Hasthorpe Cash in the Attic


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Hasthorpe

Antiques series. Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes help Heather and her husband raise £500 towards a trip to Canada, Heather's mother's homeland.


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic.

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I'm sure that sometime or another, many of you have moved house.

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And if you have, you'll know that that's when all sorts of things turn up that have just got to go.

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So you decide to sell them and hopefully make some money on them.

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Well, that's the situation that's facing the family that I'm about to meet.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic, it's a case of facing up to the fact that all eyes are on us.'

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-So which is Frank's eyes?

-Is it this one?

-Could be.

-Or on the shark perhaps?

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'Who would have guessed one of Hollywood's biggest stars would make an appearance?'

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-"From your one and only Clark."

-'At auction, could a small slip-up ruin our couple's chances?'

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-I think he's left it unsold.

-He's left it unsold!

-Oh...

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'Find out what happens when the hammer falls.'

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Today I'm in Grimsby,

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where I'm about to meet three generations of the same family

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who've decided to sell up and move.

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And I must admit, I've already been having a look in the house,

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and I've come across these pieces from a rather unusual chess set. They're going to auction,

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but are they going to make us a king's ransom or go for just a few pawns?

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We'll soon find out.

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'Heather Hasthorpe grew up and lives in Grimsby,

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'but her heart belongs to Canada.

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'Heather's mother was raised in Winnipeg

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'but came to this country as a young woman to marry Heather's father.

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'Heather was happy in the UK, but considered a move to Canada in her early twenties.

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'However, like her mother before her, love stopped her in her tracks.

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'Because she met her future husband Frank and continued to live in England.

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'Now proud grandparents, Frank and Heather have had a good life together.

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'But it's time for Heather to fulfil her dream and live in Canada.

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'Their grandson Charlie and son-in-law Dan have come round to help today.

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'And our expert Paul Hayes is also here to find any antiques that they have around the house

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'that they want to take to auction.'

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-Who's that, Charlie?

-I think we've got a veritable bumper bundle of Hasthorpes here.

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-And I bet you're Charlie, are you?

-Nah...

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-You're not? So who are you?

-Charlie.

-You ARE Charlie.

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-How old are you?

-Three.

-You're three!

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-And you're going to be helping Granny and Grandad today?

-Yeah.

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-Ah, I thought you were. And this is Granny Heather?

-That's right.

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-And Frank?

-Yes.

-And son-in-law Dan.

-That's right.

-Right!

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Why have you called in Cash In The Attic?

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To actually go to Canada. I'd love to go there for a holiday, or I'd like to live there, actually.

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-What's this fascination with Canada?

-My daughter lives there

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and my mother was Canadian.

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-So Canada's got a great attraction for you?

-Oh yes.

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You've got two daughters, haven't you?

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-Cos Charlie's mum's here.

-That's right, but my other daughter lives in Vancouver.

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How do you feel about going to Canada?

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My age is against me, but I'd like to go. I would.

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-Dan, you're married to Heather and Frank's other daughter Kelly.

-Yes.

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-Are you all moving to Canada too?

-We'd love to. We'd do it at the drop of a hat.

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It's just down to cost at the moment,

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but we love it. It's beautiful,

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and we believe it'd be a better standard of life for Charlie.

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-It'd be a great place for Charlie to grow up in.

-Oh yeah. Fantastic, yeah.

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So how much do we think we're going to raise?

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-About £500.

-500?

-Yes.

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Charlie? You're going to go and help Granny and Grandad find some things around the house?

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-Yeah.

-Tell me where you're going to look, then.

-Under the bed.

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-And where else?

-In the cupboard.

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-You are going to find the best things in there, aren't you?

-Yes.

-Yes!

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He's going to be our super sleuth today.

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I brought Paul Hayes, who is already having a look round

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to see what we might be able to take to auction.

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We don't want to leave him on his own for too long, cos you never know what he will come up with.

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So how are you doing there, Charlie?

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'The Hasthorpe home is immaculate.

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'So what's likely to be hidden away in cupboards or under the bed is yet to be seen.

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'But Paul's already spotted something.'

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-Ah, hello!

-There you go, I told you he'd be hard at work already.

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-Would you like to buy a balloon?

-Oh yes, definitely. I like that yellow one.

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They're lovely, aren't they? Very famous figure. Where did you get them from?

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They came from Aunt Rae's in Canada. We went over there for her hundredth birthday.

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And... Unfortunately, she didn't make it.

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So when we went there, we were offered them. We said we could take what we wanted.

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And what was it that appealed to you?

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The balloon sellers I remembered on my auntie's fireplace.

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She had them there, and they're the only things I could really remember in the room.

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That's what attracted me.

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So these figurines have great memories for you,

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-not just of your aunt, but of Canada.

-Yes.

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This is one of the most popular figurines that Royal Doulton did.

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And it's called The Old Balloon Seller.

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It's part of a series called The Street Sellers.

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So they had people selling flowers, matchsticks and so on.

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-She looks like Old Mother Riley, doesn't she?

-She does.

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But the modelling is absolutely superb. It's a guy called Leslie Harradine.

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He was head at Doulton for a long time and he came up with all these wonderful designs.

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And this one dates from early 1930s, just before the Second World War.

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How much might the three of them make together?

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If I was being conservative here... These turn up between £40 and £60 a figure.

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So if we said that at least for each three,

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that's £120. But if there's a rare one amongst them...

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The gentleman might be rarer than the lady.

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At least £120 for these three. How does that sound?

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-Fine.

-Sounds OK, doesn't it?

-It does, yeah. Really good.

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Well, I think 120 is a very good foundation

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on which we're going to build the £500 we're going to raise today.

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-So let's go and see what else we can find.

-OK.

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'It's appropriate that something Heather inherited from a Canadian aunt

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'could help her to go back to that country.

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'Dan's found a 20th century Lladro piece.

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'Since 1953, Lladro porcelain has been known for its distinctive design and soft colouring.

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'Will this lady attract £60-100?'

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'Everywhere you look in this home,

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'there's evidence of Canadian heritage.

