Owen Cash in the Attic


Owen

David and Barbara are looking to fund a special family reunion. Gloria Hunniford and John Cameron help with the hunt for antiques and collectibles that can be sold at auction.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic,

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the programme that helps people raise money for a special project

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or a good old treat. We do that by rummaging around their house,

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finding those collectibles and antiques

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and then taking them to auction to raise money.

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Now family history is important to all of us,

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but keeping that family circle together and encouraging relationships

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is what our couple today are all about.

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic,

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an unloved vase from overseas

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turns up a very surprising estimate.

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-No.

-Yeah.

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-You mean "no" in shock?

-In shock, I wouldn't have thought so.

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John reveals where the money is in our second hand watches.

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If I were to tell you that the value lay in the cases,

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would that horrify you?

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And at auction, one of our items has a rush of bids.

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Three, four, five, six, seven bids.

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The lowest bid is £72.

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Find out more when the hammer falls.

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Today I'm in Leicestershire,

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I'm on my way to meet Barbara and David,

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who are planning a big family reunion.

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And they certainly need our help.

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When it comes to retirement,

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David and Barbara Owen are definitely living it up.

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Fans of the great outdoors, they've been on several big adventures.

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In 2009, for example, they spent some 19 weeks on the road.

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David and Barbara grew up in Lincolnshire and got married in 1964.

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He worked the beat as a police officer, while she raised the children.

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Their daughters Alison and Carrie have since flown the nest.

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David and Barbara are now free to enjoy that happy retirement.

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They hope that by selling off some unwanted belongings,

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they can raise enough money to pay for that big family reunion.

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Today I'm joined by our expert, John Cameron.

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It's his job to find the items that will have the best chance of selling.

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-Did I hear skivvy? Were you looking for me?

-No, we weren't!

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-Barbara and David, how are you?

-Nice to meet you.

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You're on my drink. This is what I like.

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So whose idea was it to call in Cash In The Attic?

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-I'm afraid it was mine.

-A devotee, are you?

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Yes, I am. I saw all this furniture lying around and thought,

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perhaps I could put it to some good use.

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When you say "good use", how would you spend the money?

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We'd like to get our grandchildren together again,

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they haven't been together for a while

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and I'd like a new photo to hang on the wall.

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You have to work hard

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to get all the children and grandchildren together.

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They've all got commitments and things to do.

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Especially the two older ones.

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How much is it going to take for this big reunion?

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-We think about £1,000.

-That's a bit of a blow-out!

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It is, but we hope for the best.

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John Cameron, our expert, is already hard at work, rummaging through your house.

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-Shall we go and join him and get on the trail of the money?

-Lovely idea!

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Taking a look around this very tidy house,

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it seems many of the belongings must be hidden away.

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Still, John's always up for a challenge.

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True to form, he's already found something.

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What a raid, John.

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You've discovered David's secret, he was a pickpocket after the police.

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And a very good one!

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Where did all of these come from?

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They're from my grandfather. Bit of a wheeler-dealer.

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He ran a garage, he was a butcher, did various jobs.

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-He used to like collecting things.

-All of them?

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Some of them are ladies' watches.

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He just liked watches.

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-He was into horology?

-Yes.

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John, is there any value within these watches?

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In these particular watches, not a huge amount,

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but they are worth something.

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Like most things, it comes down

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to maker, age and condition.

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Sadly we don't have any 17th-century Thomas Tompions

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or George Grahams here,

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these are honest, working-class, silver and gold pocket watches

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from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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If we look at them, we've got two different types.

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We've got the complete open-face pocket watch.

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Then we have what's known as a half hunter.

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Why has this one got a cover over it?

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You get a full hunter and a half hunter. This is a half hunter.

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-It has a little receptacle you can see through.

-Like a porthole.

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That enabled somebody on horseback, the hunter,

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to be able to have a look at the watch and see the time without opening it.

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This protects the glass from being broken.

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That would smash quite easily.

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You have the Roman numerals around the metal case, but you can just see the hands.

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You can still open this up and have a look inside.

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-That enables you to have a look.

-It's like protection.

-Exactly.

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But they're all in pretty poor condition.

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They'd be "breakers", as we know it.

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I would put them as one lot. I would be hoping for £100-£150.

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For the whole shebang.

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Would it be worth polishing it?

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Wouldn't hurt, it's an attractive watch. I do like half hunters.

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-That's my favourite.

-Why not? Give that a polish.

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-If you don't clean it, I will.

-Thank you very much!

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Before I put on my rubber gloves and find a duster

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- if you believe that, you'll believe anything -

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we'd better find out what else is around the house.

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Barbara's been busy rummaging in another cabinet,

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but the cabinet itself has become the worthy contender.

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This 19th-century piece belonged to David's grandmother,

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now Barbara thinks it would be better off with a new family.

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John thinks someone will take it off their hands for £30-£50.

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There are quite a few items that have been passed down through the generations.

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Barbara wants to show off another heirloom she's happy to part with.

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Look at this, John.

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Interesting clock, let's have a look inside.

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What I want to do is take the top off, like that.

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If I have a look inside here,

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that will tell us a lot about the clock.

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When it was going, who wound it

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and how did they wind it?

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I think Dave used to wind it,

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but he pulled the string inside the cabinet.

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-We never had a key for those little holes.

-They're winding arbours.

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That's what they are. By looking at the back,

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if you have another look,

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you can see that those arbours,

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they don't actually go anywhere.

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-Can you see that?

-Yes, I can.

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What's happened is the case and the movement are not

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-original together.

-Oh.

-I'll put this back on.

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Back up there.

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Now we're looking at the face,

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that face fits this case snugly, all the way around there.

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That suggests to me that the face and the case are contemporary.

