Is there something you want to tell us, John?

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There was only three when I found them!

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Erm, they were given to the three boys on their christening days

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by Doris and Jessie, who were my husband's great aunts.

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And we were given one each, me and Ashley, on our wedding day.

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-Oh! Hence the five.

-Hence the five.

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-Right, OK.

-Chris, have you got anything to say?

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-You're rather quiet.

-Sorry, yeah. It's been a tough month.

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I think my eldest son's got his own at his house, so that's why.

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OK, all right. We're off the hook.

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Well, they're pretty standard in format, the gold sovereign.

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It has been around since medieval times, albeit with a slightly different purity

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and, obviously, the design on the obverse and reverse.

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On the obverse side, we have the reigning sovereign, the monarch,

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in this case, it's George V.

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And on the reverse, we have the now very iconic picture of St George on horseback slaying the dragon.

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What sort of value are we talking about?

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-I think easily £350 to £400 for those three.

-For just the three?

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-Yeah, most definitely.

-Incredible.

-We'll have to work on David.

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'Jill heads to the lounge and her favourite side table.

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'This is home to two peacock figurines that used to belong to her great aunts.

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'The estimate is £20 to £30.

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'Meanwhile, Chris is keen to show John one of his favourite childhood hiding places.'

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You've got a virtual attic complex here, Chris. It must have been amazing when you were young.

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Yeah, you can put things you don't want your mum to find in here.

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But this is all my childhood junk.

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Fascinating. Is this a bit of your childhood junk, this little Windsor chair?

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It's more my dad's childhood junk.

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I think it's from when he was living with his grandma, who he was brought up by mainly.

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I'm told he spent time sitting on that and playing with it, which would account for the damage.

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Having a look at the bottom, we've got some evidence of woodworm there, so I suspect that's what's happened.

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But it is a nice chair. Known as a Windsor chair. They're very iconic and easy to identify.

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Always takes the form with this curved arm round here, this bent arm, which is done with steam.

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The whole thing's put together with simple dowel joints. It's a real joiner's chair. Lovely little thing.

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Probably 19th century. It's certainly a good 100-years-plus old.

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Shame about the leg, though.

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I know. I'm sure it'll do all right, though.

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I think somebody could do a repair on that. I'm sure they could. Even in this condition,

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I'd hope we'd get about £30 to £40 for it, something like that.

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-Not too bad.

-Would your dad be happy with that?

-I'd be happy. I don't know about him.

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Let's hope he doesn't go breaking all the chairs in the house.

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'I've found two books that are so large, they're hard to miss.

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'It's a pair of 19th century family Bibles given to Jill's great aunts by their preacher father.

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'John believes they'll fetch around £20 to £30.

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Your grandfather was obviously very well known.

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Yeah. He was known by many people.

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I think he was granddad to a couple of hundred of them, as well.

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Yeah, everyone knew him. He was always on the high street, meeting and greeting people,

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doing anything he could to make things better for shop owners and people who lived in the village.

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We've had various offers of donations from here, there and everywhere,

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because he was a member of Sure Start, he used to help out voluntary there

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with the accounts and things.

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Just so many things he used to do.

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I mean, his priority was his family,

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running these three about when they hadn't got cars.

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SHE LAUGHS He was the local taxi!

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-He was a good lift, definitely.

-THEY LAUGH

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"I'll go and fetch him." Yeah.

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-He was a good man.

-Absolutely.

-Irreplaceable.

-For sure, yeah.

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Well, I think it's going to be fantastic to get that clock sorted out,

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-so shall we go and see whether John's found anything else we can value?

-Let's do that.

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'Well, John never disappoints. He's discovered a picture by the Dutch artist Meindert Hobbema.

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'This scenic countryside view may look hand-painted,

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'but it's actually printed onto the canvas, known as an oleograph.

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'It once belonged to Jill's mother-in-law, but John hopes another art enthusiast

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'may pay £20 to £30 for it.'

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-Ooh, what have you got there, Jill?

