Sansom Cash in the Attic


Sansom

Antiques series. Jill and her son hope to honour her father by paying for a clock in the high street of a Nottinghamshire village where he played such a key role in local life.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the show that searches your home for hidden treasures, gets them valued

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and then sells them at auction. Lots of families have heirlooms,

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but it's usually one member of the family that ends up storing the lot.

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And that's the dilemma facing the family we're going to meet today.

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They're hoping that we can find out whether they've got any cash in the attic.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic, our expert, John,

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'dreams up inventive ways of wearing a 19th century Albert chain.'

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I think we could attach that little hook to that nose ring of yours

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-and put the T-bar in your ear.

-I could try it, if all else fails.

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'Maybe it's time for a confession.'

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-Three gold sovereigns, no less.

-There should be five.

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-Oh, really?

-Yeah. We can't...

-Is there something you want to tell us, John?

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There was only three when I found them!

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'When we get to auction, some results beat our expectations.'

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-Straight in at £50.

-Wow!

-Yes!

-Straight in there.

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'Find out what happens when the hammer falls.'

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Today, I've come to Edwinstowe,

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right on the edge of Robin Hood's Sherwood Forest.

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I haven't come to rob the rich to give to the poor,

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but we have come to help a family clear out their attic,

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and they're hoping we'll find plenty of riches

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because they're looking to raise the funds they need to set up a memorial for a much-loved family member.

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'Meet Jill Sansom and one of her three sons, Chris.

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'Their family has had a big impact on the local high street.

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'Jill's father transformed derelict buildings into new shops and businesses

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'and, over the years, he became something of a local hero.

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'Now Jill's hoping to raise some money that can be used to create a memorial to his achievements.

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'With me today is John Cameron. He's just the man to help us hunt down the items

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'that will give us the best chance at auction. While he makes a start, I check in with Jill and Chris.'

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-Ah, good morning!

-Hi!

-You must be Jill and you must be Chris. Is that right?

-Yeah.

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-And you're the youngest son.

-Yeah, the youngest of three.

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-So you're joining us today for the rummage?

-Yes, absolutely.

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-I've took the day off work. I'm sure it'll be enjoyable.

-Excellent. The more hands, the better.

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I understand that we're here to raise money for something rather special. Tell me about that.

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My dad passed away last year and he was a big Edwinstowe man,

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had a lot to do with the village, the parish council,

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shops in the village, as well. We've been in business for about 35 years.

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So we wanted something in memory of him,

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but not the traditional wooden bench or something like that.

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We wanted something a bit different. And somebody on the parish council suggested a clock.

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We haven't got a clock on Edwinstowe high street.

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Any idea about how much it'll cost? I imagine it's expensive, because it has to be durable to the weather.

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We're looking at about £1,500 for the clock.

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The council said they would donate so much money towards it.

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But we're looking for probably £1,000, if that's possible.

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We need to raise £1,000, then, so you can get this outdoor commemorative clock for your dad.

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-Yeah.

-OK. That sounds like a fantastic idea.

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Let's go and see whether we can find John. I can't hear creaking, so he's not in the attic yet. Come on.

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Let's do it.

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'Believe it or not, this spacious home used to be an old blacksmith's workshop.

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'Jill and her husband Ashley renovated the derelict property

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'and transformed it into the house of their dreams,

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'with five bedrooms and loads of storage space.

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'I've already spotted a few collectables, and it looks like John is onto something, too.'

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-Ah, John, there you are!

-Hi, guys.

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-Have you found something already?

-I have! First thing of the day and we've struck gold!

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-Three gold sovereigns, no less!

-There should be five.

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-Oh, really?

-Yeah. We can't...

-Is there something you want to tell us, John?

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There was only three when I found them!

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Erm, they were given to the three boys on their christening days

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by Doris and Jessie, who were my husband's great aunts.

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And we were given one each, me and Ashley, on our wedding day.

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-Oh! Hence the five.

-Hence the five.

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-Right, OK.

-Chris, have you got anything to say?

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-You're rather quiet.

-Sorry, yeah. It's been a tough month.

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I think my eldest son's got his own at his house, so that's why.

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OK, all right. We're off the hook.

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Well, they're pretty standard in format, the gold sovereign.

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It has been around since medieval times, albeit with a slightly different purity

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and, obviously, the design on the obverse and reverse.

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On the obverse side, we have the reigning sovereign, the monarch,

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in this case, it's George V.

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And on the reverse, we have the now very iconic picture of St George on horseback slaying the dragon.

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The nice thing about these is the condition, because sovereigns do tend to get worn,

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especially when they're together, they rub against each other,

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but the definition is really, really good. We can see all the hair in George V's beard.

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But they're a standard weight, eight grams.

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With a bit of wear, that sometimes fluctuates point-something of a gram.

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And they're 22-carat gold, so something we can sell quite easily.

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What sort of value are we talking about?

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-I think easily £350 to £400 for those three.

-For just the three?

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-Yeah, most definitely.

-Incredible.

-We'll have to work on David.

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'It's not long before we wend our way through the labyrinth of rooms

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'in search of more items to sell.

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'Jill heads to the lounge and her favourite side table.

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'This is home to two peacock figurines that used to belong to her great aunts.

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'The birds are cast in white metal, but they scratch the furniture when the time comes to dust them,

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'so she's happy to let them go to a better home.

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'The estimate is £20 to £30.

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'Meanwhile, Chris is keen to show John one of his favourite childhood hiding places.'

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You've got a virtual attic complex here, Chris. It must have been amazing when you were young.

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Yeah, you can put things you don't want your mum to find in here.

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But this is all my childhood junk.

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Fascinating. Is this a bit of your childhood junk, this little Windsor chair?

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It's more my dad's childhood junk.

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I think it's from when he was living with his grandma, who he was brought up by mainly.

