Bessey Cash in the Attic


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Bessey

Antiques series. One couple invite Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes to help clear out some clutter. They hope to raise enough to fund horse-riding lessons for their five grandchildren.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the programme that loves to join you in a rummage around your house

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looking for things to sell at auction that will pay for a special project or treat.

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The family we're about to meet have a very exciting experience in store for one of their grandchildren.

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Find out what it is when we go looking for cash in the attic!

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Coming up on Cash in the Attic,

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will Paul succeed in persuading the lady of the house

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to part with a treasured Victorian necklace?

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-It's something to think about.

-Yes, it is.

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It's tugging at the heartstrings there.

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Plus an unorthodox way of raising cash.

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Place your bets!

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And at auction, an unexpected online bid takes our breath away!

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-Start straight away at £55.

-Ooh, blimey!

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Be there for the final crack of the gavel!

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Today, I'm on the Lancashire coast,

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where I've come to meet Michael and Dorothy,

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a couple who really did have the courage to follow their dreams.

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In the 40 years that Mike and Dorothy Bessey have been married,

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they've dabbled in the property game, owned hotels,

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a care home for the elderly and even a restaurant.

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If that's not enough, they did it while Dorothy was a professional dancer.

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Now semi-retired, they love travelling and spending time with their grandchildren.

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Dorothy hopes the money we raise will go towards a special surprise outing

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for the whole family.

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Today I'm joined by our expert Paul Hayes

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whose keen eye will spot the belongings that should give the Besseys the best chance at auction.

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Mike, Dorothy!

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Obviously this is the hub of the family home and family business!

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-Yes.

-It certainly is.

-Everybody works in a scruffy office.

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That's how you get stuff done. I have to say,

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reading about you two, it strikes me that you're prepared to take on any adventure, every new opportunity.

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Nothing really daunts you, does it?

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No. If it's a challenge, we'll try it.

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There's lots to talk to you about later on, but why have you called in Cash in the Attic?

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Well, I have five grandchildren.

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On holiday a couple of years ago we went horse-riding.

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They've been riding again this year and they really enjoy it.

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So I thought we'll pay for them to have horse-riding lessons.

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-Did you get involved in the riding?

-Not me, but...

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Yes, they said, "Come on, Nana! You're getting on a horse."

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So we might get you on one again, then?

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If the children are there, they'll say, "Oh, yes!"

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-And I'll let her.

-You'll let her. Yes. Ready to pick up the pieces.

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I'll do that, all right, yes. She's welcome!

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-How much do you think this is going to cost?

-I'd like to raise £1,000.

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-A thousand?

-A thousand seems fair enough to me.

-Right.

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Paul Hayes is with me. He's having a rummage around

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to make sure we make that total. So shall we go and find him?

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OK.

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'It seems Dorothy's decided to provide riding lessons for all five of her grandchildren.

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'So we'd better crack on today to ensure we raise that £1,000.'

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Ah, hello. Look at this!

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Paul, this is Dorothy. I suppose this is one way of making the £1,000!

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Yes, could be. Are you all ready?

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Here we go.

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Place your bets!

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What are you doing with a full gaming set in the house?

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I bought it for Michael one Christmas. We've had a lot of fun.

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And we ended up taking it to our care home

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and letting the ladies have a little spin.

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But we've had a lot of fun with it.

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Parties we have, we have a little spin.

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I've lost millions!

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Sounds great in the care home because they were engaged in doing something,

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-thinking and using their minds.

-Yes, definitely.

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Everybody needs some sort of outlet and it was fun. They enjoyed it.

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-It's a bit untidy. The children have been playing there.

-Don't worry.

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-You've got a roulette wheel.

-That's roulette. Dominoes.

-Dominoes.

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-You can take this out and is it craps they call it?

-Yes, where you throw the dice.

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-And there's that.

-Backgammon.

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-Backgammon.

-And chess.

-And chess.

-It's a full compendium.

-It's good.

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People love these sort of things. It's a full compendium.

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If you don't use real money, they're great fun items.

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They date back to the 19th century when people used to entertain

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and have several tables in the house.

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But roulette is the newcomer. Chess and backgammon go back to the year dot.

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Nobody knows where they originated.

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But roulette was originated by mistake.

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A Frenchman was trying to develop the perpetual wheel which ran for ever.

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As it spins and spins around, the game of roulette was invented.

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The earliest known example is in the 18th century. There was a roulette table in the Palais Royal in Paris.

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So fortunes were won and lost. And have been since then.

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-Is this something we could sell at auction?

-This is a really nice one.

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The butterfly veneer which looks like a butterfly wing and the marquetry panel.

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-Beautiful.

-£500 we paid for it, about 20 years ago.

-There you go.

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-What do you think we might get for it?

-I think at least half your money.

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200 to £300. If someone takes a shine to it, maybe a bit more.

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Is that all right?

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-Yes. It would be nice if I got three for it.

-Fantastic.

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-Can I play a game now?

-Yes.

-How about a game of draughts? You open that door,

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-and I'll open this one. Draughts! Can you feel it?

-Oh!

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You can pretty much bet that Paul's always got a gag up his sleeve!

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While we've been clowning around, Mike has come across a 19th-century horse figurine.

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Dorothy's love of riding compelled her to buy this

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at an auction a few years ago.

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Paul thinks he can rein in the bidders

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if the price tag reads 40 to £60.

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In the spare room, I've come across a 19th-century oil painting.

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Titled The Temptation by R. Messonet,

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this piece was painted on a panel instead of canvas.

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It's slightly rough round the edges,

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and since it will need restoration,

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Paul has priced it at 30 to £50.

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Mike has found an unusual item that reminds him of Dorothy's touring days.

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Michael, what have you found? Oh, look at that.

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That's interesting, isn't it?