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'But something in the bedroom

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'has a British link to a different neighbour across the pond.'

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-Hi, Paul!

-Hello, you two!

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Come and join me - just in time.

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What have you got here? The famous Fischer-Kasparov game?

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I don't think that's what it is, no.

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This is a re-enactment of the American War of Independence.

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It's obviously a chess set,

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but we've got America here and Great Britain over here.

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It looks like 18th century. I think that's what it is.

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We've got George Washington on his famous white horse,

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the minutemen and the eagle of America lined up against

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the British lion and the famous redcoats.

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Isn't that fantastic? What a great thing.

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So you've got a war game and a game of chess, all in one.

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I think we know who wins...

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-But maybe not every game.

-Yeah, I'm afraid it's not us.

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Are you great chess players in the family?

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No, neither of us play.

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We play chequers with them, but we haven't played any chess.

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What made you buy it?

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I think it was because my mother was born in America,

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and I saw a connection there, but I just like the figures.

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It's very unusual,

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but they do make chess sets in all sorts of different characters.

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If you think of a subject,

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there will be a chess set made around that subject.

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But the actual game was developed in India in about the 6th century.

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It was called chaturanga,

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and they used elephants and chariots for the bishops and the rooks.

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They had infantry and cavalry, but very similar game to what we have now.

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But wonderful. Once you get to know how to play,

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you can use any chess set.

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-Are these lead then, Paul?

-They're lead.

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They're almost like the Britains soldiers.

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Britains were a massive manufacturer of lead figurines.

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They would be made in a mould and then they would be all hand-painted.

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The detail in the painting is absolutely exquisite, isn't it?

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They've gone to a lot of trouble.

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You can tell it's such a quality item.

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The board itself is rosewood. It's beautiful.

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The sandalwood in the middle gives its contrasting colours.

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I just think it's super, really.

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With Charlie around,

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you couldn't possibly have lead figures with paint on them

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around the house, could you?

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So if we sell it, how much do you think they might make?

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As an auction estimate, to give it a real chance,

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if I said between £60-100...

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I think someone who really takes a shine to it...

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You've got the American history enthusiasts here

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and a chess player as well, and it's complete.

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So if I said at least £60 to give it a chance,

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but I think on the day, it could do a bit more.

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'Oh, to have the power of altering history with just a few chess moves.

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'Living in Grimsby, it's clear that Heather and Frank treasure the seaside.

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'We've discovered a whimsical painting that reflects their enjoyment of the coast.

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'This colourful beach scene was painted by a local artist

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'and Paul thinks someone would love to take it home for £40-60.

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'Everyone's rolling up their sleeves today, including young Charlie.

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'Or is he just playing?'

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So Heather, just explain to me what this fascination with Canada is in a bit more detail.

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My mother was born in America but actually lived in Canada for most of her life.

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My parents were pen friends and she came over here to get married.

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So your father must have been very persuasive. So when did you first visit the country?

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After my father died I went, when I was 20,

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and travelled coast-to-coast on the train and saw all my relations, who are splattered all about Canada.

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-Is that what made you feel you wanted to stay there?

-Yes, I did apply to emigrate at that time.

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Unfortunately after that, or fortunately, I met Frank.

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-So how did you two meet?

-We met at work, didn't we? We both worked for the same company and...

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Cos I worked for the GPO and they were on strike, and I needed money to emigrate to Canada.

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So I went to work at CV Polymers and you were there. That's where I met you.

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How about you then, Frank? Wouldn't you like to live in Canada?

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The next year, we went to Canada. Was it the next year we went there?

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And I must admit, I was pretty taken with the place,

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but...never asked me to move there, but I wouldn't.

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-Why not?

-I had a big family and think we were all close then,

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you know, really close.

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-I didn't want to do it.

-Grimsby has been your home ever since.

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-What was it like growing up here?

-It was... Actually, it was nice.

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-I enjoyed Grimsby. It was quite lively.

-Yeah, I enjoyed it.

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I remember going down to the fish docks with my father to get his pay,

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as most children did. And there was a really good community spirit in Grimsby.

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-You worked on the docks, didn't you?

-That's right. About 17 years on the commercial docks.

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It was good money then. It was good money.

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Now you've decided you really do want to live in Canada.

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If I won the lottery, I'd be there tomorrow. ANGELA LAUGHS

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You won't win the lottery,

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but I know that Charlie and Dan and Paul have been hard at work,

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so shall we go and see how much they've managed to find?

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'If Heather did win the lottery, there'd be no need for us.

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'Frank's found another thing that'll help them wing their way to Canada.

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'This 19th century station clock is in perfect condition,

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'which means we can ask for £100-150.

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'That means that so far, we've raised £380 towards our £500 target.

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'And with many more rooms to investigate,

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'it looks like they'll be booking plane tickets in no time.

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'Surely there must be something in this vast china cupboard.

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'But hold on, there's something staring us in the face!'

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I must say, I love this hallway.

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Has this always been in the hall here?

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Since we bought our house around the corner on Welholme Road.

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It was in the house when we moved in.

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-All right! So this has come from you?

-Yes. We didn't get on with it,

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so we said they could have it and they've kept it in the hallway since 2007.

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Where it came from before that, I do not know.

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-How old is your house?

-1920 it was built.

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That's dead on the time when this hallstand was made. We're looking 1920s, 1930s.

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Very Art Deco. The main point with Art Deco is the use of geometry.

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You've got this sort of almost triangular shape here, these sharp angles here...

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The whole thing is solid oak, which is lovely.

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You used to see them everywhere at the times when people used to wear macs and hats.

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They would always be in the hallway near the front door.

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You'd put your hat or coat on these items.

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You'd put your umbrella here, and all the drips would catch in these pans at the bottom.

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Under here would be your gloves,

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and you'd check yourself in the mirror as you go in and out.

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-A very clever invention, but I take it it's something that you never use?

-No.

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There is quite a demand for these. If anybody wants an old-fashioned look, it's perfect.

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If I said sort of £40-60, how does that sound?

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It sounds fine.

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-So that can definitely go? There's no problem there at all?