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I suspect what's happened is

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at some point, somebody's taken the movement out of this clock,

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which would have been an eight-day movement,

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with a calendar aperture, and they've put that into another clock,

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with perhaps a more desirable maker on the front, to enhance the value.

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Because movements and faces and clocks were often made to standard sizes,

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it's easy to do that, to chop and change things around.

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Because of those alterations, it will affect market value.

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If I were putting it into auction today,

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I would expect £400-£600 for the clock.

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That's not bad.

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-Would that be OK?

-That would be fine.

-Good.

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-Will you be sorry to see it go?

-Not really.

-No?

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-It's been around me long enough.

-That's a good item.

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-Shall we see what else we can find?

-We will.

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That valuation has just landed a good chunk of money towards their family reunion.

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But there's plenty of rummaging to go

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before we make that £1,000 target.

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I'm happy to see that David has been successful with his hunt.

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Right next to the feather dusters,

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he's found a collection of four wooden boxes.

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All date to the 19th century,

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and belonged to Barbara's aunt.

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Three of them hold jewellery, and one serves as a portable writing slope.

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John thinks this collection could go for £40-£60.

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So, Barbara, these are your delightful grandchildren.

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Which ones live in Greece?

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The two in the middle live in Greece.

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The little girl, Mycenae and the little boy, Emilios.

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Flanking them are Joel and Bethany, who live 10 miles away.

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-Tell me about your daughters. You have two?

-Alison and Carolyn.

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She's always been known as Carrie.

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They're in their 40s now.

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Which one lives in Greece?

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The younger one. She went out when she'd finished her studies.

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She went out to work in the Pasteur Institute in Athens

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and she never came back.

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She met a man.

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She'd already met this gentleman!

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Tell me about Alison, she doesn't live that far away.

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The other one lives 10 miles away.

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She's a practice manager for a doctors' surgery.

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Do you see the children a lot?

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Quite regularly, but they get older and tend to go their own way.

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You become a diary entry, as a grandparent.

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You have to learn to grow with them as they get older.

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You have to tap into their life, rather than the other way around.

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But they're very useful if I can't work the computer or a mobile phone!

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For any of us, it is difficult

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to get all your children and your grandchildren in the one spot.

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What do you have in your mind about this big reunion?

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Just a family get-together,

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going to things like the safari park.

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Things they don't have in Crete.

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There's no zoos on Crete.

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They have museums, but the Natural History Museum in London,

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that's a place I'd really like to take them. Possibly London Zoo, too.

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As a grandparent myself, my passion is getting all my family together, I love that.

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Hope it all works out. They are beautiful.

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That little one on the top of the settee looks full of mischief.

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We've got to keep at the work to get the money.

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With lovely faces like those, how could we disappoint them?

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So far we've come up with a great variety of items.

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And there's still plenty of places that might be home to hidden gems.

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John has uncovered some of David's old toys.

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One is an early 20th-century die-cast crane, made by the Dinky toy company.

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It's highly collectible.

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John thinks if we throw in the metal fort as well, we could ask £60-£80.

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Take a look at this, John.

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Looks like you've got something interesting there, David.

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-There we are.

-Fantastic. Hornby Dublo train set.

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What's in the box there? More of it?

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A station, a tram station,

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-with more...

-More bits and pieces?

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More bits and pieces of Hornby underneath.

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So, we've got Hornby Dublo. Let's have a look at it.

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Look at that, fantastic.

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You've got the box, although a bit tatty. Was this yours?

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This was mine. It was bought for me and my brother.

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We had this and a Meccano set. When we left home,

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I had the train set, he had the Meccano set.

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-I think you got the better end of the deal.

-You think so?

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They both started out from Frank Hornby,

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who started Meccano and Dinky.

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Also, you mentioned you had

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the Triang pieces in there.

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That's interesting. That was a rival company to Hornby.

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So successful was Triang, they eroded Hornby's market,

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until eventually, in 1964, they took over Hornby.

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They became Triang Hornby for a while,

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until the 1970s, when they closed.

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It's a great set. I bet you had hours of fun.

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We certainly did. As you see, we looked after it, we kept it.

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Oiled it every time, put it away in its box.

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-Really treasured, it was.

-I think they're a wonderful set.

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You've got the Triang bits as well.

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You said you have another locomotive?

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Nice thing to put into auction. Great demand for this sort of thing.

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I'd be looking about £150 at the low end,

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perhaps as much as £250,

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-somewhere between those figures.

-Very good.

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It's never been played with for years, so fine.

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Fantastic. Let's hope there are no leaves on the line,

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or the wrong type of snow come auction day.

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-I think this will be very popular.

-That's wonderful.

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Let's see what else we can find.

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It's a fantastic set, but we need some trainspotters.

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125, 130.

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They're bound to just snap it up.

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We've already managed to collect £780 worth of items.

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And as the rummage continues, I come across this chaise longue,

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made of wicker, this 20th century piece belonged to Barbara's aunt.

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John thinks it can entice the bidders with a price of £30-£50.

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We are on a roll now because I've just found another great item.

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John and Barbara? Are you around?

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-Yes, we are. In we go.

-Look at this fine specimen.

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Where did this come from, Barbara?

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It came from my husband's cousin,

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about 25 years ago.

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-I've never liked it.

-Ever?

-No.

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-You're not a great collector, are you?

-No, I'm not.

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So, is it worth anything, John?

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It can be. Do you know anything about it?

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-Not a thing.

-Know where it's from?

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I haven't a clue.

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-You've never even had a look on the bottom?

-No, I haven't.

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We can see where it's from. It's from Holland. It's Dutch.

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It's a piece of art pottery

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dating from the first quarter of the 20th century.

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By a factory called Plateelbakkerij.

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Rather you than me saying that!

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-They were based in Gouda in Holland.

-Where the cheese comes from?

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Where the cheese comes from. You can see the word Holland,

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has a Z, that's zuid, south Holland. So that's the area.