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-Can I have a look?

-Yep.

-Is it a commemorative medal?

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It looks like it. I think it's Swedish.

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-So who's got the Swedish connection?

-Nobody,

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but Dorothy was in a double act in Sweden at one time

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-and I think that's when she bought it.

-She bought it?

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I think she got it from an antiques shop.

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It didn't mean much to her, but she liked the look of it.

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-Has she worn it as a pendant, or...

-She has, from time to time.

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-But it's been in a box for a long time.

-How unusual. I've never seen anything like that.

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This does have a little mark just there. It says "guld".

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Which could be a Swedish mark for gold.

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Normally they go off the purity. They'd say 22 or 18 or nine.

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Nine carat as we know here in the UK. It looks quite a good medal.

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-It's got Gustaf Adolf. He was the king of Sweden.

-Right.

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He was Gustaf Adolf VI.

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Here, it says, "For langvarig trogen tjanst".

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That seems to me like it's long service for whatever.

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Yes. Because "for langvarig" sounds like "for long..." something. Service.

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What we need to do is determine what carat gold it is. That's very important.

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And then try and translate this into English so we know what it's been presented for.

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I've got my homework cut out here. But if we say at least 150 as it is.

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Assume everything's OK. How's that?

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-Sounds good.

-Great. So he's going to auction. I wonder how you say auction in Swedish?

-Not a clue!

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Apologies to all our Swedish-speaking viewers!

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I'm sure we'll translate it later!

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I've found something else that's travelled from its original Swedish home.

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An early 20th-century Ericsson telephone.

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Founded in 1876, Ericsson was one of the major phone suppliers to Scandinavia.

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Dorothy bought it with another wind-up model 43 years ago.

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She bought them for just ten shillings, but we hope

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to sell them for 50 to £80.

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Upstairs in the bedroom, Paul has come across a piece of jewellery.

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-Dorothy?

-Yes?

-Now, then.

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-This is a sovereign pendant. Was it yours, or Michael's?

-It's mine.

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Was it? I can just see Michael with an open-necked shirt, the Tom Selleck look!

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No, he wasn't like that! I used to wear it quite a lot.

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Mike bought it for me just after I had my son.

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-He actually bought me two.

-OK. What happened to the other one?

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-The other one's promised to my niece.

-OK.

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So this one, I'm not sure about it.

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It could go, but can I have a little think?

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Of course you can. But sovereigns are extremely popular.

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They've always been a form of bullion. If you took a bag of sovereigns to Africa or India,

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-they'd recognise it and people would trade with you.

-Right.

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It's solid gold and gold has always been a currency.

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Rumour has it at the moment that the American servicemen have bags of sovereigns on them

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in case they're caught and they can get themselves out of trouble.

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They're called a sovereign, that's the coin in the middle there,

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because they always had the portraits of the king or queen at the time.

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The original one was Henry VII.

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That was 1489.

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A long time ago.

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Very clever. In the 1960s and '70s,

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the fashion came for sovereign rings and pendants.

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Looks like this might have been mounted. Did you have it done?

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-No, that's how I bought it.

-Right.

-Or how Michael bought it, I must say.

-Right.

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What I like is that it's been sympathetically mounted.

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What happens is the sovereign sometimes is soldered to the mount.

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-So the metal would be ruined.

-I've seen that.

-Ruined.

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This one has been placed in these clamps here.

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So when you take the coin out it will be pristine. That's what people want.

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-1911. Does that mean anything to you? A family date?

-No.

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OK. It's the coronation, I think, of George V. He was crowned in 1911.

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This one is... Yeah, there we go. George V. That's him.

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Adding all that up, these are quite expensive now.

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For years, and I've been in the business over 20 years now,

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they've always been between 45 and £65 a sovereign.

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Nowadays, with gold being what it is,

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they bring in 120 or £130.

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So an item like this with its mount and its chain,

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you're looking at £150-plus.

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-It's something to think about.

-Yes.

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-It is.

-But it looks like it's tugging at the heartstrings!

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I don't blame you in the slightest.

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We'll tell Angela it's going, but between me and you, it might not get there!

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OK. Let's keep looking.

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That sum would certainly go a long way towards Dorothy's target

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of £1,000 for her grandchildren's riding lessons.

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So, while Paul carries on with the rummage,

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I'm curious to find out more about this couple's fascinating past.

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Dorothy, I did say you and Michael have had a fascinating life.

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Lots to talk about.

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You started out as a dancer, for which you had a real passion.

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I have, still!

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It's all I wanted to do.

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My father said, "If you go into show business,

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"you'll always be hard up.

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"Get a dancing school."

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I said, "Dad, I would do it if they fed me and watered me.

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"I would want to do it."

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I didn't want a dancing school.

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-You've worked with some of the greats in the entertainment industry.

-Yes, yes.

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I still keep contact with Ken Dodd, who I've known since I was 19.

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He's one of my favourite people.

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But yes, I've worked with a lot of big names.

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-Weren't you in a film with Laurence Olivier?

-I was. I was working the Winter Gardens in Morecambe.

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They were going to film The Entertainer. I auditioned for that.

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-And I got into that film.

-But didn't you get thrown off the set?

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-Don't want to talk about that!

-What happened?

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Well, they picked two of us to do close-ups

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when Roger Livesey was doing the dying scene at the side of the stage.

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They said, "This is what we need you to do, girls." My big acting bit!

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The other girl was fantastic.

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So they said, "You've got to go...like somebody's dying."

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She went, "Oh!"

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And I came and got a fit of the giggles and went...

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They said, "Cut! Do it again!"

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Then I came on again. Serious.

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SHE GIGGLES

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I can't say just what he said, but he said, "If you can't do this, get the...out of here!

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-He sacked me.