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I'm told he spent time sitting on that and playing with it, which would account for the damage.

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Having a look at the bottom, we've got some evidence of woodworm there, so I suspect that's what's happened.

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But it is a nice chair. Known as a Windsor chair. They're very iconic and easy to identify.

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Always takes the form with this curved arm round here, this bent arm, which is done with steam.

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The whole thing's put together with simple dowel joints. It's a real joiner's chair. Lovely little thing.

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Probably 19th century. It's certainly a good 100-years-plus old.

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Shame about the leg, though.

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I know. I'm sure it'll do all right, though.

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I think somebody could do a repair on that. I'm sure they could. Even in this condition,

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I'd hope we'd get about £30 to £40 for it, something like that.

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-Not too bad.

-Would your dad be happy with that?

-I'd be happy. I don't know about him.

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Let's hope he doesn't go breaking all the chairs in the house.

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'Chris's dad probably thought the chair was destined for the rubbish bin,

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'but, luckily, it's now auction-bound.

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'It also brings the family another step closer towards purchasing their memorial clock.

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'I've found two books that are so large, they're hard to miss.

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'It's a pair of 19th century family Bibles given to Jill's great aunts by their preacher father.

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'John believes they'll fetch around £20 to £30.

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'Jill and her husband Ashley made a start on doing up this house more than 30 years ago

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'and it's definitely been a labour of love. What's more, the improvements are still being made.'

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What I'm really interested to know is a bit more about this particular property,

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cos it seems to have a real varied history.

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This room we're in here, that's the original forge for the blacksmiths, is that right?

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-Yeah.

-So what was this place like when you first moved into it?

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This was the blacksmith's barn,

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so it was just an empty one-floor building.

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It was all overgrown outside.

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There was a big mound of earth where the gates are now,

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so you couldn't actually see the property very well.

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There was a tree growing through the roof, coming into the kitchen.

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Oh, my goodness! You should have your own property programme!

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Your grandfather was obviously very well known.

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Yeah. He was known by many people.

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I think he was granddad to a couple of hundred of them, as well.

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Yeah, everyone knew him. He was always on the high street, meeting and greeting people,

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doing anything he could to make things better for shop owners and people who lived in the village.

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We've had various offers of donations from here, there and everywhere,

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because he was a member of Sure Start, he used to help out voluntary there

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with the accounts and things.

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Just so many things he used to do.

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I mean, his priority was his family,

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running these three about when they hadn't got cars.

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SHE LAUGHS He was the local taxi!

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-He was a good lift, definitely.

-THEY LAUGH

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"I'll go and fetch him." Yeah.

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-He was a good man.

-Absolutely.

-Irreplaceable.

-For sure, yeah.

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Well, I think it's going to be fantastic to get that clock sorted out,

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-so shall we go and see whether John's found anything else we can value?

-Let's do that.

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'Well, John never disappoints. He's discovered a picture by the Dutch artist Meindert Hobbema.

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'This scenic countryside view may look hand-painted,

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'but it's actually printed onto the canvas, known as an oleograph.

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'It once belonged to Jill's mother-in-law, but John hopes another art enthusiast

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'may pay £20 to £30 for it. We're moving slowly and surely towards

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'our £1,000 target, and Jill's hoping this handsome-looking fellow will take us closer still.'

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-Ooh, what have you got there, Jill?

-Oh, this is a Beswick cockerel.

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I don't know much about it, only what's underneath,

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-and that says Beswick, and I don't know what that is.

-Leghorn.

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-Foghorn Leghorn. Remember the cartoon?

-Ah!

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As you've correctly identified, it is Beswick.

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Beswick Pottery, England, a very famous and much-loved firm in this country

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which started out life in Staffordshire in about 1895, something like that.

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-So what does the 1892 mean?

-That would be the model number.

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I actually know this particular piece and this dates to between about 1963 and 1983.

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It was modelled by a chap called Arthur Gredington,

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who was a very, very important modeller at Beswick,

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known for his skill in being able to depict animals realistically.

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But, also, he could switch and he could depict animals with a real sense of humour,

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so they could make fun of the animals. So he was a very talented modeller.

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One of the great things about Beswick is they do various versions of their models,

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different colour ways, different finishes. But, with leghorn here,

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there was only ever one version and one colour way.

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I'd see no problem with us getting £80 to £120 at auction for that.

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-Wow! Brilliant!

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, very!

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-Jolly good.

-It's not such a bad old cockerel after all, is it?

-I'm glad you like him now!

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-Come on, let's see what else we can find.

-OK.

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'So Jill may be convinced of his value, but what will the bidders make of him come auction day?

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'Let's hope they'll go cock-a-hoop.

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'As we continue our search chez Sansom,

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'young Chris has stumbled across a 1920s jug which shows an Indian relief pattern.

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'Made by HJ Wood of Staffordshire, Jill's aunts filled it with flowers.

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'Now it could help boost our kitty by £40 to £60.

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'Jill's found something hidden away that needs further investigation,

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'while Chris is quite taken with something that reminds him of the good old days.'

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-So, who's who in the picture?

-This is me, just here. This is my brother Andy.

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-And the tallest one with the curtains is Dave.

-Dave with the curtains.

-Yes.

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Was it a BMX or mountain biking tournament?

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This is a charity bike ride we're going on. The brothers Sansom setting off for Skegness.

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Enough talk about mountain bikes. Look what I've found.

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-What have you got, Jill?

-A watch chain.

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We found them in my dad's bungalow when we were clearing out after he died last year.

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They were very dirty in a box and I decided that I'd have them cleaned up and see how they came up.

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I think we could attach that little hook to that noise ring of yours

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-and tuck the T-bar in your ear.

-Yeah. I think it'd work.

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Absolutely. We could try it, but only if all else fails.

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They are watch chains and they would be part of the ensemble of the gentleman's pocket watch.

