Quilter Cash in the Attic


Quilter

Antiques series. Martin has inherited heirlooms from his uncle, and wishes to sell them to fund a memorial to him in the garden. Jennie Bond and John Cameron are on hand to help.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the show that finds hidden treasures around your home and helps sell them at auction.

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I bet you've got one or two pieces that were perhaps handed down to you

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and you'd love to know more about them.

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Our couple today certainly do

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and they hope their heirlooms will help bring them some cash in the attic.

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'On today's Cash In The Attic, John confounds us

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'with his knowledge of an Edwardian jardiniere.'

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In the Werkstatte, the Austrian workshop

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established at the end of the 19th century by Koloman Moser and...

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-Are you speaking English?

-Sorry!

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And we're delighted to find out the value of a Victorian brass fishing reel.

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-OK. That sounds very good, yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-Nice catch.

-Oh!

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When it comes to the auction, a phone-bidding frenzy

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brings us a particularly successful sale.

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I just need to find the other one that's in the garage, now.

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Find out what happens when that hammer falls.

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I'm in the very pretty village of Saltby in Leicestershire,

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a stone's throw, or perhaps I should say a pork-pie's throw,

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from Melton Mowbray.

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I'm on my way to meet Martin and Mary

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and they're hoping that their family treasures will raise enough money

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for a memorial to a very special relative.

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Martin and Mary have been together for the past 14 years

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but have still not tied the knot.

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The past year has been a particularly tough one for them

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but they've got through it.

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Martin was close to his Uncle Alex

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but last year he died after battling with prostate cancer.

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This prompted Martin to get a check-up

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and he was then diagnosed with it, too.

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But after treatment, he's returning to full health.

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Martin has inherited a lot of his uncle's possessions

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and John Cameron is here

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to cast his expert eye over all we find today.

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Three years ago, Martin and Mary moved into this lovely barn conversion

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in the heart of Leicestershire.

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It's set in its own land.

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Plenty of challenge here for this green-fingered couple.

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-A-ha. There you are.

-Hello!

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Gosh. I heard you had a lovely garden and you certainly do.

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-Mary, Martin, hi.

-Hello.

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-How much land have you got?

-It's about three quarters of an acre

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-and it's a work in progress.

-Yeah, lots to do. Lots of plans.

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-I think you've progressed pretty well.

-We're getting there.

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So why have you called in Cash In The Attic?

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Well, basically, I was just thinking that we'd like to get something

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in memory of my uncle, who died last year.

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We're thinking something like a bench or a gazebo

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or something that will remind us.

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-What was his name?

-It was Alex.

-Alex. Uncle Alex.

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-So I'm here for Uncle Alex.

-That's it, yeah.

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-So how much money do you think you might be able to raise?

-Hopefully, around £500.

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-£500, OK. You'd get a nice gazebo for that.

-We hope so, yeah.

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-And the flowers to grow around it.

-That sounds brilliant.

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-Shall we get out of the cold?

-That's not a bad idea.

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Let's go.

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Since moving into their beautiful home,

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Martin has been busy renovating the interior...

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something that John will appreciate,

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being a qualified surveyor, as well as a graduate in fine art valuation.

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That's what I like to see - an expert at work.

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-This is John.

-Hello, guys.

-What have you found?

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I've got an interesting piece of pottery here which caught my eye.

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I instantly knew what it was but I needed to turn it upside down

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just to be sure.

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There is a mark on the bottom that's obscured by the glaze.

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I'm fairly sure that says Minton,

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the famous Staffordshire pottery, Stoke-on-Trent,

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established at the end of the 18th century

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but this piece, dating to around 1910.

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-Martin, where did it come from?

-It's something my aunt and uncle had.

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They kept it in their bedroom as an ornament

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and it's something that I remember for many years being in their house.

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I don't recall them ever having anything in it as such.

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-Presumably it would be for plants?

-It's a jardiniere.

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I would guess that, you know, the green, hard foam oasis that you saw?

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My grandparents had them, where, I guess, you put dried flowers.

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Now, the style of this piece is very interesting indeed.

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It's known as Secessionist wares.

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They were influenced by the Wiener Werkstatte,

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the Austrian workshop established at the end of the 19th century

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-by Koloman Moser and...

-Are you speaking English?

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-Sorry, Jenny!

-It's just...

-By Koloman Moser and Josef Hoffmann.

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-Very erudite.

-It was a very famous school.

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They were a branch of the art nouveau,

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which I think is quite different to the French style of art nouveau.

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This is very much geometric in style but also organic.

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We can see these lovely stylised plant handles at the side, there.

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So we have ourselves a very decent piece of pottery here.

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-I bet you didn't know any of that.

-Certainly not.

-Neither did I.

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Gosh! It's got lots of history. What do you reckon it's worth?

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Secessionist wares have dropped in demand in recent years

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but I'd hope for about £50-£80 for it.

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-That's nice.

-That's excellent.

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Really good.

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Well, fingers crossed that really is a Minton.

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In one of the bedrooms, John finds some more pottery,

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a 1930s collection of jugs and bowls.

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They all belonged to Uncle Alex's wife Daphne

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and Martin remembers that she used to keep them in her bedroom.

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This little lot should attract around £50-£60 at auction,

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so that's two good items from Uncle Alex and Aunt Daphne so far

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and I reckon there's plenty more to come.

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We've got a rather interesting early fishing reel here.

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Martin, where did it come from?

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It was something that was actually in my uncle's shed

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and it was in a bit of a state when we got it,

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so my father took it away and cleaned it up

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and we saw the inscriptions on it

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and we thought it might be good as a little ornament

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but I think an enthusiast would be more appreciative of it.

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It's inscribed on the plate here,

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"C Farlow, Makers, 191 Strand, London."

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Now, they're very important makers, Farlow.

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They've been around since the 1840s,

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when they were making sporting apparel and country clothing.

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They're still around today at Pall Mall.

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One of the leading makers,

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along with people like Samuel Alcock and the Hardy Brothers up at Alnwick.