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I have noticed there is a bit

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of a crack around the bottom.

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A crack is worse than a chip, because it can spread.

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-Is it hand painted?

-It would be hand painted.

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Hand-potted, or thrown on a potter's wheel, traditionally,

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and then hand painted, in this very stylised pattern,

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which we can see on the bottom is the Rhodian pattern.

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Why do you not like it?

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I'm not fond of orange, actually.

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Without the orange it could be quite nice.

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So, we've established now that

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Barbara doesn't like it. Never liked it.

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Hates orange.

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-Is it worth anything?

-Exactly.

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I think we'd be looking

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-at £30-£50, given the damage.

-No.

-Yeah.

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You mean "no" in shock?

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In shock, I wouldn't have thought so.

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-You wouldn't give 30 quid for it.

-No, I wouldn't.

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I think we'd better get the bubble wrap quickly.

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It just goes to show, when it comes to bits and bobs lying around your house for years,

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their value can come as a nice surprise.

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David's been having a look around the garden, home to

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a cast-iron railway marker. Bit of a train buff!

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He found this lying by the roadside while he was out for a walk with Barbara.

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They thought it might make an interesting decoration for the house,

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but being so big, it never made it past the front door.

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John thinks someone else might put it to good use,

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if it's priced at £20-£40.

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Judging by the amount of travel books around the house,

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I can see David and Barbara have huge enthusiasm for foreign lands.

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If you've been in this house 40 years,

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-how long have you two been together?

-46 years.

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46 years. That really is man and boy, isn't it?

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Man and girl, in this case.

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Where did you meet?

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I'd just left school and we were introduced by a mutual friend.

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-Was that in Leicestershire?

-Yes, the Vale of Belvoir.

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And it went from there.

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-They said it would never last.

-A lot of people said that.

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So you've known each other since school days.

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-We went to the same school.

-But we didn't know each other at school.

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I was two or three years older, so I'd left, I was working.

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I met her in between leaving school and going to college.

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What were you working at then?

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I was a policeman when I met Bar.

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-30 years I was...

-On the beat.

-On the beat, yes, walking round.

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I was when I finished my service as well.

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-You were on the beat.

-I certainly was.

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-Did you retire early?

-You're allowed to retire after 30 years.

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I did my 30 years, retired.

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-How old were you then?

-I was 49.

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-49? That's young.

-It certainly is.

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Have you literally not worked, in that sense, since?

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-No need to.

-How do you keep yourself busy?

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I do a lot of DIY and we do a lot of holiday-making.

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I'm getting the picture here.

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-You two really planned the retirement.

-Yes.

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-Was your plan literally to travel?

-It was, yes.

0:16:420:16:45

How many weeks in a year do you travel?

0:16:450:16:48

Well, last year it was 19 weeks.

0:16:480:16:51

19 weeks' holiday!

0:16:510:16:53

-That's some plan.

-We'll try and beat it this year, if we can.

0:16:530:16:57

What was your longest trip in the past?

0:16:570:16:59

We did three months in Australia and New Zealand with my sister and brother-in-law,

0:16:590:17:04

back in '98.

0:17:040:17:05

And that's quite a long time to be away from home.

0:17:070:17:11

-Was it too long?

-We were glad to be home.

0:17:110:17:14

It was a wonderful trip.

0:17:140:17:16

Since then, we've done about six weeks at a time.

0:17:160:17:18

We find that's a nice time.

0:17:180:17:20

You can do a really good trip, but you don't get bored.

0:17:200:17:24

It's nice when it finishes, you can come home.

0:17:240:17:28

We've always found it nice to come home.

0:17:280:17:31

If you're going to make £1,000 to have this family reunion,

0:17:310:17:33

and then look forward to your holiday,

0:17:330:17:35

we'd better go and do a bit of work. Let's find John!

0:17:350:17:39

While I've been chatting with David and Barbara, John's been busy.

0:17:390:17:43

He's found another collection of watches.

0:17:430:17:46

Dave, just in time. These watches, you've got them tucked away,

0:17:460:17:52

doing nothing. Do they mean anything to you?

0:17:520:17:55

-Nothing really at all.

-Where have they come from?

0:17:550:17:58

Come down from our family. Either my wife's or my own.

0:17:580:18:02

They've just been there for as long as I can remember.

0:18:020:18:05

It tends to be how we end up with things like this in jewellery boxes.

0:18:050:18:08

They get handed down. Most of them date to certainly before the 1950s.

0:18:080:18:15

This is my favourite here.

0:18:150:18:16

JW Benson. Very good maker.

0:18:160:18:19

That one there, probably date that to about the 1920s.

0:18:190:18:23

It's in a 9-carat gold case.

0:18:230:18:25

It has a nice expanding 9-carat gold strap as well.

0:18:250:18:30

It is damaged and we won't know if that's in working order

0:18:300:18:33

because it's lost its winding pin.

0:18:330:18:36

It's a very typical, silver dial and Arabic numerals there.

0:18:360:18:40

A tiny subsidiary seconds dial, can you see that?

0:18:400:18:44

The problem with these watches is they're very hard to see.

0:18:440:18:49

Most people would have to strain their eyes.

0:18:490:18:52

They're not terribly practical. You do see people wearing these, but few and far between.

0:18:520:18:57

Now, three or four of them have gold cases.

0:18:570:19:00

If I were to tell you that the value lies in the cases,

0:19:000:19:03

would that horrify you?

0:19:030:19:04

Not at all. No.

0:19:040:19:06

Wouldn't bother you if somebody were to take those movements out,

0:19:060:19:09

scrap the gold cases,

0:19:090:19:10

-and give the movements to a watch repairer?

-Not at all.

0:19:100:19:14

Good. So, I think collectively we'd get £80-£120 for them.

0:19:140:19:20

-Would you be OK with that?

-Fine.