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They were very popular in the 19th century. Referred to as Albert chains after Prince Albert,

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Queen Victoria's husband. They take a pretty much standard form.

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You've got the hook, this little spring catch hook on one end here

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which attaches to the suspension loop of your watch.

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You've got the T-bar here, which would fix into your button hole on your waistcoat,

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and then your watch would tuck in your pocket like that.

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The other thing about Albert chains that fascinates me are the little accessories you find on them.

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This little bloodstone fob here which spins nicely,

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you often see those engraved two sides with either part of a monogram,

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which you only see when you spin it like that.

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But often people would have their monogram on there for a wax seal.

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Value-wise, we should be looking at about £60 to £80 for them.

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-Oh, right!

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, very.

-Good stuff.

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Excellent. Well, I hate to have to call time on this cosy little chat,

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but we've got some rummaging to do if we're going to get that clock.

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-Come on.

-Right, come on.

-Let's get to it.

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'Oh, dear, he does like a pun, does our John.

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'This seems to be a good time to catch up with the lady of the house.

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'She once harboured dreams of a career in nursing.'

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At the time, my mum had just got the one little shop on the high street and another one came up

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and somebody said, "Why don't you start a ladies' fashion shop? We've got nothing in the village."

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So I said, "Right-oh," so that's what I did.

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And I was there 27 years later.

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So it was quite unusual back then for a 18-year-old to be running their own shop.

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Yeah, and to get the contacts and things. Because, in a village, you needed to focus on the local people.

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And where my dad worked, at the local headquarters,

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down the road, they supplied a lot of my business, because a lot of women worked there.

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-Did you enjoy running the shop?

-Yeah. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

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And it was something I could do when, later in life, I had my three boys,

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and still be there.

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-So, you retired.

-Yeah.

-And I'm sure John Cameron would very much like to retire,

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-but he's been rather busy at work and found more stuff to sell. Let's find him.

-OK.

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'Our day at the Sansoms' house will soon be over

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'and there's still quite a way to go if we're going to reach their £1,000 target.

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'Luckily, Chris has found a 9-carat gold charm bracelet.

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'It was passed down through his father's family and includes a half sovereign.

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'Gold has risen so much in value recently that John thinks

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'the charm bracelet could make £150 to £200.

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'There are plenty of boxes to tackle in the attic and it's here that I spy some pottery

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'which could attract quite a following.'

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-Hey, guys, I've found a piece of Troika.

-Where was that?

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-In a ski bag.

-In a ski bag?

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That's interesting, because a troika is a horse-drawn sleigh, a Russian sleigh. So how fitting.

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-Where did it come from, Jill?

-I'm not sure. It says Cornwall on the bottom,

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-so would that be where it could've been bought from?

-The Troika factory started in Cornwall in about 1963.

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It was three partners and they chose the word Troika

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because, to them, it was a sharp word and it reflected the angularity of the pottery,

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very geometric in its design, but also, a troika is a horse-drawn sleigh,

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drawn by three horses, and so they felt that that reflected their partnership of three friends.

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Was it all handwritten?

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Yeah, they're all hand-painted and hand-marked.

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Also, here, we've got a monogram, SB,

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which will help us, if we had the reference book, date this a little more closely.

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The larger pieces, like the big anvils and the big coffin vases,

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-they make a lot of money at auction.

-You're quite right,

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but the market has peaked a little bit for Troika in the past few years.

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We did see a real surge in demand for this four or five years ago.

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-But it's in nice condition, good factory, still something we can sell at auction.

-Right.

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-What do you think this might fetch?

-£40 to £60.

-Crikey, that much?

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-Let's make sure it doesn't get broken before it gets to auction.

-Definitely.

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'I don't think we'll have to worry about Jill being careful when shifting her items.

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'She's determined to raise the highest amount possible to pay for the memorial clock.

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'I found a wooden bench with a handy storage compartment.

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'Together with another upholstered chair, John thinks they could make £30 to £40 at auction.

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'Now, what's this? More jewellery?

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'John's found Jill's collection of gold rings here that have been her pride and joy for quite some time.'

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-You been looking at those rings I found?

-Yes, I have.

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You've got an interesting collection of jewellery here. Where did they all come from?

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-There's so many different wedding rings.

-I know. Looks like I've been married about ten times!

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At least you've still got the wedding rings, look on the bright side.

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Yeah. I'm not quite sure about the wedding rings,

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but the two you've got there, one belonged to one great aunt

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-and one belonged to another great aunt.

-Right.

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You've got a nice pile here. I've separated them into three piles according to their gold standard.

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Here we've got, in the centre, six 22-carat gold wedding rings.

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-22-carat are the purest gold form we've got.

-Right.

-So those, per gram, would be the most valuable.

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Then we've got the 18-carat gold rings here, of which these two diamond rings are part.

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And then we've got seven little 9-carat gold rings.

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But these are interesting. You've got two diamond rings. One's diamond and sapphire,

0:18:420:18:46

a very inky-blue sapphire, not terribly commercial.

0:18:460:18:50

They're usually mined in Australia, the dark inky-blue sapphires.

0:18:500:18:54

But, interestingly, both of these rings have diamonds in them, but they're what we call illusion set.

0:18:540:18:59

Basically, you take a stone, you set it in a bigger mount, a bigger setting,

0:18:590:19:05

and where the edge of that mount spreads out further than the diamond has been facetted

0:19:050:19:10

so that it sparkles. So from a distance, the stones look bigger than they are,

0:19:100:19:15

hence the term "illusion set".

0:19:150:19:17

So, Chris, I want you to take note for future reference.

0:19:170:19:21

That's an illusion diamond, OK?

0:19:210:19:23

-Not what a girl wants.

-Right, OK. Mental note taken.

0:19:230:19:27

Or as I'd say, Chris, you do need to be giving that.

0:19:270:19:30

-I'll take them both on board.

