Chopping Cash in the Attic


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Chopping

Antiques series. Jean Chopping wants to raise money for her grandchildren. With the help of her son Mark, she sorts through her collection of glassware, furniture and jewellery.


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Hello and welcome to Cash In The Attic -

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the programme that really enjoys helping you to search through your home

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for unexpected or hidden treasures, and then, if you do decide to sell them,

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we'll help you take them to auction so you can raise money for something really very special.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic: Our expert, John, gets all bombastic with some vintage ammunition.'

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-John, what on earth have you found there?

-Incoming. Put your tin hats on.

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'And I put in a bid for Strictly in front of this period juke box.'

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We've even got the disco lights!

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'Hope you're watching, Brucie! The auction brings even more surprises.'

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-£50.

-Amazing!

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-'Find out why we got so excited when the hammer falls.'

-£50. Thank you.

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You join me deep in the heart of Essex,

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where I'm about to meet a mother and son, who live in a house

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that is full of inherited collectables.

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They're going to sell some of them so the good fortune of a previous generation

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can do something really good for the next generation.

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Jean Chopping is downsizing.

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After years in this beautiful house, which she shared with her late husband, Brian,

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and their two sons, Mark and Darren, she's decided it's time to sell up and move on.

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The trouble is, the house is stuffed to the rafters with mementoes

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that Jean and Brian inherited, or acquired on their travels.

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That's why Jean and Mark are in need of some expert help.

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The least we can do is provide the expert.

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-Hi, Jean, Mark.

-Hello.

-This is John Cameron, who's going to be our expert for today.

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Now I've described this a house that's full of collectables, inherited collectables.

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-Who was the great collector?

-My husband.

-What sort of things did he collect?

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He collected glassware, antiques, anything that's collectable.

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-Junk, people call it.

-Sounds as if you've got your work cut out, John.

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-Either that, or I'll have an easy day finding things.

-You'd better get started.

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-You get the sunshine?

-Absolutely!

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We'll be joining you in a moment when I've discovered from you

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why you've called in Cash In The Attic today, Jean.

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Well, I'm downsizing. The house is too big.

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I've got two lovely grandchildren. Unfortunately, my husband never lived to see them.

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If I sell some of his collectables, I'll give the money to them.

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-How much exactly do you want to raise today?

-£800.

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So, that's £400 each. One of those grandchildren is yours, isn't it?

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-One is mine, yes.

-So, how do you feel about that?

-I'm very excited.

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Oliver will be happy with a nest egg from what we can raise at the auction.

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John, as you know, is already started in the house, so why don't we go and join him

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-and see some of these wonderful things your husband collected.

-OK.

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The first thing you notice about this house is that there is glassware everywhere.

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Our expert, John Cameron, has more than 20 years experience in the trade.

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He's found these pieces of textured and bubble glass in one of the sheds,

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and some more interesting pieces in the front room.

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John, it looks as if you've already found pure heaven for you.

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I don't know about. I couldn't see the wood for the trees.

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Jean, you have an amazing glass collection. What is the story with it?

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My husband collected it.

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It started with an ashtray from his aunt's,

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which he couldn't part with when she passed away, so brought it home.

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Whenever he went out, he looked for something with bubbles

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and it just grew and grew and grew.

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How many pieces do you think you've got?

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A couple of hundred pieces, if not more.

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Was he looking for individual pieces of glass or did he just buy anything?

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At first, it was anything but then he got that he liked Whitefriars.

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He was told if you got the label on it, it was worth more because people realised it was more genuine.

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-John, what can you tell us?

-Interesting you said about Whitefriars and the label.

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This is the only piece with the Whitefriars label on,

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though a lot of them are, to me, Whitefriars pieces.

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Very famous factory.

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One of Britain's longest running and most diverse. Their output was huge.

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And we've got this clear glass jug here.

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That's more the Whitefriars we expect to see, isn't it, John?

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These are the bark, the textured pieces, blown into wooden moulds.

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Collectors within that area are looking for pieces

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with sharp definition, which shows it was an early blown piece.

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You've got great techniques here.

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We've got crizzling glass, which was a desired effect, developed in Germany,

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where glass, before it was cooled, was dipped into water so it almost shattered but stayed together.

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Then it was reheated and gave this wonderful crazed effect.

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So, you've got that and, as you've said,

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your much-loved ashtrays with the bubbles in.

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Are you going to take all of these pieces to auction?

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-Hopefully, yes.