-It was your big moment!

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-Gone!

-I could have been a star!

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While all this was going on,

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-you were in the Royal Navy?

-I was, indeed.

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I did 11 years. Two years boys' time and nine years with the Fleet.

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So you joined the navy and saw the world.

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-That's exactly what I did.

-But you were a sportsman.

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I used to play for United Services in hockey and cricket.

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So all the year round, virtually, I was able to play sports.

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So if you had been in the navy and Dorothy was travelling all over Europe as a dancer,

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how the heck did you get to meet?

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Ah. When I came out of the RN,

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I got a job as a manager with Top Rank.

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They sent me down to Paignton, to a bingo hall of all places,

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which was just across the road from the nightclub that Dorothy was going to appear in.

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And that's where we met.

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Singing and dancing.

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More singing than dancing.

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Clearly, it was meant to be a match,

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because you've been married for over 40 years.

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42... Nearly 42 years.

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42 years! Whatever it is, it's a great combination.

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It clearly works for you both.

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Let's hope you can sprinkle some of that stardust that you've brought to your lives and careers

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when we get to the auction.

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-Shall we go and find Paul?

-Yep.

-Yep.

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'What a lovely twist of fate that brought Michael and Dorothy together all those years ago!

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'Paul has been busy and has uncovered an unusual silver cruet set from the 1900s.

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'It's lined with green glass.

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'The six-piece condiment set was used by Dorothy's family for years

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'and Paul sets the price at 75 to £100.

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'Now, Dorothy's done some fine work in finding this 1960s vase.

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'Made by Moorcroft, it displays the classic hand-painted floral work

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'for which the company is best known.

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'Paul thinks a collector will be drawn to this piece for 100 to £150.'

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Wow!

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Mike, I found these bits and pieces that have got Concorde written on them!

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-Yep.

-You must have flown on Concorde!

-We did, indeed.

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We did a round-the-world trip

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and we flew from New York to home on Concorde.

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-It was such an amazing experience to fly Concorde, wasn't it?

-Absolutely brilliant.

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A bit claustrophobic, but then it has to be.

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-Well, it was a narrow plane.

-Yeah.

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-It had to be to go as fast as it did!

-Absolutely.

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But what a brilliant flight. Three and a quarter hours from New York to London!

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Did you get that frisson of excitement when the captain says,

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"Ladies and gentlemen, we are now travelling at twice the speed of sound."

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I think it was great. You can feel the thrust.

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Because they're only allowed to go so fast over land.

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Then they can go supersonic. Brilliant.

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We've got some bits and pieces here. You used to get wonderful goody bags.

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What did you get in your goody bag?

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That in itself was just opera binoculars.

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-Yes.

-As there were four of us, we all got one.

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-Yes.

-And obviously the details of the flight,

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menus, a diary they gave you.

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-So a memento.

-A memento of our round-the-world trip.

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Are things like this collectable?

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A lot of people are very interested in aviation

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and Concorde has to be number one. A couple of items like that, you're looking at least 50 to £100.

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If two people take a shine to them, they could go supersonic!

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-That'd be good.

-Not bad, is it?

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'We can only hope our items will fly out of the auction house that fast!'

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We're only taxi-ing now!

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'In the meantime, Dorothy's been busy hunting through drawers

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'and has come across this modern opal ring.

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'Surrounded by 18-carat gold, Dorothy fell in love with this at an auction.

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'But she hasn't worn it much since.

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'Paul thinks someone will happily take it off her hands for 100 to £150.

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'All day we've been searching for the best items to take to auction

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'in order to raise that £1,000 for Dorothy to give her grandchildren riding lessons.

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'In the hallway, Paul's eye is drawn to a portrait that has distinct possibilities.'

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-Hello, Paul.

-Ah.

-You're looking at that picture we found in the hotel.

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-Where was your hotel?

-Ambleside.

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Sure nobody had put it in the attic to stay forever young, a painting of Dorian Grey?

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-No, no.

-Not been left there deliberately?

-No.

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We just found it there when we were clearing out

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-and thought we'd take it with us anyway.

-Right.

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There are artist's initials here, RWB. 1897.

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At the time when this was painted it was very expensive to have a portrait done.

0:18:300:18:35

The only way to do it was to commission an artist

0:18:350:18:38

and you'd sit for them and it would cost an absolute fortune.

0:18:380:18:41

By this time, we had a wonderful modern invention called photography.

0:18:410:18:46

-Right.

-What would happen is for a few pounds you could have your photo done.

0:18:460:18:50

That could be blown up, put onto canvas and the artist would colour that in and bring it to life.

0:18:500:18:56

It was a lot more affordable and very realistic.

0:18:560:18:59

The reason I can tell this is if you look at her hairline there,

0:18:590:19:03

the grey's coming through. That's the greyness of the photo.

0:19:030:19:06

Her eyes are far too real. This would be an extremely good painting if they were real.

0:19:060:19:11

So the whole thing would have been black and white and tinted after.

0:19:110:19:14

-I quite like the little capsules of time.

-Yeah.

0:19:140:19:18

It looks great in the hall here. Is it something you'd send to auction?

0:19:180:19:22

Yes, it hasn't got any personal value to us, so, yeah, why not?

0:19:220:19:26

-Sure?

-Yep.

-OK.

0:19:260:19:28

It's a lovely frame as well. Gilded frames are always popular.

0:19:280:19:32

It's a painted photograph. You're looking 80 to £120.

0:19:320:19:37

-Does that sound OK?

-Absolutely fine.

-If someone puts in their attic,

0:19:370:19:41

-they can stay forever young!

-Good!

0:19:410:19:44

'From what we've found so far,

0:19:460:19:47

'it's clear Mike and Dorothy have a talent for spotting interesting artefacts.

