Miller Cash in the Attic


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Miller

Series looking at the value of unwanted items. Moya wants to visit her friend Margaret in Canada, and decides that a sale of her unused nick-nacks could help to fund the trip.


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Welcome to the show that finds hidden treasures in your home and helps to sell them at auction.

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Now, when you've inherited lots of items from close relatives over the years,

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it can be very difficult to part with them.

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But today on Cash In The Attic, it's decision time.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic, Paul breaks our golden rule of no puns when he sees a gold bracelet.'

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-It's charming.

-ALL: Ohh!

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-I did warn you.

-Sorry about that.

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'And we learn that a piece of Royal Crown Derby was an unwanted Christmas present.'

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I think he was disappointed it wasn't a bottle of Scotch.

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'Talking of whisky, has Paul been drinking at the auction rooms?'

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Yeah, these are from the Cairngorm Mountains. That's my best Scottish accent.

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'Find out if his valuations fare any better when the hammer falls.'

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Selling.

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Today I'm in the beautiful countryside of Surrey

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and I'm off to meet Moya Miller, who wants to raise some money today

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so she can see her best friend in Canada.

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'Moya Miller has enlisted the help of her eldest daughter, Gayle, today.

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'Luckily, she only lives a few miles away from her mum's house.

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'Moya and her husband, Jack, moved here 25 years ago.

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'They were married for 50 years and had two daughters, Gayle and Helen,

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'who each have two sons. Sadly, Jack passed away three years ago.

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'The family have enjoyed lots of holidays in their caravan, making many friends,

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'which is a bit of a clue to why we've been called in.

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'Talking of pals, Paul Hayes is with me today,

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'and while he gets the hunt for those much-needed collectables underway, I go and meet the ladies.'

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-Looks as if we're having some fun and games in the garden here.

-Hello.

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Who called the Cash In The Attic team?

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-I'm afraid I did.

-Why?

-To clear out loads of junk.

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Three generations of junk in the house.

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I've inherited from two mothers and some of their family, as well.

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-And are you willing to get your hands dirty, dig in for the cause?

-I'll try. I'll do my best.

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-What do you want to raise the money for?

-For a fare to British Columbia.

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I've got a very old friend out there and I'd love to go and see her again.

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My goodness, that sounds expensive. Do we know how much we need to raise?

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At least 500, I would think.

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A lot of money, but we have the number-one man with us today, Paul Hayes. Do you want to meet him?

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-Yes, let's do that.

-Come on.

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'Moya's garden covers a large area, but the house is more modest

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'and doesn't look too daunting a space to search for antiques and collectables.'

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-Hello! How are you?

-Hello, Paul.

-I'm your knight in shining armour.

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THEY LAUGH Yes, could be.

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You've been a busy bee already. What is this?

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-A lovely old fire screen.

-Do you know where it came from?

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Erm, it belonged to my mother-in-law

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and it was found in a junk yard by my father-in-law.

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This one's extremely Arts and Crafts.

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You're looking at maybe 1890, 1920, that sort of time.

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And it's been made deliberately to have that handmade effect.

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If you look at this wonderful copper item, it's got these individual hammer marks here

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and that's telling me this is a handmade item. I quite like it. Very attractive piece.

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If I said £100 to £120, how does that sound?

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Sounds quite reasonable.

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'Yeah, not bad for something found in a junk-yard.

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'Moya also spots this silver-topped cut-glass sugar shaker.

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'It was a wedding present to her parents in 1927.

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'It's hallmarked Birmingham 1912.

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'Unfortunately, the glass is chipped at the top.

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'That's taken into account when Paul estimates £20 to £30.

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'Now what's our expert up to? Has he found something special?'

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Ah, now then, Gayle, I've found some interesting items here.

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-Some nice brooches. Whose are these?

-They were my grandmother's.

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These would've been the height of fashion in the Victorian period

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and these are Scottish Cairngorm brooches.