-Crikey. How do you value something like that, John?

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150 to 200 pieces, we have got to be looking at, for me, between £300 and £500 somewhere.

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That's fantastic. I would have thrown it all away.

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Well, we were overwhelmed by that sea of glassware.

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Mark has uncovered a World War II survivor's kite.

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He thinks it belonged to his grandad who served in the RAF.

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The frame of the box kite acted as an antenna for a radio transmitter connected to the kite by string.

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Downed airmen used it to alert spotters to their position.

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Our expert's estimate, between £30 and £50 pounds.

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John is not letting our good start distract him from the hunt.

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John, what about this, please?

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Right. Looks like a little diamond engagement ring.

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-Did it belong to anyone?

-An aunt. Inherited aunt's.

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Let's have a look. If you hold on to that, let me take a look.

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Got my loop out of here.

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It's 18 carat and platinum.

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OK, and on the top, got a flower design.

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And whilst it looks as though the whole thing has been rub-over set, there are diamonds

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but not as many as you'd think - called an illusion setting.

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You've got Swiss-cut diamonds around the edges

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of the petals, there.

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And two rose-cut diamonds on the shoulders, tiny diamonds.

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The rest of it are little nodules of platinum

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which are almost similar to how you see a marcasite ring.

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Something we can sell, not going to make vast sums

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but definitely £50 to £70, something like that.

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Yeah, that'd be fine. I mean, I shan't wear it, so...

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-Never wore it in the past?

-No. Never been worn.

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One thing you soon realise about Jean is that she's very keen on dogs.

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Over the years, she has owned and exhibited

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a number of pedigree canines and she has the rosettes to prove it.

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Now, with some fascinating finds under our belt, it's probably a good time to pause and take stock.

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Jean, I know you are going to be downsizing, which is why you've sold the house,

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but it means moving away from this wonderful garden,

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which really has been very important in your life with your late husband.

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It certainly was, yeah. We both loved gardening and spent hours and hours out here.

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Him doing the vegetable patch and I did the flowers.

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-You've won prizes with this garden, haven't you, Jean?

-Yes, best garden,

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village garden, and then I got a second prize this year with it.

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The other great passion in your life is your dogs,

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and in fact you can't move

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in a single room in your house without a photograph of, or rosettes for,

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the Pomeranians and the dogs that you won. How did that come about?

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After I nursed my father and he passed away, my husband said, "Get yourself a hobby."

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And I thought, "What can I do?" And a friend said to me, "Come to a dog show."

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And that was it, I got hooked.

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How many have you had?

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We had 13 at one point.

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So, Mark, did you get dragged in on this as well?

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Showing the dogs when you were growing up.

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As a teenager, it's not cool to be seen with a small ball of fluff

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on the end of a lead, so I leave the showing to Mum.

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We've left John to his own devices for long enough.

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Shall we go and see what else he thinks we might take to auction?

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While we've been nattering, John has been busy around the house,

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digging up more treasures.

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This NSM Galaxy 200 Jukebox can hold up to 200 records and might easily fetch £900 or more at auction,

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but the family are not prepared to part with it.

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But they are happy to part with this Edwardian round-back chair

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with its stained walnut inlay and arabesque markings, this could be one to watch.

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So, will John's £50 to £80 estimate be realised at auction?

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Things are certainly hotting up.

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What do you say to this one? £100 for this one?

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£85, 100, yes.

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100 bid...already.

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'How high will it go?'

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Thank you.

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Our rummage through Jean's past continues.

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So far we've uncovered some amazing mementos.

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It's all hands on deck and our estimated total has climbed steadily upwards

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to its current level of £430.

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In the bedroom, I find this 22-carat gold wedding band

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and as John is never shy of reminding us, the price of gold is really holding up at the moment.

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This could achieve between £50 and £70.

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At the end of the garden, John has stumbled across a painting and an artist's easel.

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Don't tell me that after all these years on Cash In The Attic, he's finally found an old master!

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-Jean?

-Yes.

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I was looking at this earlier. Is this something we can send to auction?

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-It's interesting.

-The easel, yes. But not the painting. I'd like to keep it.

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Well, let's take that off of there and have a look at the actual easel.

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-Well, have you ever noticed the maker's label at the top there?

-Never.

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Well, if you have a look, it says, Reeves & Sons.

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They're an important maker of artists' materials, but you get a variety of easels.

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You'd think, "An easel's an easel," but they come in different forms and shapes

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to accommodate different pictures.