0:19:200:19:22

I think we've probably found all the watches

0:19:220:19:25

-we're going to find.

-I hope so.

0:19:250:19:28

-You haven't got any more tucked away?

-I don't think so.

0:19:280:19:31

We'll leave those there and let's see what else we can find.

0:19:310:19:34

Fair enough.

0:19:340:19:36

I find it heartbreaking that those watches are worth more melted down.

0:19:360:19:41

Considering their love of travel,

0:19:410:19:43

it's no surprise the Owens have a caravan.

0:19:430:19:45

Inside, I find a collection of albums.

0:19:450:19:49

At first glance they look as if they're meant for cigarette cards

0:19:490:19:52

but it's a tea-card set,

0:19:520:19:54

issued by the Brooke Bond tea company.

0:19:540:19:56

Barbara had them as a girl,

0:19:560:19:58

and John thinks they could go for £10-£20.

0:19:580:20:01

Now this house is obviously big enough for two coffers.

0:20:010:20:04

In addition to the one that Barbara found earlier,

0:20:040:20:08

John has found something similar.

0:20:080:20:10

So, do you like this piece?

0:20:100:20:11

I do, actually, because it's crude. It's..

0:20:110:20:15

Crude? I think it's quite nice.

0:20:150:20:16

Well, the woodwork's a bit crude.

0:20:160:20:19

Listen, David, who are you talking about being crude?

0:20:190:20:23

Surely not talking about yourself?

0:20:230:20:25

No, he wasn't. He wasn't talking about me, either.

0:20:250:20:29

We were talking about this interesting chest.

0:20:290:20:32

Now, what have you always referred to it as?

0:20:320:20:34

It's an old chest. An old family chest.

0:20:340:20:37

It's been used by us

0:20:370:20:38

to store material that the kids did their sewing with.

0:20:380:20:43

Before that it was in my parents' cottage.

0:20:430:20:46

Before that, who knows where it came from.

0:20:460:20:48

I think it's a wonderfully honest piece of English furniture.

0:20:480:20:52

A great piece to talk about in terms of the chronological history

0:20:520:20:55

of English furniture.

0:20:550:20:58

Often referred to as coffers, or chests.

0:20:580:21:01

Used for storing anything that was valuable,

0:21:010:21:05

from blankets to pewter.

0:21:050:21:07

You often see them with a candle box or a till, and a lock on the front.

0:21:070:21:12

Things you could keep away from servants or marauding invaders.

0:21:120:21:17

If you're going to do a runner, all your valuables would be in there

0:21:170:21:20

and you could go "hoik - off"?

0:21:200:21:22

They used to have to move sometimes, in difficult times.

0:21:220:21:25

It's somewhere to lock things away safe.

0:21:250:21:28

What's interesting, apart from this rather unusual carving,

0:21:280:21:32

is the row of drawers in the base.

0:21:320:21:34

This is a natural progression because, imagine this

0:21:340:21:37

filled up, and you wanted to get to something at the bottom,

0:21:370:21:41

it's quite difficult trying to delve down.

0:21:410:21:43

Some time during the 17th century,

0:21:430:21:45

somebody had the idea of putting in a single row of drawers

0:21:450:21:49

to make it easier to get to the contents

0:21:490:21:51

at the bottom of this box.

0:21:510:21:53

That then became

0:21:530:21:55

two rows of drawers. You see more of them with this one drawer.

0:21:550:21:59

These are referred to as mule chests.

0:21:590:22:01

You see more with a single row than you do with the two.

0:22:010:22:05

Eventually, it became a chest of drawers

0:22:050:22:08

and they got rid of the hinged top.

0:22:080:22:10

That is how it emerged, from a humble blanket box to a chest of drawers.

0:22:100:22:14

Look at this, 300 years old, something like that.

0:22:140:22:17

It's still a nice tight piece of joinery.

0:22:170:22:20

Is it hand carved, the panels?

0:22:200:22:22

It will be hand carved to the front.

0:22:220:22:24

It's quite an unusual style of carving.

0:22:240:22:26

I don't think I've ever seen that before.

0:22:260:22:28

There is a society called the Regional Furniture Society,

0:22:280:22:32

who have meetings about little characteristics of English oak furniture,

0:22:320:22:37

and how they pin certain pieces down to certain areas of Britain.

0:22:370:22:42

I'd be interested to know what they make of that carving.

0:22:420:22:46

Have you noticed how Barbara has been stone quiet through this conversation?

0:22:460:22:51

Do I take it this is another item you're not partial to?

0:22:510:22:55

It wouldn't matter really if it wasn't here any more.

0:22:550:22:59

That brings us to the attractive aspect of it

0:22:590:23:03

and whether it's still very desirable these days.

0:23:030:23:06

Well, the humble coffers and chests are, I feel, modestly priced.

0:23:060:23:11

It's not that they've dropped off recently.

0:23:110:23:13

I often see these at auction and think they'll make £200-£400.

0:23:130:23:17

They stutter around the £200.

0:23:170:23:18

So many of them were made and they were so well made

0:23:180:23:22

that there's no shortage of them.

0:23:220:23:24

You see them in most general sales.

0:23:240:23:26

At a very low end today, I'd be looking at £150.

0:23:260:23:29

I'd like to think you'd be up towards £250,

0:23:290:23:32

-so somewhere between the two.

-As it's from your side of the family,

0:23:320:23:35

-David, what do you think of that?

-I'm happy with 150, yes.

0:23:350:23:38

-You think the girls will be sad to see it go?

-I'm sure they would not.

0:23:380:23:42

This crude box, then, as David puts it,

0:23:420:23:45

brings us to the end of our rummage

0:23:450:23:47

and to the total, so come and join your wife.

0:23:470:23:51

You can sit on it if you like.

0:23:510:23:53

You wanted this £1,000.

