Davies Cash in the Attic


Davies

Antiques series. Keith Davies' eldest son Leslie needs a little help with his studies in Texas, so the family wants to sell some of the valuables hidden at home.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the show that searches your home for hidden treasures

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which we then sell at auction. Most people at some time in their life

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inherit various heirlooms, but which ones are valuable

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and which ones can you afford to throw away?

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That's the question everybody asks, and today we hope to find an answer.

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Will we find some very valuable heirlooms

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on today's Cash In The Attic? Time to find out.

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'On today's Cash In The Attic, a 19th-century train timetable

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'gives us a glimpse into the glamorous world of Victorian travel.'

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I love the way they list all these really important people,

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then we get "Third Class", and there's not a word!

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And Jonty gets into his Peckham mode

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when he assesses some gold-sovereign jewellery.

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Somehow there's a Del Boy feel to wearing a sovereign.

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What do you think?

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On auction day, our expert's estimates are slightly out.

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Jonty, you got that one wrong!

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But it's great when you get it wrong that way round.

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Find out if all comes right when the hammer falls.

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I'm going to sell it for 50.

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Today I've come to Buckinghamshire to meet Keith Davies.

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He's called in the Cash In The Attic team to help him raise some funds

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for one of his sons, who's flown the nest and gone to study abroad.

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Keith is the only son of a wartime globetrotting couple

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who liked to pick up a souvenir from every place they visited.

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Keith's parents have now died, and he's inherited their collections

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and those from their siblings, too. This means his home,

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which he shares with his wife Penny and sons Leslie and Mark,

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is absolutely full of exotic and eclectic items

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from the four corners of the world.

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Keith's son Leslie now has the family travelling bug,

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and is in America. Keith's wife is at work today,

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so it falls to his youngest son Mark to help with the rummage.

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And joining me is our expert antique hunter, Jonty Hearnden.

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He's certainly got his work cut out, as I've heard this family want to raise £1,000.

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Tell me, who are you looking at there?

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These are photographs of Leslie. Just looking and reminiscing, really,

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of the old pictures of him before he went to America.

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He's gone off to study and do a university course,

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and we're looking to raise some money to pay for his fees

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and help towards the fees, because it's so expensive in the States for education.

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-Do you miss Leslie, I take it?

-Oh, yes. Yes, we do.

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So we need to raise £1,000 for Leslie's tuition fees in America.

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Let's see if Jonty's found anything yet. Got a lot to get through!

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'Jonty's been hard at work - and he's spotted something already.'

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This is a lovely room. Ah, there's Jonty!

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-I have been hard at work.

-What have you found?

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I've found a lovely little case here. This is a cigarette case.

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-And a cigarette box.

-Right.

-Inside this one here

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is a picture. Who's that?

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That's a photograph of my mother. This was a cigarette case

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that was given to my father,

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I presume as maybe a wedding gift, or maybe an engagement gift.

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And it says here, "To my darling Les, all my love, Nan".

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Mum, from a very young age, was always called Nan

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-and was Nan Davies.

-Lorne, I've been looking for a hallmark on here,

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and I haven't been able to find one, but I do have a little number here -

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833.

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Now that obviously means that this case is solid silver,

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but it wasn't made in the UK.

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This possibly could have come from the Egyptian-jeweller friend

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-that they had.

-All sounds very exotic!

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Yeah. When it comes to selling an object like this in an auction sale,

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we cannot call it solid silver, by law.

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We have to call it white metal. Whereas this box is.

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If you look on the side here, lovely crisp, clean hallmarks,

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and it's got the inscription "Thomas Hugh Davies".

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That was my grandfather. That was a gift from the company he worked for,

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for long service.

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The problem we have is, it's been incredibly personalised,

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so therefore they just have to be sold for their weight.

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But, having said that, they're still worth £60, £80.

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OK. Well, let's hope we can take these to auction

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and get £60 to £100. That would be wonderful, wouldn't it?