-It just looks the same.

0:19:300:19:33

So, how are we going to sell these, John?

0:19:330:19:36

Well, I've got to put a value on at this point.

0:19:360:19:38

Depending on where we went to auction, one auction house will do them differently than another.

0:19:380:19:43

But the value should be pretty much constant, however we break it down.

0:19:430:19:47

-So I'm going to put a value on them as a whole.

-Right.

0:19:470:19:51

And, collectively, these rings should net us around £700 to £900.

0:19:510:19:56

-You're joking.

-Seriously.

-Wow.

0:19:560:19:59

I should explain, John, this clock that they want to get

0:19:590:20:02

is actually going to be a bit more than that, nearer £1,500.

0:20:020:20:06

There is a good chance that the council might make a contribution, so our target is £1,000.

0:20:060:20:11

But if they don't make up the difference, don't worry,

0:20:110:20:14

cos the value of everything going to auction comes to £1,540!

0:20:140:20:18

-Get in there!

-So you can do it all on your own if you want to.

-Brilliant.

0:20:180:20:22

'We've had a very successful day and found a variety of items

0:20:230:20:27

'that are certain to rev up the bidders on auction day.

0:20:270:20:30

'First of all, we have the gold. Not only Jill's rings, but also the three sovereigns,

0:20:300:20:35

'valued at £350 to £400.

0:20:350:20:38

'And we have great expectations of them making John's estimate, hopefully even beating it.

0:20:380:20:43

'The there's the collection of silver watch fobs.

0:20:430:20:46

'It's a fashionable lot, priced to sell at between £60 and £80.

0:20:460:20:50

'Jill thought this Beswick cockerel was creepy,

0:20:500:20:53

'but he has a fine maker's name

0:20:530:20:55

'and a reasonable price tag of £80 to £120.

0:20:550:20:58

'So he might bring our target home to roost.'

0:20:580:21:01

'Still to come, the Sansoms look set to make big money.'

0:21:030:21:07

-Go on.

-All done at £400?

0:21:070:21:11

-Yes!

-Wow!

0:21:110:21:13

'But will their good luck run out?'

0:21:130:21:16

-A bit more.

-Come on! It's a nice jug.

0:21:160:21:18

-Staying with us if we have no other bids.

-Ohh.

0:21:180:21:21

'Find out what happens when the final hammer falls.'

0:21:210:21:24

It's been a few weeks since we met Jill and her son Chris at their home in Nottinghamshire,

0:21:280:21:33

and we had a lovely time finding plenty of items to bring here

0:21:330:21:36

to Cuttlestone Auction Rooms in Staffordshire.

0:21:360:21:39

If you remember, they wanted to raise £1,000 towards a memorial clock for the village.

0:21:390:21:44

Let's just hope, with time ticking, that our bidders are feeling very generous today.

0:21:440:21:49

'I don't think I've ever seen such an enthusiastic crowd.

0:21:490:21:51

'They're practically tripping over themselves to check out our antiques.

0:21:510:21:56

'It's all John can do to stop himself being trampled under foot

0:21:560:21:59

'as he works out which items are piquing their interest. Could it be this colourful farmyard fancy?'

0:21:590:22:04

-Morning, John.

-Hi, Lorne.

-He's a very handsome fella.

0:22:040:22:08

-He's a real prize-winner.

-Do you think that'll do well?

-Should do. He's a good model, this one.

0:22:080:22:13

Beswick leghorn in super condition. Should go down well today.

0:22:130:22:17

We've also got quite a lot of gold and silver, which seems to be doing well at the moment.

0:22:170:22:21

Yes. That should save the day today. Prices are quite strong.

0:22:210:22:24

But they do have a number of low-value items, in particular, the child's chair with a broken leg,

0:22:240:22:29

-so we need all the help we can get today!

-OK.

0:22:290:22:32

-Well, I think they're here, so shall we go and meet them?

-Come on, then.

0:22:320:22:36

'There's every chance that Jill's mixture of mementos will have bags of appeal for this astute crowd.

0:22:370:22:42

'We find her bidding a fond farewell to one piece that has plenty of family history.'

0:22:420:22:48

-Morning, Jill.

-Morning!

-Aren't you missing someone? Where's Chris?

0:22:480:22:52

Oh, he booked a snowboarding holiday two weeks ago, so he flies to France this morning.

0:22:520:22:58

-Just left me to it.

-Typical! Did he really?

-Yep.

0:22:580:23:01

Well, you can't really blame him, can you? These are lovely, aren't they?

0:23:010:23:05

They're gorgeous, aren't they? Yeah. This one I particularly like, because it's full of pictures and things.

0:23:050:23:12

Not your typical Bible, really, is it?

0:23:120:23:15

-They are wonderfully done, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-Not a big price, though,

0:23:150:23:18

-considering the work and the age.

-I know, it is such a shame.

0:23:180:23:21

But I have got another two at home, so if these sell...

0:23:210:23:24

-Is there anything that you're missing?

-Nope.

0:23:240:23:27

I've brought everything. I couldn't convince David to bring the fourth sovereign.

0:23:270:23:32

-That's OK, cos we only valued for three sovereigns.

-We did.

0:23:320:23:35

-Well, jolly good. They should do well today.

-And the price of gold's gone up since we saw you last.

0:23:350:23:41

-Has it? Brilliant!

-So let's hope that that's reflected in the room.

0:23:410:23:44

-Yes.

-Shall we get into position?

-Yep!

-See whether all that glitters is gold.

0:23:440:23:49

'With a goal of £1,000, we're keen to get going.

0:23:490:23:53

'The first lot under the hammer is the pair of family Bibles, valued at £20 to £30.'

0:23:530:24:00

-Just remind me of the history of those.

-They belonged to Ashley's, that's my husband, his great aunt.