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Queen Victoria based her family home in Balmoral in Scotland and because she was the celebrity of the day,

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people followed her, so anything Scottish was extremely fashionable. Do you know what these stones are?

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-No.

-That's a big piece of solid amber.

-Really?

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-So that's over a million years old, that piece of amber, fossilised pine resin.

-OK.

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And these here are from the Cairngorm Mountains in the highlands.

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These are cut from the face of them. So the whole thing is extremely Scottish.

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These ones are both solid silver. If I said around the £50 mark,

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£40 to £60 as an auction estimate, how does that sound?

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-That sounds fine.

-All right. Let's keep going.

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'Gayle also digs out this gold slave bangle.

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'It used to belong to her great aunt. It's 15-carat gold

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'and Paul values it at £50 to £80.

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'When it gets to auction, we are more than surprised by the response.'

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-That's great, isn't it?

-120. 130.

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-140. 150. 160.

-Fantastic!

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'We'll find out later just how much it makes.

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'As the search of Moya's house continues,

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'Paul comes across something else he thinks should do well at auction -

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'a couple of Edwardian mahogany side chairs with inlaid backs.

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'They get a very healthy £60 to £100 valuation.

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'And it seems our expert is on a roll.'

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-Moya.

-Yes, Paul?

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-Now, who's been the smoker in the house?

-My husband.

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-Oh, right. It wasn't you?

-Yes, I did, for quite a few years.

-Right.

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You've got quite a set here. A nice lighter, an ashtray, cigarette case and a couple of cigarette boxes.

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-Yes.

-Quite a lot, isn't it?

-It is a lot, yes.

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-Were these items that he collected?

-No, he acquired those for being with the firm for 25 years.

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This one dates from 1930, typically Art Deco.

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I don't think I've ever seen a silver lighter like that,

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so it's very unusual.

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What you do tend to see is more the Victoriana.

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This is a lovely old cigarette case which has been hand-chased.

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The silversmith would have a little tiny die and hammer

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and he would chase this decoration all the way round, all by hand. Beautiful.

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But these can have another use. I actually use one of these now for credit cards.

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You can put your credit cards in there and it stays nice and rigid so you don't break them.

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So there's also a multitude of uses for items like this.

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OK, you've got two cigarette boxes, as well,

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and I think they could be used more for jewellery items,

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little knickknacks, that sort of thing. So you don't have to use them for cigarettes.

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If I said at least £100, maybe up to £150

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for that lot, how does that sound?

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-That'd be fine.

-That sound all right?

-Yes, it sounds very well.

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'Moya's lovely home is full of places to search.

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'In the garden room, she spots a Victorian willow pattern china bowl.

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'It's part of a small collection that belonged to her mother-in-law,

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'but they're not to Moya's taste. Paul gives them the thumbs up

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'and values them at £40 to £60.'

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'And I think I might be onto something too!'

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Come and have a look at this.

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I've seen the two words Derby and china.

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Of course, Derby isn't in China, it's in Derbyshire.

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But the reason we actually use the word china is that, originally, all the porcelain came from China

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and it was imported, since the 16th century,

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and, of course, when you looked at your old porcelain, you said it's "me old china".

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-So whose are these?

-That was given to my father. It was a present from a contractor.

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-I think he was quite disappointed that it wasn't a bottle of scotch.

-THEY LAUGH

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This is an Imari style, which comes from Japan,

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and it always has the brick-red colour, the dark blue and the gilded decoration.

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That's actually 22-carat gold leaf, which is lovely.

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But it was originally the Derby factory, since about 1750,

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but then King George III visited the factory

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and he put the crown, so it became Crown Derby.

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And then Victoria visited again in the late 19th century

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and she let them use the word Royal.

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So Royal Crown Derby is all to do with the royal family.

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But an average cup and saucer like this, from the '70s or '80s,

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you're looking at maybe £30 to £50.

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It's never been one of my favourite things. Sounds fine.