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-We're a tenth of the way there.

-It's gone up!

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THEY LAUGH Optimistic!

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Absolutely! Well, why not? They're both lovely objects,

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and to get £100 - let's be positive.

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I really like Keith's enthusiasm.

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Let's hope it does make nearer the £100 mark for him.

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In the bedroom, Jonty finds a cameo brooch and ring

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which belonged to Keith's aunt Ethel from Sunderland.

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These examples are from the early 20th century,

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but are quite good quality, so Jonty values them accordingly

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at £80 to £100.

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Also winging its way to the auction is this late 19th century

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French mantel clock. It used to have a glass dome,

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but Mark and Leslie accidentally broke it during a childhood game.

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It's also missing its minute hand -

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but Jonty still hopes it'll make £80 to £120.

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-Ah, Jonty!

-Yeah?

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Look what I've got here!

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Two fabulous pocket watches.

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-So, where were these from?

-That's Grandfather's,

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and he gave them to me when I was about 13.

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And the smaller pocket watch was from my great-aunt Maggie.

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Let's have a look at this gent's one first.

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Have you ever looked at the back of it?

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-Yes. Little engravings on the back.

-OK.

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This is interesting. This is not a British-made pocket watch.

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This is an American one, because we can see here

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that it's the American Watch Company,

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Waltham, Massachusetts.

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They were a very big watchmaker.

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In fact they made millions of watches

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in the late 19th century. They went out of business in the 1950s.

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The great news is - I've just had a look on the back here -

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this is what they call ten-carat gold,

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which we don't use in this country, which is very good news indeed.

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Tell me about this small lady's pocket watch.

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I would presume that was, sort of, late 1800s, type of...

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-Over 100 years old.

-Well, you're about right,

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and you can tell that by looking at the decoration on the outside.

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Look at all the chasing on the reverse and on the side here.

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It's very, very busy, so this has to be late 19th century,

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possibly early 20th century. Let's see if we can get to the back of it.

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Ah! That's really very good news indeed.

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I suspected so. Because this casing here is nine-carat gold.

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But look at the condition of that on the inside! Isn't that wonderful?

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-That's almost mint.

-Why should it not be?

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It's always been enclosed.

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That lady's pocket watch is in very good condition,

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this not so, so as far as value is concerned,

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on a poor day we're looking at £200, but on a good day,

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as much as £400, so that's a very good find.

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In the bedroom, Keith has come across something from his childhood.

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It's a toy van made by Budgie,

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one of the British die-cast toymakers of the 1960s.

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It's not as valuable as other well known makes

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such as Dinky and Matchbox, so it gets a slightly lower valuation

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of just £20 to £30.

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Hi, Jonty. I've found something of interest for you.

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Good. That's what I'd like to hear.

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-A ring and a pennant-type brooch.

-Yes, OK.

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Oh, wow! They've got sovereigns inset inside them,

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in the middle there. Where are they from?

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They were originally my great-aunt's.

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She used to wear them quite often. The brooch she would wear daily

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with scarves and things like that.

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We're not sure she wore the ring, but she did wear the brooch.

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It was very fashionable, in the late 19th century

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and throughout the 20th century, for many people

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to convert their sovereigns into jewellery.

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You were simply wearing your money, wearing your wealth.

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If you could afford to buy a sovereign, or a half-sovereign,

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why not turn it into a ring, because it is solid gold after all.

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But somehow there's a touch of the Del Boy about them.

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I certainly wouldn't be caught wearing that.

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-You sure?

-No. It's not for me, I'm afraid.

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-So can we sell this pair?

-Oh, for sure. Yeah.

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They're not strictly a pair. I imagine they were converted

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probably at the same time.

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So in the brooch, the half-sovereign here is 1905,

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so that's Edwardian,

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and this one is a similar age. This is 1914,

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so the beginning of the First World War.