0:24:000:24:07

I think it was Doris, the older sister,

0:24:070:24:09

got that when she was 18, the biggest one,

0:24:090:24:13

and then the next sister got one, so I've got four,

0:24:130:24:16

-cos there was three girls and a boy.

-Let's see what we can get for them.

0:24:160:24:20

Two old family Bibles. Interesting bedtime reading, or you can stand on them to reach a high shelf.

0:24:200:24:25

And we'll start them at £15.

0:24:250:24:28

I've got a commission bid and that's all I've got. 18 on the front.

0:24:280:24:31

At £18. And my commission bid's out. Are we 20?

0:24:310:24:34

At £18. 20 at the back. 22.

0:24:340:24:38

-At 22.

-Keep going.

-One bid, that's all he's having. At 22.

0:24:390:24:42

Lady's bid we have. At 22. We're selling, on the front at £22.

0:24:420:24:47

-£11 a Bible. That's not a lot of money, is it?

-No.

0:24:470:24:51

And they were in super condition. But it just reflects the market. Such a shame.

0:24:510:24:55

'I think we'd all have liked to see them make a bit more, but they sold

0:24:550:25:00

'within John's estimate.'

0:25:000:25:02

Next up are our two white-metal Indian bird models.

0:25:020:25:05

-What's the story with these?

-They belonged to the youngest of the sisters, Mary.

0:25:050:25:10

I think they came from India. They used to go on holiday quite a bit to there.

0:25:100:25:15

They're actually, I think, peacocks, a male and a female.

0:25:150:25:19

Some people don't like peacocks cos they think they're unlucky. Let's hope ours are lucky.

0:25:190:25:23

We want £20 to £30.

0:25:230:25:25

Commission will start them. £10 bid on the models.

0:25:250:25:29

-At £10. 12. 15.

-These seem to be going down well.

0:25:290:25:33

At £15. 18 are we, quickly? At £15. At £15.

0:25:330:25:37

They're here to sell. 18 if you like. And it goes. Sold at £15.

0:25:370:25:42

-£15. That's all right.

-It is, it's fine.

0:25:420:25:46

-Especially as they're hardly one of your favourite things.

-No.

0:25:460:25:49

-Think of the money you'll save on beeswax.

-Yeah, definitely. I feel lucky.

0:25:490:25:54

'Great news for Jill that someone took a shine to the peacocks.

0:25:540:25:58

'She was happy to just give them away.'

0:25:580:26:00

Our next lot is the 20th century oleograph picture.

0:26:000:26:04

Yes, when I saw it, I knew instantly it was a print. Sorry to let you down.

0:26:040:26:08

But it was one I remembered from my university days. It's The Avenue at Middelharnis by Hobbema.

0:26:080:26:13

Very famous picture. So I was pretty sure the original was in a very important gallery.

0:26:130:26:18

Hence, we've only got £20 to £30 on it.

0:26:180:26:20

-Are you happy with that?

-Very.

-You don't like it?

-I don't like it, no.

0:26:200:26:24

It's hung far too long in what was the study.

0:26:240:26:28

I think probably the frame's worth more than the picture.

0:26:280:26:31

-Start the picture at £15.

-You seem surprised.

-Yeah.

0:26:310:26:35

18, quickly? 18. At £18. I'm out at £18. Anybody got a damp spot?

0:26:350:26:40

-Make it 20.

-And it sells at £18.

0:26:400:26:45

-Yes!

-You're very happy with that one, aren't you?

-Oh, definitely!

0:26:450:26:50

'£18 may seem like a modest sale price,

0:26:500:26:53

'but I'm happy to see it's put such a big smile on Jill's face.'

0:26:530:26:57

Our next lot is the small child's Windsor chair with three legs.

0:26:570:27:00

-Yeah. I've brought the fourth leg with me.

-Jolly useful!

0:27:000:27:04

It was glued a few years back, but I think the woodworm and the glue

0:27:040:27:08

probably melted and it fell off and it's been like that ever since.

0:27:080:27:12

Well, I still think a good joiner could do a repair job on this,

0:27:120:27:15

perhaps dowel that leg back on. But £30 to £40 I still think is reasonable.

0:27:150:27:19

A little chair like this in good condition, 19th century Windsor chair, can sometimes get £150.

0:27:190:27:24

-So maybe we'll get lucky today.

-Hope so.

-Hopefully, the three bears are in the room.

0:27:240:27:29

-Straight in at £50.

-Wow! Straight in there!

0:27:290:27:32

At £50. 5. 60.

0:27:320:27:34

5. 70. 5. 80.

0:27:340:27:37

-5. 90.

-Goodness!

-95.

0:27:370:27:39

-100. Bid's with me at £100. 110 now.

-Go on, keep going, keep going.

0:27:390:27:44

-On commission. No mistake. 10 if we like. At £100.

-Makes up for that picture.

0:27:440:27:49

At £100. On the commission at 100.

0:27:490:27:52

-£100!

-The broken leg didn't deter them. They wanted it.

0:27:520:27:56

-That was incredible! What a result!

-Yeah!

0:27:560:27:59

'Wow. After all that speculation,

0:27:590:28:01

'that amazing sale means we'll have to eat our words.

0:28:010:28:04

'Let's hope we'll be just as fortunate with the next lot,

0:28:040:28:07

'then Jill will reach her £1,000 target in no time.'

0:28:070:28:10

The bench with the little early 20th century chair.

0:28:100:28:13

We're looking for £30 to £40.

0:28:130:28:15

We'll start straight in at £30. Lot 63A. At £30. 32.

0:28:150:28:20

-35.

-Come on.

-38. 40.

0:28:200:28:23

5. 50. 5. 60.

0:28:230:28:27

-5.

-Yes, go on!

0:28:270:28:29

65. Are we 70? Bid's in the doorway at £65.

0:28:290:28:32

70, quickly? There you go there at £65.