-No.

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All right, that's £40 in the kitty. Grab your coat, you've pulled.

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'It's important to have a place to hang your hat, but come auction day,

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-'I wonder if the bidders will feel the same way.'

-FRANK CHUCKLES

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'As we continue our rummage in Grimsby, I've enlisted the help of Charlie.

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'He's got the hang of it now and points me in the right direction.

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'Heather bought this cameo brooch piece in an antique shop years ago.

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'The 9-carat gold and pink shell inset reflect its classic Victorian design.'

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'If Frank and Heather are happy to let it go, it could fetch £60-100.

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'Meantime in the kitchen,

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'Heather's having a good root through a box of cards.'

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Now then, Heather... What have you found? Something good?

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-Lots of postcards that my mother collected.

-All right.

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I love postcards. Where are they all from?

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-All sorts of places.

-Was she well travelled?

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-Yes, she was. And there's that one as well.

-OK. Who is this, then?

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Clark Gable. I don't think it's really from him. You read it.

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It says here, "My own darling Irene,

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"just a line hoping you are always thinking of me as I am of you

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"from your one and only Clark." So did she have a relationship with Clark Gable?

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I don't think so.

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I think it was a joke. I think my uncle, she said, had sent it.

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Because he went to the movie studios, and it was at that time she received that from Clark Gable.

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-But she never did find out.

-She never met him or anything like that?

-No.

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It definitely is a publicity shot that you'll get of all the Hollywood actors at the time.

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But what an interesting thing. What else have we got here?

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-Some funny ones. Mabel Lucie Atwell, have you heard of her?

-Yes.

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Very famous 1930s cartoonist.

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Ah! This is what you're looking for. Look at that.

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Anything to do with transport. Trains, planes, automobiles...

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All that sort of thing. Shipping lines are very popular. That's a White Star Line as well.

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Aquitania. That's very collectable. This is quite a collection here.

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-Some funnies as well.

-There's some funny ones. A Windsor one.

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-Nothing sentimental here at all?

-No. No.

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OK, I'll tell you what we'll do. If these will be sorted out by the auctioneer,

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he tends to put them in certain categories, in certain orders.

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If we put these in as a lot... If I said £30-50, how does that sound?

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-That sounds brilliant.

-In the meantime, what I think we should do,

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is to try and get a copy of Clark Gable's signature,

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see if we can match that up.

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Cos that potentially could be a very collectable thing.

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All right, so we're looking at £30 plus Clark Gable.

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-That sounds brilliant.

-All right. We don't say that every day, do we?

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-That's brilliant.

-Let's pack them up and keep looking

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-and see if we can find something else.

-Yeah, OK.

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'Paul, you're being very optimistic,

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'but I think if Heather's mum had had a relationship with Clark Gable,

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'she would have shared it not just with her daughter, but the world. I know I would.

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'Heather's decided to let these five 19th century prints from Vanity Fair Magazine go.

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'The publication started in the late 1800s,

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'and Paul hopes that someone will take them off our hands for £30-50.

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'The hunt continues so that the family can make their way to Canada.

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'Even Charlie is working to book his own seat on the plane.'

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Heather, seeing you with your grandson Charlie,

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it's clear that you're very close as a family.

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-You must miss so very much your daughter and granddaughter in Canada.

-Yes.

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-How long has she been there and why did she go?

-Ten years.

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She went there originally to study. She went there to work with a Mr Stanick,

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who was a very famous viola teacher in Canada,

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and managed to get a place there.

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She wanted to stay, so she decided to stay.

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So that's a real reason for you wanting to go to Canada.

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-Yes.

-But when you were younger and you didn't go and you came back to England,

0:17:120:17:17

your father had very definite ideas about what you should do, didn't he?

0:17:170:17:21

He did, yes. He wanted me to go to the college and study catering.

0:17:210:17:27

And I love cooking, but I hated catering.

0:17:270:17:31

When my father died, I came back to Grimsby to look after my mother and I refused,

0:17:310:17:35

even though I was offered a job. I said, "I don't want to do catering any more."

0:17:350:17:39

-I ended up working at the GPO.

-But then, in your forties,

0:17:390:17:43

you fulfilled one of your lifetime ambitions. How did that come about?

0:17:430:17:47

I had been working in a factory and then I decided to actually do some music.

0:17:470:17:52

And from that I went down to Richard Stilgoe's Share Music and Orpheus Centre,

0:17:520:17:58

and he suggested that I do a degree.

0:17:580:18:02

-So Richard Stilgoe is responsible for this?

-He is totally to blame for this.

0:18:020:18:06

I ended up with a degree at Lincoln. I travelled every day to Lincoln.

0:18:060:18:12

-So what did you do with your degree?

-I work at Grimsby Institute

0:18:120:18:15

and I teach maths and English

0:18:150:18:18

and IT, and I also work at Tukes for mental health, which is a cafe,

0:18:180:18:23

funnily enough, although I don't like catering.

0:18:230:18:25

I work to get mental health people back to work.

0:18:250:18:28

You've obviously fulfilled one lifetime ambition

0:18:280:18:31

by becoming a teacher.

0:18:310:18:33

The other lifetime ambition is not just to go on holiday to Canada, but to go and live there.

0:18:330:18:39

Let's see if we can now help to make that particular dream come true

0:18:390:18:43

by raising enough money at auction for you. I think perhaps we'd better go and get back to work.

0:18:430:18:48

'How impressive to have gone back to studying in her forties.

0:18:480:18:53

'Paul's still on the case and has found another beautiful seaside painting.

0:18:530:19:00

'A watercolour of Whitby harbour.

0:19:000:19:03

'This was painted by a local lighthouse keeper, Desmond G Sythes.

0:19:030:19:07

'Paul estimates it might raise £50-100.'

0:19:070:19:10

I must admit, Frank, I've found one of my favourite items.

0:19:110:19:14

-This beautiful settee. Where does this come from?

-I bought it five or six years ago

0:19:140:19:19

from my sister-in-law. She used to do antiques at one time...

0:19:190:19:23

-Ah...