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I can see an artist buying it, somebody that is at college, who can't afford to buy this.

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Because retail, this would cost you three figures definitely.

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An auction house might buy it, because it's a great thing to display a painting on.

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-Sure you've got no aspirations of being an artist?

-No!

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-And shall we get rid of the palettes as well?

-Yeah, can we put them both together?

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-Yeah. I've had a look. I can't see any makers' names on them.

-No.

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-And they're very well used, aren't they?

-I know.

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If you're not taking up a career in art, stick them in with the easel.

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-At auction, I'd put it on at £40-60, something like that.

-That's fine.

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It may make a bit more,

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-you never can tell.

-No, that'd be lovely.

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Back in the house, the quest for the rest continues.

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In the bedroom, Jean finds this lovely porcelain box

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with a painted lid.

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It belonged to her husband's aunt and could be worth between £30-50.

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Meanwhile, Mark has found some old ginger beer bottles that his dad once dug up in the garden.

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They're priced at between £50-£60.

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In total, Mark's dad dug up more than 1,000 bottles.

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They discovered that their house is built on the site of an old ginger beer factory.

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Our expert, John, has been nothing if not determined today.

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There isn't a corner of the house he hasn't explored. And, yet again, that seems to have paid off.

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It's difficult for Mark to move anywhere in the house or garden

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without finding something that reminds him of his late father.

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Mark, this is such a lovely thing to have in the garden, a seat in the garden in memory of your father.

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Brian Chopp, which was his nickname. What's this on the end here?

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That's a symbol he put in cards for my mother.

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We're not quite sure what it means, it might be some sort of secret message to her.

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-But that's what he used to put and he used to do it for years.

-Yeah.

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John, what on earth have you found there?!

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-Incoming! Put your tin hats on.

-Does that mean we've got to duck?

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I think you'd want to if one of these was coming your way. Right, I found some war memorabilia.

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-What's the story?

-My father bought one on the back of two that we acquired from a Great Uncle Freddie,

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who was involved in the First World War.

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So having two, being my father, he wanted a collection and got a third one.

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Well, I think you may well have got that mixed up,

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which often happens with stories handed down.

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This one is First World War and those two are Second World War.

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-Right, OK.

-You can see here, if we turn it up on the bottom, we've got a date on there.

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See that? 1917. So that tells us that's when it's from.

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And those two there have 1945 and 1944, respectively on them.

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They're Second World War, so they're the ones he picked up later.

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If you turn that one up, Mark, you can see it's a 25-pounder and this one a six-pounder.

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What sort of money do they make at auction, John?

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-Are there people who collect them?

-No pun intended, won't make a bomb.

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But I still think we'll make about £20-£30, maybe even £40.

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Excellent. Surprising, actually.

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'We're coming to the end of our rummage, but we're £200 short of our target.

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'Will our last find push us over the edge?'

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Some great old tunes on this jukebox, John, aren't there?

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We've even got the disco lights, John!

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-Any change for the jukebox?

-No, I haven't.

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-No, me either.

-I've got some change.

-Oh.

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-Oh, that's good.

-Oh, I don't think

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that's exactly change, Jean!

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Blimey, look at that, John. A pocketful of sovereigns and half-sovereigns.

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-Where have they come from?

-My mother was given one on her wedding day for her first-born, which was me,

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-and the rest were given to us by a neighbour.

-It is a good time to sell them.

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And what we've got are two full sovereigns and seven half-sovereigns.

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And we've got a mixture of dates here, from Edward VII to George V,

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so about the same time these all date from.

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And on the other side, we've got the different monarchs.

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All on the obverse, we've got the very iconic image of St George on the horse there slaying the dragon.

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Before you tell us how much you think they might make, I'm going to call in Mark,

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because he should hear this. Mark, have you got a minute?

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Come and join us. Your mum's just brought us these amazing sovereigns.

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So what do you reckon, John, when they go under the hammer?

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Well, I certainly expect the full sovereigns to make £150 each.

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Then we've got seven halves,

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so adding them up, in total, I make that about £825.

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I didn't think they'd be worth as much as that. I'd have said a couple of hundred.

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If you think that's good news, let me give you a bit more good news.

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Because adding that to the lowest figure John has given on everything that he's looked at today,

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I think we should be able to raise a very respectable...

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..£1,445.

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-Good grief!

-Gosh!

-That's fantastic!

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I'd never have said that!

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That's at least £700 each for the grandchildren.