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We're selling just at the right time,

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because the market is really at an all-time high as we speak.

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Five years ago, I would value these

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at between £60 and £80. In today's market, at auction,

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-we're looking between £150 and £200.

-Brilliant!

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-So that is very good news.

-Good job you came now, then!

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Good job you showed them to me!

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-I'll give those back to you for safekeeping. We'll carry on.

-OK.

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At auction, will the gold have the Midas touch with the bidders?

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110, 120, 130, 140.

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-Will it reach Jonty's estimate?

-150. In the room at 150. 160.

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Will it go higher still? Find out later.

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All that excitement is still to come.

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In my search, I spot these two old teddy bears

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that belonged to Keith's mother.

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Unfortunately they're not very valuable,

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only getting a £20 to £30 estimate from Jonty.

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-Here we are, Lorne.

-Oh, what have you got there?

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-Jonty?

-Let's have a look.

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This is a silk time-bill, it's described as,

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and it's an old Indian train journey

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that took place in 1876, I think.

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-That's right. Yes.

-For the Prince of Wales'...

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journey through from Delhi to Lahore.

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If you look here, it has all these carriages, and it tells you who's...

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-Who's in every one.

-Oh, yeah! Carriage!

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I love the way they list all these important people,

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and then we get "Third Class", and there's not a word!

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You have second class, third class, and that's it.

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-That's it. They won't mention those.

-THEY LAUGH

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How did this come into your possession, then?

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This probably came from my great-uncle Rich,

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who was a bit of an eccentric and went travelling around the world

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in the mid-'60s, and went from Victoria Coach Station to Bombay

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-on a bus.

-I think that was just insane.

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-He did rather stupid things.

-He got there, did he?

-Yeah!

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I can only presume that he's picked this up on his travels.

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Now, the condition is pretty poor, because it's made of silk,

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and silk does perish quite badly. Now, this is a rare item,

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but it doesn't necessarily make it incredibly valuable.

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I just find it fascinating, and a lot of other people will, too.

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So what sort of price do you think?

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I would put £20 to £30 on it,

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and just see what happens in the auction sale.

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I think we go for it.

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Jonty makes the next discovery in the hall -

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two French spelter figures of children.

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Jonty reckons this pair should attract some attention

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at £50 to £80.

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Keith's son Leslie is the person we're raising the money for today.

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But, as he's now living in America, I get the low-down on him from his brother Mark.

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So, this was Leslie's bedroom before he went away.

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-It's big, isn't it?

-Nice and big. He got the bigger room of the two.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Right. So, what's this?

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This is a wakeboard. It's the snowboarding equivalent of water-skiing.

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You're behind a boat, and you get towed at 30 miles an hour,

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and it's all about doing the biggest, baddest trick you can do.

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-Your parents must have a fit.

-Not the best thing to watch your child do,

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but as a participant, it's exhilarating. It's great fun.

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You've got lots of medals here. These are Leslie's medals?

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Came second in one competition, third in another,

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and the best one we have of him

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is Best Crash award, where he completely totalled himself

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in a competition and had memory loss for a day,

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so we had a lot of fun taking the mick out of him.

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What has he gone to America to do? Is it linked to this sport?

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He's doing physiotherapy, and it connects with this,

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because in wakeboarding there's a lot of impact injuries,

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and it helps to know a good physiotherapist

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once you get out of those crutches and get walking again,

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so it's quite linked, really.

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It's been quite tough for your mum and dad.

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They get quite emotional talking about it.

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Every time Les comes up in conversation, they're welling up.

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But they're pleased for him because this is an avenue for him to follow.

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So they were pleased.

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What are your plans for going out there?

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Hopefully in August the whole family will be going out,

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so it'll be good to get back together again.

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It will be. There'll be lots of tears then.

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I'm sure there will be. Lots of hugs and kisses.

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There'll be tears if Jonty doesn't find some more stuff to sell. Let's see how he's doing.