-Oh, this is a Beswick cockerel.

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I don't know much about it, only what's underneath,

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-and that says Beswick, and I don't know what that is.

-Leghorn.

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-Foghorn Leghorn. Remember the cartoon?

-Ah!

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As you've correctly identified, it is Beswick.

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Beswick Pottery, England, a very famous and much-loved firm in this country

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which started out life in Staffordshire in about 1895, something like that.

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-So what does the 1892 mean?

-That would be the model number.

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I actually know this particular piece and this dates to between about 1963 and 1983.

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It was modelled by a chap called Arthur Gredington,

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who was a very, very important modeller at Beswick,

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known for his skill in being able to depict animals realistically.

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One of the great things about Beswick is they do various versions of their models,

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different colour ways, different finishes. But, with Leghorn here,

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there was only ever one version and one colour way.

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I'd see no problem with us getting £80 to £120 at auction for that.

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-Wow! Brilliant!

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, very!

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-Jolly good.

-It's not such a bad old cockerel after all, is it?

-I'm glad you like him now!

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-Come on, let's see what else we can find.

-OK.

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'So Jill may be convinced of his value, but what will the bidders make of him come auction day?

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'Let's hope they'll go cock-a-hoop.

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'As we continue our search chez Sansom,

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'young Chris has stumbled across a 1920s jug which shows an Indian relief pattern.

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'Made by HJ Wood of Staffordshire, Jill's aunts filled it with flowers.

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'Now it could help boost our kitty by £40 to £60.

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'Up in the attic, I spot a small square vase by the popular firm Troika.

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'The factory started in Cornwall in 1963

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'and as this piece is in good condition,

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'John hopes it'll make £40-£60.'

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-Look what I've found.

-What have you got, Jill?

-A watch chain.

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We found them in my dad's bungalow when we were clearing out after he died last year.

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They were very dirty in a box and I decided that I'd have them cleaned up and see how they came up.

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I think we could attach that little hook to that noise ring of yours

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-and tuck the T-bar in your ear.

-Yeah. I think it'd work.

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Absolutely. We could try it, but only if all else fails.

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They are watch chains and they would be part of the ensemble of the gentleman's pocket watch.

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They were very popular in the 19th century. Referred to as Albert chains after Prince Albert,

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Queen Victoria's husband. They take a pretty much standard form.

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You've got the hook, this little spring catch hook on one end here

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which attaches to the suspension loop of your watch.

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You've got the T-bar here, which would fix into your button hole on your waistcoat,

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and then your watch would tuck in your pocket like that.

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Value-wise, we should be looking at about £60 to £80 for them.

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-Oh, right!

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, very.

-Good stuff.

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Excellent. Well, I hate to have to call time on this cosy little chat,

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but we've got some rummaging to do if we're going to get that clock.

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-Come on.

-Right, come on.

-Let's get to it.

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'Our day at the Sansoms' house will soon be over

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'and there's still quite a way to go if we're going to reach their £1,000 target.

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'Luckily, Chris has found a 9-carat gold charm bracelet.

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'It was passed down through his father's family and includes a half sovereign.

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'Gold has risen so much in value recently that John thinks

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'the charm bracelet could make £150 to £200.

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'I found a wooden bench with a handy storage compartment.

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'Together with another upholstered chair, John thinks they could make £30 to £40 at auction.

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'Now, what's this? More jewellery?

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'John's found Jill's collection of gold rings here that have been her pride and joy for quite some time.'

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-You been looking at those rings I found?

-Yes, I have.

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You've got an interesting collection of jewellery here. Where did they all come from?

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-There's so many different wedding rings.

-I know. Looks like I've been married about ten times!

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At least you've still got the wedding rings, look on the bright side.

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Yeah. I'm not quite sure about the wedding rings,

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but the two you've got there, one belonged to one great aunt

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-and one belonged to another great aunt.

-Right.

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You've got a nice pile here. I've separated them into three piles according to their gold standard.