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This is a free-winding reel

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and we can tell the date because of the trademark on the bottom,

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the little fish trademark on the foot.

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They only used that on their early reels

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and that would date it to around 1890,

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so it's nearly 120 years old.

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They had different fish for different decades?

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No, that was just their early trademark. They ceased to use it.

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It's an interesting thing and there is a very buoyant market

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for fishing collectables.

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Reels are probably the sweet spot in that field.

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So you mean people would collect it rather than use it?

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No, people would buy them and use them as well.

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You will have collectors that won't use them

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but some of these early reels that are in perfect working order

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are cheaper to buy than a brand new one from Hardy Brothers or Farlow

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because these have royal warrants.

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Looking at this one here, it does have some damage.

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We've got a split to this little ivorine handle.

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It's also lacking its hard leather case.

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It's had one or two dents but even in that condition,

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I'd expect it to make £60-£80, something like that.

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OK. That sounds very good, yeah.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-Nice catch.

-Oh!

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'Let's move on swiftly to our next item,

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'which is another heirloom from Martin's aunt and uncle.

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'He remembers these kettles used to sit either side of the fireplace in their house.

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'The darker one is made of copper and the other one is brass.

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'Copper is a metal in itself,

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'whereas brass is an amalgam of copper and zinc

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'and it's the zinc that gives it that gold look.

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'This pair should create a bit of interest at £20-£40.

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'We're making steady progress today.

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'Let's hope the next item continues in this vein,

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'which again comes from Uncle Alex and Aunt Daphne.'

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-John, we've found something else.

-Ah.

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Jolly good. Let's have a look.

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Do you mind holding that for me, Mary?

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Right, well. Let's look for the shiniest thing first of all.

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This is an Albert chain. Where did this come from?

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That was in some of the items that my uncle had.

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It didn't have any watch with it.

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That was basically what was in the box.

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It's nine carat. I was hoping it was going to be 18 carat.

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People do collect these because collectors want to marry them up with watches.

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I think we're looking at about £50 for that.

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-Oh, OK.

-Not bad, is it?

-Not at all.

-No, that's very good.

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So what have we got here? We've got some bar brooches here,

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gold bar brooches.

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Did they come from Alex?

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They were part of my Aunt Daphne's collection of jewellery

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and the little pieces that we found in the jewellery box.

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That one's set with what looks like a little aquamarine.

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I think they are aquamarine in there.

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That's possibly a peridot, a little bit darker.

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And that one's just gold.

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They're all nine carat.

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-I think we'd be looking at about 40 to 50 for those.

-Right.

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So we're up at about £90 there, aren't we?

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But this is quite interesting, isn't it?

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That, again, was from my Aunt Daphne.

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OK, well, to me, that's probably a piece

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of Renaissance revival silver jewellery from the Victorian period.

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There's not a lot of weight in it,

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so we're looking at £10-£20 for that, not a great deal of money.

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But together, I think all those items,

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we should be looking at about £100-£150 for them.

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That's very good.

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Well, I'll take these but there's some more rummaging to do,

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-so lead on.

-OK.

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Well, gold is certainly getting a good price at the moment

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but will the bidders at auction want to buy it?

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We've got a bid of 85, a bid of 90, a bid of 100,

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a bid of 105, a bid of 120 and higher.

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Stay with us and find out how high it does go.

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All that is still to come

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but as our search continues,

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Martin comes across another of his aunt and uncle's collection.

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It's a Burmese brass tea set.

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Martin's Uncle Alex spent most of his career in the merchant navy

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but joined the Commandos during World War II

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and fought in Burma and India.

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Martin remembers they used to display this set in their living room

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but they never used it.

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John gives it an estimate of £20-£30 for the auction.

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Well, that's six items that all belonged to Martin's uncle,

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so I think it's time we found out a little more about him.

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He sounds such a character, your Uncle Alex.

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-Tell me a bit about him.

-Yeah, him and my aunt were very loveable.

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They were a smashing couple

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and, as I say, I had a lot of respect for my uncle.

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He was ever so knowledgeable.

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He loved travelling, he loved reading books.

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He was someone that you could always have a long chat with

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and come away quite enlightened.

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How old was he, then, when he died?

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He was 91. Yeah, so... He died last year

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of prostate cancer.

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And it was quite ironic, really,

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because in October last year I was also diagnosed with prostate cancer.

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Gosh.

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And although I had no symptoms with regard to the cancer,

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I felt I ought to be checked and went to my local GP

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and within two days, they came back to me

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after having the blood test

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and I was told I had prostate cancer.

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My goodness.

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Fortunately, I've had all the treatment now

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and I'm hoping that it's cured the situation

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and I've got a long and happy retirement for the future.

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Well, we all hope that, of course.

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So you mentioned retirement, there.

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What was it you used to do?

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I worked for Ford for 35 years.

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-For Ford?

-Ford motor company, yeah.

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I was lucky enough to be offered early retirement when I was 51.

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-So you grabbed, I bet, didn't you?

-I grabbed it.

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And basically, I wanted to do a lot more work outside.

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I've started to do things for the wildlife trust,

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lots of things in the garden here

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because it's a big project.

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It's given me an opportunity that I never expected to have.

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Ford's were very good to me and gave me that opportunity.

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Well, you can't sit there pretending you're retired from rummaging.

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-We've got more work to do. Shall see where everyone is?

-OK.

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Both John and Mary have been busy searching the house.

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In the study cupboard, Mary's found this Japanese framed silk tapestry panel.

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It's hand woven and from the late 19th century.

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It belonged to her mother, who liked to visit auctions and antique shops,

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and she kept it in her lounge.

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For the past few years, though, it's been in storage

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and Mary's happy to let it go with an estimate of £50-£80.

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That tapestry's brought our running total to £350,

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so not far to go to reach our target.

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Maybe this next find will get us there.

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It's certainly something interesting because John's taking a closer look

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with his jeweller's loupe.

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-Have you had a chance to look at them?

-I have, Mary.

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They're interesting. Where did they all come from?

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My mother was a great one for going round antique shops.

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She picked them up and there was a lot more than this

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but I've given a lot away to family and friends

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and I've kept my favourites for myself.