0:19:470:19:52

'These shelves are lined with collectibles and one in particular has caught my eye.'

0:19:520:19:57

That's by Stinton and it's Royal Worcester.

0:19:570:20:02

-Where did you get it?

-I bought it at an auction.

0:20:020:20:05

Is it going to go back to an auction?

0:20:060:20:09

-Yes, I'd let that go.

-You're letting it go?

-Yes.

0:20:090:20:12

We should call Paul so he can have a good look at this.

0:20:120:20:15

Paul?

0:20:150:20:16

Mike?

0:20:160:20:18

Dorothy bought this rather nice looking vase at auction.

0:20:180:20:22

-Do you remember how much you paid for it?

-Yes. £250.

0:20:220:20:26

-Did she get a bargain?

-You got an absolute bargain.

0:20:260:20:29

This is the Holy Grail in terms of ceramics.

0:20:290:20:32

It's Royal Worcester. But more importantly, it's the work of John or James Stinton.

0:20:320:20:37

-Did you know that?

-Yes, I did. It's signed underneath.

-There we are.

0:20:370:20:41

J.Stinton in the corner there.

0:20:410:20:43

They were a family of decorators at the Worcester factory.

0:20:430:20:49

They perfected the art of Highland cattle or game birds,

0:20:490:20:53

falcons and that sort of thing.

0:20:530:20:54

The cattle is one of the most desirable ranges that they did.

0:20:540:20:58

-It's the best of its range, really. Amazing stuff.

-It's really nice.

0:20:580:21:03

At the time, lots of painters who worked for different factories weren't allowed to sign their work.

0:21:030:21:08

So you have to attribute them to an artist.

0:21:080:21:11

What's great about Worcester is that they are clearly signed so you can say that's definitely a Stinton.

0:21:110:21:17

-It's a genuine item.

-It's got a lovely quality to it.

0:21:170:21:19

The misty glens with the bridge in the background.

0:21:190:21:23

You feel like you're in the Highlands.

0:21:230:21:26

You do. That's part of the charm, actually. It's realistic.

0:21:260:21:29

There's a secret, I don't know if it's folklore or a myth,

0:21:290:21:33

John Stinton, who first started to paint these items,

0:21:330:21:37

never actually saw real Highland cattle in the flesh.

0:21:370:21:40

He got his inspiration from photos and postcards.

0:21:400:21:43

So he didn't know what the feet looked like.

0:21:430:21:46

So it's extremely rare to find any of his cattle paintings with the feet visible!

0:21:460:21:51

They're always in heather or long grass!

0:21:510:21:53

-One of the things you find in his work.

-A very wise man!

0:21:530:21:56

-A very wise man.

-Couldn't be caught out.

-No!

0:21:560:21:59

She paid £250 originally. How long ago was that, Dorothy?

0:22:000:22:04

-1991.

-How much do you think it might make now?

0:22:040:22:08

This is absolutely superb. It's known as blush ivory,

0:22:080:22:12

these wonderful warm colours.

0:22:120:22:14

The pierced work along the top with real gilding.

0:22:140:22:17

-And the Royal Worcester stamp. Do you know how to date them?

-No.

0:22:170:22:20

Royal Worcester, they put their dot for the year 1891

0:22:200:22:24

and a dot every year since.

0:22:240:22:26

So if I count these dots. One, two, three, four, five...

0:22:260:22:29

..seven, eight, nine, ten, 11. So this was made in 1902, 1903, that sort of time.

0:22:290:22:35

Isn't that amazing? At the turn of the century.

0:22:350:22:38

These are so in demand. I can't stress how recognisable these are.

0:22:380:22:41

That in auction today would create such a lot of interest.

0:22:410:22:46

-I can imagine between 400 and £600. Something like that.

-Very good!

0:22:460:22:52

-How does that sound to you, Mike?

-Not a bad profit!

0:22:520:22:56

-That's super.

-Why didn't I buy it?

0:22:560:22:59

Excellent.

0:22:590:23:00

That's a lovely note on which to end.

0:23:000:23:02

I'll be realistic and take the lowest estimate Paul gave. £400.

0:23:020:23:07

Let me add that to the other things you've looked at, taking the lowest price.

0:23:070:23:11

I know you want to raise £1,000 for the riding lessons,

0:23:110:23:15

but I think there's going to be enough left over for you to have lessons as well, Dorothy!

0:23:150:23:20

And maybe even drag Mike along,

0:23:200:23:22

because we should be able to make £1,425.

0:23:220:23:28

-Brilliant.

-Good heavens! That would be good.

-That's all right!

0:23:280:23:31

Lovely. Thank you very much.

0:23:310:23:33

But we'll have to wait to see what happens when we get to auction.

0:23:330:23:37

Who would have thought that the small Royal Worcester vase

0:23:370:23:41

would be worth quite as much as that?

0:23:410:23:43

It could make a real difference to their fortunes on sale day.

0:23:430:23:46

Along with the Concorde memorabilia.

0:23:460:23:49

At 50 to £100, we'll hopefully attract a few aviation enthusiasts.

0:23:490:23:53

And there's the fully-loaded games table.

0:23:530:23:55

At 200 to £300, that price could increase our odds of a sale.

0:23:550:24:00

Finally, the stunning Worcester vase.

0:24:000:24:03

At 400 to £600, this rare design

0:24:030:24:06

will undoubtedly draw the attention of big collectors.

0:24:060:24:09

Still to come on Cash in the Attic,

0:24:090:24:12

some of Mike and Dorothy's collectibles have come with a few optional extras!

0:24:120:24:16

-These come with a lot of dust on them.

-You've seen my garage!

0:24:160:24:20

Yes, I have! Dust is extra, here.

0:24:200:24:23

And one find brought to the table proves to be a surprising hit!