0:28:320:28:37

-Yeah! That's higher than the estimate!

-We're doing well today!

-That's really good.

0:28:370:28:42

'Another fantastic outcome for Jill.

0:28:420:28:44

'Maybe John was wrong about the peacocks. They've brought us luck.'

0:28:440:28:48

Our next lot is the Indian tree jug.

0:28:490:28:52

-We've got £40 to £60 on that.

-Yeah, I'm quite pleased with that valuation.

0:28:520:28:56

-Why has it got that value?

-It's in nice condition, there's a nice pattern, a lot of work gone into it.

0:28:560:29:01

It's a nice decorative piece. So I think we should get £40 to £60. I'd give it house room.

0:29:010:29:05

But then, there's no accounting for taste. Or lack of it.

0:29:050:29:09

-We have interest on this lot with a commission to start at £30.

-Yes!

0:29:090:29:13

£30 bid. At £30. At £30 on commission.

0:29:130:29:16

-A bit more.

-Come on. It's a nice jug.

0:29:160:29:19

At £30. Any interest in the room at £30?

0:29:190:29:21

-At £30. It's staying with us if we have no other bids.

-Oh.

0:29:210:29:25

2, thank you. At 32. I'm out at 32. 5. Now we're off.

0:29:250:29:29

-Yeah, now we're off.

-38.

0:29:290:29:32

I have the bid on the front row at 38. You're out at the back.

0:29:320:29:36

Sold at £38.

0:29:360:29:39

-There we are.

-Just under our lower estimate.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, I am.

0:29:390:29:44

'I think Jill's still pleased we raised £38 for this family heirloom.

0:29:440:29:49

'So far, we've had a really successful run.'

0:29:490:29:51

Well, fortunately, it brings our total so far,

0:29:520:29:55

bearing in mind that our better lots are in the second half of today's sale,

0:29:550:29:59

-but we've already banked £258.

-That's brilliant!

0:29:590:30:04

-So that's really good.

-Yeah.

-What was your favourite lot to sell?

0:30:040:30:07

I think the chair. The three-legged chair, definitely.

0:30:070:30:10

I'm going to go straight out on the break and phone Ashley and tell him the good news.

0:30:100:30:15

-All right, we'll let you do that. John wants to see something and I'm dying for a coffee.

-Come on.

0:30:150:30:21

'You can never tell how an auction will go, but I'd say it's been an inspirational first half.

0:30:210:30:26

'Fingers crossed, it'll get better and better.

0:30:260:30:29

'If you'd like to raise some money for something special,

0:30:290:30:32

'it's worth remembering that auction houses charge fees, such as commission.

0:30:320:30:36

'They do vary from one saleroom to another, so be sure to check the small print before you go.

0:30:360:30:41

'While Jill phones her hubby, John and I take a peek around the saleroom.

0:30:410:30:45

'John's looking for items that may make a sound investment.'

0:30:450:30:48

-What have you got your hands on now?

-I've spotted three cracking items.

0:30:480:30:52

It's three Victorian silver wine-bottle coasters.

0:30:520:30:55

-They are lovely.

-They're super. They've got beautiful shaped galleries, pierced round the sides,

0:30:550:31:00

and what's lovely about them is the hallmark. They're dated to 1851

0:31:000:31:04

and they're by Robert Garrard & Co,

0:31:040:31:06

-a firm steeped in silversmithing history.

-Right.

0:31:060:31:10

In about 1830, they succeeded the very posh firm of Rundel, Bridge and Rundell

0:31:100:31:14

as goldsmiths to the crown.

0:31:140:31:16

Then, in 1843, they literally became crown jewellers,

0:31:160:31:19

and some of their finest work can be seen in the Tower of London.

0:31:190:31:23

These date to 1851, a very good year, especially for the London Great Exhibition.

0:31:230:31:28

So I think these would've adorned a very posh dining table.

0:31:280:31:31

-What's the estimate on these?

-The auctioneers have estimated them at £400 to £600,

0:31:310:31:37

but I think, with such a good quality and pedigree, they might even make four figures.

0:31:370:31:42

-But I think they'd be worth every drop, I mean penny.

-THEY LAUGH

0:31:420:31:45

-Trust you. All right, shall we go back to the auction?

-Come on, then.

0:31:450:31:49

'John wasn't kidding about the historical significance giving extra appeal.

0:31:510:31:56

'The coasters eventually sold for a whopping £2,300!

0:31:560:32:01

'As we return to the Sansoms' collectables, we know we need to make around £750

0:32:020:32:08

'to reach Jill's target.

0:32:080:32:10

'Her next lot is a collection of silver watch fobs,

0:32:100:32:12

'which once belonged to her father.'

0:32:120:32:15

Right, good to see there's still plenty of people here.

0:32:150:32:19

-It's still full.

-Hopefully, they're here for our items.

0:32:190:32:22

We've got a lot of interesting items coming up. The Beswick,

0:32:220:32:25

that lovely big cockerel that you hate,

0:32:250:32:28

-and loads and loads of jewellery.

-Yeah, I'm looking forward to that.

0:32:280:32:31

Let's see if we can make some good money. The first lot is your dad's collection of watch fob chains.

0:32:310:32:37

-Yeah.

-It'll be nice to see these sell.

-It will, definitely.

0:32:370:32:40

-I think these are lovely.

-It's the only lot here today that's from my dad.

0:32:400:32:45

They belonged to his dad and were passed down to him,

0:32:450:32:49

as very little things were in them days.

0:32:490:32:52

It's ironic, in a way, that you say that this lot comes from your father,

0:32:520:32:56

they're watch chains, and we're raising money for a clock.

0:32:560:32:59

-Yes.

-They are nice, aren't they?

-They are. And people do have them turned into necklaces or bracelets.

0:32:590:33:05

But who knows? They may just end up back on a watch, which would be nice.