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Some of them aren't perfect, so let's see what we can get for them.

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OK. I've separated them into two categories here.

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We've got nine carat here and these three are 18-carat gold.

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Now, when gold is mined pure,

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it's 24-carat gold, or with a few impurities from the ground

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but it's too soft to be used for jewellery at that point.

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-It has to alloyed with other metals...

-Right.

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..commonly silver and copper.

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So nine carat is the lowest.

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You can see that some of them are damaged.

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Some of them have had pieces let into to make them bigger.

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Some of them have worn, they're quite thin.

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That happens when people wear rings together on the same finger.

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I particularly like this little ruby and rose-cut diamond ring.

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They're call rose-cut because they're quite crudely cut.

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You can see each one is like a rose, the facets are asymmetrical,

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but when you get close up, you can see there's a stone missing.

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But they're saleable items.

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That little pile there, I reckon, is around £100.

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That bigger pile there, because it's half the carats,

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-that's about the same, about £100-£150.

-OK.

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So I would say for the lot, we're looking at between £200-£250.

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Oh, that's great.

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That's good.

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'That's a fantastic amount to add to our running total.

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'We seem to be on a bit of a roll here.

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'The next find is a pair of majolica moon flasks.

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'They were given to Martin's grandmother as a gift

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'from a wealthy family she worked for in Essex.

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'Majolica is a soft earthenware ceramic

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'that's been fired and glazed to create the intense colours

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'that make this pottery really stand out.

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'The technique originated in Spain in the 8th century.

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'These two flasks are a mid-20th century reproduction

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'but they should still fetch £30-£50 at auction.

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'Martin and Mary have some really fascinating pieces here

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'and each one has a story.'

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Now, tell me about these.

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Well, these were in Mary's sister's garage.

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They were part of something that Mary's mother and father had in the old house.

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Quite interesting because I think they're made from an old cartridge, gun cartridge.

0:16:220:16:27

You're absolutely right. They're referred to often as trench art.

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When you think back, these are World War I shells.

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Now, when Kitchener said, "Your country needs you,"

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millions of young men took up the call to arms

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and went marching proudly off to France.

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Now, among them were lots of skilled workers,

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metal workers, jewellers, things like that,

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and through all the documented horrors of war,

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there were still long periods of inactivity in the trenches.

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Lots of guys took to applying their working skills

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with the things that were lying around them, such as shells.

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-Goodness me.

-Here we've got a couple of shells

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that have been embossed to make these little spill vases.

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There's not huge sums in things like this

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because there were millions of shells, producing a lot of trench art.

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This is interesting as well and another good example.

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This little lighter is just a brass nut

0:17:170:17:21

that's been soldered with two pennies of the period, copper pennies,

0:17:210:17:25

to form the body of a lighter, a little petrol lighter.

0:17:250:17:28

-Isn't that wonderful?

-It's amazing.

0:17:280:17:30

And did this come from the same place?

0:17:300:17:32

No, this was in one of my uncle's boxes of knickknacks

0:17:320:17:36

-and I believe it's a cigar cutter.

-It is.

0:17:360:17:40

Quite a novel little thing.

0:17:400:17:43

And then this, again, was in the garage.

0:17:430:17:47

There's a cannon on its carriage, there,

0:17:470:17:50

possibly something that would have been used in the Crimean War.

0:17:500:17:54

The lighter is much later than that

0:17:540:17:56

but because they're military related, I'd keep them as one lot

0:17:560:17:59

and it should appeal to both tobacco collectors and military collectors.

0:17:590:18:03

I suggest about £60-£80 for them.

0:18:030:18:05

That's brilliant, yeah.

0:18:050:18:07

-Happy with that?

-I'm quite happy with that.

-Fantastic.

0:18:070:18:10

Yet another interesting find. We're doing very well today.

0:18:110:18:14

Martin and Mary have found love second time around

0:18:150:18:18

and between them, they now have four grown-up children

0:18:180:18:21

and two grandchildren.

0:18:210:18:22

But the twist in their story is that they've known one another

0:18:220:18:25

since their schooldays.

0:18:250:18:27

So, come on, then, where are you? 1966. You were at school.

0:18:280:18:32

I'm sitting there.

0:18:320:18:34

-Oh, look at those teeth.

-I know! They're all my own, unlike now.

0:18:340:18:39

-And where are you, Mary?

-I'm somewhere here.

0:18:390:18:42

-Er... There you are.

-With pigtails.

-OK.

0:18:430:18:46

So this is your school in 1966. Were you great friends then?

0:18:460:18:53

We knew each other

0:18:530:18:54

but Mary was in the A grade and I was in the X grade,

0:18:540:18:58

so our paths crossed at times but she was a lot cleverer than I was.

0:18:580:19:03

So you weren't particularly good friends at school, yet here you are,

0:19:040:19:08

-together for how many years?

-14 years now.

0:19:080:19:11

So what happened? How did you meet up again?

0:19:110:19:13

Well, it was when we were both 40.

0:19:130:19:16

A group of us decided to have a school reunion

0:19:160:19:19

-and...

-That's how we met again.

-That's how we met again.

0:19:190:19:23

So, 14 years and still not man and wife.

0:19:230:19:26

Ah but we are actually getting married.

0:19:260:19:28

Yes, very shortly, we're getting married

0:19:280:19:31

and, as I say, it's been a long time but we've finally got there.

0:19:310:19:35

So what brought you here to this lovely village?

0:19:350:19:37

Well, we decided to move from where we were living at the time

0:19:370:19:40

and we wanted a project and this was everything we wanted.

0:19:400:19:43

It ticked all the boxes.

0:19:430:19:45

We fell in love with it and the main criteria for me

0:19:450:19:50

was that it was near my daughter because I have two grandchildren

0:19:500:19:53

and I help to look after them when she works,

0:19:530:19:56

so it fitted in very well.

0:19:560:19:57

It was the project that Martin wanted so much.

0:19:570:20:00

So it is a lovely house. I suppose it's been loads of work, has it?