0:23:530:23:56

You've got your £1,000.

0:23:560:23:58

-Not only that, you've got £1,100.

-Lovely!

0:23:580:24:02

You can hoop and holler now.

0:24:020:24:04

Whoo!

0:24:040:24:05

Oh, go on, Barbara!

0:24:050:24:07

Hoop and a-holler, go on!

0:24:070:24:09

Whoo!

0:24:090:24:10

Great.

0:24:100:24:11

With Barbara all fired up, we just have to see how things fare at auction.

0:24:110:24:15

Amongst our finds is a collection of pocket watches

0:24:150:24:19

in need of polishing.

0:24:190:24:20

Someone might take them off our hands for £100-£150.

0:24:200:24:24

Also the grandfather clock should fetch £400-£600,

0:24:240:24:28

which would be very nice indeed.

0:24:280:24:31

And finally the Dutch vase.

0:24:310:24:33

Not one of Barbara's favourites,

0:24:330:24:35

but worthy of admiration at £30-£50.

0:24:350:24:39

Still to come on Cash In The Attic -

0:24:390:24:41

will David's train set keep our estimates on track?

0:24:410:24:44

Oh!

0:24:440:24:46

Will our collection of watches bring in a pleasant sum?

0:24:480:24:51

-At £80. Five now?

-Yes!

0:24:510:24:53

Find out what happens when the hammer falls.

0:24:530:24:56

It's been a few weeks since we met Barbara and David at their home

0:25:000:25:04

and looked for items to bring here to Bamfords Auctions in Derby.

0:25:040:25:08

They want to raise £1,000 for a really big family reunion,

0:25:080:25:13

which I think is a great idea.

0:25:130:25:14

Let's hope there's lots of eager bidders in the room

0:25:140:25:17

as their items go under the hammer.

0:25:170:25:19

Sadly John can't be with us,

0:25:200:25:23

but the auctioneer has cast his eyes over our lots.

0:25:230:25:26

He thinks the train set might be a bit too specialist for the sale,

0:25:260:25:30

although he'll do his best.

0:25:300:25:32

Still, you never know who will be in the room.

0:25:320:25:34

It might be our lucky day.

0:25:340:25:37

-Nice grain, isn't it?

-Doing a bit of polishing, are you?

0:25:370:25:41

-Just saying it was a nice grain.

-Yeah, I know.

0:25:410:25:44

-You've got some cracking toys.

-We do, yes.

0:25:440:25:48

Then there's a wonderful grandfather clock which I really liked.

0:25:480:25:52

-I won't be sorry to see it go.

-That's what I love about you two.

0:25:520:25:55

-Every time I was with you, you'd go, "I won't be sorry to see it go."

-That's right!

0:25:550:26:01

But I remember you had four boxes and you've only got three today.

0:26:010:26:06

Our daughter took a shine to one of them and it went.

0:26:060:26:09

-It had to go.

-Yes.

0:26:090:26:11

-It's never lost when a daughter gets it.

-No.

0:26:110:26:14

She was right to take it.

0:26:140:26:16

-The auctioneer's in place, so follow me.

-Thank you.

0:26:160:26:20

If you'd like to raise money by selling at auction,

0:26:200:26:23

note that sale rooms may charge fees such as commission,

0:26:230:26:27

and these vary from one sale room to another.

0:26:270:26:30

The first item here is one that I remember you hated.

0:26:300:26:34

-I liked the orange and you loathed it.

-I didn't like it at all.

0:26:340:26:38

It's classified as a Gouda Art Deco jardiniere.

0:26:380:26:42

-Remind me why you hate it.

-It was mainly the colour.

0:26:420:26:45

-Being Gouda, I think John said it was from Holland.

-Yes.

0:26:450:26:50

All I can think of is cheese.

0:26:500:26:51

THEY LAUGH

0:26:510:26:53

The price may be a bit cheesy.

0:26:530:26:55

He's put on it somewhere like £30 to £50.

0:26:550:26:59

I take it you'd be happy with that?

0:26:590:27:02

-More than happy.

-Anything to get rid of it.

0:27:020:27:05

It's about to go under the hammer. Let's see what you get for it.

0:27:050:27:09

At £20 and two.

0:27:090:27:11

24, 26, 28, and 30 and two.

0:27:110:27:14

-See?

-Yes.

0:27:140:27:16

32 new place. 35.

0:27:160:27:19

38 at the back. I can't see you.

0:27:190:27:21

38? Yes, waving at 38. 40 now.

0:27:210:27:24

£38 by the cabinet and 40 do I see?

0:27:240:27:27

At £38 right at the back of the room. 40 did you want?

0:27:270:27:31

One more?

0:27:310:27:33

At £38, right at the back, any advance?

0:27:330:27:36

-What do you think about that?

-Amazing.

-That is wonderful.

0:27:380:27:41

David, why are you so amazed?

0:27:410:27:43

I can't really say, but it was rather awful!

0:27:450:27:48

Those two couldn't wait to offload that item, could they?

0:27:480:27:51

Making £38 is a big bonus,

0:27:510:27:54

but now something closer to Barbara's heart -

0:27:540:27:57

her collection of tea cards.

0:27:570:27:59

My drink is tea, I drink gallons of it.

0:27:590:28:02

Two walkers walked the world once over two years.

0:28:020:28:05

When they got back, all they wanted was a cup of tea. They're my people!

0:28:050:28:10

You collected these tea cards

0:28:100:28:13

that are about to be auctioned.

0:28:130:28:14

Over how many years?

0:28:140:28:17

I collected them from the age

0:28:170:28:19

of about six to ten, I suppose.

0:28:190:28:21

My grandmother lived in London and she posted them to me.

0:28:210:28:25

We'd get the albums and stick them in. It was exciting to get a whole set, you know.

0:28:250:28:30

It was just something I did then.