0:33:050:33:10

-It would be.

-We want £60 to £80 for these.

0:33:100:33:13

We'll start them straight in at 40 bid.

0:33:130:33:15

-Lot 92A at £40.

-Come on.

-5.

0:33:150:33:18

50. 5. 60.

0:33:180:33:20

-5.

-Yes!

-65, back of the room at £65. 70 now?

0:33:200:33:25

-At 65.

-Bit more.

-70, thank you. At £70. 5, sir? 5.

0:33:250:33:29

80. 5. I have 85, at the back of the room at £85.

0:33:290:33:33

90 now. At £85. Are we selling them?

0:33:330:33:36

All done and dusted, there. Sold at £85.

0:33:360:33:40

-Yes!

-£85. That's very good.

0:33:400:33:43

'I think Jill's very happy to see those old fobs transform

0:33:430:33:46

'into the memorial clock she wants to commission.'

0:33:460:33:49

Our next lot is hardly antique, but it has got a very high valuation. It's the cockerel.

0:33:490:33:54

-Now, how did you get hold of that?

-That belonged to one of Ashley's great aunts,

0:33:540:34:00

but I've never liked it because of the eyes.

0:34:000:34:03

They used to follow you around the room when you were in there.

0:34:030:34:06

So I tried desperately, when I used to dust it,

0:34:060:34:09

that it might break as it fell. But I'm glad now

0:34:090:34:12

-because it's quite a high value.

-Yes!

0:34:120:34:15

We've got on this one £80 to £120.

0:34:150:34:18

-Yes, he's a handsome fella. When we got here this morning, we could hear cockerels crowing.

-Yes.

0:34:180:34:24

-And I thought it was our man. Anyway, let's hope he's the cock of the saleroom today.

-Definitely.

0:34:240:34:29

We'll start it straight in at £60 for the leghorn cockerel, the Beswick, at £60.

0:34:290:34:33

At £60. And 5, thank you, sir.

0:34:330:34:35

65 I'm bid in the centre of the room. At 65.

0:34:350:34:38

-70.

-Come on.

-5. 80. 5.

0:34:380:34:43

85 I have in the centre. At £85.

0:34:430:34:45

90 now. 90. 95.

0:34:450:34:48

100. 110.

0:34:480:34:50

At 110 in the centre. Are we 20 now?

0:34:500:34:52

At 110 in the centre of the room.

0:34:520:34:55

-120, fresh money.

-Yeah.

0:34:550:34:58

I'll take it, sir, 125.

0:34:590:35:01

130. 140 now if you wish.

0:35:010:35:05

£130. 140.

0:35:050:35:08

-There's a new bidder down there.

-Standing bid at 140. 140.

0:35:080:35:11

Selling now at £140.

0:35:110:35:14

-Yes!

-Ooh, that's good, isn't it?

-Yeah!

0:35:140:35:17

Did you ever think, when you were trying to break him in two,

0:35:170:35:21

-that he could be worth £140?

-I didn't even know it was Beswick until the day you came.

0:35:210:35:25

'Jill might have found him a bit creepy,

0:35:250:35:27

'but I'm glad there were several bidders willing to fight over him.'

0:35:270:35:31

Our next lot is a lovely 9-carat gold charm bracelet.

0:35:320:35:35

-It's got ten charms, including a half sovereign.

-Mm-hm.

0:35:350:35:38

-So where was this from?

-This was from Ashley's grandmother.

-Right.

0:35:380:35:42

And she was a very showy person.

0:35:420:35:45

Actually, the charms on it, she would've gone to all different jewellers,

0:35:450:35:49

to York and to Oxford and to any sort of unusual place.

0:35:490:35:54

She did pay out quite a bit of money for the charms. Or Granddad did.

0:35:540:35:58

So what do we expect for these? £150 to £200?

0:35:580:36:01

Yeah, we should push at least our top estimate.

0:36:010:36:04

It's a nice bracelet and gold prices are doing quite well,

0:36:040:36:07

-so, hopefully, that's in our favour.

-Mm.

0:36:070:36:09

-And we've got three commission bids.

-Excellent.

-Starting at £250.

0:36:090:36:14

Yes!

0:36:140:36:16

250 bid. At 250. At 250.

0:36:160:36:18

260. 270. 280. 290.

0:36:180:36:22

300. 320. 340.

0:36:220:36:25

360. 360 is with me. 380, fresh money. I'm out at 380.

0:36:250:36:31

Go on, 400.

0:36:310:36:33

At £380. The bid's in the room and no mistake.

0:36:330:36:37

-Come on, another one.

-At £380.

0:36:370:36:41

-Yes!

-Do you think my scales weren't working that day?

0:36:410:36:43

I think the price of gold has gone up a lot, so it's a big difference.

0:36:430:36:48

-In a few weeks?

-And like I said before...

0:36:480:36:52

And don't forget, people have got to pay commission on top of that,

0:36:520:36:55

so there's a lot of people taking a bet at the moment that the price of gold is going to continue to rise,

0:36:550:37:00

because that will count for the extra commission.

0:37:000:37:03

And they are taking a risk, cos there's no guarantee that anything rises in the market.

0:37:030:37:08

-People have had their hands bitten.

-What goes up, often comes down.

0:37:080:37:11

'It looks like the market for gold is working for Jill today

0:37:110:37:15

'and there's even more on the way with our next item.'

0:37:150:37:18

Our next lot are the three gold sovereigns, which are family pieces.

0:37:180:37:22

Yeah, they were christening presents from two of the aunts.

0:37:220:37:27

The price of sovereigns, John, crazy nowadays.

0:37:270:37:30

I suspect a lot of the sovereigns sold recently to bullion dealers will have been scraped,

0:37:300:37:36

and that's quite sad, so I think when this gold rush finally comes to an end

0:37:360:37:40

and gold prices come back down again, I think gold sovereign prices will hold up

0:37:400:37:45

because they will become rarer as collectors' items.