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'Well, looking outside, there are plenty of reminders of Moya's love of caravanning

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'and I want to know more about her holiday plans for the future.'

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It's time for a little break for you and me, and I think we deserve it.

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I want to know what we're raising this money for. Tell me about this trip. Where do you want to go?

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To fly out to British Columbia

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and then go to Peachland, which is further inland, to see my friend.

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-I want to know a bit more about Margaret. How did you meet her?

-We met her on our first motorhome trip

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in 1991, I think it was,

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on a camping site

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and Jack was wandering around outside the van

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and a voice said, "Are you English?"

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And that was Margaret. And from then on, we teamed up with them,

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went to their home eventually, she and her husband, Alan, who has since died.

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And, yeah, from then on, we were friends.

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-What sort of trip are you planning?

-Well, that really depends on Margaret.

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We've never had a holiday on our own, so I really don't know.

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But I rather feel that she's got a few quirky things up her sleeve.

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-Well, I'm sold on her.

-Good! You should do it.

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-If we raise a bit more money, will you take me, as well?

-Oh, yeah.

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-OK, excellent. Hard work, I'm in. Let's go and find Paul, come on.

-Fair enough.

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'As you can tell, I don't get out much, and neither does poor old Paul.

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'Gayle's spotted this silver batch dressing table set.

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'It belonged to her great aunt and has a Birmingham hallmark from 1925.

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'Sadly, Paul thinks the condition is poor and their estimate is £40 to £60.

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'And then Moya notices a large collection of books that needs an expert opinion.'

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Ah, what have we found?

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-I've got some Dickens here.

-Oh, right.

-I think I've got the whole set.

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-The complete works of Dickens.

-Wow.

-What was it about Dickens that fascinated you?

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-It wasn't me, it was my step-father.

-OK.

-He collected the whole lot and he loved Dickens.

-Right.

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Well, Charles Dickens has to be one of Britain's best-known authors, if not the most popular,

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-and we're all familiar with the stories. Did you have a favourite?

-Erm, well, we all know Oliver Twist.

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-Yes, of course.

-And Pickwick Papers.

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But the books themselves were started almost by accident.

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What happened was, Charles Dickens came from quite a wealthy family,

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but they fell onto hard times, and from the age of 12,

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he actually worked in a boot polish factory.

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So he saw first-hand what it was like to work in these workhouses.

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And he started to do some stories about events that had happened in his own life and fictitious events,

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and the rest is history. Dickens, Shakespeare and the teachings of Chairman Mao

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-are the three most produced books in the world.

-Really? Gosh!

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Lots of those around. But people do buy them.

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-If I said maybe £100, £120, how does that sound?

-Ooh.

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-Do you think a little more, a little bit less?

-Can we set a reserve?

-Of course.

-100?

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-So a minimum of £100?

-Yes.

-And if they don't sell, we'll send Fagin and the boys in and bring them back.

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-OK. Right.

-Let's keep looking.

-Right.

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'Moya's lovely house is a real joy to explore.

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'In the dining room, I've noticed this oil lamp base on the sideboard.

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'It's Victorian black pottery with flora decoration

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'and it belonged to Jack's mother.

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'Although Moya doesn't like it, Paul says the bidders might,

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'and gives it a £30 to £50 estimate.

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'And Paul and Gayle are having one last search for treasure.'

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Ah. Now then.

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This is a nice item. A nice old charm bracelet.

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Look at that. Is that your mum's?

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-No, I think that was my grandmother's.

-Really?

-Mm.

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-Right, OK, that's interesting. It's definitely worth something.

-Great.

-Let's hear the story. Moya, Chris.

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-Whoops. We're being called.

-What do you think? Just fits me nicely.

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Oh, beautiful! THEY LAUGH

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-Isn't that a cracker?

-Is that a charm bracelet?

-It's an old charm bracelet, yes.

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-I take it this was yours, Moya?

-My mother's.

-Your mother's. OK.

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Actually, it could've been your grandfather's.

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Bear with me, because I know charm bracelets are predominantly worn by ladies.