0:20:000:20:03

Oh, yeah, yeah. We've got a very big project.

0:20:030:20:07

We've done a lot on the house now

0:20:070:20:09

and we're now moving into the garden

0:20:090:20:12

and we've got to get that ready for the marquee for the wedding.

0:20:120:20:15

So a lot of pressure but we just enjoy it.

0:20:150:20:19

Well, it won't happen if we sit here all day,

0:20:190:20:22

so let's go and look somewhere else.

0:20:220:20:24

Many of the items they're sending to auction

0:20:250:20:28

would really fit well into their beautiful period property.

0:20:280:20:31

But they like the clean, modern interior look,

0:20:310:20:34

so it's a good time for a clear-out.

0:20:340:20:38

And how about this for a find?

0:20:380:20:40

A pair of morning and evening art deco spelter statues

0:20:400:20:43

on a Bakelite base.

0:20:430:20:47

They belonged to Martin's other grandmother

0:20:470:20:49

and she kept them on her hearth but he hasn't found a place for them,

0:20:490:20:52

so he's happy to let them go at £30-£50.

0:20:520:20:55

'We're almost done here today.

0:20:570:20:58

'Just taking a last sweep of the lounge to make sure we haven't missed anything.'

0:20:580:21:03

-Oh, hi.

-Hi.

-Who's this, then?

-That's my grandchildren.

0:21:030:21:06

That's Louis, that's Evan.

0:21:060:21:08

Oh, they are gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous.

0:21:080:21:11

-What have you found?

-This is a picture that was in my mum's house.

0:21:110:21:15

Mum was a great one for going round the antiques shops

0:21:150:21:18

and she had this.

0:21:180:21:19

And then when she died, it just got stuck in my sister's garage

0:21:190:21:24

-and we found it.

-It's extraordinary.

-It's very unusual, yes.

0:21:240:21:28

-It's quite cartoon-like.

-Yeah.

-Fascinating.

0:21:280:21:31

John might like it. John! Oh, Martin's there, too.

0:21:310:21:34

-Look what Mary's found.

-That's very interesting.

0:21:340:21:37

-Isn't it extraordinary?

-It is.

0:21:370:21:39

I've seen this picture before. It's one of a series

0:21:390:21:42

-of which there were several thousand printed.

-Oh, I see.

0:21:420:21:45

This is a Japanese woodblock print

0:21:450:21:48

dating from the first half of the 19th century

0:21:480:21:50

and it's by an artist known as Ando Hiroshige,

0:21:500:21:53

a famous Japanese artist.

0:21:530:21:55

-Are you pretending you can read that?

-I know his signature.

0:21:550:21:59

This tells us that this is a particular number in a series.

0:21:590:22:02

But in 1832, Hiroshige was part of a delegation

0:22:020:22:06

that travelled the road, taking horses, a gift from a shogun,

0:22:060:22:10

to the emperor.

0:22:100:22:11

During that time, he would have made sketches of various things along the route.

0:22:110:22:15

Now, this is one of a series known as the 53 Stations Of The Tokaido,

0:22:150:22:19

one of the five important roads

0:22:190:22:21

linking the capital with the rest of the country.

0:22:210:22:24

Here we have, in the scene, some pilgrims

0:22:240:22:26

and this little fellow here is known as a tengu.

0:22:260:22:30

It's a mystical forest and mountain-dwelling figure

0:22:300:22:34

with both Shinto and Buddhist attributes

0:22:340:22:36

and the Japanese, they feared and respected the tengu.

0:22:360:22:41

In fact, as late as the 1860s,

0:22:410:22:44

the Edo government were posting notices to the tengu, asking them -

0:22:440:22:48

this was the Edo government -

0:22:480:22:50

asking them to vacate a particular mountain

0:22:500:22:52

in anticipation of the visit of a shogun.

0:22:520:22:55

-Isn't that interesting?

-Amazing.

0:22:550:22:57

-Do you think your mother knew any of this?

-No, I don't think she did.

0:22:570:23:00

Even in this condition - it has faded a bit

0:23:000:23:03

and we've got some little mites behind the glass -

0:23:030:23:05

but even in that condition, it should make £100-£200,

0:23:050:23:09

-possibly a bit more.

-Gosh.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:23:090:23:12

-Impressed with that?

-Yeah.

0:23:120:23:14

-My mum would have been very pleased.

-Ah!

-Yeah.

0:23:140:23:16

Do you know, we've finished now. You can put that down.

0:23:160:23:19

We've actually ended up rather nicely on a high note, I think.

0:23:190:23:26

And, now, you wanted £500, you said at the start, that's what our target was,

0:23:260:23:30

so we can have a wonderful gazebo or something for Uncle Alex.

0:23:300:23:33

Well, based on John's lowest estimates

0:23:330:23:36

and if things go to plan and we get everything at the auction sold,

0:23:360:23:41

you should make £770.

0:23:410:23:44

-Really?

-Hey!

0:23:440:23:46

Wow, excellent.

0:23:460:23:47

-That would be all right,

-Amazing.

-That's brilliant.

0:23:470:23:50

Well, I reckon with that result,

0:23:500:23:52

we're in for a fantastic day at the auction in a few weeks.

0:23:520:23:55

Here's a quick reminder of some of the items

0:23:550:23:58

Martin and Mary will be taking there.

0:23:580:24:00

There's the late Victorian Farlow brass fishing reel

0:24:000:24:03

with the ivorine handle that belonged to Uncle Alex.

0:24:030:24:06

That should drum up some interest at £60-£80.

0:24:060:24:09

Then there's another family heirloom, a pretty jardiniere.

0:24:110:24:14

I'm sure that will be scooped up at £50-£80.

0:24:140:24:18

And there's the trench artwork.

0:24:190:24:22

This is a fascinating lot

0:24:220:24:23

and hopefully will achieve John's estimate of £60-£80.

0:24:230:24:26

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:24:290:24:31

Martin thinks he might get away with a little white lie.

0:24:310:24:34

Well pleased. I'll tell Mary we got 200 for it.

0:24:350:24:38

You!