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Here we've got, in the centre, six 22-carat gold wedding rings.

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-22-carat are the purest gold form we've got.

-Right.

-So those, per gram, would be the most valuable.

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Then we've got the 18-carat gold rings here, of which these two diamond rings are part.

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And then we've got seven little 9-carat gold rings.

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But these are interesting. You've got two diamond rings. One's diamond and sapphire,

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a very inky-blue sapphire, not terribly commercial.

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They're usually mined in Australia, the dark inky-blue sapphires.

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But, interestingly, both of these rings have diamonds in them, but they're what we call illusion set.

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Basically, you take a stone, you set it in a bigger mount, a bigger setting,

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and where the edge of that mount spreads out further than the diamond has been facetted

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so that it sparkles. So from a distance, the stones look bigger than they are,

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hence the term "illusion set".

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So, Chris, I want you to take note for future reference.

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That's an illusion diamond, OK?

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-Not what a girl wants.

-Right, OK. Mental note taken.

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Or as I'd say, Chris, you do need to be giving that.

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-I'll take them both on board.

-It just looks the same.

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-So I'm going to put a value on them as a whole.

-Right.

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And, collectively, these rings should net us around £700 to £900.

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-You're joking.

-Seriously.

-Wow.

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I should explain, John, this clock that they want to get

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is actually going to be a bit more than that, nearer £1,500.

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There is a good chance that the council might make a contribution, so our target is £1,000.

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But if they don't make up the difference, don't worry,

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cos the value of everything going to auction comes to £1,540!

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-Get in there!

-So you can do it all on your own if you want to.

-Brilliant.

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'We've had a very successful day and found a variety of items

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'that are certain to rev up the bidders on auction day.

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'First of all, we have the gold. Not only Jill's rings, but also the three sovereigns,

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'valued at £350 to £400.

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'And we have great expectations of them making John's estimate, hopefully even beating it.

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'The there's the collection of silver watch fobs.

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'It's a fashionable lot, priced to sell at between £60 and £80.

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'Jill thought this Beswick cockerel was creepy,

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'but he has a fine maker's name

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'and a reasonable price tag of £80 to £120.

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'So he might bring our target home to roost.'

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'Still to come, the Sansoms look set to make big money.'

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-Go on.

-All done at £400?

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-Yes!

-Wow!

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'But will their good luck run out?'

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-A bit more.

-Come on! It's a nice jug.

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-Staying with us if we have no other bids.

-Ohh.

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'Find out what happens when the final hammer falls.'

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It's been a few weeks since we met Jill and her son Chris at their home in Nottinghamshire,

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and we had a lovely time finding plenty of items to bring here

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to Cuttlestone Auction Rooms in Staffordshire.

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If you remember, they wanted to raise £1,000 towards a memorial clock for the village.

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Let's just hope, with time ticking, that our bidders are feeling very generous today.

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'There's every chance that Jill's mixture of mementos will have bags of appeal for this astute crowd.

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'We find her bidding a fond farewell to one piece that has plenty of family history.'

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-Morning, Jill.

-Morning!

-Aren't you missing someone? Where's Chris?

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Oh, he booked a snowboarding holiday two weeks ago, so he flies to France this morning.

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Well, you can't really blame him, can you? These are lovely, aren't they?

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They're gorgeous, aren't they? Yeah. This one I particularly like, because it's full of pictures and things.

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-They are wonderfully done, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-Not a big price, though,

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-considering the work and the age.

-I know, it is such a shame.

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But I have got another two at home, so if these sell...

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-Shall we get into position?

-Yep!

-See whether all that glitters is gold.

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'With a goal of £1,000, we're keen to get going.

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'The first lot under the hammer is the pair of family Bibles, valued at £20 to £30.'

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£15. I've got a commission bid and that's all I've got. 18 on the front.

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At £18. And my commission bid's out. Are we 20?

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At £18. 20 at the back. 22.

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-At 22.

-Keep going.

-One bid, that's all he's having. At 22.