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-This is actually part of an Albert chain.

-Oh.

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So you had your pocket watch here and two lengths of this type of chain.

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And when they went out of fashion, when the wrist watch came along,

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they started to recycle them and they would make them into items exactly like this.

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-Is that a squirrel and a duck?

-We've got a cat and a duck

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and we've got this one, like a tambourine and a pair of maracas.

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But what I like is you can actually see the two different types of gold.

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This one is a rose gold, typically Victorian,

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and this is more modern, this very bright, brassy gold.

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And the reason for that is, if you made an item from pure gold, 24-carat gold,

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it's too soft, the whole thing disintegrates.

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So what you have to do is mix it with another metal, to give it strength.

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And in the Victorian times, what was very popular was copper.

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So the charms are later than the actual chain, which is why I think it's been part of an Albert.

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If I stuck my neck out and said £150 to £200, how does that sound?

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-Really?

-Sounds fantastic.

-Extraordinary.

-It's charming.

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-ALL: Ohh!

-I did warn you.

-Sorry about that.

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I know you wanted to raise about £500 to £600.

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Well, I think we've done a really good job

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because, conservatively, if we take all of your items to auction,

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-we reckon we could make around £760.

-Wow!

-How do you feel about that?

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That's good! That's very good!

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-I think that's an excellent day's work. What about you, Paul?

-Fantastic.

-Very good!

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'And so are we. Those two pieces of gold really made a difference to Moya's total today.

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'I'm looking forward to finding out if Paul's estimates are close to the eventual sale prices.

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'We have the silver cigarette set which was given to her husband Jack

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'after 25 years of service.

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'The guide price here is £100 to £150.

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'And that copper fire screen which Moya's father-in-law found in a junk yard.

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'That was given an estimate of £100 to £120.

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'And finally, we have the collection of books by Charles Dickens.

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'They're in such good condition that we have great expectations of them making £100 to £120.

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'Still to come in Cash In The Attic, could we be off to a shaky start?'

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Surely £10 for the silver top. Nobody want it for £10?

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'But it's not too long before the bidders take a shine to our lots.'

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-Yes!

-Excellent.

-Very good.

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'And what could be the object of Paul and Moya's affections?'

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-You hate this, don't you?

-I hated it.

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-What is it about it that you dislike so much?

-It's just ugly.

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'We'll find out when the final hammer falls.'

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We had a great time at Moya's house, but now it's down to business,

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so we've brought all the items here to the Chiswick Auction Rooms

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and we want to raise around £500. Fingers crossed now as those items go under the hammer.

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'All the lots have been on view in the auction room for several days.

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'I'm sure they've attracted interest.'

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'Since our last meeting, I hear Moya's been uncertain about selling that copper fire screen.

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'But it looks like it's made it here after all.'

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-Hello, you two!

-Hello!

-Hello.

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I'm very pleased to see you two, but I'm also quite pleased to see this.

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-You've brought it along.

-Yes.

-Were there any umming and ahhings about this?

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Well, there is a little bit of a hole where I removed it,

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but I expect I can find a large plant to put in there. THEY LAUGH

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-So it can go at any price?

-Erm, fixed price.

-Ooh. Fixed price of?

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I'd like 120.

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That's fine, it's within estimate. If it's any more than that, it can be a problem for the auctioneer.

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£120 fixed reserve on that.

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-Fingers crossed. Let's get in position.

-OK!

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'If you have a special project in mind and you'd like to try buying or selling in this way,

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'it's worth remembering that there are charges to be paid, such as commission.

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'These vary from one saleroom to another, so it's always worth checking in advance.

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'Let's get started. The first lot is the silver-topped sugar shaker.'

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I'm bid £10 down there. At £10.

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£12 now. 14? 14.

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£14 here. At 14. Anybody else?

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At £14. 16.

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-£16 to my left. At £16. Anybody else? At £16 it goes.

-HAMMER BANGS

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-Ohh.