0:24:390:24:40

'And he reveals that the unusual trench art isn't really to his taste.'

0:24:410:24:44

They won't be missed.

0:24:460:24:47

In your household, if you're ugly, you go, don't you?

0:24:470:24:50

I'm surprised I haven't gone, then.

0:24:500:24:52

'Find out how well they all get on when the final hammer falls.'

0:24:530:24:57

It's a few weeks since we searched Martin and Mary's house

0:25:020:25:05

for items to bring here to Bamfords Auctions at Matlock

0:25:050:25:08

in Derbyshire.

0:25:080:25:09

Martin and Mary have got a bit of an unusual mission on their hands.

0:25:090:25:13

They want to raise £500 so they can build a memorial in their garden

0:25:130:25:17

for Martin's Uncle Alex.

0:25:170:25:19

So let's hope there's a full house here today when their items go up for sale.

0:25:190:25:24

Bamfords have auction houses in Derby and Matlock

0:25:240:25:28

and are always very popular with dealers

0:25:280:25:30

and anyone looking for a bargain.

0:25:300:25:32

One of the more unusual items here today is one of ours

0:25:330:25:36

and John is taking a last look at it.

0:25:360:25:39

-Hi, John.

-Hello, Jenny.

0:25:390:25:41

Now, this print, this is quite special, isn't it?

0:25:410:25:44

-Is it going to do well?

-It ought to.

0:25:440:25:46

He's a very popular and important Japanese artist

0:25:460:25:49

but at auctions it's all about do the right buyers know it's for sale?

0:25:490:25:52

That's the question.

0:25:520:25:54

Do you think word has gone out that's there something special here?

0:25:540:25:57

Well, it ought to have done

0:25:570:25:59

and I think most people will have spotted this straight away.

0:25:590:26:03

Is there interest in any of the other items?

0:26:030:26:05

Well, that lovely little fly-fishing reel

0:26:050:26:08

that Martin inherited from his uncle, that has got some interest.

0:26:080:26:12

I love that reel. I thought there might be.

0:26:120:26:14

We're in the right part of the world in Derbyshire.

0:26:140:26:16

We have the address, we just need to get somebody on the hook.

0:26:160:26:20

You said it! Well, I think they might have arrived, so let's tell them the good news.

0:26:200:26:25

The auction has attracted a large number of people

0:26:260:26:29

and hopefully, that bodes well for Martin.

0:26:290:26:32

-Good morning, Martin.

-Hi.

-Morning.

0:26:330:26:35

-You've got the fishing reel.

-Yes, a last look at it.

0:26:350:26:38

You've got the reel but where's Mary?

0:26:380:26:41

-I'm afraid she had to go to work today.

-Oh, really?

0:26:410:26:44

I tried to convince her but she couldn't get the time off,

0:26:440:26:47

so I'm here on my own and I'm having to do all the work.

0:26:470:26:50

You're not having any last thoughts about this, as a fishing man?

0:26:500:26:53

No, no. I think it's got to go to a collector.

0:26:530:26:57

I think it will.

0:26:570:26:58

Somebody's collection will appreciate that.

0:26:580:27:02

Have you brought everything else?

0:27:020:27:04

The only thing we haven't brought is the Japanese silk.

0:27:040:27:08

Mary's mum gave it to her

0:27:080:27:10

and Mary had second thoughts about putting it in the auction.

0:27:100:27:13

-That's fair enough.

-Well, on that note,

0:27:130:27:15

we do have some interest in the woodblock print.

0:27:150:27:18

-I understand we may have a telephone bid.

-Really?

0:27:180:27:21

-So that's encouraging.

-And you've just found that out?

0:27:210:27:24

-I've just found that out. I couldn't contain myself.

-Oh, good.

0:27:240:27:28

-Shall we go and get our spot?

-OK.

-Right.

0:27:280:27:31

'Mary's decision to take out the silk tapestry

0:27:310:27:33

'means our chances of making the £500 target

0:27:330:27:36

'are down by around £50-£80.

0:27:360:27:38

'Let's just hope this auction crowd are feeling generous.

0:27:400:27:43

'Well, we're going to put them to the test first

0:27:430:27:45

'with Martin's Victorian brass fishing reel.

0:27:450:27:48

'It's priced at £60-£80.'

0:27:480:27:51

It's a nice example. Farlow, very good maker,

0:27:510:27:54

and in good condition.

0:27:540:27:55

Late 19th century, so well over 100 years old and we want £60.

0:27:550:27:59

-£60. I think it's going to go for more, though.

-Excellent.

0:27:590:28:02

-We've got three bids on it.

-Bids on the book.

0:28:020:28:05

So £50 starts it. 55 now.

0:28:050:28:07

-At £50...

-That's great.

0:28:070:28:10

55, 60. Against you at £60.

0:28:100:28:14

-We wanted 60.

-65 do I see?

0:28:140:28:16

At £60.

0:28:160:28:17

65 now. Absentee bid will take it at 60.

0:28:170:28:21

-£60.

-That's brilliant.

0:28:210:28:23

-Our lower estimate but I'm happy with that. Are you happy?

-I'm fine.

0:28:230:28:27

That's very good.

0:28:270:28:28

So that's a very reassuring start for Martin.

0:28:290:28:32

Let's hope we can keep up the trend with our next item,

0:28:320:28:35

the 1930s collection of jugs and vases valued at £50-£60.

0:28:350:28:40

We've got some good names in there - Myott, Bretby and Rington's,

0:28:410:28:45

all early 20th century.

0:28:450:28:46

-Where did this lot come from?

-They came from my aunt and uncle's.

0:28:460:28:50

They had them around the house

0:28:500:28:51

and they're not our sort of style.

0:28:510:28:54

Well, hopefully, they'll make between £50 and £60.

0:28:540:28:57

Nice lot. Something for everyone. Let's see what happens.

0:28:570:29:00

We've got 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 bids on it. £32 has it.

0:29:000:29:04

Five bids but we're not at our lower estimate.

0:29:040:29:07

At 35. At £32. 35 do I see?