0:28:300:28:33

Please tell me you've got a pang of regret for a collection you did when you were so young.

0:28:330:28:39

I suppose a lot of work went into it, but no, not really.

0:28:390:28:43

-Time moves on.

-They've had their day.

-Yes.

0:28:430:28:45

-If they sell well, I'll get you an extra cup of tea.

-Thank you.

0:28:450:28:51

Where shall we start, then? £20? 20, 15?

0:28:510:28:55

Ten pounds, then?

0:28:550:28:57

Ten pounds for them.

0:28:570:28:59

Anybody want those? Ten pounds?

0:28:590:29:02

Gosh. I'm going to sell them for five.

0:29:020:29:04

-No!

-Five pounds, anyone?

0:29:040:29:06

Anybody want them?

0:29:070:29:09

No? Sorry, guys. That's a not sold.

0:29:090:29:12

-Oh, dear.

-Oh, Barbara.

0:29:120:29:15

Nobody wanted your tea cards. How do you react to that?

0:29:150:29:18

They weren't worth the paper they were printed on, were they?

0:29:180:29:23

At least we got a joke out of that

0:29:230:29:25

even if we didn't get any dosh.

0:29:250:29:27

But the sale of the railway marker David found while walking

0:29:270:29:31

put us back on track as it sells within our estimate.

0:29:310:29:33

Now I remember this next lot -

0:29:330:29:35

it's a collection of watches.

0:29:350:29:38

Where did they come from?

0:29:380:29:39

From my grandfather.

0:29:390:29:41

-They were all your grandfather's?

-The whole lot. He was

0:29:410:29:44

a wheeler-dealer, a collector.

0:29:440:29:46

He just liked to collect things.

0:29:460:29:48

-Have you ever used any of them?

-No, I'm not a watch person.

0:29:480:29:53

Not at all. Our grandson had one of them. He took that.

0:29:530:29:57

The other week, he decided he needed a fob watch.

0:29:570:30:00

At 16 going on 17, it's a must-have.

0:30:000:30:04

Must have a fob watch, yes.

0:30:040:30:06

The boy's got style.

0:30:060:30:07

If there were no collectors for cigarette cards,

0:30:070:30:10

-I hope there are for watches. We'll find out.

-Yes.

0:30:100:30:15

I have three bids on it and £80 starts it.

0:30:150:30:18

-At £80. Five now?

-Yes!

0:30:180:30:20

At £80 and five do I see?

0:30:200:30:22

How good is that?

0:30:220:30:24

85, 90, and five?

0:30:240:30:25

All the bids close together, at £90, 95 do I see?

0:30:250:30:29

At 90.

0:30:290:30:31

-Hey!

-£90!

-How about that?

0:30:320:30:35

I am more than thrilled. £90!

0:30:350:30:39

-For something that's been lying in a drawer.

-Forgotten about.

0:30:390:30:42

I always think every girl should have a chaise longue

0:30:420:30:45

to drape herself along. Where did this one come from?

0:30:450:30:49

It belonged to my little Great Aunt Annie.

0:30:490:30:51

You can tell she was small because she could sleep on it.

0:30:510:30:54

My daughter took a shine to it and my father gave it to her.

0:30:540:30:58

And she never took it to her own house,

0:30:580:31:01

she never took possession of it.

0:31:010:31:04

I've been landed with it for about 30 years.

0:31:040:31:07

About time Cash In The Attic came in.

0:31:070:31:10

The wicker chaise longue, great fun, this one.

0:31:100:31:13

Better than it sounds, it's quite a stylish lot.

0:31:140:31:19

I've got one bid, so I'll start it just below at £25.

0:31:190:31:23

30 do I see?

0:31:230:31:24

At 25 and 30, sir, 30 and five?

0:31:240:31:26

35, 40, 40 and five?

0:31:260:31:29

45, 50. One more?

0:31:290:31:32

48, if it helps?

0:31:320:31:33

At 45 with me, absentee bid, 48 I'm taking at the front.

0:31:330:31:37

And 50. You're coming back?

0:31:370:31:39

One more? £48 is here. 50 where?

0:31:390:31:42

At 48. 50 do I see?

0:31:420:31:45

At £48. All sure?

0:31:450:31:48

What an auctioneer!

0:31:490:31:52

You were only £2 off John's highest estimate.

0:31:520:31:55

I think that's wonderful, I really do.

0:31:550:31:58

Trouble is, your daughter will want the 50 quid now, £48.

0:31:580:32:01

She's going to have it!

0:32:010:32:02

Honestly, I'd say this chaise longue is an acquired taste.

0:32:020:32:06

But it's obviously taken one buyer's fancy.

0:32:060:32:09

No doubt someone will be draping themselves over it soon.

0:32:090:32:12

The next item is a carved-oak sideboard. Is it very grand?

0:32:120:32:17

-No.

-Where did it come from?

0:32:170:32:19

From my grandparents, the ones with the fob watches.

0:32:190:32:23

I find it very depressing.

0:32:230:32:26

How many years has it depressed you?

0:32:260:32:29

Ever since I was a small boy.

0:32:290:32:32

-What are you like?

-I've managed to rise above it.

0:32:320:32:35

Where shall we start it? £50? 50.

0:32:350:32:37

50 anywhere? 30, then.

0:32:370:32:40

£30 bid here, 30 and five? 40.

0:32:400:32:42

40 and five? £40 here and five at the back.

0:32:420:32:46

45 bid. 50? 50 and five?

0:32:460:32:48

55 and 60. 60 and five?

0:32:480:32:51

At £60. Any more?

0:32:510:32:53

At £60. Do I see five anywhere?

0:32:530:32:56

At... One more?

0:32:560:32:57

At £60, selling to the left.

0:32:570:33:00

At 60. Are you sure?

0:33:000:33:01

At £60... It's yours.