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Lady's bid we have. At 22. We're selling, on the front at £22.

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-£11 a Bible. That's not a lot of money, is it?

-No.

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And they were in super condition. But it just reflects the market. Such a shame.

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'I think we'd all have liked to see them make a bit more, but they sold

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'within John's estimate.'

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Next up are our two white-metal Indian bird models.

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-What's the story with these?

-They belonged to the youngest of the sisters, Mary.

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I think they came from India. They used to go on holiday quite a bit to there.

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They're actually, I think, peacocks, a male and a female.

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Some people don't like peacocks cos they think they're unlucky. Let's hope ours are lucky.

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We want £20 to £30.

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Commission will start them. £10 bid on the models.

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-At £10. 12. 15.

-These seem to be going down well.

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At £15. 18 are we, quickly? At £15. At £15.

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They're here to sell. 18 if you like. And it goes. Sold at £15.

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-£15. That's all right.

-It is, it's fine.

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-Especially as they're hardly one of your favourite things.

-No.

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'Great news for Jill that someone took a shine to the peacocks.

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'She was happy to just give them away.'

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There's another few pounds in the pot when the large painting goes under the hammer...

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18. At £18. I'm out at £18. Anybody got a damp spot?

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-Make it 20.

-And it sells at £18.

0:18:250:18:30

..selling just under its £20 estimate.

0:18:320:18:35

Our next lot is the small child's Windsor chair with three legs.

0:18:350:18:38

-Yeah. I've brought the fourth leg with me.

-Jolly useful!

0:18:380:18:42

It was glued a few years back, but I think the woodworm and the glue

0:18:420:18:47

probably melted and it fell off and it's been like that ever since.

0:18:470:18:50

Well, I still think a good joiner could do a repair job on this,

0:18:500:18:53

perhaps dowel that leg back on. But £30 to £40 I still think is reasonable.

0:18:530:18:57

A little chair like this in good condition, 19th century Windsor chair, can sometimes get £150.

0:18:570:19:03

-So maybe we'll get lucky today.

-Hope so.

-Hopefully, the three bears are in the room.

0:19:030:19:07

-Straight in at £50.

-Wow! Straight in there!

0:19:070:19:10

At £50. 5. 60.

0:19:100:19:12

5. 70. 5. 80.

0:19:120:19:15

-5. 90.

-Goodness!

-95.

0:19:150:19:17

-100. Bid's with me at £100. 110 now.

-Go on, keep going, keep going.

0:19:170:19:22

-On commission. No mistake. 10 if we like. At £100.

-Makes up for that picture.

0:19:220:19:26

At £100. On the commission at 100.

0:19:260:19:30

-£100!

-The broken leg didn't deter them. They wanted it.

0:19:300:19:34

-That was incredible! What a result!

-Yeah!

0:19:340:19:37

'Wow. After all that speculation,

0:19:370:19:39

'that amazing sale means we'll have to eat our words.

0:19:390:19:42

'And the bids just keep on coming,

0:19:420:19:45

'as the upholstered chair and bench go before the room.'

0:19:450:19:47

65. Are we 70? Bid's in the doorway at £65.

0:19:470:19:50

70, quickly? There you go there at £65.

0:19:500:19:55

'Selling for more than double John's lower estimate.

0:19:550:19:59

Our next lot is the Indian tree jug.

0:19:590:20:01

-We've got £40 to £60 on that.

-Yeah, I'm quite pleased with that valuation.

0:20:010:20:05

-Why has it got that value?

-It's in nice condition, there's a nice pattern, a lot of work gone into it.

0:20:050:20:10

It's a nice decorative piece. So I think we should get £40 to £60. I'd give it house room.

0:20:100:20:14

But then, there's no accounting for taste. Or lack of it.

0:20:140:20:18

-We have interest on this lot with a commission to start at £30.

-Yes!

0:20:180:20:22

£30 bid. At £30. At £30 on commission.

0:20:220:20:25

-A bit more.

-Come on. It's a nice jug.