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I'm not sure where our expert's got to,

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but Mark makes an interesting discovery downstairs.

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It's a Victorian cast-iron doorstop

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in the shape of the puppet, Mr Punch.

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It belonged to Keith's great-aunt Maggie,

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who worked as a governess for families in France and England.

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Jonty values it at £30 to £40.

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In the bedroom, it looks like Keith might have found something sparkling,

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but there's no stopping Mark at the moment.

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In the snug, he's come across something else that has family connections.

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It's the war medals that were given to Keith's father

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and his great-uncle Oswald for their services during the wars.

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These war medals, however, are fairly common,

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and that is reflected in Jonty's estimate,

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as he values them at £50 to £80.

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-Hello! Oh, do I see diamonds?

-We do.

-Oh, hello!

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And whose ring is this?

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This is actually my mother's engagement ring.

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It was made for her by a jeweller in Cairo

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who was a personal friend of hers.

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That's a proper knuckleduster! Excuse me.

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-Can I have a look?

-Certainly.

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-So, how many diamonds have we got in here?

-Ten.

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Yes, you're right. We've got eight smaller ones,

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and two large ones on the ends.

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And those diamonds are inset in a very fine platinum ridge.

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The band itself, the ring itself, is gold, probably nine-carat gold.

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I would hazard a guess that we're looking between two and three carats.

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We would have to properly assess the clarity of those diamonds,

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because I think they're not the best,

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but as far as value is concerned, an auction value is concerned,

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we're looking at between £500 and £600.

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-What do you think about that?

-Superb. I think that's good.

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I'm quite pleased that we've got nearer our target,

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and £1,000... Nearer to £1,000.

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Well, it certainly has taken us a lot nearer our target,

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because, as you say, you wanted £1,000

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towards Leslie's education, or the fees for him studying in America,

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and thanks to the ring, the value of everything going to auction

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comes to £1,260!

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-Oh, really?

-That's pretty good.

-That is good, isn't it?

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That's fantastic.

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There was certainly a Middle Eastern flavour to our items today.

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I can't wait to see how they all do when we take them to auction.

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There's the two gold pocket watches.

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Will they tick all the boxes for the bidders,

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with an estimate of £200 to £400?

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The early 20th-century sovereign ring and pin

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which belonged to Keith's aunt. With the price of gold being so high,

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they should reach their £150 to £200 estimate.

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And not forgetting the silk train timetable

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for the Prince of Wales's journey from Delhi to Lahore in 1876.

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His valuation was only £20 to £30,

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but who knows what it might fetch on the day.

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Still to come on Cash In The Attic - I think Jonty is punch-drunk

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after the sale of the Victorian doorstop.

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That's the way to do it!

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'And what has us reacting like this?'

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-That's just bizarre.

-I'm stunned.

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I'm absolutely stunned.

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'All will be revealed when the hammer finally falls.'

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Now, it's been a few weeks since we met Keith and his son Mark,

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and we found some lovely items in their home,

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including that Indian railway timetable with a royal touch

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and the Egyptian ring. We've brought those and other items here

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to Chiswick Auction House in West London.

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Remember, Keith's looking to raise around £1,000

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so he can send the money to his other son, Leslie,

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for his tuition fees in America.

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Let's hope today the bidders are feeling very adventurous

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and help us make our money.

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These general auctions take place every Tuesday.

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Today there are almost 800 lots,

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and dealers and experts alike are eyeing up everything on offer.

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Keith and Mark have never been to an auction before,

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and I wonder if they're feeling anxious about how well all their family heirlooms will do.

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How are you looking forward to the auction?

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I'm a little bit nervous, not knowing what's going to happen.

0:17:300:17:33

So we'll wait and see.

0:17:330:17:36

I'm not nervous, but we never know what will happen at auction either.

0:17:360:17:40

-How are you feeling, Mark?

-It's going to go well.