0:29:070:29:10

35. They'll have to go.

0:29:100:29:11

At 35. 38, now?

0:29:110:29:13

At 35. It remains with me, though. At 35. It's not going to be enough.

0:29:130:29:17

No? I'll have to pass that, I'm afraid.

0:29:170:29:20

Obviously those ceramics are not as fashionable as they used to be.

0:29:200:29:24

I wonder if the next lot, the brass and copper items,

0:29:240:29:27

will be more to this crowd's taste?

0:29:270:29:29

Well, it is a nice little lot.

0:29:290:29:31

We've got some copper and some brass.

0:29:310:29:33

There are brass trivets, a kettle, some fire irons and we're only asking £20-£40,

0:29:330:29:38

-so we should do that.

-It sounds cheap.

-It does.

0:29:380:29:41

It's the right time of year for that sort of thing - it's cold!

0:29:410:29:44

£20 is bid. 22 now.

0:29:440:29:46

22, 25, 28 and 30.

0:29:460:29:49

32, 35, 38 beats it.

0:29:490:29:50

38 in the hat and 40 now.

0:29:500:29:53

At £38 and 40 where?

0:29:530:29:54

At £38. Down the centre.

0:29:540:29:57

Anybody else? 40?

0:29:570:29:58

At 38 and selling at £38.

0:29:580:30:01

-To you.

-Cold day, sell things like that - perfect.

0:30:020:30:06

That's a great result. We almost made it to John's higher estimate.

0:30:060:30:10

We could be in for a rocky ride, though,

0:30:100:30:12

as our next piece is another ceramic

0:30:120:30:14

and the last one didn't go down so well.

0:30:140:30:16

Remember I said it was Minton Secessionist?

0:30:160:30:19

Well, the mark was quite obscured by the glaze.

0:30:190:30:22

I wasn't sure but I felt it was Minton.

0:30:220:30:24

James, our auctioneer, thinks it's Continental.

0:30:240:30:27

It is of the period but he doesn't think it's Minton,

0:30:270:30:29

so that may well affect our price but let's see.

0:30:290:30:32

My head's on the block now. Let's see what happens.

0:30:320:30:35

-We've got 1, 2, 3, 4 bids and £38 I have.

-Well...

0:30:350:30:40

38. 40 now.

0:30:400:30:41

At 38. 40, do I see?

0:30:410:30:43

At 38 and 40?

0:30:430:30:45

At £38 and 40 now?

0:30:450:30:47

At 38.

0:30:470:30:48

With me at £38. Any advance?

0:30:480:30:51

At 38. That's not sold.

0:30:510:30:53

-The auctioneer's brought that in, as they say.

-Right.

0:30:530:30:56

So it's another unsold. A shame.

0:30:560:30:59

Mmm, they don't seem to like ceramics today.

0:30:590:31:01

What will they make of our next lot,

0:31:010:31:04

the 20th century majolica moon flasks?

0:31:040:31:06

Estimate, £30-£50.

0:31:060:31:09

-So where are these from?

-These are from my grandmother

0:31:090:31:12

and she had them on display in the house.

0:31:120:31:15

Again, they're not my style.

0:31:150:31:18

-No sentimental value attached to them, then?

-Not really, no.

0:31:180:31:21

They're not that sort of thing that you'd be sentimental about.

0:31:210:31:26

And bids on them, six bids, and £50 starts them.

0:31:260:31:30

That's our top estimate.

0:31:300:31:31

At £50 and five now. At £50 and five do I see?

0:31:310:31:34

At 55, 60. 60 and five?

0:31:340:31:37

-No? At £60.

-It got stuck.

0:31:380:31:41

Absentee bids, almost all the bidding. With me.

0:31:410:31:44

-Ah, well £60. That's pretty good.

-That's very good, yeah,

0:31:450:31:48

for something that someone will appreciate, I'm sure.

0:31:480:31:52

It's very frustrating, I find, at auction, though,

0:31:520:31:55

when you hear there were about five or six bids

0:31:550:31:57

and it started at 50 and we only got to 60.

0:31:570:32:00

-Yeah.

-It's disappointing that, isn't it?

-Well, we made our estimate.

0:32:000:32:04

That's the main thing.

0:32:040:32:06

Well, obviously they do like some ceramics here

0:32:070:32:10

and £10 over John's top estimate is a great result.

0:32:100:32:13

Martin's next lot is that interesting collection of trench art,

0:32:130:32:17

which John priced at £60-£80.

0:32:170:32:19

Why have you decided to part with these?

0:32:190:32:22

Again, they're not particularly good-looking, are they, so...

0:32:220:32:26

So... Let's say that they won't be missed.

0:32:260:32:30

In your household, if you're ugly, you go, don't you?

0:32:300:32:33

-I'm surprised I haven't gone, then.

-Oh!

0:32:330:32:37

Interesting lot and I can start the bidding here at £30.

0:32:370:32:40

At 30 and five do I see? At £30. 35?

0:32:400:32:43

With me at 30 and five do I see?

0:32:430:32:45

35. 40 and five, sir?

0:32:450:32:46

45, 50. And five?

0:32:460:32:48

55 do I see?

0:32:480:32:50

At 50 and five now.

0:32:500:32:51

It remains with me at £50.

0:32:510:32:53

Are we all sure? I'm going to sell it at that.

0:32:530:32:56

At 50. Absentee bid.

0:32:560:32:58

-£50.

-That's all right.

-It's under our lower estimate but is that OK?

-That's fine.

0:32:580:33:03

Not too disappointing.

0:33:030:33:05

I reckon Martin's not doing as badly as he thinks.

0:33:050:33:08

Well, it's been a bit up and down. The pottery hasn't gone too well.

0:33:090:33:13

No, the pottery's been a damp squib. Our moon flasks did OK, didn't they?

0:33:130:33:18

-That's true.

-But the art pottery, no takers.

0:33:180:33:21

All right. You're looking for £500 to build the memorial for Uncle Alex.

0:33:210:33:25

Obviously, we'd like to be at 250 at this point.

0:33:250:33:28

We're not quite there but you have made £208.