-A few years back, and it was in a bit of a state.

0:19:230:19:27

There was all hair hanging out and we had it recovered from somebody, I think, at Lincoln.

0:19:270:19:33

And I think he made a good job of it.

0:19:330:19:35

That's what I was going to ask you. Normally by now, the stuffing's coming out

0:19:350:19:40

or they're a bit worn. This one is in absolutely mint condition.

0:19:400:19:43

-How long ago was that?

-About five or six years ago.

0:19:430:19:46

Really? It's held up well, hasn't it?

0:19:460:19:48

-What was it that attracted you?

-We liked the frame, the shape, the fact that it was black.

0:19:480:19:53

I don't think you... We've not seen too many black ones.

0:19:530:19:56

-It caught our eye.

-That's what you call the Aesthetic Movement.

0:19:560:20:01

They use black and gilt. That's very architectural.

0:20:010:20:04

It's not so much organic, like the Art Nouveau style.

0:20:040:20:07

And if you think about it, the old Georgian furniture

0:20:070:20:10

was very spindly, very uncomfortable, more for show.

0:20:100:20:13

By the time you get to about 1850 onwards, they're all for comfort.

0:20:130:20:18

Ladies would sit on here and spend hours and chat in their parlour and do their daily activities.

0:20:180:20:22

And these have a specific use.

0:20:220:20:24

-Can you see the way they're sloped?

-That's right.

0:20:240:20:27

If you were a lady, I'll just demonstrate here,

0:20:270:20:30

and I was sat here and I had a big crinoline dress,

0:20:300:20:32

it would all be bunched up.

0:20:320:20:34

What they had to do was to put the excess material around the edge.

0:20:340:20:37

That's why they had a sloping edge. So a nice, neat front like that.

0:20:370:20:41

I can imagine that's been quite expensive to recover.

0:20:410:20:44

I believe it cost us about £300, yes.

0:20:440:20:47

I think he's done an excellent job and it's a nice, neutral colour.

0:20:470:20:50

Value-wise, if I said between £400 and £600, is that what you were thinking as well?

0:20:500:20:57

Could we put a reserve of, say, £500 on it?

0:20:570:21:00

The reserve of £500, then, you'd be happy...

0:21:000:21:02

-On the understanding if it doesn't fetch that, it comes back with you.

-That's fine.

0:21:020:21:07

Let's keep looking.

0:21:070:21:09

'Such a beautiful piece,

0:21:090:21:11

'and a reserve will ensure that they do get a handsome return for their efforts.

0:21:110:21:15

'So far, we've collected some really good items for auction.

0:21:150:21:18

'With several paintings in the mix,

0:21:180:21:20

'I wonder if the Hasthorpes have some artists hidden in their family tree.'

0:21:200:21:24

It's funny little trousers, isn't it?

0:21:240:21:27

Are you going to have a look at this for us?

0:21:270:21:29

-Blimey! What a colourful picture.

-That's some picture, isn't it?

0:21:290:21:33

-It's of Auckland, New Zealand.

-New Zealand? Right, I've got you.

0:21:330:21:37

It's done by my nephew.

0:21:370:21:38

So is he a well-known artist, your nephew?

0:21:380:21:41

-He probably is in New Zealand, but...

-He did some stamps.

0:21:410:21:47

He's done some stamps, yes. First cover stamps and...

0:21:470:21:50

Of course, while I was there, he took a photograph of my eyes and...

0:21:500:21:56

So you think you might be in this picture somewhere?

0:21:560:21:59

-So which is Frank's eyes?

-Is it this one?

-Could be.

-Or on the shark perhaps?

0:21:590:22:03

I love his style. That's the modern method.

0:22:030:22:05

It's almost like a collage, but using photography,

0:22:050:22:08

so they've taken your still and your snapshot

0:22:080:22:11

and made them into these animals that do wonderful things.

0:22:110:22:14

It's fantastic, actually. It's very well done.

0:22:140:22:17

-I would think that took a lot of doing.

-Definitely.

0:22:170:22:20

It's quite a modern method. There's not many people using that sort of design.

0:22:200:22:24

What I have noticed here is Hallmark, they're a massive greeting card chain.

0:22:240:22:28

He must have had a contract with them.

0:22:280:22:30

Is this something that's likely to have a value at auction?

0:22:300:22:33

Limited edition prints can do very well most times.

0:22:330:22:36

The fact that we've got a good artist here...

0:22:360:22:38

He must well-known in New Zealand to be on the cover of the stamps. That would be amazing.

0:22:380:22:43

But if I said £60-100,

0:22:430:22:45

that sort of price band...

0:22:450:22:47

I think the auction room

0:22:470:22:49

-will put it on the internet. Then we might even get an overseas bidder. All right?

-Yeah.

0:22:490:22:53

Let's add that to everything else we've seen.

0:22:530:22:56

But before I tell you how much we think we're going to make,

0:22:560:22:59

let's call in the rest of the family.

0:22:590:23:01

Dan and Charlie, do you want to come and join us?

0:23:010:23:03

And then you can all hear how much we think we might make at auction,

0:23:030:23:08

taking Paul's lowest estimates on everything.

0:23:080:23:12

£500 is your target to get everybody over to Canada for a holiday to see your other daughter.

0:23:120:23:19

But with a bit of luck, Charlie, we should be able to make

0:23:190:23:24

-£1,050.

-Ooh!

-Wow!

-Bit of a difference, isn't it?

0:23:240:23:30

So you should all be on that flight to Canada.

0:23:300:23:35

-But we've got to go to the auction first.

-Yes.

0:23:350:23:38

Thumbs up, Charlie!

0:23:380:23:40

Nearly right!

0:23:410:23:43

'That target does not take into account the reserve that Frank's put on the settee.

0:23:430:23:48

'If it sells for £500 instead of the £400 that we valued it at,

0:23:480:23:52

'our family could actually make £1,150.

0:23:520:23:55

'And included in that target is the chess set,

0:23:550:23:59

'valued at £60-100, which just might inspire a bidding battle.