0:17:400:17:42

We'll make a lot of money and it should be good fun.

0:17:420:17:45

The show is under way, so let's hope Mr Punch gets us a good audience.

0:17:450:17:48

Come on!

0:17:480:17:50

The auction room is packed, and with all the lots available online too,

0:17:510:17:56

let's hope there'll be plenty of interest in Keith's belongings.

0:17:560:17:59

The first to come up is my favourite - that Victorian train timetable

0:17:590:18:04

with the royal connection.

0:18:040:18:06

There's interest in this straight off, I'm glad to say.

0:18:060:18:09

I'm bid £20. Straight off with me at 20.

0:18:090:18:11

22, everywhere. 22.

0:18:110:18:12

25. 28.

0:18:120:18:15

30. 32.

0:18:150:18:16

£32, the middle there. 35.

0:18:160:18:19

38. 40. Five.

0:18:190:18:22

50. Five.

0:18:220:18:24

£60 with Terry.

0:18:240:18:26

Anybody else? 65 here. 70.

0:18:260:18:30

Five. 80. £80 there, further away. At 80.

0:18:300:18:33

Anybody else? At £80. I'm going to sell it for 80.

0:18:330:18:36

-There it goes.

-£80! That's really good, isn't it?

0:18:360:18:40

How about that? That put a smile on your face.

0:18:400:18:42

-Jonty, you got that one wrong!

-It's great when I get it wrong that way round!

0:18:420:18:47

'What a great start! More than double Jonty's top estimate.

0:18:470:18:50

'Let's hope this sale bodes well for the rest of Keith's heirlooms

0:18:500:18:54

'coming under the hammer today. Next up are the two teddies,

0:18:540:18:57

'priced at £20 to £30.'

0:18:570:19:00

£14 here. At 14. Anybody else?

0:19:000:19:03

At £14. 16, standing.

0:19:030:19:05

18. 20.

0:19:050:19:07

22. £22, then.

0:19:070:19:09

With the lady at 22. At £22. You all done?

0:19:090:19:12

22. And going for 22.

0:19:120:19:13

£22! That's £11 a bear.

0:19:130:19:16

Oh, how do you feel?

0:19:160:19:19

I find it really sad when I see my childhood stuff go.

0:19:190:19:22

I guess after the excitement of the first one, we've got to have a few downers!

0:19:220:19:27

'It was still within Jonty's estimate, though,

0:19:270:19:30

'so not too disappointing.

0:19:300:19:31

' The bidders seem pretty keen on our lots,

0:19:310:19:35

'as the boxed Budgie van and the silver cigarette box and case

0:19:350:19:38

'both sell on or over estimate...'

0:19:380:19:41

£60 and going, then, for 60.

0:19:410:19:44

'..adding £110 to our kitty between them.

0:19:440:19:48

'Now, how will that Victorian cast-iron doorstop do,

0:19:490:19:53

'in the shape of Mr Punch?'

0:19:530:19:55

What do we want for this? £30 to £40?

0:19:550:19:58

-It's worth every penny. Don't be surprised if he makes more.

-Right. Let's see!

0:19:580:20:01

There's a bit of interest in Punch. I've got a £30 left bid.

0:20:010:20:06

With me at £30 for Punch. 32.

0:20:060:20:08

35. 38. 40. 42. 45.

0:20:080:20:11

48. 50.

0:20:110:20:13

-55. In the room at 55. 60.

-Lots of hands going up.

0:20:130:20:16

-Look at this.

-£60 in the blue. 65. 70.

0:20:160:20:20

Five. 80. Five.

0:20:200:20:21

£85. With 85.

0:20:210:20:23

Anybody else? At £85. 90.

0:20:230:20:26

95.

0:20:260:20:28

-£95, then. At 95.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:20:290:20:31

-Now, that's the way to do it!

-That's amazing! £95.

0:20:310:20:35

-That is good!

-Pretty good for a doorstop.