0:24:230:24:27

-Fantastic!

-Good heavens!

0:24:270:24:30

It's been quite a while since we joined Michael and Dorothy at home on the Lancashire coast.

0:24:350:24:41

They're a lovely couple and have achieved so much in their lives,

0:24:410:24:44

that I think it's terrific they now want to raise money

0:24:440:24:48

to take their grandchildren on a very special day out.

0:24:480:24:52

We've brought all their things to sell here at auction at Silverwoods of Lancashire.

0:24:520:24:58

We hope they'll exceed their £1,000 target.

0:24:580:25:00

But as always, it's now in the hands of the bidders.

0:25:000:25:04

These auction rooms are always teeming with buyers.

0:25:040:25:08

Let's hope Mike and Dorothy's items will cause a stir today. Paul's already here,

0:25:080:25:14

having a closer look at that Swedish gold medal that Dorothy bought on her travels.

0:25:140:25:20

Hi, Paul. How's your Swedish?

0:25:200:25:22

It's improving since last time I saw you!

0:25:220:25:24

We knew one thing about it,

0:25:240:25:26

that Gustaf Adolf was the king of Sweden in the early 20th century.

0:25:260:25:30

But the inscription on the back reads,

0:25:300:25:32

"From the Patriotic Society", which was set up in the 18th century,

0:25:320:25:37

and it's presented to Aldot Andersson for long and faithful service.

0:25:370:25:42

The Patriotic Society promoted Sweden in the international market.

0:25:420:25:46

He may have been a businessman, an MP, or equivalent.

0:25:460:25:50

So it's a good deed for a long time and he's been awarded the medal.

0:25:500:25:54

Who'll be interested in buying a Swedish medal here in Lancashire?

0:25:540:25:58

Military medals are always collectible. This is a civil medal

0:25:580:26:02

but it's solid gold, and with us being on the internet today,

0:26:020:26:05

we could have bids from Sweden. Who knows! It could have international appeal.

0:26:050:26:09

Shall we go and see Dorothy and Michael? They've just arrived.

0:26:090:26:13

Since our rummage at their home, Dorothy has had a change of heart over selling the sovereign.

0:26:150:26:20

So we're already down £150 on target.

0:26:200:26:22

We've also discovered that the Worcester vase that Paul valued at 400 to £600

0:26:220:26:28

has had some repair work done to the rim.

0:26:280:26:31

This has reduced the estimate to between 300 and £400.

0:26:310:26:36

I hope we can still make that £1,000 target.

0:26:360:26:38

There is quite a bit of excitement about this, Paul?

0:26:380:26:41

The name Stinton, the Royal Worcester combination, it's a wonderful item.

0:26:410:26:46

We've protected it with a reserve.

0:26:460:26:47

-And the reserve amount was?

-£300.

0:26:470:26:50

-I think it's worth that, and three is my lucky number, so let's see.

-Right.

0:26:500:26:54

Shall we put it back up, in good company with the horn!

0:26:540:26:58

Let's take our places. It's beginning to fill up

0:26:580:27:01

and we should get on with the auction.

0:27:010:27:04

If you'd like to raise money by selling at auction,

0:27:050:27:08

remember that salerooms may charge fees such as commission.

0:27:080:27:11

Prices vary, so do enquire in advance.

0:27:110:27:14

It's time for the bidding to begin.

0:27:140:27:16

Our first item is the Moorcroft vase.

0:27:160:27:18

-Moorcroft pottery is a favourite of yours, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:27:180:27:22

I'm very fond of it. I've got four nice pieces, all the same colour.

0:27:220:27:26

-But this one doesn't match.

-So it's got to go.

-Yes.

0:27:260:27:29

There are other Moorcroft pieces here. Was she having a look?

0:27:290:27:33

She did, actually, and I tried to pull her away from it.

0:27:330:27:37

I had to make an excuse to get her away!

0:27:370:27:40

The excuse is she's here to sell today! That's nice and easy!

0:27:400:27:44

-We've got 100 to 150 on this, Paul.

-This is a modern Moorcroft. Not the original William Moorcroft.

0:27:440:27:50

But it is a very attractive vase and it is amongst friends.

0:27:500:27:53

We want around £100 for this.

0:27:530:27:55

But no bidding!

0:27:550:27:57

Start me at what for this? £100 anywhere?

0:27:570:27:59

100. I have 50 on the pad. 50 bid. 50 and five, if you like.

0:27:590:28:04

55. £60. 65.

0:28:040:28:06

65. £70. 75?

0:28:060:28:08

At £70 bid. Looking for 75. 75. And 80?

0:28:080:28:12

75. 80.

0:28:120:28:14

85, now.

0:28:140:28:16

90. 95? I've 90 in the room.

0:28:160:28:19

95 on screen.

0:28:190:28:20

100. 100. And ten?

0:28:200:28:23

At £100. Looking for 110. £100 in the room. Anywhere else? At £100 now.

0:28:230:28:29

-Dead on!

-£100 for that tiny little vase!

0:28:290:28:33

You may not have liked it, but it was a good buy!

0:28:330:28:36

That's bang on target with our estimate. But it's early days yet.

0:28:370:28:41

There are plenty more lots to sell

0:28:410:28:43

before reaching that target of £1,000

0:28:430:28:45

for the horse-riding lessons for the grandchildren.

0:28:450:28:49

This is hold on to your hats time because the lovely Royal Worcester is coming up.

0:28:490:28:53

We hope it's going to do very well.

0:28:530:28:55

We have a reserve of £300 and you valued it at more than that?

0:28:550:29:00

The combination of Stinton and Royal Worcester, it's textbook stuff.

0:29:000:29:04

What I've noticed, this explains it, in the catalogue it says "rim restored".