0:23:590:24:05

'The cameo brooch, a classic collectable

0:24:050:24:07

'that will hopefully fly off the shelf for £60-100.

0:24:070:24:11

'And the three Royal Doulton figurines

0:24:110:24:14

'inherited from Heather's aunt with an estimate of £120-150.

0:24:140:24:18

'But they could be rarer than we think.'

0:24:180:24:22

'Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:24:240:24:26

'a Hollywood heart-throb seems to attract the bidders.'

0:24:260:24:30

-HAMMER BANGS

-There you go.

-Excellent!

0:24:300:24:33

A Clark Gable fan, perhaps? You never know.

0:24:330:24:35

'And later, a surprising outcome.'

0:24:350:24:38

-Oh dear...

-Oh!

-Not sold!

-Wow.

0:24:380:24:42

'Find out what happens when the hammer falls.'

0:24:420:24:45

Well, it seems like only yesterday that we were rummaging in Heather and Frank's home in Grimsby,

0:24:490:24:54

looking for items that we could sell at auction that would help them to realise the dream

0:24:540:24:59

of first a holiday in Canada and then possibly relocation to that country.

0:24:590:25:03

In the meantime, we haven't travelled quite that far.

0:25:030:25:06

We've just come to Derby, to Bamfords Auctioneers.

0:25:060:25:09

Let's hope that we're going to get some really enthusiastic bidding today, to help us make our target.

0:25:090:25:15

'This is one of the biggest auction houses in Derbyshire and has regular weekly sales.

0:25:150:25:20

'It's well-known in the area

0:25:200:25:21

'and it looks like there are the usual flurry of interested buyers here today

0:25:210:25:25

'eyeing up what's on offer.

0:25:250:25:27

'Paul's arrived and is taking a last look at one of the Hasthorpe's most impressive pieces of furniture.'

0:25:270:25:33

Are you having a bit of a sit-down before the hard work begins?

0:25:330:25:36

-I'm waiting for a bus, actually.

-They've actually made a lovely job of recovering it.

0:25:360:25:41

It's beautiful. They've covered it in a neutral colour, it fits in with that modern style.

0:25:410:25:45

It's an antique, but it will go anywhere. I think it's superb. I love this settee.

0:25:450:25:49

Have they had any interest in it?

0:25:490:25:51

Yes. I was chatting to the auctioneer. There's been a lot of interest looking at it.

0:25:510:25:55

They've had a couple of bids.

0:25:550:25:57

Whether it reaches the reserve is another matter, but there's interest.

0:25:570:26:01

We've got some lovely Doulton figurines coming up.

0:26:010:26:04

Yes, of course. I did look at my price guide, which I did promise,

0:26:040:26:07

and the two balloon sellers, they're both still in production, so they have a limited value.

0:26:070:26:12

But the belle of the ball has now stopped being made. That stopped in 1978.

0:26:120:26:16

-So she's a collector's item?

-Yes. Let's hope the collectors are here.

0:26:160:26:20

-And the chess players too, because we've got that chess set.

-Of course.

0:26:200:26:23

You've got a bit of tribal interest, it's good quality.

0:26:230:26:26

That could go away as well.

0:26:260:26:28

I think everything's going to do very well.

0:26:280:26:30

-I hope so too, because Heather and Frank have just arrived, so let's go and join them.

-Great!

0:26:300:26:35

'Brave words, Paul, brave words.

0:26:350:26:38

'But you're right, there is a real mix of things going under the hammer.

0:26:380:26:42

'So let's hope that there's an equally good variety of bidders in the room.

0:26:420:26:47

'And if there are, that can only bode well for Frank and Heather.'

0:26:470:26:51

-Now, then...

-I see you're taking a look at that wonderfully sunny Antipodean scene

0:26:510:26:57

on what is a very, very cold day here.

0:26:570:26:59

I'm glad you said that and not me, Angela.

0:26:590:27:03

-You've put reserves on a couple of things, haven't you?

-Yes.

0:27:030:27:06

We put £500 on the chaise and we put some money on the chess set.

0:27:060:27:10

-How much?

-£100 reserve.

-Why have you done that?

-We thought we might hand it to Charlie.

0:27:100:27:16

I think he'll make better use of it than we have done.

0:27:160:27:20

-Did you bring Charlie with you?

-Yes, he's about somewhere.

0:27:200:27:24

-Just make sure he doesn't bid for anything.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:240:27:27

-We'll keep his hands locked.

-As you can see, the place is starting to fill up,

0:27:270:27:31

-so follow Paul and let's go and take our places.

-Come on!

0:27:310:27:35

'Let's hope that our bidders are a bit more awake than young Charlie today.

0:27:350:27:39

'Frank and Heather want to raise £500 and, with a bit of luck, we might get above that figure.'

0:27:390:27:45

'The bidding is already under way and our first lot,

0:27:460:27:49

'the chess set, is about to take the stand.'

0:27:490:27:53

I have to announce a change of reserve. We've increased the reserve. I have to ask £100.

0:27:530:27:58

£100? £100 for it? £80, then?

0:27:580:28:03

I've got five bids on commission, but they're no longer enough. £80?

0:28:030:28:07

70, then? £50 to start it?

0:28:070:28:10

-£50, there we are.

-Here we go.

0:28:100:28:13

At £50 and 5 now. At £50 and 5?

0:28:130:28:16

-Charlie's going to get it.

-It won't go.

0:28:160:28:18

-60, 65, 70, 75, 80... 85?

-Oh, it's creeping up.

0:28:180:28:24

At £80, can I sell it?

0:28:240:28:26

-Can he sell it for 80?

-No!

-No?

0:28:260:28:29

90? 95. 100?

0:28:290:28:35

£95. 100 now?

0:28:350:28:36

-And 95?

-95 is OK, isn't it?

0:28:360:28:39

All done, and 95.

0:28:390:28:41

-That's good.

-I think he's left it unsold.

-He's left it unsold!

-Oh, has he left it unsold? Oh right.

0:28:410:28:47

-What happens, you see, when you put a reserve...

-Yes.

0:28:470:28:50

-If it doesn't fetch that reserve, you do get to take it home.