0:20:250:20:28

At £30. Any interest in the room at £30?

0:20:280:20:30

-At £30. It's staying with us if we have no other bids.

-Oh.

0:20:300:20:34

2, thank you. At 32. I'm out at 32. 5. Now we're off.

0:20:340:20:39

-Yeah, now we're off.

-38.

0:20:390:20:41

I have the bid on the front row at 38. You're out at the back.

0:20:410:20:45

Sold at £38.

0:20:450:20:48

-There we are.

-Just under our lower estimate.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, I am.

0:20:480:20:53

'I think Jill's still pleased we raised £38 for this family heirloom.

0:20:530:20:58

'So far, we've had a really successful run.

0:20:580:21:00

'With half our lots sold, we've banked £258.

0:21:000:21:04

'Our big value lots are still to come, so we're right on track.

0:21:040:21:09

'If you'd like to raise some money for something special,

0:21:090:21:13

'it's worth remembering that auction houses charge fees, such as commission.

0:21:130:21:16

'They do vary from one saleroom to another, so be sure to check the small print before you go.

0:21:160:21:22

'Jill's next lot is a collection of silver watch fobs,

0:21:220:21:25

'which once belonged to her father.

0:21:250:21:27

'We're looking for £60-£80.'

0:21:270:21:30

50. 5. 60.

0:21:300:21:32

-5.

-Yes!

-65, back of the room at £65. 70 now?

0:21:320:21:37

-At 65.

-Bit more.

-70, thank you. At £70. 5, sir? 5.

0:21:370:21:41

80. 5. I have 85, at the back of the room at £85.

0:21:410:21:45

90 now. At £85. Are we selling them?

0:21:450:21:48

All done and dusted, there. Sold at £85.

0:21:480:21:52

-Yes!

-£85. That's very good.

0:21:520:21:55

'I think Jill's very happy to see those old fobs transform

0:21:550:21:58

'into the memorial clock she wants to commission.'

0:21:580:22:01

The Beswick cockerel finds a new home as well...

0:22:010:22:04

At £140...

0:22:040:22:06

'..topping up our coffers by an impressive amount.'

0:22:060:22:09

-Yes!

-That's good, isn't it?

0:22:090:22:13

Did you ever think, when you were trying to break him in two,

0:22:130:22:16

-that he could be worth £140?

-I didn't even know it was Beswick until the day you came.

0:22:160:22:20

'Jill might have found him a bit creepy,

0:22:200:22:22

'but I'm glad there were several bidders willing to fight over him.'

0:22:220:22:26

Our next lot is a lovely 9-carat gold charm bracelet.

0:22:270:22:31

-It's got ten charms, including a half sovereign.

-Mm-hm.

0:22:310:22:34

So what do we expect for these? £150 to £200?

0:22:340:22:37

Yeah, we should push at least our top estimate.

0:22:370:22:39

It's a nice bracelet and gold prices are doing quite well,

0:22:390:22:42

-so, hopefully, that's in our favour.

-Mm.

0:22:420:22:44

-And we've got three commission bids.

-Excellent.

-Starting at £250.

0:22:440:22:49

Yes!

0:22:490:22:51

250 bid. At 250. At 250.

0:22:510:22:53

260. 270. 280. 290.

0:22:530:22:57

300. 320. 340.

0:22:570:23:00

360. 360 is with me. 380, fresh money. I'm out at 380.

0:23:000:23:06

Go on, 400.

0:23:060:23:08

At £380. The bid's in the room and no mistake.

0:23:080:23:11

-Come on, another one.

-At £380.

0:23:110:23:16

-Yes!

-Do you think my scales weren't working that day?

0:23:160:23:18

'It looks like the market for gold is working for Jill today

0:23:180:23:23

'and there's even more on the way with our next item.'

0:23:230:23:25

It's the three gold sovereigns.

0:23:250:23:28

Easy to sell. We know what they're worth, folks. We'll start them at £400.

0:23:280:23:32

At £400. 20 who says? At 400.