0:33:010:33:03

Hey, what a result!

0:33:030:33:05

No longer am I depressed.

0:33:050:33:07

No longer, depression lifted for 50 quid.

0:33:070:33:11

Give me a big smile, David.

0:33:110:33:13

Hooray, what a result!

0:33:140:33:15

We've cured David's depression and made £60 in the process.

0:33:150:33:20

If we keep meeting these estimates,

0:33:200:33:22

we'll be on target to raise the £1,000 for the family reunion.

0:33:220:33:27

Now, David, earlier on you did very well with some fob watches.

0:33:270:33:31

Here you have some more.

0:33:310:33:34

How many fob watches do you have in your house?

0:33:340:33:36

We have no more now after they've all been sold.

0:33:360:33:39

Five pocket watches and I have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven bids.

0:33:390:33:43

-Seven bids!

-The lowest bid is £72.

0:33:430:33:46

The under bidder is £95. £100 starts it.

0:33:460:33:50

And ten in the doorway.

0:33:500:33:51

120 here. 130 for you?

0:33:510:33:54

130 in the doorway. 135 I have. 140 beats it.

0:33:540:33:57

All the bidding very close.

0:33:570:33:59

140 for you?

0:33:590:34:01

At 135, absentee bid.

0:34:010:34:03

Are you sure? At £135.

0:34:030:34:06

Anywhere else at 135?

0:34:060:34:08

-135!

-That's good.

0:34:090:34:11

£135, isn't that brilliant?

0:34:110:34:14

-I'm really pleased with that.

-That's nearly John's top estimate.

0:34:140:34:18

He was very close, wasn't he?

0:34:180:34:21

You're liking John more by the second, aren't you?

0:34:210:34:24

Up next we have a 19th-century rosewood writing slip.

0:34:240:34:28

Sounds very nice, and two other boxes.

0:34:280:34:32

I've got three bids on it and I can start it at £26.

0:34:320:34:37

-28 now?

-Not much for a first bid.

0:34:370:34:40

At £28? 26 has it.

0:34:400:34:42

28, 30, 32?

0:34:420:34:44

32. 34.

0:34:450:34:47

36? £34 with me.

0:34:470:34:50

£34, 36 now?

0:34:500:34:53

At 34.

0:34:530:34:55

You happy? At £34?

0:34:550:34:56

And selling for 34.

0:34:560:35:00

John's lower estimate was £40 and you got 34, so not too bad.

0:35:000:35:04

-Nearly there.

-Happy with that?

-Yes.

0:35:040:35:06

Not as much as we'd hoped for,

0:35:060:35:09

but it hasn't dampened their spirits in the slightest.

0:35:090:35:11

I bet they're wondering what to do with all that free space at home.

0:35:110:35:16

I have very high hopes for the train set.

0:35:160:35:19

Every time I come to an auction,

0:35:190:35:21

things like cars, train sets, they always sell well.

0:35:210:35:24

John's estimate for this Hornby train set

0:35:240:35:26

is £150 to £250.

0:35:260:35:29

Great if you get that.

0:35:290:35:31

-Was this yours?

-This was mine, yes.

0:35:310:35:34

When I was about ten, my brother and I had it for Christmas.

0:35:340:35:38

-You remember Christmas presents like that because they're special.

-That one certainly was, yes.

0:35:380:35:44

£100 please? 100.

0:35:440:35:46

£100 for it.

0:35:460:35:48

100. 100 I'll start it at, 110 do I see?

0:35:480:35:52

At £100, and ten now?

0:35:520:35:53

At £100. 110 do I see?

0:35:530:35:56

At 100... 110, sir.

0:35:560:35:59

120 with me, 130.

0:35:590:36:01

125, 130, 135 for you?

0:36:010:36:04

No? At 130 it remains with me unsold at 130.

0:36:040:36:08

It will go into the collectors' sale if I don't see a better bid.

0:36:080:36:12

At 130, are we all sure?

0:36:120:36:15

No? Into the toy sale next month.

0:36:150:36:17

Oh!

0:36:170:36:19

-Didn't like that.

-We were expecting that, actually.

0:36:190:36:22

The auctioneer did think they might not sell today.

0:36:220:36:25

Still, perhaps the Dinky toys and metal fort

0:36:250:36:28

will be more to the bidders' taste.

0:36:280:36:30

Did this belong to you as a boy?

0:36:300:36:32

This was mine. I can even remember where we bought the mobile crane.

0:36:320:36:36

It was bought on holiday in Great Yarmouth.

0:36:360:36:39

I can start it at £45. 50 do I see?

0:36:390:36:42

At 45 and 50 now?

0:36:420:36:44

50, five, 60, five, against you.

0:36:440:36:48

At £65, 70 now.

0:36:480:36:50

At £65, any advance?

0:36:500:36:53

HE BANGS GAVEL

0:36:530:36:54

-That's wonderful.

-She's really happy.

0:36:540:36:56

The toys have gone, oak panelling is gone, everything is gone.

0:36:560:37:00

It just goes to show

0:37:000:37:02

that you never can tell what will sell on the day.

0:37:020:37:05

Up next is the oak coffer, which David thought was crude.

0:37:050:37:08

I don't think it's crude... Well, maybe just a bit bawdy.

0:37:080:37:12

I do remember the carved-oak coffer.

0:37:120:37:14

I watched a man sit on it throughout the auction.

0:37:140:37:17

I thought, "I hope it doesn't collapse before it gets to sale."

0:37:170:37:21

-So, who did this belong to?

-This was my parents'.

0:37:210:37:24

I imagine it came down through the family.

0:37:240:37:27

It's quite nice, actually.

0:37:270:37:29

-You like it?

-Yeah.

-For a change, he's happy with something.

0:37:290:37:32

-Amazing, isn't it?

-Bit of a novelty for you.

-It is.