0:20:350:20:39

'Incredible! More than double the top estimate.

0:20:390:20:42

'Keith's next lot is the collection of war medals.

0:20:420:20:44

'Let's hope they can repeat Mr Punch's performance

0:20:440:20:47

'at £50 to £80.'

0:20:470:20:49

I'm bid £60. Straight off with me at £60.

0:20:490:20:51

65. 65.

0:20:510:20:53

70 with me. 75. 80 with me.

0:20:530:20:55

85. 90 with me. 95 in the room. Against commissions at 95.

0:20:550:20:59

-Wow!

-Wow!

0:20:590:21:00

At 95. 100 there in the middle. Are you giving up?

0:21:000:21:04

-110.

-Great.

-120.

0:21:040:21:06

120 in the middle of the room. At 120.

0:21:060:21:08

In the hat, at 120.

0:21:080:21:10

-At 120, then...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:21:100:21:12

-What a result!

-That was great!

-Another good one.

0:21:120:21:15

-We're on a roll, aren't we?

-It's going well.

0:21:150:21:17

'We certainly have the sort of items the buyers are looking for today.'

0:21:180:21:22

We're halfway through the lots we're going to be selling.

0:21:230:21:27

So far we've made £427, so almost halfway there.

0:21:270:21:32

-Your items have done really well.

-We're second-half players, as well,

0:21:320:21:36

so bring on the second half!

0:21:360:21:37

If you've been inspired by Keith's success

0:21:390:21:42

and would like to raise money at auction, remember there are charges to be paid, such as commission.

0:21:420:21:48

These vary between salerooms, so it's always worth checking in advance.

0:21:480:21:52

Keith and Mark's next lot is the 19th-century French mantel clock.

0:21:520:21:56

We're looking for £80 to £120.

0:21:560:21:58

Bit of interest in that straight off. I'm bid £70.

0:22:000:22:03

At £70. 75. 80.

0:22:030:22:05

85. 90. In the corner at £90. Anybody else?

0:22:050:22:09

95, fresh bidding. £95. You all done?

0:22:090:22:12

At £95. Near the mirror, £95 and going.

0:22:120:22:16

95...

0:22:160:22:18

£95! That's not bad, is it?

0:22:180:22:20

'That's a good start to our second half,

0:22:200:22:22

'but the pair of spelter figures don't prove quite as popular...'

0:22:220:22:27

I'm going to sell them for £38.

0:22:270:22:29

-At £38. All done? £38.

-Disappointing.

0:22:290:22:32

'..selling well under Jonty's £50 estimate.

0:22:320:22:35

'The next lot is the two half-sovereigns.

0:22:370:22:39

'This year, gold has hit record highs,

0:22:390:22:42

'so now's a great time to sell and cash in.'

0:22:420:22:45

I've got interest in these straight off. I'm bid £100 for them.

0:22:450:22:48

With me at £100. 110. 120.

0:22:480:22:50

130. 140.

0:22:500:22:52

-150. 160 everywhere. 160.

-Everywhere!

-170.

0:22:520:22:56

180. 190.

0:22:560:22:59

200. And ten.

0:22:590:23:01

220. 230.

0:23:010:23:02

240.

0:23:020:23:04

240, further away. At 240. Anybody else?

0:23:040:23:07

At £240. 240 is the bid.

0:23:070:23:11

'I think Keith is just delighted that they've sold

0:23:110:23:14

'for such a good price - £40 over the top estimate.

0:23:140:23:18

'The cameo brooch and ring don't hit the same chord with the bidders, though.'

0:23:180:23:23

At £55. No? Not sold.

0:23:230:23:26

'And that's our first. unsold lot of the day

0:23:260:23:30

'I hope it's not a bad omen,

0:23:300:23:31

'as we've got two more jewellery lots to come.

0:23:310:23:34

'First up, the two pocket watches, with a sizeable £200 estimate.'