0:29:040:29:09

It had some restoration on the top, which explains it.

0:29:090:29:12

-Which we hadn't noticed.

-I never picked up on it.

0:29:120:29:14

We want 300 to 400, with a reserve of 300.

0:29:140:29:16

Let's see how we get on. There could be a herd of buyers!

0:29:160:29:21

We'll start this one straightaway at £300.

0:29:210:29:24

300. And 20 if you like.

0:29:240:29:27

At £300 on the pad. At 300.

0:29:270:29:30

Looking for 320. At £300, and 320 from any of you?

0:29:300:29:34

At £300 and 320 this time, then, now?

0:29:340:29:37

All quite sure? Anybody else?

0:29:370:29:39

All done at £300.

0:29:390:29:42

-It did well.

-You made your reserve.

0:29:420:29:45

£300. Happy with that?

0:29:450:29:48

Very happy. Very happy.

0:29:480:29:50

The auctioneer was dead right to put 300 to 400 on that, being slightly damaged.

0:29:500:29:55

-You were right to put your reserve.

-Yes.

-Well done.

-I'm happy with that.

0:29:550:29:59

In spite of the restoration work on the rim,

0:29:590:30:03

it hasn't put the bidder off paying our reserve price.

0:30:030:30:06

Something that's definitely not antique now.

0:30:060:30:08

The Concorde memorabilia. This is a wonderful collection.

0:30:080:30:12

Such a rare item. You were lucky to fly on Concorde.

0:30:120:30:14

Yes, we did. And it was quite an experience flying in that.

0:30:140:30:18

-We've got 50 to £100 on this, Paul.

-Yes.

0:30:180:30:22

I think that's a good long-term investment.

0:30:220:30:24

Someone pays £50, puts it away for a couple of generations

0:30:240:30:28

and who knows what it might be worth? But £50 today.

0:30:280:30:30

Who'll start me at what for this?

0:30:300:30:32

£60, any of you? 60 for the lot.

0:30:320:30:35

60, any of you? 50, then?

0:30:350:30:37

£50? 50 bid.

0:30:370:30:39

-We're in.

-£50.

0:30:390:30:42

Back of the room and 55?

0:30:420:30:43

At £50. And 55? I'll take 55. Come on, we're only taxi-ing now!

0:30:430:30:47

55? Anybody else want a go or are you sure on a maiden bid?

0:30:500:30:54

All finished at £50.

0:30:550:30:57

Well, good.

0:30:570:31:00

-I'm pleased with that.

-You are?

-Absolutely.

0:31:000:31:02

-Wouldn't buy you a ticket on Concorde!

-No!

0:31:020:31:04

Wouldn't buy you a drink now!

0:31:040:31:06

With Concorde now sadly a thing of the past,

0:31:060:31:09

enjoying this memorabilia is the next best thing.

0:31:090:31:12

A collection like this can only grow in value.

0:31:120:31:15

Despite reaching all of Paul's estimates up until now,

0:31:150:31:19

our dark horse comes in with a disappointing result.

0:31:190:31:22

Let's hope the next lot rings all the right bells.

0:31:220:31:25

When I was rummaging in your garage,

0:31:250:31:27

I found these two old telephones.

0:31:270:31:30

The expression on your face, Michael!

0:31:300:31:32

-You don't think much of them, do you?

-No, I don't! Horrible!

0:31:320:31:37

You never actually used them, having bought them in Sweden.

0:31:370:31:40

I bought them because I liked them.

0:31:400:31:43

I must be odd because I was only 22, 23, and I used to buy old things.

0:31:430:31:49

I didn't buy clothes. I was a collector, you know. So...

0:31:490:31:52

-Well, these come with quite a lot of dust on them.

-You've seen my garage!

-Yes.

0:31:520:31:57

Dust is extra, here!

0:31:570:31:58

So are we being a bit ambitious with 50 to £80, Paul?

0:31:580:32:03

I don't think so at all. These are collectors' items, and well may you scoff!

0:32:030:32:07

Remember, this is 1908. A time before most people would have telephones.

0:32:070:32:12

Anything that's early in technology has a following interest.

0:32:120:32:16

With the internet being here today, you watch this space.

0:32:160:32:19

-We will!

-We'll say 50 to £80.

0:32:190:32:21

-Let's hope...

-Let's hope.

0:32:210:32:23

It's ironic. The internet is the new telephone.

0:32:230:32:26

This is how it started.

0:32:260:32:28

I'll start these straightaway at £55.

0:32:280:32:31

Blimey!

0:32:310:32:33

At 55, various interests. Where's 60 for these?

0:32:330:32:36

At 55, and 60 now. 60 on-screen. 65.

0:32:360:32:39

-On the internet!

-70, now? 65 with me.

0:32:390:32:41

70 we're looking for. At £65,

0:32:410:32:44

£70. 75 again.

0:32:440:32:46

75 and 80? At £75 on the pad.

0:32:460:32:50

All done at £75? 80.

0:32:500:32:53

80 on-screen. £80. Where's 85 now?

0:32:530:32:55

At £80 only bid.

0:32:550:32:57

85 quickly? All done?

0:32:570:32:59

Online at £80.

0:32:590:33:02

There you go!

0:33:020:33:04

Do you remember how much you paid for them?

0:33:040:33:07

One was given to me. The other I gave the equivalent of ten shillings.

0:33:070:33:12

Ten shillings, which is 50p.

0:33:120:33:14

-There we go.

-50p and you've made £80.

-I don't believe it!

0:33:140:33:20

-That's a fantastic result!

-It is!

-The dust!

0:33:200:33:24

-It's the dust that's done it!

-It's the dust!

0:33:240:33:27

Tell you what, we've had quite a bit of dust today

0:33:270:33:30

and it's all totting up.