0:37:320:37:36

And £100 is bid. At 110?

0:37:360:37:39

110, 120, 130, 140,

0:37:390:37:41

150 in the red.

0:37:410:37:43

150, 160, 170.

0:37:430:37:45

170 bid.

0:37:450:37:46

180 behind you. 180, 190, 200.

0:37:460:37:49

200, 220, 240.

0:37:490:37:51

240 either of you? 240 bid now. 260 in the red?

0:37:510:37:55

260, yes? 250 if you like.

0:37:550:37:58

At 240 at the back.

0:37:580:38:00

250 here.

0:38:000:38:01

New place, at 250 behind the rostrum.

0:38:010:38:04

At 250, 260, sir?

0:38:040:38:06

260, he shakes his head.

0:38:060:38:07

At 250 it's here. 260 anywhere else?

0:38:070:38:10

260 do I see?

0:38:100:38:11

At 2... 260.

0:38:110:38:13

270. 280?

0:38:130:38:15

-Oh, don't!

-280, 290. 300?

0:38:150:38:17

-At 290 still at the back.

-Fantastic!

-300, one more?

0:38:170:38:21

One more? Go on. 300. 310. 320.

0:38:210:38:25

Might get it for another. Shake of the head.

0:38:250:38:28

At 310 it's here. 320 now?

0:38:280:38:30

At 310. 320 anywhere?

0:38:300:38:33

At 310 and selling...

0:38:330:38:35

-How about that?

-That is wonderful.

-What an auctioneer!

0:38:380:38:41

What an auctioneer!

0:38:410:38:42

He teased it out of them.

0:38:420:38:44

-What a piece, though.

-Yes.

-£310, well over the estimate.

0:38:440:38:49

-Top estimate.

-I'm sure he's very embarrassed about sitting on it now.

0:38:490:38:53

-Maybe he brought you good luck.

-Yes.

0:38:530:38:55

He can sit on the next one.

0:38:550:38:58

What a result! I don't think any of us saw that coming.

0:38:580:39:01

It's a very welcome addition to the £1,000 target.

0:39:010:39:05

Hopefully they'll soon be seeing their children for that reunion.

0:39:050:39:09

Now, our final item of the day is perhaps the grandest.

0:39:090:39:14

One of my favourite items at home

0:39:140:39:16

that and I love to see at auction are long-cased grandfather clocks.

0:39:160:39:20

You have put a reserve of £400 on this,

0:39:200:39:24

and John has put £400-£600 on it overall.

0:39:240:39:26

And a good clock, circa 1780.

0:39:260:39:30

Where shall we be for that? £400, please.

0:39:320:39:34

400? 300 if you l... 300 is bid.

0:39:340:39:37

At 300, 320 now.

0:39:370:39:39

At 300, 320 do I see?

0:39:390:39:40

320. 350?

0:39:400:39:42

350, 380?

0:39:420:39:44

380, 400.

0:39:440:39:45

Hiding at 400. 420, now?

0:39:450:39:48

With you hiding at £400, 420 do I see?

0:39:480:39:51

At 420 now.

0:39:510:39:53

With you at £400.

0:39:530:39:55

Any advance? 400.

0:39:550:39:56

Sure? Coming back?

0:39:570:39:59

At £400? Anybody else? Seems reasonable.

0:40:000:40:03

With you. Four. All done.

0:40:030:40:05

400, spot on your reserve.

0:40:050:40:08

Yes. He's very good, John, isn't he?

0:40:080:40:11

So, the sale of our final item gave the total a good old boost.

0:40:110:40:16

Have we made our £1,000 target?

0:40:160:40:18

You've had a real mix of items to bring to auction.

0:40:180:40:21

I've been bemused by them, because mostly, David, you've hated all of it,

0:40:210:40:26

so whatever you got for it was going to be a bonus!

0:40:260:40:29

Now, you wanted £1,000.

0:40:290:40:32

Ideally, you wanted this £1,000 to bring your daughter and grandchildren over from Crete,

0:40:320:40:37

get all the family together so they all get to know each other.

0:40:370:40:42

-Yes.

-Lovely.

0:40:420:40:44

I'm very happy to tell you that you've got your £1,000.

0:40:440:40:48

Not only that, you got £1,208.

0:40:480:40:52

So £1,208.

0:40:530:40:56

Truly amazing!

0:40:560:40:58

But listen, you've been terrific. You've amused me enormously.

0:40:580:41:01

The hate you have for some of the stuff you've had for 30-40 years!

0:41:010:41:06

And to think you almost brought the trailer

0:41:060:41:08

to take home any unsold stuff,

0:41:080:41:10

and all you're taking home are tea cards!

0:41:100:41:12

-You didn't need the trailer after all.

-Done well, haven't we?

0:41:120:41:15

Well done, and have a wonderful time with your family.

0:41:150:41:18

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, Gloria.

0:41:180:41:20

Since raising the money at auction,

0:41:250:41:27

David and Barbara have decided to head out to Greece to catch up with their family.

0:41:270:41:33

What better way to get in the mood than go Greek for the day?

0:41:330:41:37

'We went on Cash In The Attic to raise some money

0:41:370:41:40

'to get our daughter and her family

0:41:400:41:43

'over from Crete for a visit.'

0:41:430:41:46

But my daughter has just got a new job in Crete,

0:41:460:41:48

so it's best that she doesn't leave at the moment.

0:41:480:41:51

So we decided we'll have to go out there to see her.

0:41:510:41:55

So now we've just had a lovely picnic

0:41:550:41:58

where we can get into the mood for our trip next week,

0:41:580:42:01

off to see the grandchildren.

0:42:010:42:03

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:320:42:36

David and Barbara Owen are looking to raise 1,000 pounds to create a special family reunion. Gloria Hunniford and John Cameron help with the hunt for antiques and collectibles that can be sold at auction.


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