0:37:450:37:48

-So, what are we looking at for these?

-We've got 350 to 400.

0:37:480:37:52

-Should quite easily push our top estimate.

-Super.

-OK.

0:37:520:37:56

Gold sovereigns. Easy to sell. We know what they're worth, folks.

0:37:560:38:00

We'll start them at £400.

0:38:000:38:02

At £400. 20 who says? At 400.

0:38:020:38:05

I'm selling and no mistake. 20 if we'd like.

0:38:050:38:08

All done at £400?

0:38:080:38:11

-Yes!

-Well, bang on our upper estimate.

0:38:110:38:15

'It's so exciting when you hit the high end of an estimate.

0:38:150:38:18

'Let's hope the next gold collection has the same good fortune.'

0:38:180:38:22

No less than 17 gold rings. I'm sure there's a song there somewhere.

0:38:220:38:27

I didn't know I'd got that many until I found them in the attic

0:38:270:38:30

and they were in a plastic bag, just in a plastic bag.

0:38:300:38:33

In fact, I was quite astonished by John's estimate

0:38:330:38:36

because a lot of them, as I say, have not got any stones in.

0:38:360:38:40

So, you've got quite a hefty estimate on this, John.

0:38:400:38:43

Yes, I put it as one lot, but I thought the auctioneers might separate it.

0:38:430:38:47

But they've kept it together and they've kept our collective estimate of £700 to £900. Quite punchy!

0:38:470:38:52

If we make the top end of the estimate, we've done our target figure in one lot!

0:38:520:38:58

We've got easy bids on this starting me at £600.

0:38:580:39:00

Ooh! 600. Amazing.

0:39:000:39:03

At 600. At £600 a bid. At 600.

0:39:030:39:06

650. 700.

0:39:060:39:08

750. 800.

0:39:090:39:11

The bid is with me at £800. You're out at the back at 800.

0:39:120:39:16

-Come on!

-At £800. The bid is with me and I'm selling. It's on commission.

0:39:160:39:20

At 800, all sold. £800.

0:39:200:39:23

-Wow!

-Nice one.

-800 for those bent rings.

0:39:250:39:29

-There you go.

-The scales were working that time.

-Yeah.

0:39:290:39:34

-That's fantastic. What a result!

-Super!

0:39:340:39:36

'Well, we've clearly beaten Jill's target, but she still has one last lot to go.

0:39:360:39:41

'What are the chances of the Troika vase beating its estimate?'

0:39:410:39:45

Well, with Troika, you either love it or you hate it.

0:39:460:39:49

The market did peak a couple of years ago now for Troika.

0:39:490:39:52

Most of the collectors have acquired the nice big pieces they want. But we should get our money.

0:39:520:39:58

-Commission straight in at £30.

-Oh, wow!

0:39:580:40:00

2. 5. 8. 40.

0:40:000:40:03

5. I'm out at 45. On the Troika at 45.

0:40:030:40:07

-Come on.

-At £45 bid. 50 quickly. Gentleman's bid.

0:40:070:40:12

-Makes a good pill pot.

-£45. We'll sell and no mistake.

0:40:120:40:15

At £45. 1680.

0:40:150:40:18

-£45.

-Brilliant!

-That's not bad, is it?

-No!

0:40:180:40:21

-Where are you keeping the dog tablets now?

-I'll have to find another pot!

0:40:210:40:25

'A fair price with which to end a hugely successful day.

0:40:250:40:28

'We already know we've bagged at least £1,000 for Jill.

0:40:280:40:31

'I wonder if she's worked out exactly how much more we've been able to make.'

0:40:310:40:36

That's us done, I'm afraid. Yes, it's all over.

0:40:360:40:39

-You know that we've done quite well cos some of those gold lots flew!

-Yeah, definitely.

0:40:390:40:44

We wanted £1,000 towards this memorial clock.

0:40:440:40:47

We've actually made... Are you ready for this?

0:40:470:40:49

-..£2,108!

-Oh, wow!

0:40:490:40:53

-Oh, brilliant!

-That's fantastic!

-It's a lot of money.

0:40:530:40:57

It's double what you wanted. So how is that going to help with the clock?

0:40:570:41:01

Well, the clock I really, really want, that's about £1,600 plus VAT.

0:41:010:41:06

-Right.

-But with the extra money now,

0:41:060:41:09

I want a metal frame built so it'll actually stand further off the shop

0:41:090:41:14

-and that's going to cost quite a bit to make so...

-Brilliant.

0:41:140:41:17

-Thank you very much! Super. Thank you.

-I'm really pleased. Fantastic.

0:41:170:41:21

'It's just a few weeks since Jill's triumphant day at auction.

0:41:260:41:31

'Work on the commemorative clock in memory of her father is close to completion.

0:41:310:41:36

'The clock is destined for Edwinstowe high street

0:41:370:41:40

'and will be a constant reminder to the community of a man who meant so much to them.'

0:41:400:41:45

When we originally thought about the idea of having a memorial clock for my dad,

0:41:450:41:51

we imagined £500,

0:41:510:41:54

but then we realised, no, we want something special.

0:41:540:41:58

The finished result is just a lot better than I thought it would be.

0:41:590:42:03

It's just fantastic. Absolutely everything I could've hoped for and more.

0:42:030:42:07

My dad would be just over the moon.

0:42:070:42:11

I know he's up there looking down and saying, "Yes, that's beautiful".

0:42:110:42:14

So, yeah, Cash In The Attic came good.

0:42:140:42:18

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:250:42:27

Jill Sansom and her son Chris hope to honour her father by paying for a clock in the high street of a Nottinghamshire village where he played such a key role in local life. Lorne Spicer and John Cameron join the hunt for antiques and collectables to sell at auction, with the aim of raising £1,000.


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