0:33:300:33:32

-You're trying to raise £1,000 today.

-Yes.

0:33:320:33:34

And so far, we are over the halfway point.

0:33:340:33:39

-Because you've made £550.

-Really?

-That's good!

-Are we that far?

0:33:390:33:45

You're halfway into the saddle! But we've still got lots of wonderful things to come.

0:33:450:33:50

Go and take a rest and we'll see you back in a second.

0:33:500:33:53

Good.

0:33:530:33:55

At the break, Paul notices it's not just Mike and Dorothy who have something for plane spotters.

0:33:570:34:03

It's no good, Paul, you won't get to fly on Concorde!

0:34:030:34:06

What a shame! It's amazing, another piece of memorabilia.

0:34:060:34:09

What I like is it's got a signed photograph of Brian Trubshaw

0:34:090:34:14

who was the first test pilot, which is amazing.

0:34:140:34:17

And a cheque book that was issued from NatWest bank. What a novelty. A great thing to have.

0:34:170:34:23

Someone else will have to write a cheque to buy this. How much will they pay?

0:34:230:34:27

It's in the auction at between 80 and £120.

0:34:270:34:30

A future long-term investment.

0:34:300:34:31

It's great cos it goes with our items as well.

0:34:310:34:34

If we get a couple of bidders, it could be supersonic!

0:34:340:34:37

It's amazing how many times Paul thinks he can get away with that joke!

0:34:390:34:43

Mike and Dorothy were lucky to make their estimate for their Concorde memorabilia

0:34:430:34:47

as this item didn't make the guide price when it went under the hammer.

0:34:470:34:51

So far, things are looking good for Mike and Dorothy.

0:34:510:34:55

At this rate, it won't be long before the grandchildren can saddle up.

0:34:550:34:59

Dorothy's opal ring proves to be a sure-fire hit with the bidders

0:34:590:35:03

as it sells for Paul's top estimate.

0:35:030:35:05

We have the Swedish medal that you bought and we did some research before we came.

0:35:070:35:13

Now we know to whom it was presented and why.

0:35:130:35:16

But presumably, Paul, people will be interested in it

0:35:160:35:19

not just because it's Swedish but because it is pure gold.

0:35:190:35:22

Let's hope so. I've never seen a medal like this before.

0:35:220:35:25

It has that unique collectability and it's solid gold, anyway.

0:35:250:35:29

But £150, let's see how the internet comes in.

0:35:290:35:32

Could be a live line from a sauna in Sweden!

0:35:320:35:35

It is the long service medal, 18-carat gold.

0:35:370:35:41

Who'll start? It's crested. Who'll start me for this one?

0:35:410:35:45

150 for this. 150, any of you?

0:35:450:35:48

-£100. 100. 110.

-100 already.

0:35:480:35:51

-At £100 and 110 now for this medal.

-It's a dark horse.

0:35:510:35:54

110. 110. 120.

0:35:540:35:56

120. 130.

0:35:560:35:58

130. 140? 140. 150?

0:35:580:36:01

At £140 and 150 where else?

0:36:010:36:04

At £140, all done?

0:36:040:36:07

At 140.

0:36:070:36:09

There we go. Just underneath there. Interesting, though.

0:36:090:36:13

-Do you remember how much you paid for that?

-The equivalent of £8.

0:36:130:36:17

-I found it in a junk shop.

-Good lord!

0:36:170:36:20

Eight pounds. And 140 is what you've just sold it at!

0:36:200:36:24

With that profit margin, I'd say this bit of Swedish royal history was definitely a good return.

0:36:240:36:30

Next on the table is the elegant silver cruet set.

0:36:310:36:34

I like these. Not only were they silver,

0:36:340:36:36

and we've dated them to 1905, 1907,

0:36:360:36:39

but they had the green glass linings

0:36:390:36:42

which you don't see. You see more blue.

0:36:420:36:45

At 75 and 80 I'll take.

0:36:450:36:46

£80. 85. £90. 95?

0:36:460:36:49

100. And ten.

0:36:490:36:51

110. 120?

0:36:510:36:54

-I have 110 at the back.

-Is he going again?

0:36:540:36:56

120. New bidder. 120.

0:36:560:36:58

130? 130. 140. 150?

0:36:580:37:02

At £140. 150? Anybody else then, now?

0:37:020:37:06

All quite sure this time?

0:37:060:37:08

At £140.

0:37:080:37:10

-Very good! Brilliant!

-We had that in at 75 to £100.

0:37:100:37:15

-Excellent.

-A really good result.

-Absolutely splendid.

0:37:150:37:19

-That one really cut the mustard!

-Oh...

0:37:190:37:21

Paul's gags are wearing down even Michael and Dorothy!

0:37:220:37:25

Still, three lots left to go, and next up is the painting.

0:37:250:37:29

It's the turn of that lovely portrait of the little girl

0:37:300:37:33

-that was in your hallway.

-Yes.

0:37:330:37:36

-This was cleverly painted cos it was a photograph. Remember?

-Yes.

0:37:360:37:39

It was highlighted. To the untrained eye, it looks great.

0:37:390:37:43

-You don't know who this lady was?

-No, we don't.

0:37:430:37:46

We found her in the attic of a hotel we had in Ambleside.

0:37:460:37:50

I liked her and took her home with me!

0:37:500:37:52

OK. 1897 it's dated and there is a monogram, but it is a photograph. But it looks pleasing.

0:37:520:37:59

100 this time. 100. 80, then?

0:37:590:38:02

50, if you like. Straight in at £50.

0:38:020:38:05

-No-one likes her.

-30?

0:38:050:38:06

£30? 20 bid. 20 and two?

0:38:080:38:11

At £20 and 22 where?

0:38:110:38:12

At £20. 22.