-Are you happy with that?

-It'll do.

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'A slightly disappointing start, but at least it's sold.

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'Next up is some china. It's the Royal Crown Derby cup and saucer with a matching side plate.

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'They were a present to Jack from someone he once worked for.

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'We're hoping for £30 to £50 for them.'

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I'm straight in here at £30.

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-Ooh.

-That's great.

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35. 40. On the book at £40.

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-Still at 40. 45. 50.

-Wow.

-Still with me at £50.

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On the book still at 50. Are you all done? At £50 with me, on the book at £50 and selling.

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-£50! That's great!

-Good.

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-Upper limit there, Paul. That's good.

-Mm!

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-Brilliant, isn't it? You've no more in a cupboard?

-No.

0:18:220:18:24

'That's a great result. I think Moya was very impressed with how quickly it was snapped up.

0:18:240:18:29

'Our third lot is a Victorian oil lamp base which once belonged to her mother-in-law.

0:18:290:18:36

'It has a estimate of £30 to £50.'

0:18:360:18:40

-You hate this, don't you?

-I hated it!

0:18:400:18:42

-What is it about it that you dislike so much?

-It's just ugly.

0:18:420:18:45

Is it worth £20? £20 for a lamp base, surely. £10 to start me.

0:18:450:18:50

-I think everyone agrees with you, Moya.

-I think so.

0:18:500:18:53

No interest at all? Passing the lot, I'm afraid.

0:18:530:18:56

Oh, dear!

0:18:560:18:58

'Hm. Oh, dear, indeed!

0:18:580:19:00

'Poor Moya. The one item she really wanted to get rid of today

0:19:000:19:03

'and she's got to take it back with her.

0:19:030:19:06

'Will she have more luck with those Victorian Scottish brooches?

0:19:060:19:09

'They're in the catalogue at £40 to £60.'

0:19:090:19:13

You're hoping for quite a lot for this. It's got gemstones.

0:19:130:19:17

These are from the Cairngorm Mountains. That's my best Scottish accent.

0:19:170:19:20

-When's the last time you wore them?

-I didn't. They were Mum's.

0:19:200:19:25

-Almost new!

-Almost new.

-THEY LAUGH

0:19:250:19:28

Start me these, £20 for them. Must be worth £10 each, surely.

0:19:280:19:32

10 I'm bid. £20 I'm bid, rather. Thank you. At 20.

0:19:320:19:36

22. 25. 28.

0:19:360:19:39

30. 2. 35.

0:19:390:19:42

-£35 on that sofa there.

-Just a little, please.

0:19:420:19:44

Anybody else? £35 for the Scottish brooches. At £35. 35. I'm going to sell them, then. 35.

0:19:440:19:50

-Ooh, just under.

-35.

-That's not too bad, is it?

0:19:500:19:55

'I think Moya would've preferred a little bit more for those brooches,

0:19:550:19:59

'but it has put another £35 in the kitty towards that trip to Canada.

0:19:590:20:03

'The silver-backed dressing table set is coming up now. It's hallmarked Birmingham 1925

0:20:040:20:09

'and it belonged to Moya's aunt.'

0:20:090:20:11

Plenty of silver there. Start me at £20 for the lot, please.

0:20:110:20:14

20 I'm bid down below. 22.

0:20:140:20:17

25. 28.

0:20:170:20:19

30. Are you bidding upstairs? 32.

0:20:190:20:23

-35. 38.

-Yes!

0:20:230:20:26

-40. 42. 45.

-New bidder.

-48.

0:20:260:20:30

50. £50 down below.

0:20:300:20:33

At £50. You all done? 55.

0:20:330:20:36

-60.

-60.

-Lovely.

0:20:360:20:38

No? £60 in the middle, then. At £60. I'm going to sell it, then. £60 and going.

0:20:380:20:43

-Yes!

-Excellent!

-Very good!

-Top estimate, that.

0:20:430:20:47

'So, despite the damage, that set did really well.