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-Blimey! They'll need a bigger piggy bank!

-Much bigger.

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I can't believe that. Honestly, I can't believe it.

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What a terrific day of searching we've had.

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But what's going to take the bidders' fancy?

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How about the collection of nearly 200 pieces of glassware

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Jean and her late husband, Brian, collected over a lifetime, valued at up to £300?

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Will the Second World War kite that saved lives soar higher than its £50 maximum?

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Or will those wonderful sovereigns really turn out to be

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worth their weight in gold, and break the £1,000 mark?

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Still to come on Cash In The Attic, John gives us some gruesome facts...

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A lot of times, these little rings are cut off of people's fingers as they grow.

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..while Mark gives a definite maybe when quizzed about his future.

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-Have you not got someone you might like to put this on their finger, Mark?

-Not yet.

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Will his loss be someone else's gain when the hammer falls?

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You've now joined us at Tring Market Auctions in Hertfordshire, and this is going to be the setting

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where, hopefully, Jean Chopping and her son Mark

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are going to be able to raise that £800 that she wants

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to put into a little nest-egg for her two much-loved grandsons.

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So let's hope that the bidders will do the business

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and we'll get some good money for her items when they go under the hammer.

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Jean's at auction to raise money for a nest-egg for her two grandchildren, Harry and Oliver.

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If only these bidders at Tring auction house were aware of the responsibility

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on their shoulders.

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Jean and Mark have already discovered that their sovereigns

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have been split into three separate lots to make them more marketable. And that's not all.

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Have you seen what they've done with the glass?

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It's been split up into 16 lots, and the auction house have put it into sort of coloured groups.

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I think it looks really good, don't you?

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It does. I couldn't believe it when I saw it.

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It looks fantastic, it really shows it to its best.

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So, quietly confident, but still quite nervous.

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I'm nervous - it's not going to sell!

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Of course it will, keep your nerves under control!

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And to prove it's going to sell, let's take our places over there and watch the bidding, come on.

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The sale is underway, and the auctioneer is in full swing.

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Let's see how the bidders react to the shell cases.

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One of them was inherited from a grandparent who served in World War I. We're looking for at least £20.

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What about those? I think we ought to be in the region of £40 for those. £40 for the shell cases.

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£30? Will anyone bid for them? Do I bid, and five, for you, sir?

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-£30 and 2 now. 30, they're going at £30...

-30.

-Both of you are in at £30, thank you.

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-£30.

-Not too bad.

-Right in the middle of John's estimate.

-It's not bad.

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Jean's happy with that, and if it goes like this all day, we're quids in.

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Next up is the World War II kite.

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Handy if you're a pilot who's been shot down and you need to contact your chums.

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We're looking for somewhere between £30 and £50.

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50 has it then. £50.

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-£50!

-Yes or no? No, he says.

0:18:180:18:20

OK then, it's yours, sir, for £50.

0:18:200:18:24

-That's fantastic.

-£50.

-Amazing!

0:18:240:18:27

Fantastic indeed! Every bit extra goes into the pot

0:18:270:18:32

for Jean's grandchildren, Oliver and Harry.

0:18:320:18:36

Our next lot is the stately Reeves & Son easel.

0:18:360:18:39

A bit of a specialist item, this.

0:18:390:18:42

What about that one? £50 for it, £30. £20, I'm bid five.

0:18:420:18:45

£30. Five, 40?

0:18:450:18:46

Going down at £40. Five? At £40, then. Yes, at £40, then.

0:18:460:18:50

It is yours at £40, then.

0:18:500:18:54

I wonder if they were artist or dealer!

0:18:540:18:57

Well, let's hope it's gone to a good home.

0:18:570:18:59

The porcelain box with painted lid Jean found in the bedroom is next...

0:18:590:19:04

-Thank you.

-..and it achieves the lower estimate of £30.

0:19:040:19:09

Coming up next are the gold sovereigns.

0:19:090:19:12

We're really banking on gold's current popularity.

0:19:120:19:15

John's estimate for these was a minimum of £825,

0:19:150:19:19

but we have to pay attention because they're not being sold as one lot.

0:19:190:19:24

So a bit of loose change, Mark?

0:19:240:19:26

It is. It's something we've sat on for some time and it's the time to sell it

0:19:260:19:30

and benefit from the money that we raise from them.

0:19:300:19:33

Even though more are coming up because the price is so good,

0:19:330:19:36

demand seems to still be outstripping supply, so the prices are holding up.