0:33:280:33:32

That's surprising. I'm really pleased with that.

0:33:320:33:34

It's a good start and there are other items to come,

0:33:340:33:37

so we'll keep our fingers crossed.

0:33:370:33:39

There are some very good items to come.

0:33:390:33:41

I think perhaps we deserve a break.

0:33:410:33:44

I'm going to take a look at a neat piece of furniture

0:33:440:33:47

-and, Jenny, I'll catch up with you in a bit.

-OK.

0:33:470:33:49

Now, if you've been inspired to try your hand at auction,

0:33:510:33:55

do bear in mind that there are charges to be paid,

0:33:550:33:57

including commission,

0:33:570:33:59

and they vary from one saleroom to another.

0:33:590:34:02

It's always worth enquiring in advance.

0:34:020:34:04

While Martin enjoys a refreshing cuppa,

0:34:060:34:08

John has spotted an unusual Edwardian combination.

0:34:080:34:12

-What have you found?

-Well, it's so cold in here today

0:34:120:34:15

I was drawn towards this little coal container,

0:34:150:34:18

thinking about warm open fires, Jenny.

0:34:180:34:20

Now, we've got a humble coal scuttle and we've got a whatnot

0:34:200:34:24

but I don't recall ever seeing such a combination.

0:34:240:34:27

So you'd put a vase of flowers or...?

0:34:270:34:29

It's a whatnot. Any little bits and pieces.

0:34:290:34:32

This would be perfect for the bedroom. Typically Edwardian.

0:34:320:34:35

Use of walnut, reeding and acanthus leaf carving.

0:34:350:34:38

But I just love these little three-quarter gallery shelving sections.

0:34:380:34:42

You said bedroom there. That's where you'd see this piece of furniture?

0:34:420:34:46

I think it's a small, compact piece,

0:34:460:34:49

perfect and dual purpose for a tight space.

0:34:490:34:52

I think it's a great thing and the best bit of all,

0:34:520:34:54

the auctioneers haven't printed an estimate

0:34:540:34:56

so they're not expecting it to do terribly well.

0:34:560:34:59

I think you could buy this for £50 and you'd have a real bargain.

0:34:590:35:02

So it might go for around £50?

0:35:020:35:04

If I could buy this for £50, I'd be very happy.

0:35:040:35:07

I couldn't wait to get home and try it out.

0:35:070:35:09

-OK. Well, let's get back to the auction.

-Come on, then.

0:35:090:35:12

Well, that curious item certainly caught the crowd's imagination, too,

0:35:130:35:17

as it sold for £110, not quite the bargain John had forecast.

0:35:170:35:23

Martin has five items left,

0:35:230:35:24

including the collection of gold rings from Mary's family

0:35:240:35:27

and that Japanese woodblock print

0:35:270:35:30

that already has a telephone bidder interested.

0:35:300:35:32

But his next lot on the podium is the Burmese brass tea set,

0:35:320:35:37

which belonged to his aunt and uncle,

0:35:370:35:39

priced at just £20-£30.

0:35:390:35:42

-Do you think it was ever used?

-I wouldn't think so, no.

0:35:420:35:45

I'm not sure they ever... My uncle liked a little tipple of whisky

0:35:450:35:49

but I think he used a tumbler rather than something like that.

0:35:490:35:52

£20 for it, please, 20.

0:35:520:35:54

£20, somewhere.

0:35:540:35:57

15.

0:35:570:35:58

15. 10.

0:35:590:36:01

Ooh, it's not going to go, I don't think.

0:36:010:36:03

Sorry, guys. I can't blame them, either.

0:36:030:36:06

-Oh, dear.

-Oh! That was a bit cheeky.

0:36:060:36:08

You'll be taking those home.

0:36:080:36:10

Looks like the car's going to be loaded up, Martin.

0:36:100:36:13

-Nobody wanted our tea set.

-Even the auctioneer didn't like them.

0:36:130:36:17

No.

0:36:170:36:18

Oh, dear. At least it's not a huge dent in our target

0:36:190:36:22

but we need better luck with Aunt Daphne's collection of jewellery.

0:36:220:36:26

Martin wouldn't want to take this lot back.

0:36:260:36:28

We're aiming for £100-£150.

0:36:280:36:31

Next up is our first lot of jewellery.

0:36:310:36:34

We've got some brooches and a nine-carat gold Albert chain.

0:36:340:36:37

With gold prices being buoyant,

0:36:370:36:38

this should go some way to clawing us back where we need to be.

0:36:380:36:42

I've said £100-£150. Let's see what the room thinks.

0:36:420:36:45

-Lots of bidding.

-Brilliant.

0:36:450:36:47

We've got a bid of 85, a bid of 90, a bid of 100,

0:36:470:36:50

a bid of 105,

0:36:500:36:52

a bid of 120 and higher.

0:36:520:36:56

So 130 has it. At 130. 140 do I see?

0:36:560:36:59

140, 150... 150 has it.

0:36:590:37:04

160 now? 150. 160 anywhere?

0:37:040:37:07

At £150. With me at 150.

0:37:070:37:10

-Oh, brilliant.

-That's good.

-That was a bit better, wasn't it?

0:37:120:37:15

That's improved a lot, yeah.

0:37:150:37:16

Right at the top of John's estimate. That's more like it.

0:37:160:37:20

Daphne obviously had an eye for fine jewellery.

0:37:200:37:23

Let's see if we can do as well

0:37:230:37:25

with the morning and evening art deco statues, priced at £30-£50.

0:37:250:37:30

These art deco statues, where are they from?

0:37:310:37:34

They were my other grandmother.

0:37:340:37:36

She used to have them on the hearth of her fireplace

0:37:360:37:40

and I always remember the story

0:37:400:37:41

where somebody offered some money for them

0:37:410:37:44

and she said it wasn't enough,

0:37:440:37:46

so let's hope that today, somebody makes a good offer.

0:37:460:37:49

I can start the bidding at £22. With that lovely bronze colour.

0:37:490:37:52

At 22, 25 now. Should be bids everywhere.