0:20:470:20:50

'It's probably down to the fact that it had so much silver in it.

0:20:500:20:55

'Up next, for £40 to £60, the Victorian willow pattern china,

0:20:550:20:59

'which belonged to Moya's mother-in-law.'

0:20:590:21:01

Anybody else? 28.

0:21:010:21:03

-At 28 it goes.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:21:030:21:05

-28.

-Not bad.

-Not too bad, is it, that?

0:21:050:21:08

'I think Moya's just relieved to have it taken off her hands!

0:21:080:21:11

'It's been an auction of mixed fortunes

0:21:110:21:13

'and with half our lots sold, we've made £189.

0:21:130:21:17

'It's not bad, but there's a way to go yet

0:21:170:21:20

'if we're to reach our target of £500.

0:21:200:21:22

'But I have high hopes for the next lot, and I think Moya has too.

0:21:220:21:27

'She's put a reserve of £120 on her Arts and Crafts copper fire screen.'

0:21:270:21:32

What's it worth for the fire screen? £80 to go for it.

0:21:350:21:39

-80 I'm bid.

-80.

-85. 90. 95.

0:21:390:21:41

£95 for the fire screen. £95. 100 I'll take. At 95.

0:21:410:21:46

-He won't sell it.

-Ohh.

0:21:460:21:48

At 95. Not quite enough, I'm afraid.

0:21:480:21:50

-No. Goes home.

-You quite happy with that?

-Yes.

0:21:500:21:53

-You're going to have to clean it now.

-Oh, well, never mind.

0:21:530:21:56

'Oh, no, that's a bit of a blow to our Canada fund.

0:21:560:21:59

'We've got five lots left now. Everything rests on these making over £300 between them.

0:21:590:22:05

'First, then, it's the 15-carat gold slave bangle.

0:22:050:22:10

'Its estimate is £50 to £80.'

0:22:100:22:12

I'm straight in at £60.

0:22:120:22:15

With me at £60. 65. 70. 5. 80. 5.

0:22:150:22:18

-90. 5. 100.

-That's great!

-110. 120.

0:22:180:22:21

130. 140. 150. 160.

0:22:210:22:24

-Fantastic!

-Come on!

0:22:240:22:27

-180. 190.

-Hands everywhere!

-200. 210.

0:22:270:22:30

-In the doorway at £210.

-I don't believe it.

-At 210.

0:22:300:22:33

-220 now. At 230.

-Fantastic!

0:22:330:22:36

Are you bidding 240?

0:22:360:22:38

-Go on, bid 240.

-240 nearer to me now. 240.

0:22:380:22:41

-At 240. I'm going to sell at 240.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:22:410:22:44

-Fantastic!

-Well done!

-Fantastic!

0:22:440:22:47

HE MIMES

0:22:470:22:49

'Well, that took us completely by surprise! An astonishing result.

0:22:490:22:53

'Paul's estimate was based on the value of the precious metal,

0:22:530:22:57

'but as 15-carat gold is no longer made, it's become very popular.

0:22:570:23:01

'I'm sure that would explain the extraordinary sale price.

0:23:010:23:05

'Next we have the complete works of Charles Dickens, 22 volumes in fact.

0:23:070:23:11

'The estimate is £100 to £120.'

0:23:110:23:14

£100, the Charles Dickens. £100.

0:23:160:23:18

All done? At £100, the full works.

0:23:180:23:20

-Good.

-We got the money.

-We did.

-That's fine.

0:23:200:23:25

'Well, my great expectations were slightly blunted

0:23:250:23:28

'and, like Oliver Twist, we could've wished for more!

0:23:280:23:31

'But these family heirlooms achieved their reserve

0:23:310:23:34

'and there's no grumbling about that.

0:23:340:23:36

'The two Edwardian mahogany side chairs are coming up next.

0:23:360:23:40

'They belonged to Moya's in-laws, who were great collectors.