0:19:360:19:40

310? Just for you, 310, then.

0:19:400:19:42

20, 320 I'm bid. New bidder. 320, front row. Thank you.

0:19:420:19:48

These are George V sovereigns.

0:19:480:19:50

260 and 70 is in. £260.

0:19:500:19:55

Thank you. Two good sovereigns there. £300 for those. 300 I'm bid.

0:19:550:20:00

320, I'm bid, 320.

0:20:000:20:03

Madam, are you going to bid? I've got 330 now, and it's going at £330.

0:20:030:20:09

£910 for your three sets of gold sovereigns. That's not bad, John.

0:20:090:20:17

-It was quite within our estimate as well, wasn't it, I'm pleased to say.

-Fantastic.

0:20:170:20:21

Well, it turns out that John does know his onions, or rather his gold, after all.

0:20:210:20:27

-You're looking for £800 in total, aren't you?

-Yeah.

0:20:270:20:30

-400 each?

-Yes.

-In the piggy bank.

0:20:300:20:32

Well, we're only halfway through and we're up to £1,060.

0:20:320:20:37

-Wow!

-Fabulous!

-That's fantastic, thank you.

0:20:370:20:40

Remember, that items sold at auction

0:20:400:20:43

are subject to the auction house's rate of commission.

0:20:430:20:47

So if you have items you're thinking of selling in this way, do bear in mind that the total amount bid

0:20:470:20:52

will not necessarily be the amount you take home.

0:20:520:20:55

Next up for us, the first of our two rings.

0:20:550:20:58

It's the diamond-platinum engagement ring at 50 to £70.

0:20:580:21:02

-Have you not got someone you might like to put this on their finger, Mark?

-Not yet.

0:21:020:21:08

-He's gone all pink!

-Maybe!

0:21:080:21:10

-At £65...

-GAVEL FALLS

0:21:100:21:12

A slightly more modest return there, but we won't say no.

0:21:120:21:16

Now, it's time to see if John's oft-repeated mantra

0:21:160:21:20

that the price of gold is holding these days is true.

0:21:200:21:23

We're after at least £50 for this 22-carat gold wedding band.

0:21:230:21:27

A lot of times, these little rings are cut off of people's fingers as they grow,

0:21:270:21:32

and these languish in boxes.

0:21:320:21:33

People bring them into you and are surprised that this broken wedding ring is worth £100.

0:21:330:21:38

I'm bid 80...90...

0:21:380:21:40

-Gosh, it went up with a clip.

-110, I bid. 120, 130 and 40. 150?

0:21:400:21:45

No, 140. Starting, then, back at 140, then. It's going for £140. Thank you.

0:21:450:21:52

There you are, and you just left it lying in a drawer!

0:21:520:21:55

That's incredible.

0:21:550:21:57

Almost three times John's minimum. The price of gold really IS holding up.

0:21:570:22:03

Next, the ginger beer bottles that Mark's dad

0:22:030:22:06

unearthed in the back garden. Our target, £50 to £60.

0:22:060:22:09

It's going, then, for £30... Thank you.

0:22:090:22:13

That was under John's estimate, but every little counts.

0:22:130:22:18

What will the bidders make of the round-backed Edwardian chair?

0:22:180:22:22

-And it's not something, Mark, that you'd like in your home?

-No.

0:22:220:22:25

What don't you like about it?

0:22:250:22:27

I'm not a big fan of old, brown furniture.

0:22:270:22:29

-It's quite old-fashioned now.

-But it's pretty!

0:22:290:22:33

What shall we say for this one? Are we going to beat 100 plus for this one? 84, 90, 100, yes.

0:22:330:22:38

100 bid already.

0:22:380:22:40

£120, 30.

0:22:400:22:43

£40, 50, 60. Five, 70.

0:22:430:22:47

Number one, 170 on my left.

0:22:470:22:49

-Good Lord!

-I'm selling to sir on my left, then, for £170.

0:22:490:22:55

-I told you it was a pretty chair.

-It really is, but this shocked me. That's quite a large amount.

-It is.

0:22:550:23:01

That wonderful result well and truly busted John's maximum estimate.

0:23:010:23:05

So far, so good, but things are about to get tricky.

0:23:050:23:09

The auction house has broken down Jean's collection of glassware

0:23:090:23:12

into 16 separate lots.

0:23:120:23:15

Now, I think this is where we sort of hold on to our hats,

0:23:150:23:19

because we've got this huge amount of glass to sell.