-I thought there was a bit of leeway.

0:28:500:28:55

-We'll take it home.

-We're not disappointed at all.

-No, that's fine.

0:28:550:28:59

-So Charlie is going to have to start learning how to play chess.

-Yes, he'll have to teach us!

0:28:590:29:05

'I think that no-sale was meant to be,

0:29:050:29:08

'as Heather and Frank had said, right at the beginning,

0:29:080:29:11

'they wanted to hand it on to Charlie.'

0:29:110:29:14

OK, I really like this next lot.

0:29:140:29:15

It's those five fashion prints.

0:29:150:29:17

They date from the Victorian period,

0:29:170:29:19

and it's wonderful for people to get an indication how design is

0:29:190:29:23

and what the fashions were of the day.

0:29:230:29:25

There's five of these in a set and I've put these in at £30-50.

0:29:250:29:28

These would have been in a magazine originally, wouldn't they?

0:29:280:29:31

Exactly. They would have been cut out and framed up.

0:29:310:29:34

But it's a little capsule of time, exactly how people used to dress.

0:29:340:29:38

-And £30, please. £30? £30 for them?

-Oh!

0:29:380:29:42

20, then? £20 is bid.

0:29:420:29:45

At £20 in the cap, and 2 do I see? At 22.

0:29:450:29:48

-25. 28? Go on, 28.

-Come on...

-30.

-That's more like it.

0:29:480:29:54

And 2? At £30 in the cap, and 2 do I see?

0:29:540:29:58

At £30 and selling...

0:29:580:30:00

-There you go.

-They're sold. Yay!

-On the nose. £30.

-He's a very fashionable chap.

0:30:000:30:05

He's got a flat cap and a whippet.

0:30:050:30:08

'Paul sees himself as the Yves Saint Laurent of the auction world.

0:30:080:30:13

'But I'm not sure I'd let him style me for the Oscars.

0:30:130:30:16

'And up next, it's the Oscar-winning Clark Gable.'

0:30:160:30:19

OK, it's the turn now of that job lot of postcards and memorabilia

0:30:190:30:22

and of course, there is a photograph that's signed somebody called Clark.

0:30:220:30:26

It wasn't Clark Gable, I don't think, no.

0:30:260:30:29

We can't say definitely it is, so we're going to assume it isn't.

0:30:290:30:32

It's going in at £30-50.

0:30:320:30:35

-On commission at £25...

-We've already got interest.

-At £25, at 8 now?

0:30:350:30:39

At £25, at 8? 28, 30 and 2? 32 takes them.

0:30:390:30:46

At £32 standing right at the back, and selling at £32.

0:30:460:30:50

-Oh!

-Excellent!

-A Clark Gable fan, perhaps?

-Yes, that's right.

-You never know.

0:30:500:30:55

'So Clark Gable was irresistible... Even if he was just a photograph.

0:30:550:31:00

'The next two lots showed us

0:31:000:31:02

'that you can never tell which way a sale will go.

0:31:020:31:05

'We had some trouble with the ocean scene painted by Frank's nephew.

0:31:050:31:09

'He may be a well-known artist from New Zealand

0:31:090:31:12

'but didn't generate enough interest for the bidders here to bite.

0:31:120:31:16

'On the other side of the coin,

0:31:160:31:18

'the colourful fairground painting had very good luck,

0:31:180:31:21

'going for £55 - well over Paul's lowest estimate.

0:31:210:31:24

'But nothing is going to disturb Charlie from his slumbers,

0:31:240:31:28

'even though it's his find next.'

0:31:280:31:30

Charlie and I had a good hunt round your house,

0:31:300:31:33

and he actually came across a very pretty little cameo.

0:31:330:31:36

-Where did it come from?

-It was mine. It was stuffed in a drawer.

0:31:360:31:39

I think I've worn it once, that's it.

0:31:390:31:42

-Cameos kind of come in and out of fashion, don't they?

-Yes.

-It's out of fashion with you.

0:31:420:31:47

Let's hope it's in fashion with somebody in the auction room, Paul. You've got it at £60-100.

0:31:470:31:52

It's a lovely example. It's a shell cameo, it's nicely carved,

0:31:520:31:55

there's no splits and it's got a lovely gold frame. So yeah, £60-100. Fantastic.

0:31:550:32:00

Pretty brooch. £60? 50, then?

0:32:000:32:03

£50? Well, 40, then.

0:32:030:32:06

-£40.

-Oh, dear...

0:32:060:32:08

With an estimate of £60-90, who'll bid 40?

0:32:080:32:11

£40?

0:32:110:32:12

-Oh dear...

-Oh!

-Not sold!

-Wow.

0:32:140:32:17

'That took us all by surprise.

0:32:180:32:20

'But, obviously, it's not fashionable in Derby, either.'

0:32:200:32:24

Another disappointment there.

0:32:250:32:27

That's the third thing we've not managed to sell in this first half of the auction.

0:32:270:32:33

So we're sort of staggering towards our £500 total.

0:32:330:32:37

And so far, all that we've made is...

0:32:370:32:42

-£117.

-Oh, that's brilliant!

-But don't lose heart.

0:32:420:32:47

In the second half of the sale, we've still got some really lovely pieces to come.

0:32:470:32:51

But in the meantime, why don't we take a break?

0:32:510:32:53

Paul wants to have a look at some of the other things in the auction room.

0:32:530:32:57

'We may be in need of a breather, but there is still plenty of time left

0:32:570:33:01

'to make Heather and Frank's dream journey to Canada come true.

0:33:010:33:05

'If you'd like to raise money at auction for something special,

0:33:050:33:08

'take note that houses charge a commission.

0:33:080:33:11

'Fees vary from saleroom to saleroom,

0:33:110:33:13

'so it's always best to enquire in advance.

0:33:130:33:16

'Paul's had a snoop around the room,

0:33:160:33:18

'and he's found something which reminds me

0:33:180:33:21

'of the early days in my broadcasting career.'

0:33:210:33:23

-London calling, London calling!

-Glenn Miller's on.