0:38:120:38:14

25. 28? 28 I'll take.

0:38:140:38:16

At 28. £30. 32.

0:38:160:38:19

32?

0:38:190:38:20

32. 35. 38?

0:38:200:38:23

38. At 35. Give me 38 now?

0:38:230:38:27

All done at £35?

0:38:270:38:29

All done at £35.

0:38:290:38:31

That's OK for something stuck in the attic!

0:38:320:38:35

That's where it was.

0:38:350:38:37

-Yes.

-Literally.

0:38:370:38:38

-You got £35 cash for that attic thing.

-It's good.

0:38:380:38:41

-It'll do me!

-That'll do us.

0:38:410:38:44

Our mystery girl in the painting

0:38:440:38:46

may not have brought out the big bidders,

0:38:460:38:49

but at least Mike seems happy she's out of his attic.

0:38:490:38:52

I must admit, I am a strange person, I realise that,

0:38:520:38:56

but I think this is a cracking painting.

0:38:560:38:58

It's called The Temptation, by R.Messonet, who I haven't heard of.

0:38:580:39:03

We're looking at 30 to £50. There's something nice about it.

0:39:030:39:07

Is someone going to buy it so they can restore it,

0:39:070:39:10

or would they like that damaged look?

0:39:100:39:13

I'm not a big fan of restoration.

0:39:130:39:15

It can make things look too new. In the trade they say they'll give it a wipe over. OK.

0:39:150:39:21

£50 for it. 50 for it.

0:39:210:39:23

30, then. £20, if you like.

0:39:230:39:25

I thought he'd start higher.

0:39:250:39:27

A little oil on panel there. 20, quickly? 15?

0:39:270:39:30

At £15 and 18 where?

0:39:300:39:32

-Fantastic.

-18. 18. £20. 22 now?

0:39:320:39:36

-22. 25.

-I can't believe it.

0:39:360:39:38

-Who'll give me 25? At 22 and 25 where?

-I don't want to take it home.

0:39:380:39:42

22 and 25, anybody else, then?

0:39:420:39:44

All done at £22.

0:39:440:39:47

Eight pounds below what we thought it might make.

0:39:470:39:49

-That's fine.

-What the heck!

0:39:490:39:52

Exactly! You're in a selling mood, aren't you, Michael?

0:39:520:39:55

OK. Here we go. Listen to this for a description.

0:39:550:39:58

"A continental marquetry inlaid games table of canted square form.

0:39:580:40:01

"The lift-off reversible top encloses sliding covers

0:40:010:40:04

-"fitted for roulette, backgammon, chess, et cetera."

-It's all there!

0:40:040:40:09

Sounds good!

0:40:090:40:11

This is a great bit of fun.

0:40:110:40:13

-There's a reserve on this.

-£200.

-£200. Let's hope it's a good bet for someone!

0:40:130:40:17

Spin the wheel, here we go!

0:40:170:40:20

I'll start this one straightaway at £130.

0:40:200:40:23

-130. 140?

-130 bid on it!

0:40:230:40:25

130. 140, now for the games table? 140. 150.

0:40:250:40:30

160. 170.

0:40:300:40:32

180. 190. 200.

0:40:320:40:34

You're up to your 200 reserve.

0:40:340:40:36

-190 on the pad. 200, if you like.

-Oh, is he?

-Anybody else, then?

0:40:360:40:40

At 190. And 200? Are you all quite sure? At £190.

0:40:400:40:44

-Will he sell for 190?

-200 this time? Are you sure? 200.

0:40:440:40:47

200. At £200. And 210? You've gone red now!

0:40:470:40:52

At £200. 210, anybody else?

0:40:520:40:55

All done at £200.

0:40:550:40:57

Terrific. You've made your reserve.

0:40:580:41:00

You don't have to take it back with you.

0:41:000:41:02

I don't think we've got room.

0:41:020:41:05

You were so lucky there. He stopped at 190.

0:41:050:41:08

Technically, he could have said unsold.

0:41:080:41:10

That £10 made all the difference.

0:41:100:41:13

I'm glad he didn't. You don't have to take it back.

0:41:130:41:16

But what you are going to take back

0:41:160:41:18

-is a cheque for a very respectable £1,237.

-Brilliant!

-Ooh!

0:41:180:41:24

-So you wanted 1,000.

-I thought we'd make about 1,000.

0:41:240:41:27

-I'm pleased with that.

-That's wonderful.

-The extra money

0:41:270:41:31

you can use to do what?

0:41:310:41:33

We're going to give some to the RSPCA in Blackpool.

0:41:330:41:39

-There's a horse sanctuary there.

-That's a lovely thought.

0:41:390:41:42

Have a great day riding. We might get you in the saddle, Michael!

0:41:420:41:46

You might. And you might not!

0:41:460:41:48

With the £1,237 that they raised from auction,

0:41:550:41:58

Mike and Dorothy have booked those horse-riding lessons.

0:41:580:42:02

All the grandchildren are here, but today it's young Michael's turn for a lesson.

0:42:020:42:07

We're here today because Michael came for a special lesson

0:42:070:42:11

for children with disabilities.

0:42:110:42:14

He's really enjoyed it and he wants to come again.

0:42:140:42:17

It's wonderful, isn't it?

0:42:170:42:19

-Yeah!

-Good.

0:42:190:42:22

The only disappointment - we'll never know if Mike senior got into the saddle as well!

0:42:220:42:27

That's what you call a win/win situation.

0:42:300:42:34

We had a wonderful day at auction

0:42:340:42:36

and Dorothy and Michael had a great day out with their grandchildren.

0:42:360:42:40

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:530:42:57

Mike and Dorothy Bessey invite Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes to help clear out some of their clutter. They hope to raise enough money to fund horse-riding lessons for their five grandchildren.