0:23:400:23:43

'We're looking for £60 to £100. Let's see how they did.'

0:23:430:23:46

-A little bit of interest in these. I'm bid £30.

-We're bid 30 already.

0:23:460:23:51

35 now. 40. 45. 50.

0:23:510:23:54

£50 for those chairs. At £50 for the two little chairs.

0:23:540:23:57

-£50. I'm selling at 50.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:23:570:24:00

-Ohh. £10 less than we wanted.

-Never mind.

0:24:000:24:03

'Moya's got the right attitude here. Those chairs didn't do too badly after all.

0:24:030:24:08

'Now it's back to some silver, the lighter, ashtray, cigarette case and two cigarette boxes.

0:24:080:24:13

'The estimate is £100 to £150.'

0:24:130:24:18

I'm bid 65. 70. 5.

0:24:180:24:20

80. 5.

0:24:200:24:22

-100.

-Yes.

-110. 120.

0:24:220:24:26

-120 there, original bidder at 120. 120 it goes.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:24:260:24:30

-Brilliant!

-That's great, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Straight in the middle.

-Lovely.

0:24:300:24:34

'The second half of the auction is making up for the first,

0:24:340:24:37

'and Moya has just one more lot to go,

0:24:370:24:40

'that nine-carat gold charm bracelet on an Albert chain.

0:24:400:24:44

'The last lot of gold did incredibly well, so we hope this one follows suit.

0:24:440:24:47

'£150 to £200 is the estimate.'

0:24:470:24:49

And there's interest in that straight off. I'm bid £140.

0:24:530:24:55

-140.

-Wow!

0:24:550:24:58

At £140. 150, thank you.

0:24:580:25:00

160 now. 170.

0:25:000:25:03

180. Are you bidding 190? 190 I'm bid.

0:25:030:25:07

190 in the doorway. At 190. Anybody else?

0:25:070:25:10

£190. 200. 210.

0:25:100:25:13

220. 230.

0:25:140:25:16

240. 250.

0:25:160:25:18

260. 270.

0:25:190:25:21

-270, then, in the doorway at 270. 270.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:25:210:25:26

-Amazing!

-Whoa!

-That's brilliant, isn't it?

0:25:260:25:29

-Fantastic!

-We need to dig out more gold.

0:25:290:25:33

We do! Have you got any more gold jewellery?!

0:25:330:25:35

THEY LAUGH

0:25:350:25:39

'Well, it's another indicator of the top prices that gold collectables are making at the present time.

0:25:390:25:45

'Moya's picked the perfect time to sell and I'm sure it's made all the difference to her target.'

0:25:450:25:50

-We're just recovering, I think, from the last gold sale, aren't we?

-Absolutely! Thank you!

0:25:500:25:55

-We wanted to raise £500 today.

-Yes, we did.

0:25:550:25:59

Because the grand total is £969!

0:25:590:26:05

-No!

-Incredible!

-Really?

-That's amazing!

0:26:050:26:07

-Fantastic!

-That's wonderful!

-I can't believe it!

0:26:070:26:11

'Moya is hoping to take a long train journey when she visits her friend Margaret in Canada.

0:26:150:26:20

'Her younger daughter, Helen, is helping her plan the trip.'

0:26:200:26:23

Where would it start from?

0:26:230:26:26

I was hoping it would start from Newfoundland.

0:26:260:26:31

It's been very interesting doing Cash In The Attic

0:26:310:26:35

and, of course, the money I've made at the auction will help towards the fare.

0:26:350:26:41

If you want to raise some money for something special and you think you might have hidden treasures,

0:26:450:26:50

why don't you apply to be on the show? All the details at online at:

0:26:500:26:54

Good luck and I'll see you next time on Cash In The Attic.

0:26:540:26:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:080:27:11

Moya Miller wants to visit her friend Margaret in Canada, and decides that a sale of her unused nick-nacks could help to fund the trip. On hand with advice are Chris Hollins and Paul Hayes, plus Moya's daughter Gail.