0:33:230:33:27

Yeah, I was going to say, did you get the right programme on that?

0:33:270:33:30

It's got a bit of age to it, hasn't it?

0:33:300:33:32

Definitely a 1930s, 1940s.

0:33:320:33:34

The golden age, really, of the radio.

0:33:340:33:36

This is the pre-television era.

0:33:360:33:38

This is the only form of entertainment that you'd have,

0:33:380:33:41

to listen to the worldwide broadcasts.

0:33:410:33:43

-So what's it made of?

-Bakelite. When Bakelite first came out,

0:33:430:33:47

it was made to imitate other materials, in this case wood.

0:33:470:33:50

But by the end of the 1930s, they were making very bright colours,

0:33:500:33:53

bright green, white examples.

0:33:530:33:55

You get these big, circular examples which are very Art Deco.

0:33:550:33:59

Does it work?

0:33:590:34:00

It does. You can only get long wave, but they're more ornamental.

0:34:000:34:03

If you want that Art Deco look,

0:34:030:34:05

put it on your sideboard and you're instantly back there.

0:34:050:34:08

-What sort of money might it go for?

-It has a little bit of damage.

0:34:080:34:11

There's more than one crackle, but as a fun item here today,

0:34:110:34:14

I reckon you could buy that for £30-50. It's a bargain.

0:34:140:34:17

-We'll tune in to that, won't we?

-I do the jokes!

-THEY LAUGH

0:34:170:34:21

'Well, the bidders did tune in, and to a sum of £35.

0:34:210:34:27

'But it's back to our sale now, and Heather's next item is just about to hit the auction block.'

0:34:270:34:34

Coming up now is my favourite item of all of yours that are in the auction today,

0:34:340:34:38

and that's that wonderful Harbour At Low Tide,

0:34:380:34:41

the watercolour, which is actually signed, 20th century.

0:34:410:34:44

We've got £50-100 on it, Paul. Let's see how it does.

0:34:440:34:48

£30. 2 do I see?

0:34:480:34:50

Starting at 30, there we go.

0:34:500:34:52

At £30, and 2 do I see?

0:34:520:34:54

At £30. It's worth that, surely.

0:34:540:34:57

32. Thank you, madam. 35, 38, 40 and 2.

0:34:570:35:02

45, 48, new place, 50 and 2? Go on...

0:35:020:35:08

-50, which is the lowest end?

-At £50 and 2 for you?

0:35:080:35:12

Quite sure?

0:35:120:35:14

You're quite sure too? At £50. On commission and selling at £50.

0:35:140:35:18

THEY CHEER

0:35:180:35:21

-I'll tell you what, I think they've got a bargain.

-They have.

-I think so too.

0:35:210:35:25

'With a sale that meets Paul's estimate,

0:35:250:35:28

'it looks like we've started the second half on the right foot.

0:35:280:35:31

'The 1920s hallstand is modestly priced at £40-60.

0:35:310:35:36

'It's an Art Deco piece,

0:35:360:35:37

'and it's sure to give someone a place to hang their hat in style.'

0:35:370:35:42

-Would you be sorry to see it gone?

-Not really.

0:35:420:35:45

It starts with me at £55.

0:35:450:35:47

-FRANK CHUCKLES That's good.

-Unbelievable!

0:35:470:35:51

At £55, and 60 do I see?

0:35:510:35:53

-They clearly did like it!

-That's right.

0:35:530:35:55

At £60 in the room, and we're selling. At £60. Are we OK?

0:35:550:35:59

At £60 in the room.

0:35:590:36:01

Gentlemen standing, all done.

0:36:010:36:03

Against commission and selling at £60.

0:36:030:36:06

-£60, there we go. How's that?

-There we are!

0:36:060:36:09

There's real surprise in your voice, Frank.

0:36:090:36:12

I mean, I wouldn't have given it house-room.

0:36:120:36:15

-But you did.

-But I did.

-You did for a while.

-I did for a while.

0:36:150:36:19

'It's a double whammy when you sell well

0:36:190:36:21

'and get rid of something that you didn't even like.

0:36:210:36:24

'Heather won't be sorry to see the back of our next item either.'

0:36:240:36:28

Lladro is a very popular name. We see lots of Lladro figures.

0:36:280:36:32

Did you buy this for yourself, or was it a gift?

0:36:320:36:34

I bought it from my sister-in-law. She had it a long while and got tired of it.

0:36:340:36:38

-And so, now...

-Now you've got fed up with it.

0:36:380:36:41

That's right.

0:36:410:36:43

-Lladro always sells well at auction. Doesn't it, Paul?

-It's a success story.

0:36:430:36:47

It started in a little shed in Valencia, and now it's a massive company.

0:36:470:36:50

So I've put this in at £60-100, all right?

0:36:500:36:54

£55 is bid with me.

0:36:540:36:56

-55. How's that?

-That's a good start.

-That's excellent.

0:36:560:36:59

At £55, and 60 now? 60, 5, 70.

0:36:590:37:02

-5, 80...

-He's nodding!

-At £80 the gentleman's bid. 5 may I say?

0:37:020:37:07

Gentleman's bid at £80.

0:37:070:37:10

-There you go.

-Did you pay your sister £80 for it?

-I can't remember.

0:37:100:37:15

-I can't remember. It was more than that.

-How very diplomatic.

0:37:150:37:20

-That's great, isn't it?

-She might be watching.

0:37:200:37:22

'We'll never know what they bought and sold it for.

0:37:220:37:25

'But the main thing is it's gone for a good price today.

0:37:250:37:28

'Now, more ornaments.

0:37:280:37:29

'Will they do as well?'

0:37:290:37:31

Three Royal Doulton figurines coming up that you brought back from Canada that had belonged to your auntie.

0:37:310:37:37

We're hoping these'll do very well as a trio.

0:37:370:37:40

It's interesting as we're in the heart of the potteries here.

0:37:400:37:43

The rare one is belle of the ball. She's no longer made,

0:37:430:37:46

so she should add a bit of interest.

0:37:460:37:48

But we want at least £120. Let's see how we go.