0:23:320:23:35

I'm selling and no mistake. 20 if we'd like.

0:23:350:23:39

All done at £400?

0:23:390:23:42

-Yes!

-Well, bang on our upper estimate.

0:23:420:23:45

'It's so exciting when you hit the high end of an estimate.

0:23:450:23:49

'Let's hope the next gold collection has the same good fortune.'

0:23:490:23:52

No less than 17 gold rings. I'm sure there's a song there somewhere.

0:23:520:23:57

So, you've got quite a hefty estimate on this, John.

0:23:570:24:00

Yes, I put it as one lot, but I thought the auctioneers might separate it.

0:24:000:24:04

But they've kept it together and they've kept our collective estimate of £700 to £900. Quite punchy!

0:24:040:24:09

If we make the top end of the estimate, we've done our target figure in one lot!

0:24:090:24:15

We've got easy bids on this starting me at £600.

0:24:150:24:18

Ooh! 600. Amazing.

0:24:180:24:20

At 600. At £600 a bid. At 600.

0:24:200:24:23

650. 700.

0:24:230:24:25

750. 800.

0:24:260:24:28

The bid is with me at £800. You're out at the back at 800.

0:24:290:24:33

-Come on!

-At £800. The bid is with me and I'm selling. It's on commission.

0:24:330:24:37

At 800, all sold. £800.

0:24:370:24:41

-Wow!

-Nice one.

-800 for those bent rings.

0:24:420:24:47

-There you go.

-The scales were working that time.

-Yeah.

0:24:470:24:51

-That's fantastic. What a result!

-Super!

0:24:510:24:54

'There's one final addition to the kitty,

0:24:540:24:56

'when the Troika vase sells for £5 over its lower estimate.'

0:24:560:25:01

At £45 bid. 50 quickly. Gentleman's bid.

0:25:010:25:04

-Makes a good pill pot.

-£45. We'll sell and no mistake. At £45.

0:25:040:25:09

'A fair price with which to end a hugely successful day.

0:25:090:25:13

'We already know we've bagged at least £1,000 for Jill.

0:25:130:25:16

'I wonder if she's worked out exactly how much more we've been able to make.'

0:25:160:25:20

We wanted £1,000 towards this memorial clock.

0:25:200:25:24

We've actually made... Are you ready for this?

0:25:240:25:26

-..£2,108!

-Oh, wow!

0:25:260:25:29

-Oh, brilliant!

-That's fantastic!

-It's a lot of money.

0:25:290:25:34

It's double what you wanted. So how is that going to help with the clock?

0:25:340:25:37

Well, the clock I really, really want, that's about £1,600 plus VAT.

0:25:370:25:43

-Right.

-But with the extra money now,

0:25:430:25:45

I want a metal frame built so it'll actually stand further off the shop

0:25:450:25:50

-and that's going to cost quite a bit to make so...

-Brilliant.

0:25:500:25:54

-Thank you very much! Super. Thank you.

-I'm really pleased. Fantastic.

0:25:540:25:57

'It's just a few weeks since Jill's triumphant day at auction.

0:26:030:26:07

'Work on the commemorative clock in memory of her father is close to completion.

0:26:070:26:12

'The clock is destined for Edwinstowe high street

0:26:140:26:16

'and will be a constant reminder to the community of a man who meant so much to them.'

0:26:160:26:22

The finished result is just a lot better than I thought it would be.

0:26:220:26:26

It's just fantastic. Absolutely everything I could've hoped for and more.

0:26:260:26:30

My dad would be just over the moon.

0:26:300:26:34

I know he's up there looking down and saying, "Yes, that's beautiful".

0:26:340:26:38

So, yeah, Cash In The Attic came good.

0:26:380:26:42

Jill Sansom and her son Chris hope to honour her father by paying for a clock in the high street of a Nottinghamshire village where he played such a key role in local life. Lorne Spicer and John Cameron join the hunt for antiques and collectables to sell at auction, with the aim of raising £1,000.