0:23:340:23:38

Start me, £100 to go for the lot. £100 for them, surely.

0:23:390:23:43

-£100. 110. 120. 130. 140.

-Come on!

0:23:430:23:46

£130? Is that 130?

0:23:460:23:48

At 130 for the watches.

0:23:480:23:50

£130.

0:23:500:23:52

130, not quite enough.

0:23:520:23:53

-Gosh!

-Unsold!

-That's unbelievable.

0:23:530:23:57

-Unbelievable!

-We've gone right back.

-What happened there?

0:23:580:24:01

-No interest in the room whatsoever.

-That's just bizarre!

0:24:010:24:04

I'm stunned. I'm absolutely stunned.

0:24:040:24:07

'Poor old Jonty! He was so sure those watches would fly.

0:24:070:24:11

'But at least the auctioneer didn't let them go for a silly price.

0:24:110:24:13

'And now we have the final lot. It's that large Egyptian engagement ring

0:24:130:24:18

'with ten diamonds that was Keith's mother's.

0:24:180:24:21

'Jonty valued it at £500 to £600.'

0:24:210:24:24

-Have you put a reserve on that?

-I think we did,

0:24:270:24:30

because I was concerned that it might go for not enough

0:24:300:24:34

as to what I thought it was.

0:24:340:24:36

-So there is a reserve on it.

-Do we know what that is?

0:24:360:24:39

-It's a discretionary reserve.

-Discretionary. OK.

0:24:390:24:42

The auctioneer is selling. Let's see what happens.

0:24:420:24:45

Is it worth... Start me, 400. 400 for the ring. Surely, 400? And 20.

0:24:450:24:49

-440. 460.

-Come on!

0:24:490:24:51

£460 for that ring.

0:24:510:24:53

At £460. 460. Anybody else?

0:24:530:24:56

-At 460. Not quite enough, 460.

-SHE GASPS

0:24:560:24:59

-No!

-Oh, my word!

0:24:590:25:01

-£460, and it's not sold.

-We were doing so well,

0:25:010:25:06

and all of a sudden we've come to a full stop.

0:25:060:25:08

What do you think about the ring not selling?

0:25:080:25:11

Everything that we thought was going to do really well hasn't done well,

0:25:110:25:15

and some of the items we were not expecting to do well

0:25:150:25:19

has done fantastic.

0:25:190:25:20

'I think Keith has just summed up how unpredictable an auction can be.

0:25:200:25:26

'But you have to take the good with the bad. What we need to know now

0:25:260:25:29

'is whether our unsolds have affected our target.'

0:25:290:25:32

Well, you wanted £1,000, didn't you, to send over

0:25:340:25:37

for the tuition in America.

0:25:370:25:39

We've got two major things that haven't sold -

0:25:390:25:42

the gold pocket watches and the gold ring.

0:25:420:25:45

-But you have made £800.

-Much better than nothing,

0:25:450:25:49

because we've still got those items, and I know we can put them somewhere,

0:25:490:25:53

and I'm sure we will get our thousand or more, so that's fine.

0:25:530:25:58

Thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

0:25:580:25:59

Hi. How are you?

0:26:030:26:05

A few days later, Keith and Penny break the news of their earnings

0:26:050:26:09

to son Leslie by webcam.

0:26:090:26:11

Mark and I went to the auctions,

0:26:110:26:13

and we've managed to raise you a healthy amount of money.

0:26:130:26:17

So when I send this £800 over to you,

0:26:170:26:21

don't spend it on anything other than your tuition fees,

0:26:210:26:27

and look after the money carefully.

0:26:270:26:30

'Thank you very much. I really appreciate it.'

0:26:300:26:33

That's fine, Son. You're welcome.

0:26:330:26:35

Keith Davies' eldest son Leslie needs a little help with his studies in Texas, so the family enlists the help of Lorne Spicer and expert Jonty Hearnden to search their home for valuables to sell at auction.


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