0:37:480:37:51

-I can start at £80. 5 do I see?

-There we go, 85. Three figurines.

0:37:510:37:54

At £80, and 5 do I see? At £80 and 5?

0:37:540:37:58

85. 90, 5? At £90 on commission and selling. At £90...

0:37:580:38:03

He's going to let them go.

0:38:030:38:05

All done at £90.

0:38:050:38:09

-£90!

-He's sold them. There we go. That's the way it goes.

0:38:090:38:12

-Someone's got a bargain with belle of the ball there, haven't they?

-Sounds like it.

0:38:120:38:16

-But the three have gone together.

-Yes.

0:38:160:38:19

-No more balloons.

-That's it.

-I think the balloons burst.

0:38:190:38:23

'£90 was a tad less than we'd hoped for,

0:38:230:38:27

'but it all adds to the pot for Canada.

0:38:270:38:29

'It's time now for the much talked about sofa. It could make or break today's outcome.'

0:38:290:38:34

This is the real show-stopper. It's that beautiful settee. Fantastic.

0:38:340:38:39

Aesthetic design, it's got that wonderful gold

0:38:390:38:42

and the black ebony on it. It's been beautifully covered as well.

0:38:420:38:46

A beautiful piece indeed this one.

0:38:460:38:48

-But you've put a reserve on it, haven't you, of £500?

-£500, yes.

0:38:480:38:52

-If it doesn't make that, you do realise you'll have to take it home?

-Yes.

0:38:520:38:56

-How do you feel about that?

-Fine.

0:38:560:38:58

Leave Charlie here, I don't think there's room for him anyway.

0:38:580:39:02

The prettiest piece of furniture in the room by a long way. My favourite thing.

0:39:020:39:06

It's been really popular over the day's viewing.

0:39:060:39:10

It's a superb thing. I have got nine bids on commission.

0:39:100:39:15

-They range from a poor bid of £75...

-Dear me!

0:39:150:39:20

I start, on commission, at £420.

0:39:200:39:23

-420. Come on!

-That's a start.

-At £420, 450 now?

0:39:230:39:27

At 420 on commission, 450 may I say? Superb sofa.

0:39:270:39:32

At £420, 450? 450, 480.

0:39:320:39:36

500? 490 for you? At £480, a superb sofa.

0:39:360:39:41

At £480 on commission. And we're selling, nod of the head. All done at 480.

0:39:410:39:48

-Well done!

-Brilliant!

-I couldn't survive another one of them.

0:39:480:39:52

-£480.

-And the auctioneer was brilliant. He used his discretion. That's great.

0:39:520:39:56

I thought you were going to lose it,

0:39:560:39:58

-cos it stopped at 440 and I thought, "He's not going to sell it."

-It just stood there.

0:39:580:40:03

'That was a nail-biter!

0:40:030:40:06

'After the misunderstanding with the chess set,

0:40:060:40:08

'I'm glad they let the auctioneer sell the sofa

0:40:080:40:11

'for just shy of its reserve.

0:40:110:40:13

'It's the last lot coming up,

0:40:130:40:15

'and the final chance to raise money for our couple's trip to Canada.'

0:40:150:40:19

OK, you've got an interesting item now.

0:40:190:40:22

I love these clocks. It's an old station master's clock.

0:40:220:40:25

I've had a look inside. The best examples of these

0:40:250:40:28

have a fusee movement, like an ice cream cone in the back.

0:40:280:40:31

This one hasn't got that, so it's purely a timepiece.

0:40:310:40:34

But it's a Victorian clock, nice condition, tells good time,

0:40:340:40:37

and looking for about £100. All right?

0:40:370:40:39

-Does that sound all right to you?

-Brilliant. That's great.

0:40:390:40:42

-They look lovely in kitchens, don't they?

-Yes.

-They look fantastic.

0:40:420:40:46

-It starts with me at £55. 60 may I say?

-55 already.

0:40:460:40:51

At £55 and 60 now. 60, 5, 70, 5...

0:40:510:40:55

80? At 75 with me still.

0:40:550:40:58

-No, it's 75.

-At 75, what a superb little clock.

0:40:580:41:01

At £75. 80 may I say?

0:41:010:41:04

At £75, then. All done? At...

0:41:040:41:07

-80, new place.

-New place.

-85, 90?

0:41:070:41:11

At 85, on commission still and selling.

0:41:110:41:13

All done at 85.

0:41:130:41:15

-HEATHER: Brilliant!

-Oh wow, that's not bad.

0:41:150:41:19

-That is a terrific total.

-Things you don't expect.

0:41:190:41:24

Now, I'm going to tell you how much we've made in total towards your £500

0:41:240:41:28

that you want for this wonderful family trip to Canada.

0:41:280:41:32

So... Dan, Charlie, come and join us!

0:41:320:41:35

There we go.

0:41:350:41:37

At the halfway stage, if you remember, we'd barely made a quarter of your £500.

0:41:370:41:41

A bit dodgy there for a minute, but we have made...

0:41:410:41:47

£962!

0:41:470:41:50

ALL: Wow!

0:41:500:41:52

-Charlie!

-Charlie? Wow!

0:41:520:41:57

'With the £962 raised at auction,

0:42:030:42:05

'the Hasthorpe family have got a fair chunk of cash towards that trip to Canada.

0:42:050:42:11

'Ice hockey is Canada's national sport,

0:42:110:42:13

'and they are the current Olympic gold champions.

0:42:130:42:16

'So to get them into the swing of things, the Hasthorpes have come to see an ice hockey game

0:42:160:42:21

'which is a bit closer to home.'

0:42:210:42:24

I didn't know they did ice hockey in Grimsby. It's brilliant.

0:42:240:42:27

-We've loved every minute. Haven't we, Charlie?

-Thumbs up.

-Thumbs up! Thumbs...

0:42:270:42:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:570:43:01

Heather Hasthorpe lives with her husband Frank in Grimsby, but she longs to visit Canada, her mother's homeland. Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes help them seek out items to sell at auction, in the hope of raising £500 towards the trip.