0:23:190:23:24

Is it going to go one right after the other?

0:23:240:23:27

And I'm not even going to try and keep up with how much it's going to make until we get to the very end,

0:23:270:23:33

but I think that this could be quite surprising.

0:23:330:23:36

50, I have it at £50. Five, £50, at £50.

0:23:360:23:41

That's 50 for the amber.

0:23:410:23:42

90, I'm bid. 100, sir?

0:23:420:23:44

There you are, the collection of ruby. £55.

0:23:440:23:48

£45? £55. Thank you.

0:23:480:23:50

You've got this one, sir, for your £60. Thank you. £30, thank you.

0:23:500:23:56

Guess what? Some more glass! £30. Your turn.

0:23:560:23:58

For £50, yours, sir. There we are. Some more bubble dishes(!)

0:23:580:24:04

£45.

0:24:040:24:05

£55. You're out, sir, at £30.

0:24:050:24:08

At £20, the lemonade set.

0:24:080:24:11

To anyone at £20. That's it, you've got them.

0:24:110:24:14

Hello, we have yet more! £45, thank you very much.

0:24:140:24:19

Got your breath back?

0:24:190:24:21

-Just about!

-That was a bit of a roller-coaster, wasn't it?

0:24:210:24:25

Have you any idea how much your husband paid for that glass

0:24:250:24:28

when he bought any of it? Just a kind of ballpark?

0:24:280:24:31

-A few pounds for each piece, but I wouldn't like to hazard a guess at adding them up together.

-No.

0:24:310:24:37

Because the way that it was sold, it means that just the glass alone,

0:24:370:24:43

you might need to go and lie down after I've told you this again, £883.

0:24:430:24:48

Oh, my goodness!

0:24:480:24:50

-That's fantastic!

-Brilliant!

0:24:500:24:52

Well, the bidders at Tring really took a shine to Jean's pieces.

0:24:520:24:57

But now for the amount we've all been waiting for.

0:24:570:25:01

Now, we had some amazing things come through.

0:25:010:25:03

-The gold sovereigns - that left you shocked.

-It did!

0:25:030:25:07

-The glass - that left you shocked. The chair - that left you shocked!

-It did.

0:25:070:25:11

Well, I tell you what, I think you're in line

0:25:110:25:14

for a few more shocks, because you originally wanted to raise £800 for the two grandsons, £400 each.

0:25:140:25:19

What are you going to do with...

0:25:190:25:22

-£2,348?

-That's brilliant.

0:25:220:25:25

-I never thought we'd make that sort of money. Never.

-No. Over the moon.

0:25:250:25:29

Over the moon! Thank you so much.

0:25:290:25:32

Have you thought how you might spread this out and give the little ones a start in life now?

0:25:320:25:38

-Definitely.

-How are you going to do it?

-I'm going to open a bank account.

0:25:380:25:42

There you are, you see.

0:25:420:25:43

And that's exactly what Jean did.

0:25:460:25:49

With the £2,348 burning a hole in her pocket,

0:25:490:25:53

Jean headed straight to open accounts for her grandchildren, Harry, and Oliver, who lives abroad.

0:25:530:25:58

A lovely feeling that I've been able to give them something and hopefully they'll enjoy it when they're older.

0:25:580:26:05

Unfortunately, Oliver lives in Miami so he can't be with us, but I treat them both the same, so...

0:26:050:26:11

What one has the other has.

0:26:110:26:13

But Harry and his dad Darren, Jean's other son, were on hand to show their appreciation.

0:26:130:26:18

Obviously with losing his grandad and never knowing him,

0:26:180:26:22

I think it's a fitting end to all his antiques going to the two people he would have cared most about now.

0:26:220:26:29

HARRY BLOWS A RASPBERRY

0:26:290:26:31

Jean's generosity is going to give her two little grandsons such a wonderful start in life.

0:26:350:26:40

If there's something special that you would like to raise money for

0:26:400:26:43

and you think you have things at home you'd be happy to take to auction,

0:26:430:26:47

then why not get in touch with the programme?

0:26:470:26:50

You'll find all of our details on our website.

0:26:500:26:53

And it'll be nice to have you with us here on Cash In The Attic.

0:26:530:26:57

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:160:27:20

Jean Chopping of Stansted wants to create a nest egg for her grandchildren. With the help of her son Mark, plus Angela Rippon and expert John Cameron, she sorts through a large collection of glassware, furniture and jewellery. Their target at auction is 800 pounds.