0:37:520:37:55

25, 28 and 30. 32, 35.

0:37:550:37:58

38 do I see? At 35. 38, do you want?

0:37:580:38:01

At £35. It's seated.

0:38:010:38:03

-Are you all sure?

-Come on!

0:38:030:38:05

At £35. Gentleman's bid and selling.

0:38:050:38:07

-35.

-Oh, your grandmother would not be happy.

0:38:080:38:11

-No, no, not really.

-But you are.

0:38:110:38:14

But she often exaggerated, anyway, so...

0:38:140:38:16

Luckily for us, John never exaggerates his estimates

0:38:160:38:20

and Martin is looking more relaxed now that the sale's nearly over.

0:38:200:38:24

The penultimate lot is one of John's favourites,

0:38:240:38:27

the Japanese woodblock print that Mary's mother bought.

0:38:270:38:30

It's valued at £100-£200.

0:38:300:38:33

The auctioneer said he has a telephone bid on this

0:38:330:38:36

and that's encouraging but we need a couple of bidders in the room.

0:38:360:38:41

-We want £100 at least.

-OK.

0:38:410:38:43

And I can start the bidding here at £80. 85 do I see to start it?

0:38:430:38:48

At £80 and five now.

0:38:480:38:50

At 80 and five anywhere?

0:38:500:38:52

85 nods. 85. 90 with me. 95 for you? 95, yes.

0:38:520:38:56

100. And five? 105.

0:38:560:38:59

110, 120.

0:38:590:39:01

120. I'm out. At £120 on the phone.

0:39:010:39:05

-120.

-At 120. 130 do I see?

0:39:050:39:08

At 120 with you.

0:39:080:39:10

-120. Well done.

-Well?

-There we are.

0:39:100:39:13

I feel vindicated for my earlier failings with the art pottery.

0:39:130:39:17

-£120. That's pretty good, isn't it?

-That's very good, yes.

0:39:170:39:21

I just need to find the other one that's in the garage now.

0:39:210:39:24

It's a great result and a fantastic addition to our funds.

0:39:240:39:29

The final lot is another from Mary's side of the family.

0:39:290:39:32

It's the collection of gold rings.

0:39:320:39:35

Together, they should make £200-£250.

0:39:350:39:38

Next up is our quantity of rings. We've got 13 in the lot.

0:39:390:39:43

It's a mixture of 9 and 18 carat.

0:39:430:39:45

Mary did take out the ones she wanted to give to family members

0:39:450:39:48

and this is the residue, the bottom end - a lot damaged rings and chipped stones.

0:39:480:39:52

-I think we've got a £200 reserve.

-Yes.

0:39:520:39:54

OK, well, gold's doing all right. We should get there.

0:39:540:39:57

-Lots and lots of interest...

-Lots and lots of interest!

0:39:570:40:01

We've got a bid of 200, 210, 220,

0:40:010:40:04

262, 270,

0:40:040:40:07

-280 has it.

-Wow!

0:40:070:40:09

-That's good.

-Brilliant.

0:40:090:40:11

At 280. 290 now.

0:40:110:40:12

290 on the phone. 300, 310 in the room.

0:40:120:40:15

320, 330 behind the pillar.

0:40:150:40:17

330 nodding. At 330 seated. 340 anywhere?

0:40:170:40:21

I'm out. At 330 seated.

0:40:210:40:24

-330.

-That's brilliant.

-What do you think of that?

0:40:250:40:28

I'm well pleased. I'll have to tell Mary we got 200 for it.

0:40:280:40:32

You!

0:40:320:40:34

Gold is certainly still selling high at the moment,

0:40:350:40:38

which has been great news for Martin today.

0:40:380:40:40

The question is, just how well has he done?

0:40:400:40:43

It's over! Done and dusted.

0:40:440:40:46

I really enjoyed that. That was fantastic.

0:40:460:40:48

-Did you?

-Yes. Some high and some low moments.

0:40:480:40:50

All right. At the start of the day we were hoping for £500

0:40:500:40:54

so you can build a memorial to Uncle Alex

0:40:540:40:56

-and so many of the pieces that we sold today belonged to him.

-Yes.

0:40:560:41:00

So it's the least he deserves, really.

0:41:000:41:02

OK, you have exceeded your target.

0:41:020:41:05

You have made £843.

0:41:050:41:08

Blooming hell.

0:41:080:41:10

Not sure what to say. That's amazing.

0:41:100:41:13

I didn't expect to make that at all. That is brilliant.

0:41:130:41:16

I will tell Mary the exact figure, don't worry.

0:41:160:41:19

Good luck. We've enjoyed being with you. You've been good fun.

0:41:190:41:22

-Thank you.

-Give our love to Mary.

-I will do.

0:41:220:41:24

-Tell her the truth.

-I'll phone her right away.

0:41:240:41:27

Since the auction, Martin's been preparing the garden

0:41:320:41:35

to make space for the new acquisition.

0:41:350:41:37

It was always my intention to get something in memory of my uncle

0:41:370:41:41

who died a couple of years ago.

0:41:410:41:43

I still have very fond memories of him

0:41:430:41:46

and it would be a nice gesture towards him if he's still looking down.

0:41:460:41:49

He's come to a garden centre to get some ideas

0:41:490:41:53

for what will be a fitting memorial to a man who meant so much to him.

0:41:530:41:56

This would sit very nice on a decked area

0:41:560:41:59

with the decking coming out in front of it.

0:41:590:42:01

Well, the next stage is, we're going to go back, re-measure up

0:42:010:42:06

get the base sorted out

0:42:060:42:08

and then we'll make our final decision.

0:42:080:42:11

He loved the garden, he loved being out in the country

0:42:110:42:15

and now we've got the chance to get something

0:42:150:42:18

that we feel is very fitting.

0:42:180:42:21

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:280:42:31

Martin Quilter has inherited heirlooms from his uncle Alex, and would like to sell them in order to create a memorial to him in the garden. He is joined by his fiancee Mary, Jennie Bond and John Cameron to look through the collectibles around their home in Leicestershire.


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